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CONTACT:

HONORS/ACTIVITIES

TIFFANY WILLEY Brooklyn, NY 11238 willeytm@gmail.com

Long Island, NY Long Island Children’s Museum 2012 Volunteer, designed and built children’s exhibit for Craft Time. for Craft Time at the museum.

EDUCATION:

National Parks Volunteer Elverson, PA Created a new design concept for Hopewell Furnace National Park, 2011-2012 for the Van Allen, Parks for People Competition.

Pratt Institute M.F.A in Interior Design

Brooklyn, NY 2009-2012

Eckerd College St. Petersburg, FL B.A. in Fine Arts 2006 Cum GPA: 3.52 May, Semester Abroad Program/Gallery Internship London, England Williston North Hampton School (Post Graduate) East Hampton 2001-2002 High Honors. Awarded distinction upon graduation for Solo Gallery Show.

WORK EXPERIENCE:

Published in Best of Tampa Bay Magazine and House Trends Magazine (Decorative painting, faux finishes and murals)

Named Top Five Best Painters to ever graduate from Eckerd College Work is showcased as the header for the Eckerd College Visual Art webpage, and also featured in depth as a feature artist from Eckerd college Awarded Honors for Senior Thesis Exhibition Eckerd College Special Talent Award recipient Eckerd College Basketball Art Club, Member

St. Petersburg, FL 2007 and 2008 St. Petersburg, FL 2006

St. Petersburg, FL 2006 St. Petersburg, FL 2002 St. Petersburg, FL 2002/2003 St Petersburg, FL Feb 2004-2006 St Petersburg, FL Sept-Nov 2005

Jeffrey Beers International Composed Design specifications, books, boards, and schedules. Hand Rendered perspective, as well as floorplans and elevations.

New York, NY Sept 2011-Present

Designer Faux Finishes Painted Commercial and Residential spaces Faux finishes, textured finishes, murals, and furniture finishes

St. Petersburg, FL 2006-2009

Elliott Gallery Senior Thesis Show Large-scale abstract mixed media paintings. Show was awarded honors.

St. Petersburg, FL April 2nd-7th 2006

Computer Programs Familiar with PCs and Macs, experienced with Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Adobe Creative Suite, Macromedia Dreamweaver, Auto CAD, 3ds Max and Revit

Glasure Group Graphic Design and Public Relations Designed promotional ads, business cards, and other inter-office material

St. Petersburg, FL May-Sept. 2005

Hand Rendering Watercolor, Acrylics, Oils, Graphite, Charcoal, Pen and Ink and Colored Pencil

Grubbs Gallery Watercolor and Oil Landscape Paintings Show was honored with a “Gallery Distinction Award”

Easthampton, MA May 2002

Creative Clay, volunteer for shrimp attack Community Art Project

SKILLS


CONTENT PARKS FOR PEOPLE: HOPEWELL FURNACE NATIONAL PARK MADE IN AMERICA: MUSEUM OF AMERICAN DENIM CHILDRENS MUSEUM: WHERE ONCE THERE WAS A WOOD COMMUNITY CENTER RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR COMMUNITY LIBRARY OFFICE PROJECT: QUICKSILVER RETAIL PROJECT: MUJI ART OF REFLECTION: WHITNEY MUSEUM FILM PRODUCTION COMPANY: HUNTER GATHERER PAINTINGS


PARKS FOR PEOPLE: HOPEWELL FURNACE NATIONAL PARK

Our mission for the Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site was to develop multiple layers of active solutions that could be used across boundaries and applied throughout the country for other National Parks. In this proposal, information is revealed through a multitude of educational methods to better convey a cohesive narrative that visitors can explore and absorb in various ways. The interpretive planning and exhibition experience addresses visitor needs and accommodates, engages, and ultimately envelopes the visitor in park experience.

This concept is founded on the idea that education is the key to a better, more sustainable future. The system envisioned and described in this proposal aims to empower and connect; to educate and engage visitors at parks throughout the United States. In creating a concept for Hopewell Furnace, we took into account all the needs of the 21st century visitor. From these needs we created a diagram which breaks the park experience into four zones. These four zones are imperative for the engagement of all visitors. They set up dynamic, self-guided voyages and continuously engaged and engulf the visitor in their surrounding landscape. This concept is designed with the ability to adapt to any National Park and reinforces our connection with the landscape, giving us a deeper sense of responsibility and ultimately stimulating stewardship.


