Page 1

Blue Award 2012

International Students Display Their

to Build Change


Blue Award 2012


Blue Award 2012 International Student Competition for Sustainable Architecture

International Student Competition Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design Institute for Architecture and Design Vienna University of Technology


TABLE OF Foreword

Foreword by Françoise-Hélène Jourda 6 Blue Award 2012 8 International Jury 12 The Organizer 16

Category 1 Urban Development and Transformation, Landscape Development

Category 2 Ecological Building

18

36

20 Restructuring Urban Fringes along Ring-roads – Case of Nagpur City

28 Children’s Growth Path

34 Gaay Nagar [Cow District]

40 Embedding Food Urbanism

4

48 A School for Anajô

56 Community Farm in Uszka


CONTENTS Category 3 Building in Existing Structures (Urban Renewal) 62

Special Awards 84

64 Shed Transformation in Markoc

Appendix

86

Submissions Category 1 100 Submissions Category 2 104 Submissions Category 3 106

Dumplab Sponsors 108

72 Re-Define the City

92

Colophon 110

Living with the Earth

78 Transformation

5


BUILDING FOR AN ENVIRONMENT WORTH LIVING IN

But these projects frequently neglect the other preoccupations, i.e. the economisation of nonrenewable resources – material and water – , proper treatment of the soil and above all the awareness for the other social and economic pillars of development that allow future generations to grow in peace and justice.

Twenty years ago this problem was still ignored. Ten years ago people still made jokes about it. Today the issue has officially been made public, as since the beginning of the year 2000 it has become an important aspect of communication in projects of architecture, urbanisation and urban development all over the world. Unfortunately, however, all too often this is merely an announcement, a discourse that is still far removed from the reality of a project or a construction. Something that is often called “greenwashing”.

How many of our projects in our rich and industrially highly developed countries are planned in such a way as to considerably reduce the energy consumption or even to produce as much energy as they consume, but have for example been constructed in areas far from public transport (while thus generating very significant carbon-dioxide emissions of themselves through private transport)? Or how many use high-emission materials contributing to the greenhouse effect or scarce raw materials that future generations will lack!

Z

N

6

The issue of sustainable development still appears to be an extra constraint for many of our colleagues and partners with regard to construction and development, no matter whether these are architects, engineers, material suppliers or investors. It seems to be an extra and heavy limitation on one’s freedom of action, trading and creating.

X

C

The regulations in the field of construction in Europe have frequently been considerably changed in order to integrate strategies for the economic use of energy. It was urgently necessary to implement these changes, in order to deal with the near shortage of fossile fuels but also to reduce the emissions of gases and thus the greenhouse effect, which is essentially responsible for the climatic changes.


W Françoise-Hélène Jourda Architect Univ.Prof. Mag. Arch Initiator of the Blue Award Head of the Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design, Vienna University of Technology

P

Despite political and very committed discourses by numerous scientists and practitioners, many architects and urban planners have still not changed their practices. Under the pretext of difficulties caused by regulations or funding, in most cases however quite unaware of problems of a sustainable development, there are still too many leading the world of construction into a catastrophe for our societies of which we have been forewarned. The transformation of our practices as planners is nevertheless vital! It is less the acquisition of new knowledge that is called for than a simple conscience, an ethic that, in contrast to the often-shared fears, does not limit our creation but represents a renewal, a still unexploited opportunity to invent new ways of constructing our future places to live, of discovering new architectural texts, of creating new places of life in the city and in our rural areas.

Z

X

For the students of architecture, urban and landscape planning this is an incommensurable research field, of questioning established strategies of action, of completely transforming their own ways of carrying out their projects, not only for the benefit of their personal development as creators but also as active participants of a world that will soon be utterly changed. And we all hope that this change will lead towards more participation, more awareness of the particular needs of the individual, of their differences and those of the places they live in.