HOPEWELL FURNACE NATIONAL PARK

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

CONCEPT DIAGRAM


DECOMPRESSION ZONE The point of arrival for Hopewell National Historic Site has been conceptualized as a kind of ‘threshold’ that allows people to enter the park at a point where the visitor experience begins. This is envisioned to be a radical shift from the traditional visitor center that often serves to distract from the interpretative and educational elements that have been planned. Thus, the idea of ‘decompression’ initiates a move into another place, as in crossing a threshold, and allowing visitors time and space and hopefully the ability to renew and to explore ideas, experiences, activities and narratives that will enhance their collective understanding of history, diverse peoples, and even stainability, and how these ideas have influenced and can be applied to the present and to the future. The purpose is to acclimate the visitor to their surroundings before revealing the narrative content. Decompression is the place where visitors arrive and park, use facilities available, and absorb the surrounding environment. The idea is to slowly introduce the park through a garden of ‘subliminal’ information. The garden encompasses materials inherent to the Hopewell landscape that the visitor will see throughout the entire park experience. This zone will also have graphic content about Hopewell, allowing visitors the option to engage them if desired. The abstract architectural intervention designed for the Decompression zone deconstructs the idea and intent of the traditional visitor center, and instead the structure acts as an ‘envelope’ for restrooms and ranger stations, to help direct and inform visitors and to prepare them for their adventure in the park. Decompression is a place to relax and absorb the scope and breadth of the park, to passively engage it, and then choose to begin the next visitor experience.

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

DECOMPRESSION ZONE

PLAN OF DECOMPRESSION AND INTRIGUE ZONE


SEASONAL DIAGRAM Seasons are important for Hopewell Furnace because it is an opportunity to introduce different activities revolving around the seasons. Depicted below is the Decompression zone. In the Decompression zone it is extremely important to show this seasonal change because this is the visitors first interaction with the park, as well as a preparation area that show them what they will see throughout the park.

SUMMER

AUTUMN

WINTER

SPRING


INTRIGUE ZONE Visitors move through Decompression to Intrigue, the zone that acts as a portal to different trail experiences and activities. The portals are designed to entice visitors by framing perspectives to different vistas in the park – specifically, field, forest, and town. The portals lead to trails and paths that are imbedded with relevant information informed by the greater themes of Hopewell’s history. Portals are oriented in the following manner: Field focuses to a path concentrating on ‘ingenuity’. Town leads to the ‘history’ trail, while Forest guides visitors to the ‘landscape’ trail. The Portal allows for visitors to make choices about their park experience, and enables the potential to re-explore, and revisit Hopewell to gain new experiences and knowledge and adventures. The idea of thresholds is again represented in these various experiences, each opening to diverse activities and insights throughout the park.

INTRIGUE ZONE

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

PLAN OF DECOMPRESSION AND INTRIGUE ZONE


After selecting a trail, visitors enter the Exploration zone. This area allows visitors to experience the park through narratives that highlight the history of Hopewell and speaks to visitors with diverse interests. The trails are designed to intersect at different points in the park. The trails focus on ingenuity, history and landscape and include activity areas that utilize multiple education methods in order to provide varying learning opportunities. Pledge walls are located at the beginning and end of each trail where visitors can sign-on to be stewards of the land, reinforcing the message of stainability. TRAIL FEATURES: Ingenuity Trail highlights community, industry and landscape over time. History Trail restores facts, revives spaces and re-tells relevant stories. Landscape Trail focuses on the power of nature and the natural resources.

CONCEPT DIAGRAM


PICNIC SHOP

ADMINISTRATION

CAFE

DECK We/ PICNIC BENCHES

BATHROOM CASH & WRAP BATHROOM

ARCHIVE MUSEUM LEVEL -2 LAYOUT

ARCHIVE MUSEUM EXHIBIT

GALLERY

SPECIAL EXHIBIT

VIDEO ROOM ADMINISTRATION RECEPTION

ARCHIVE MUSEUM LEVEL -1 LAYOUT

ARCHIVE MUSEUM Hopewell Furnace National Historic Park is one of the most well preserved iron communities in Pennsylvania. The National Park Service has archived all artifacts, supporting documentation and other evidence pivotal to the park’s existence. Our aim for the Archive Museum is to make these elements available for public viewing, to enhance the visitor’s experience and strengthen the bond with the park. For this purpose, the existing visitor’s center has been redesigned to house this idea as well as maintaining some of the original program. The elevated view of the town, accessibility, existing parking, and the terrain make it an ideal location and place to conclude a visit, or to learn more. The interior experience includes exhibits, spaces for visitors to relax and interact, a small cafe, gift shop and administrative spaces for Rangers and park staff.