The issue of a sustainable development means an incredible chance for future generations of planners to find a place that is integrated in societies of people, of inhabitants and users. For us, the teachers, it is urgently necessary to carry this change out in the schools, to prepare the future agents for different tasks to participate in this profound cultural, political, economic and social transformation that will completely change the decades to come. The Blue Award rewards the students and thus even their teachers who turn to this still too-rarely practised approach. The results of the Blue Award 2012 show that many students all over world are already committed and that they are already capable of including creativity, spatial and technical solutions in projects that respect human beings and their environment. Not only would I very much like them to develop their own working methods further but also to be able to communicate their enthusiasm to their colleagues, to continue their approach so that there will be a growing number of people preparing this revolution of ideas, which is sustainable development. Françoise-Hélène Jourda Paris, 11 March 2012

7


K The Blue Award is a biennial, anonymous, international and single-phase competition for students of architecture, regional planning and urbanism and awards projects addressing the topic of sustainability. Considering its economic, cultural and social dimensions, sustainable development should be treated equally alongside technical and functional issues when developing projects and solving problems in architecture, regional planning and urbanism. The competition is an open invitation to demonstrate pioneering and sustainable solutions. How will our built environment present itself in the years to come? Not a one-dimensional approach but rather a comprehensive view of the tasks at hand leads to results and an environment worth experiencing.

B

THE AIM

The main intention of this project is to encourage and foster the topic of sustainability in the academic fields of architecture, regional planning and urbanism in universities worldwide. The Blue Award is to recognise and award students and teachers dedicated in pursuing this topic in their studies. One of the rules of the competition is, that the project submitted has to be part of a coursework at University or at a school of architecture. The initiative Blue Award aims at building a network of architecture schools, creating an institution for the exchange and integration of innovative and promising solutions developed by faculty and students involved in the topic of sustainability, in areas

8


BLUE AWARD 2012 of teaching as well as research. It will support and intensify international exchange between different faculties and architecture schools that are developing innovative and promising proposals in the area of sustainability. Subsequently it aims to prepare the planners of tomorrow in implementing these proposed solutions in an ecological and economical context, as well as in a setting concerned with globalisation and climate change. These developments will establish and preserve a built environment worth living in, for current and future generations. The Blue Award is intended to organise a collection of student design work that addresses the issue of sustainability in architecture, urbanism and regional planning and with this the award is to provide an impulse for improving teachings in the area of sustainability.

world. 101 universities and schools of architecture, regional planning and urbanism, from 38 countries worldwide, participated. THREE CATEGORIES

The Blue Award 2012 is handed out in three categories. All categories in the Blue Award 2012 specially emphasise the efforts in sustainable architecture, particularly in hot and dry climates. Projects located in crisis areas and in environmentally threatened areas will be given special consideration. Category 1 – Urban Development and Transformation, Landscape Development Category 2 – Ecological Building Category 3 – Building in Existing Structures

THE BLUE AWARD 2009

The unusually large amount of feedback from the first appearance of the competition, Blue Award 09, held in 2009 and 2010, is a testimony to the high interest and standing of sustainability as topic enjoyed by students and teachers. 163 projects from 86 faculties and architecture schools spread across 49 countries were submitted. The projects submitted not only demonstrate an intensive examination of the ecological aspects of building, but also of the social and cultural tasks at hand. THE BLUE AWARD 2012

The second edition of the international competition for students, announced in spring 2011 with a kick-off event at the Vienna University of Technology, was again an unanticipated success: 232 projects have been submitted from all over the

THE JURY

The jury, with the British architect Sir Michael Hopkins as Honorary President, met on 24 February 2012 at the Vienna University of Technology. The jury nominated eleven projects: one first prize for each category, five honourable mentions and one special honourable mention. In addition to these nominations, the jury decided on two special prizes: one for efforts in sustainable architecture in hot and dry climates and one for efforts in areas environmentally threatened. The Blue Award 2014 will be announced in spring 2013. The Blue Award Team

9

O


H

Sweden (10)

United Kingdom (10)

S Czech Republic (3)

Netherlands (3)

Belgium (2)

Denmark (1) Germany (34)

Austria (36)

France (8) Hungary (5)

Switzerland (1)

Slovenia (2)

Bulgaria (1) Spain (12) USA (12)

Venezuela (1)

E

Colombia (1)

N

E

A

BW H N

TV

J

H

W T K

E

SUBMISSIONS 2012

W

SC

V K

T

R

10

D

Portugal (1) Greece (8)

Italy (15)


Russia (2)

Sweden (10) Ukraine (2)

Slowakia (3) Czech Republic (3)

rlands 3)

m

enmark (1)

Turkey (1)

Japan (1)

Cyprus (1)

N

China (36)

Taiwan (1)

B TO

Iran (1) Bangladesh (4)

India (9)

Thailand (1)

Indonesia (1)

B

Kenya (1)

Australia (1)

A

G N

R

C

Albania (1)

South Korea (1)

1 Submission

10 Submissions

20 Submissions

30 Submissions

N

11

VB

Serbia & Montenegro (1)

Italy (15)


JURY MEMBERS N

V

12

www.hopkins.co.uk

L

L C

V M

R Sir Michael Hopkins (GB) CBE RA AADipl RIBA

Sir Michael Hopkins founded his practice, Hopkins Architects, in 1976. He has been awarded a CBE and knighted for services to architecture, and in 1994 together with Patty Hopkins he won the RIBA Gold Medal for Architecture. He is a Royal Academician, a recent trustee of the British Museum and a past president of the Architectural Association.

V V WV N B N

C I X NP VVPU P N R C

N

T

Y

Q

C V O

O

J K

T

K

X

B TO A

L

L AJ

»Hopkins Architects fully supports and promotes sustainability within our practice and our projects. We acknowledge the effect that climate change is having on our current and future lives, the need to protect our environment, enhance social cohesion and ensure financial security for the present and future generations. We strive to minimise our own impact on the environment by making sustainability a fundamental part of the way we operate and approach the design and delivery processes of our developments. We are committed to developing designs that reconcile ethical concerns with our clients’ priorities.« APRIL 2011 HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE JURY


»The Blue Award architectural competition invites architectural teams to work in a comprehensive and difficult field and allows them to choose their own programme, method and actors. This framework is very rare, even though >reality< obliges us to this overture. The approach is completely different from the simple photovoltaic panel; one is rather right in the middle of looking for a sense that is only rarely addressed in the architectural schools. Furthermore, the competition gives rise to an exchange between different cultures, and I particularly value the invitations to Vienna of everybody mentioned, in order to enable new friendships beside the virtual exchange. In 1983, I myself was prizewinner of an international competition for diploma students. This prize not only boosted my professional career, but it also allowed me to benefit from beautiful friendships that still continue.« MARCH 2012

V

P

K

U

TO T

X

www.apur.org www.pavillon-arsenal.com

B

In 1994 she was awarded the second prize in the architectural competition “Concours d’architecture pour le prix de la 1ére oeuvre”. After her encounter with the later mayor of Paris, Bertrand Delanoë, in 1994, she abandoned her free practice in 2000 “to go campaigning“. In 2001 she became Chargé de Mission for Urban Redevelopment, the Public Space and Architecture in the cabinet of the mayor of Paris. In May 2003, she was appointed general director of the Pavillon de l’Arsenal (centre for information, documentation and exhibition for urban planning and architecture of Paris). Since February 2012 she has also been director of APUR, the Paris Urban Planning Agency.

L AJ

Dominique Alba (FR) Architect

R

B

Dominique Alba, born on 8 May 1957 in Toulouse, is a qualified architect (DPLG). From 1982 to 1983 she worked at the heart of the Jean Nouvel architectural office, before leaving for the Congo to cooperate on a rural development programme. She is a prize winner of the competition “Stuctures et concepts des villes de demain” (Structures and Concepts of Tomorrow’s Cities), organised by IFHP (International Federation for Housing and Planning). She also worked at the Ècole des Mines de Paris for three years on issues concerning urban development around the mining industry. In 1986 she co-founded the Roux-Alba architectural office “Architecture, Urban Planning and Urban Development”, where she initially worked independently on refurbishing buildings, then in the field of urban planning in France, Europe and Africa. She was particularly entrusted with urban development operations in Rennes or with several architectural and urban development projects in Hérouville Saint Clair.