ARCHIVE MUSEUM CAFE


HISTORY & LANDSCAPE CONNECTION LAB

CONNECTION LABS The trails leading the visitor through the park are designed to intersect at specific points. Connection Labs have been implemented at these points and provide a program outline specifically related to its corresponding intersecting paths. The Labs are intended to constantly evolve and inspire the visitor to draw connections between the content of the trails and to learn how history, landscape and ingenuity are continuously integrated throughout time. The architecture of the Labs relate in scale and were inspired by the existing historic structures in the park. Interiors vary based on the particular function, facilities and equipment required for the individual Lab programs. Generally, Lab interiors follow a ‘one room schoolhouse’ layout that relates to the history of the park. The interior space functions to serve any number of educational programs that can incorporate diverse learning methods. The Landscape and History Labs include a classification library and equipment necessary to study soil samples, archaeological artifacts and natural resources. The Ingenuity and Landscape Labs include a botany station, astronomy equipment, a culinary demo kitchen and an indoor outdoor garden. The History and Ingenuity Labs include a wood and metal workshop, an indoor outdoor performing arts stage, a prop closet and an art history teaching theater. The Labs are available to Rangers, daily visitors, and to students from education programs who plan to have an extended stay. Participating school students will be encouraged to contribute to a Hopewell blog enabling anyone outside the Hopewell community to follow and interact with it.


PROGRAMS CONNECTION LABS: HISTORY & LANDSCAPE CONNECTION LAB PROGRAMS 3 12

CONNECTION LAB 3 11

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CONNECTION LAB 7

ARCHAEOLOGY

Study of human activity primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data that they have left behind: artifacts, architecture, biofacts and changes to the landscape.

NATURAL RESOURCES

Study of how Hopewell Furnace exploited and conserved the natural resources on site. Current uses of these natural resources will be studied parallel to future considerations through the lens of stainability and energy consumption. Natural resources at Hopewell include: wood, water, limestone and iron ore.

PEDOLOGY

Study of soils in their natural environment through testing soil core samples for indications of layers of time and carbon content.

ARCHITECTURE

Study of the process of planning, design and constructing as well as materiality and restoration of existing structures at Hopewell.


PROGRAMS CONNECTION LABS: INGENUITY & HISTORY CONNECTION LAB 3 12

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DESIGN

Study of how the people of Hopewell’s past came up with the design for making the iron stove. Learn to integrate design concept and innovation at the wood and metal making workshops.

ART HISTORY

Study the relationship of Hopewell Furnace to the industrial revolution and Rococo art.

PERFORMING ARTS For students to construct narratives to teach the daily visitor about the history of Hopewell Furnace through Performing arts.


PROGRAMS CONNECTION LABS: LANDSCAPE & INGENUITY CONNECTION LAB 3 12

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CONNECTION LAB 7

AGRICULTURE

ASTRONOMY

BOTANY

CULINARY ARTS

Study of agricultural methods used in Hopewell’s past. Create kitchen gardens to teach about eating local produce and healthy living. Study of plant life at Hopewell considering time and uses. Learn about the invasive species at Hopewell, why they were introduced to the site, their effects on the site, and how they were used.

Study of celestial objects seen from Hopewell as well as the study of light pollution and its effects on nature. Learn what food the women of Hopewell Furnace cooked and the conventional methods they used. Standard cooking classes and healthy eating recipes are also included.


Resolution walls are placed throughout the Exploration zone and at the end of each trail, for visitors returning from their excursion. The walls are used as interactive touch-points where visitors can leave behind a personal message on a chalkboard surface. Visitors are encouraged to share thoughts and experiences for other visitors to read and be inspired by. It is through this idea, of taking a public interest in the visitors opinions and thoughts, that we hope to remind visitors of their ownership of the park and help them to recognize the positive impact of having an increased desire to be active stewards of the land. At the end of each day, Park Rangers can photograph and record all stories for web access and build on an active, participatory archive.

CONCEPT DIAGRAM


MADE IN AMERICA: THE MUSEUM OF AMERICAN DENIM

The museum of American Denim tells the story of a quintessential American fabric. The collection includes a range of artifacts documenting denim production and many forms and styles it has come to embody. The design of the structure is based off of the denim weave and was created to show the strength of the textile as well as the versatility. The structure acts as a time line and showcases photographs in chronological order which fade away as the structure moves from textured to smooth. This is supposed to suggest the loss of the American Denim mills. The structure also has video embedded into its frame. These videos are interactive moments where people can engage and learn about the denim making process, as well as the rise and fall of American Denim Mills.