L

B

»The world has finite resources and we do not have any other choice than share those resources. Otherwise we can build as many protection walls as we want, there are more and more poor people who will inevitably knock down those walls some day.«

www.uia-architectes.org

APRIL 2011

Y

Albert Dubler is President of the International Union of Architects and council member of the French Order of Architects. He is a practising architect in Strasbourg.

R

Albert Dubler (FR) Architect

T

13

X


B Jury

Z

M 14

www.ecologik.org

V

W

Dominique Gauzin-Müller [FR] Architect

UM C L

B

Dominique Gauzin-Müller is a French architect, author and journalist who since 1986 has been living in Stuttgart. She shares her passion for wooden construction and sustainability in architecture and urbanism through conferences and workshops at international level. Dominique Gauzin-Müller has written some 150 articles for architectural reviews and has published seven books, which have been translated in several languages: e.g. Sustainable Architecture and Urbanism, Wood Houses and Sustainable Living. Since 2007 she has been editor-in-chief of EcologiK, a French magazine about sustainable architecture and urbanism.

O I

A

MARCH 2011

T R Q G

S

J

www.syntres.gr www.uia-ares.tee.gr

Z

Nikos Fintikakis architectural work is specifically related to the fields of bioclimatics – environmental architecture, archaeology, urban planning, administration centres, cultural centres, educational projects, tourism and leisure projects, and major infrastructure transportation projects with the use of renewable energy sources.

Nikos Fintikakis (GR) Architect

»Today, every conversation about architecture and urban planning to a greater or lesser extent contains the topic of natural environment in relation with energy-saving issues. In developed countries, environmental design is used as a means to retain the existing quality of living while minimising the negative effects of human activity on the environment (innovative technology/ecological materials), whereas in developing countries it is used as means to deal with more fundamental issues such as housing and infrastructure, aiming at an improvement of the existing living conditions (economic solutions/ ecology). In each of these cases, architecture is called upon to provide solutions for a more sustainable development. In this framework, UIA-ARES Int. WP plays a major role in the promotion of energyefficient design with the use of renewable energy sources (RES). The training and further education of architects and engineers must therefore be related to future needs and should take place within mutually related systems on various levels, using the facilities provided by the new media. Schools, universities, and professional associations are called upon to develop relevant options. The Blue Award initiative is playing a major role in this topic, and the dissemination of the results through the UIA-ARES website will substantially help the global architectural community to integrate sustainability and renewable energy sources in future design.«

P

Nikos Fintikakis is senior partner and managing director of Synthesis and Research Ltd, G. Albanis-N. Fintikakis and Partners Architects – Consulting Engineers. He is member of the Technical Chamber of Greece, of the Association of Greek Architects and of the Greek consulting firms’ association (Hellasco). He is director of the UIA work programme ARES on Architecture and Renewable Energy Sources.

»Sustainable architecture! What to some militants has become a fundamental value of existence remains for others a form of communication, a marketing tool for greenwashing projects. For people involved in building, the concept of sustainability encompasses many aspects with differing focal points, including energy, natural materials and social factors. Some associate sustainable building with low-tech and do-ityourself (DIY) construction using timber and loam, others with high-tech installations and nanomaterials. The solution will probably be found in a respectful balance between bioclimatic principles and resource-saving innovations. The path to a sustainable architecture leads to a multidisciplinary and integrative planning based on a holistic approach. The Blue Award supports this search for intelligent solutions in a responsible architecture.« MARCH 2011

K


»Creating concepts and strategies for a sustainable development is based on the willingness to think, research and develop ideas outside the box. Experience shows that the collaboration of different disciplines lead to innovative planning ideas. This is one of the greatest challenges of the Blue Award for me.« M AY 2 0 1 1

Rudolf Scheuvens (DE) Univ.Prof. Dipl.-Ing.

M

www.ifoer.at www.scheuvens-wachten.de

C

NB

E

N

M V

J

N

Y

H

C

YT B

B

GG T OT G VI H B

V

U

W SV UM A C L

W

Rudolf Scheuvens founded his own practice in partnership with Kunibert Wachten, Office for Urban and Spatial Planning (Scheuvens + Wachten), Dortmund, in 1994. Since 2009 he has been a full professor at the Department of Local Planning, Vienna University of Technology. Since 2007 he is a member of the German Academy for Urban and Regional Spatial Planning (DASL), since 2009 he is vice-chairman of the Vienna Real Estate Advisory Council, since 2009 he is member of the Association of Town and Spatial Planners (SRL) and since 2010 he is chairman of the Aspern Seestadt advisory board, Vienna. He has been a reviewer for the Foundation for Accreditation of Study Programmes in Germany (AQAS) since 2011.

Robert Korab is founder and managing director of the research and consulting company Raum&Kommunikation. He is member of the board of experts of the Austrian Climate and Energy Fund.

PRESIDER OF THE JURY PANEL

www.raum-komm.at

K

The president of the jury was not entitled to vote.

Robert Korab (AT)

Jury

15


TB

V V

DEPARTMENT OF SPATIAL & SUSTAINABLE DESIGN B

O

D

YC

V

T

B

M

T 16

O


THE ORGANIZERS

In cooperation with the registered Society of Architecture and Spatial Design, the Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design from the Vienna University of Technology organises the Blue Award competition biennially. The Department, headed for more than ten years by the French architect Univ.Prof. Mag. arch. Françoise-Hélène Jourda, places a growing emphasis on planning processes incorporating resource management and ecology, both in the fields of teaching as well as in research. The Department’s philosophy towards architectural academic education focuses on the soft factors of design that are beyond the basic concerns of construction technique and building physics. The approach incorporates a holistic view towards design: sustainability is not only dealt with in terms of construction methods, but also within a broader context encompassing social, cultural, economic and ecological factors. The subjects of the courses and research cover content in all consecutive phases of planning, from urban aspects to the implementation of the material. In order to support the issue of a sustainable development in architecture and to prepare the future generations of planners to meet the challenge of preserving an environment worth living in, the Department introduced a series of themes, instruments and actions that attend to academic education and research. URBAN SPACE AND EXISTING STRUCTURES

As cities are becoming more important living spaces, one of the future tasks of architects will be to restructure the existing urban fabric, since the construction on virgin sites is less viable as an economical and ecological option. An awareness and competence in building with existing structures besides the understanding of cultural and social effects of urban restructuring is among the important topics: the prevention of

space depreciation, the conservation of green space, the reduction of transport routes and the utilisation of the existing infrastructure. BIOS — BUILDING IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

From an ecological point of view, an architecture that contributes to the reduction of energy use in building has to take into account climatic conditions, vegetation, topographical and geological aspects, life cycle orientated planning and the use of renewable materials. MATERIAL LIBRARY

Beside the collection of the latest publications in the field of sustainable building in the Department´s library, the Department set up a library with material samples. It is intended as a collection point for construction materials and conceived as a catalogue of products to support the research-based content and to give students the possibility to monitor the choice of materials for design projects, informing about perceptible properties, possible usages and ecological characteristics. WAITING FOR MIRACLES

“Waiting for Miracles. Positions on Architecture and Sustainability” is a lecture series that invites architects to present their approach to the topic and to confront him- or herself in a public discussion with an invited speaker from a discipline other than architecture. This results in a kaleidoscope of positions reflecting correspondences and gaps between different approaches to and understandings of a sustainable development. THE BLUE AWARD

The Blue Award is one of the Department’s initiatives. The project not only aims at awarding design projects addressing the topic of sustainability, but it also promotes the theme in the academic field to facilitate international exchange and to collect and preserve innovative solutions, developed by students together with teachers.