THE COLLECTION Garments through the Decades

Thread Samples

Denim Samples

Hardware and Denim Tags

Structure with images, embedded video and graphic stimulating the visitor experience. Images from far away blend together and create a super graphic to the American Flag.

Base structure based on denim weave and developed to show its strength and durability as a textile.


THE COLLECTION PHASE 1 - TEXTILE PRODUCTION RAW COTTON, SEED COTTON, LINT COTTON, ROVING, YARN, TEXTILE, HISTORICAL IMAGES PHASE 2 - OF DENIM GARMENTS

HISTORIC TO CURRENT GARMENTS, PATENT DRAWINGS “NOT ORIGINAL,” HISTORIC IMAGES, TEXTILES, HARDWARE.

PHASE 3 - DENIM TODAY GRAPHICS, INNOVATIVE DENIM SAMPLES: FLEX DENIM, SAFE DENIM, RECYCLED


CHILDREN’S EXHIBIT: WHERE ONCE THERE WAS A WOOD

The goal of this children’s exhibit is to teach children about the importance of respecting and preserving nature. The exhibit shows children how animals and people share the environment. Children will experience what it is like to have their homes taken over by animals and will have the opportunity to do hands on activities that relate to helping the animal find there way back to nature in their own backyards. The end of the exhibit will show children the different animal habitats and allow them to learn through discovery and pretend they are the animals themselves.


FLOOR PLAN


CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

ACTIVITY DIAGRAM

House Area

STORY DIAGRAM

Birds Eye View

“Where once there was a wood, a meadow, and a creek. Now sits houses side by side, twenty houses deep.”

Planting Station Rock Den Climbing Tree Tree Swing Plaster Animal Print Castings Tree Slide Lily pad Hop

“Where once the red fox rested, and the woodchuck left its den. Where once the ferns unfurled and purple violets grew. These wild creatures need your help. Lets see what you can do.” “Where once the horned owl hunted and the heron came to fish. Where once the pheasant roosed and waxwings came to feed. As their habitats are changing lets learn what they need.”

Leaf Pit “Where once the raccoon rummaged and foraged in the night. Where once the brown snake slithered and slipped out of sight. Look into your own backyard and try to mike it right.”


Children are exposed to what it would be like if there house was taken over by animals, similar to the way we have taken over a lot of animal homes. They are asked to help the animals find there way back to there in nature and are given a nature guide with images and foot prints of the animals they have to help. Stamps are provided for each animal habitat they find.

Drawing of a house that has been taken over by animals.


Exhibit changes from day to night on a 30 minute timer. and different animals come out depending on wether they nocturnal or diurnal.

DAY

NIGHT


RENDERED ELEVATION


COMMUNITY CENTER

Through this library I tried to bring back a sense of community. This library is a neighborhood center, it is a place where people from the community can help each other and multiple generations can learn from one another. This library is not about seclusion there are many vantage points, or portals, in which people can see or look out to different levels within the library. There are quiet areas as well as multiple computer stations however the underlying concept was to bring people together, breaking them away from the isolation that is so easily found in New York City.


PLAN: BASEMENT

PLAN: FIRST FLOOR

View from the Mezzanine looking towards the first floor

PLAN: MEZZ FLOOR

PLAN: SECOND FLOOR


RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR

In this design the client was a family that not only demonstrated a strong bond but also was very influenced by the arts. Therefore, I presented to them a concept that would reflect their strong familial bond. My concept was based on the daughters art which I felt represented the whole family. The daughters sculpture and paintings where based off of nature and morphology and I took this as a jumping off point and structured my design around that art. The focal point of the interior is the staircase which morphs into the kitchen. This was designed as a subtle representation of morphology, in which design represents the growth of an organic organism. Artistic approach, which I knew the client would appreciate. To achieve a common flow, like a strand of DNA I had a staircase morph into the bar area. I chose to use sculpture because the daughter was a sculptor. I chose translucency because it simplified the interior without taking away from the art or the sculptural stair and bar.


RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR


RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR

Concept Co

Concept Collage

5TH FLOOR

PENTHOUSE

Concept


RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR

CONCEPT COLLAGE

Concept Collage


COMMUNITY LIBRARY PROJECT

The focus of this project was the history and cultural diversity of the lower east side of Manhattan. My concept was based on demographic mapping of the lower east side. I created a structure in the center of the library that ached over the library’s center inclosure and book stacks. This structure layered two different types of maps. The first map and metal support structure was based on the street grid of the lower east side. The second map displayed the air traffic flight paths of planes returning and departing New York City. The two interlocking maps created a stimulating environment which paid tribute to the lower east side’s culturally diverse history


SECOND FLOOR FIRST FLOOR

scale:1/16”= 1’-0”

MEZZANINE

scale:1/16”= 1’-0”

THIRD FLOOR

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CONCEPTUAL PROCESS

Lower east side city grid used to create domed metal structure within the library.

SECOND FLOOR FIRST FLOOR

scale:1/16”= 1’-0”

Conceptual mapping of library interior.

scale:1/16”= 1’-0”


SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

MEZZANINE

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FIRST FLOOR

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PROCESS CONCEPT DRAWING

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

MEZZANINE

scale:1/16”= 1’-0”

FIRST FLOOR

scale:1/16”= 1’-0”

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PLAN: FIRST FLOOR

PLAN: SECOND FLOOR

PLAN: MEZZANINE

PLAN: THIRD FLOOR

CONCEPT MODEL Made of tape, wire and chip board


ACRYLIC ON PAPER: THIRD FLOOR

ACRYLIC ON PAPER: MEZZANINE ACRYLIC ON PAPER: MEZZANINE


OFFICE PROJECT: QUICKSILVER

I created an office for the company Quicksilver. I achieved this by designing an environment that embodied the Quicksilver aesthetic. I began this process by researching what was important to both the client and the employee. I found that both would benefit from an office that could test products in house. Therefore, I decided to create a skate bowl in the middle of the office. The skate bowl created a natural division between public and private space. The upper level featured the skate bowl, becoming a public recreational zone. The upper level was also where the conference rooms were located and where clients were entertained. The lower level housed all the private office spaces and work stations


S3

OFFICE PROJECT:

QUICKSILVER

S1

S2

S3

S2

S1

S2

S1 Process Collage

S3

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S2

S1 Process Collage


OFFICE PROJECT:

PLAN: FIRST FLOOR

QUICKSILVER

PLAN: SECOND FLOOR


OFFICE PROJECT:

QUICKSILVER

The skate bowl serves as a graffiti wall inspiring employees to be creative and interact with one another.

Employees desks are laminated with a marker board material so people can write down notes without having to use post-its or paper.


RETAIL PROJECT: MUJI

Muji has a very strong brand identity, which is “no Brand.� Because of this stance on branding I tried to focus on other ways in which they were selling themselves. My concept, which was framing and perspective was base off of a Muji advertisement, shown below. This advertisement became the main focus of my design. I also wanted to incorporate a Muji museum in the program of the space. I chose to do this because I felt that Brooklyn and in Particular Clinton Hill, was a perfect location, as well as a perfect demographic for this type of retail environment. It was very important to Muji that the consumer understood the benefits of buying recycled products and they wanted to focus there retail environment around that concept. Therefore the Museum would focus on artist and exhibits which promoted their environmentally friendly attitude.


MUJI

Muji has aMuji veryhas strong brand identity, which is “No Brand.” Because a very strong brand identity, which is “No Brand.”ofBecause of this stancethis on branding tried to focus ontoother in which were they were stance onI branding I tried focusways on other waysthey in which branding themselves. My concept, waswhich framing and perspective, branding themselves. Mywhich concept, was framing and perspective, was basedwas off of a Mujioffadvertisement and became the main focus of myfocus of my based of a Muji advertisement and became the main design anddesign creation ofcreation the Muji of retail and the space. Muji retail space. I also wanted to incorporate a Muji museum the layout of the retail I also wanted to incorporate a Mujiinmuseum in the layout of the retail space. I chose to do this because that the Clinton Hill,Clinton Brooklyn space. I chose to do thisI felt because I felt that the Hill,locaBrooklyn location required anrequired introduction to Muji’s design approach. It was veryItimportion an introduction to Muji’s design approach. was very important to me tant that to theme consumer understoodunderstood the benefits ofbenefits using a of product that the consumer the using a product made of recycled well asas buying a product was well made ofmaterial, recycled as material, well as buying athat product that was well made. Having theHaving customer these see benefits, store, would drive made. the see customer these inbenefits, in store, would drive them to buy Mujitoproducts a similar at product the same point.price point. them buy Mujiverus products verusproduct a similar atprice the same

Muji advertisement overlaid with a perspectival grid

Concept image


MUJI

Perspectival grid designed for the museum walls, made of structural steel and semi transparent low iron glass.