17


A D B

C

H

N


A Category 1 Urban Development and Transformation, Landscape Development

The emphasis of the Urban Development and Transformation, Landscape Development category ranges from urban redevelopment, renewal and restructuring of existing city fabrics to the development of new housing structures and typologies. Concepts dealing with self-sufficient housing developments, environmentally friendly forms of mobility and new interpretations of open/ public spaces in urban areas are equally important.


Category 1 Prize Winner

REVERSE THRUST

Tibet

Pakistan New Delhi Nepal

Restructuring Urban Fringes along Ring-roads – Case of Nagpur City

Nagpur City

Nikhil Chaudhary

Sri Lanka

Restructuring Urban Fringes along Ring Roads – The Case of Nagpur City UNIVERSITY

Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology University (India) ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Yatin Pandya

TASK DESCRIPTION

The declared intention of the author was to establish a natural urban continuity as an opposition to conventional concentric city expansions over city fringe land. The aim of the project is to guide the process of urban development and to respect the inherent logic and nature of vacant unoccupied land along ring roads and to counter the threat of un-controlled urban sprawl. The proposed “starshaped” system for urban growth envisages inwardorientated “green fingers”. SITE DESCRIPTION

The project focuses geographically on a five km strip of land located between the existing Nagpur ring road and the new highway currently under construction. The site – at the same time water catchment area for two major rivers – hosts a landfill site run by the city as well as villages, fallow land and institutionally reserved land. The different components set the framework for the proposed development strategy. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The project envisages a system of urban development that reverses uncontrolled urban growth by focusing

20

Reverse Thrust

on and empathising with rural and natural parameters. The aim is to create a thrust system embodying “green fingers and urban arms”. The project aims to investigate a methodology for a sustainable development model for a fragile and critical urban fringe area that is “trapped” between the inner and the outer ring road of the city of Nagpur. JURY STATEMENT

The project develops and applies a new strategic concept for sustainable land-use planning in a difficult environment – the urban fringe of the big and fast-growing city of Nagpur, India. Urbanisation and uncontrolled urban sprawl will be induced and increased along a second ring road under construction. The foreseeable development will spoil sensitive areas and natural resources of a fragile ecosystem as well as local economic potential and lifestyle. The project envisages a procedure of endogenous development for guiding urban growth by building the momentum of the rural and of nature to create a “back-thrust” of green fingers within urban arms. The main result of this diploma thesis is a “manual of reverse thrust” as an evolving process with steps and strategies to establish a balanced land use. The shown spatial plan – generated as a cell-use plan


Tibet

»Well, open-minded proposal taking care of the fact that we have an existing urban situation that we can integrate as partners for urban planning.« Dominique Alba

Bhutan

Bangladesch Myanmar

and based on ecologically, socially and economically sustainable parameters – is not regarded as a final solution but as the initiation of activation.

local communities and is therefore seen as a suitable approach to a resilient settlement development and climate adaptation.

Contribution to sustainability: The project foresees a counter-model to escalation of city sprawl and deserted villages caused by urban migration and its adverse impacts on nature, the regional economy and society. The process focuses on preserving and promoting local resources. It embodies a transformation to a sustainable mix of functions (nature, rural, urban) with a healthy and productive exchange in which tools and solutions are particularly applicable for fragile land-use systems (ecologically vulnerable, threatened by external pressure, weak administration bodies). The author uses existing land division and slow mobility as a basic scale and speed for the planning process, and green spaces and functions for the whole city are supplied through a low local energy and land consumption.

Innovation: The project presents a tool kit of processes for a systemic and flexible solution and at the same time focuses on the design of a transition process, but not on a “one and only” final picture of the future land-use pattern. The jury is convinced the proposal is particularly suited to the local socio-cultural and institutional conditions and appreciates a design that applies new methodological tools: cell-use plan, land-use wheel, rural, urban and ecological “generators”, “trigger cells”, etc.

The project contributes to socially sustainable development though governance, including governmental and non-governmental institutions and self-help groups. It participates and empowers the

According to the jury, the proposal embodies a comprehensive and systemic, process-oriented approach, which has been elaborated and visualised very carefully. The very dense and visionary document contains many socially sustainable development goals without simply mapping ideas but rather representing a method that can be interpreted as a catalyst working in a very complex urban situation. The jury especially appreciated the open-minded character of the proposed methodology.

Category 1, Prize Winner

21


1

3

22

Reverse Thrust


2

4

Category 1, Prize Winner

23


ÂťThe project shows a slow and open method for an urban development.ÂŤ Rudolf Scheuvens

5

24

Reverse Thrust


»The project shows a very realistic approach on how to deal with a very complex situation. The author finds a method, which is not analytical, using established parameters not as solutions but as a negotiation of activations.« Dominique Gauzin-Müller

6

Category 1, Prize Winner

25


7

26

Reverse Thrust


CAPTION 1 — Developing strategy diagrams: the urban, the rural, nature 2 — Identifying anchors for the three categories as development generators 3 — Analysis of the urban, the rural and the natural nodes and network 4 — Growth scenario for the present condition versus conditions after reverse thrust, using the potential green arm and urban fingers 5 — Transformation of fringe land and its gradual conversion 6 — Principles of urban growth along the ring-roads 7 — Cell use plan as a result of the established parameters 8 — Demonstration of spatial implications of the thrust strategies

8

Category 1, Prize Winner

27


Category 1 Honourable Mention

CHILDREN'S GROWTH PATH

Russia

Kazakhstan

Jinglang Xia Dan Wang Heyan Zhang Jinlong Zhao

Mongolia

Beijing

Kyrgyzstan

Japan China

Nep

al

Shenzen Taiwan

India Laos

Vietnam

Thailand

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Growth Path UNIVERSITY

Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School (China) ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Donghui Dai

TASK DESCRIPTION

Before China initiated far-reaching economic changes in 1979, the inhabitants of the small town of Shenzhen had generated an income from fishing and farming. Through the economic reforms Shenzen was declared a special economic zone, with rapid urbanisation, vibrant real estate and business activities and a large number of migrants searching for work. The situation led to cheap, informal housing developments occupied by poor migrants. The lack of safety throughout public spaces poses a high risk to children and limits their chances of growing up in healthy and supportive urban environments. SITE DESCRIPTION

PingShang is a very typical village in the wider urban area of Shenzen. It is located in the northeast of the NanShan district and is close to the Shenzen University. Numerous factories and

28

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Growth Path

corporate enterprises surround the town. It covers 33.26 ha and has a population density of 43%. The floor area ratio is 3.02 m2 per person with 642 buildings housing 33,469 people. The figures show that the area suffers from overcrowding and a shortage of space per inhabitant. The conditions have led to dark, narrow streets and passages, which do not provide circulation space for city dwellers. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Children provide hope to all of us. Society should take more consideration of their needs while they are growing up. It is the intention of our project to inspire designers to pay more attention to the needs of children and to incorporate suitable spaces for children within their proposals for public urban environments. While we were working on our proposal for the PingShang playground, we went on site to learn about the


existing conditions and the local inhabitants. Our project focuses exclusively on a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s path that covers all their needs, and we created four individual themes for this path. Furthermore, we paid attention to sustainable development goals within our architectural project. Used furniture and tyres were re-used to design new items to play with. Our aim is to change the poor and excluding living conditions of children in PingShan and to create spaces that will provide good memories and happiness. JURY STATEMENT

The enormous economic development in China has at the same time led to a decrease in attention to the needs of the weaker members of the Chinese society, such as poor migrants and in particular their children. High-density living under poor conditions, informal housing and unsafe public spaces pose a threat to childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very natural desire to

play and to interact. The project focuses in a very sensitive way on the needs of children and therefore sends a very important message to those who design our future public urban environments. The propsal directly reflects the declared aim of the Blue Award to consider not only environmental, cultural or economic development goals but also to take social aspects into account and to pay attention to the most vulnerable members of our societies, who are too young, too old or too weak to form and articulate a voice that will be widely heard by stakeholders and city planners. Even though the project may appear a little optimistic at first sight, the deeper meaning and the very important contribution to allow for social justice, equity and inter-generation fairness was articulated strongly enough to convince the jury.