Perspectival grid design for museum walls made of structural steel and semi transparent glass.

1 Section 1 Section

Museum exhibit: 300 ceramic cast trash bags representing

1 Sectionthe amount of trash people throw away in a year separated by a light path inlaid with new Muji recycled products.

Perspectival grid design for museum walls made of structural Perspectival grid design for museum walls made of structural steel and semi transparent glass. Perspectival grid design forsemi museum walls made steel and transparent glass.of structural steel and semi transparent glass.

2 Section 2 Section

2 Section

1 Section

2 Section

Museum exhibit: 300 ceramic cast trash bags representing Museum exhibit: 300 ceramic cast trash bags representing the amount of trash throw away in a year separated Museum exhibit: 300people ceramic trash bags representing the amount ofcast trash people throw away in a year separated by light path inlaidpeople with new Muji recycled products. theaamount of trash throw away in a year separated by a light inlaid with newbags Muji recycled products. Museum Exhibit: 300 path ceramic cast trash representing the by a light path inlaid with new Muji recycled products. amount of trash people throw away in a year. The mounds of trash are separated by a light path inlaid with new Muji recycled products


MUJI

EXTERIOR VIEW

INTERIOR VIEW


ART OF REFLECTION: WHITNEY MUSEUM

This project was designed to be a place of reflection. The location was the basement level of the Whitney Museum. For this project I wanted to entice the public from the exterior and interior in order to draw them into the space. The Structure is made of fiberglass which punctures the double height space, making it visible from the exterior and the lobby. In order to entice the visitors into the basement of the Whitney I used lighting and sculpture, creating an art piece instead of a formal structure. I wanted the public to feel bathed in light as they moved through the structure and created many voids which allowed light to shine through in organic patterns, creating an atmosphere that mimicked that of nature.


ART OF REFLECTION: WHITNEY MUSEUM


ART OF REFLECTION: WHITNEY MUSEUM

Processcollage collage Process Processcollage collage Process


ART OF REFLECTION: WHITNEY MUSEUM

Process collage Process collage

RENDERING DEVELOPED FROM A MODEL MADE OF PLASTER, TAPE AND PAPER Process collage


FILM PRODUCTION COMPANY: HUNTER GATHERER

In creating a space for Hunter Gatherer Productions, I looked at the needs of the client as well as the clients love of ink block printing. The client was a stop motion film producer and he created his works by using block printing, therefore it was important for me to include this into my design concept. The way I incorporated this was through layering, by making shape morph into architecture. I also used paint to give the space three dimensionality, creating voids that define space in a open floorplan.


CONCEPT IMAGERY

FILM PRODUCTION COMPANY:

HUNTER GATHERER

CLIENTS ARTWORK: USED AS A BASIS TO CREATE VOLUME USING LINE.

Todd St. John is a designer, animator and filmmaker living in New York City. He grew up on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. His work consistently spans many different mediums, including drawing, sculpture,


FILM PRODUCTION COMPANY:

HUNTER GATHERER


FILM PRODUCTION COMPANY:

HUNTER GATHERER


FILM PRODUCTION COMPANY:

HUNTER GATHERER

GALLERY AND LOUNGE

RECEPTION


PERSPECTIVAL SECTION OF RECEPTION


PAINTINGS: 2007-2012

Through the use of multipul layers of paint I’ve allowed the viewer to see into my past, see all the steps taken to get to the final overall composition. I want people to see the begining, middle and end. Something that is not alway apperent in paintings.


SERIES A - 2007 8’ X 5’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES A - 2007 8’ X 5’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES A - 2007 6’ X 4-1/2’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES B - 2007 6’ X 4’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES B - 2007 6’ X 4-1/2’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES C - 2007 5’ X 5-1/2’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES C - 2007 6’ X 4-1/2’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES C - 2007 4’ X 8’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES D - 2008 4-1/2’ X 5-1/2’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES D - 2008 4’ X 4-1/2’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES D - 2008 4-1/2’ X 5’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES E - 2008 5’ X 8’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES E - 2008 5’X 8’ Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES E - 2008 4’ X 8’Mixed Media on Canvas


SERIES E - 2008 3’ X 4’ Mixed Media on Canvas


Tiffany Willey's Portfolio  

Interior and Exhibition Design Portfolio

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