Category 1, Honourable Mention

29


Path analysis

1

30

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Growth Path


Security

Communication

Game

Memories

Category 1, Honourable Mention

31


2

32

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Growth Path


CAPTION 1 — Path analysis considering security, communication, game and memories 2 — Site plan giving children a suitable place in the urban village 3 — Use of sustainable materials

3

»A sensitive project which involves a mixture of social life and of environmental conditions in a way that affects the new generations.« Nikos Fintikakis

Category 1, Honourable Mention

33


Category 1 Honourable Mention

GAAY NAGAR [COW DISTRICT] Pakistan

Re-housing Settlement Project for an Inclusive Design

New Delhi Nepal

Laura Marcheggiano Ahmedabad

Sri Lanka

Gaay Nagar [Cow District]: Re-housing Settlement Project for an Inclusive Design

TASK DESCRIPTION

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

UNIVERSITY

The main focus of the research is the conception of a low-cost, affordable housing community of around 200 dwelling units, aiming to create a sustainable habitat in the periphery of Ahmedabad.

Sapienza University of Rome (Italy)

SITE DESCRIPTION

The urban dwellers have lost their connection with nature and the rural people are losing their livelihoods and land. Can these two opposing types of living co-exist? Thus the main aim of the project is the creation of an â&#x20AC;&#x153;inclusive designâ&#x20AC;?, in which all parties concerned mutually benefit from the design.

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Alessandra Battisti

34

The growing metropolis of Ahmedabad is today aiming for the status of a world heritage city. Sarkhej Roza, an important cluster of monuments, has taken a back seat and needs to be re-looked at. This will also require strengthening the ceremonial approach to the complex, partially occupied by squatter settlements, and the location of the construction site.

Gaay Nagar [Cow District]

JURY STATEMENT

The proposal for Gaay Nagar in India explores the potential for sensitive local low-tech interventions on a regional scale. It is based on careful analyses of the bioclimatic, biophysical, socio-spatial and settlement situation. The implementation strategy includes defining minimum standards, a self-financing model and local eco-cycles. The master plan shows an


»The project works through the whole gamut of planning from climate analyses to ground state analysis, to building groups analysis and finishes off in a main drawing with a very optimistic combination of inside and outside space.« Sir Michael Hopkins

Tibet

Nepal Bhutan

Bangladesh Myanmar

Sri Lanka

adequate base frame for the open space and buildings, connected to the proposed typologies of houses and locally produced building materials. Regarding sustainability, it pays specific attention to the use of local natural materials and aims to improve the given living situation of the inhabitants. The author allows for a slow transition of the existing urban fabric through the application of feasible, selfmade social housing building activities. The model developed – applied on all scales – is inclusive in social, ecological and economical aspects and creates synergies with the local economy. A further innovation is the improvement of traditional building methods through the various monitoring processes.

According to the jury, the development patterns and housing typologies shown are flexible and motivating for self-organisation. Extensions and transformations over time can be easily implemented. The project allows for sustainable building methods on a low-cost basis and therefore contributes to the social justice of the community. It combines regional and local perspectives by appropriate planning strategies. The project embodies an encouraging solution with a very strong social focus. It is a very dense spatial concept and well illustrated with good drawings. From the climatic analysis to the building analysis it is well documented.

Category 1, Honourable Mention

35


1

36

Gaay Nagar [Cow District]


2

Category 1, Honourable Mention

37


3

38

Gaay Nagar [Cow District]


CAPTION 1 — Isometric view of inclusive design 2 — Diagrams of the cut and fill strategy 3 — Example of T2 – structure and service: diagram, section, floor plan and elevation of change in time 4 — Design strategy in terms of space 5 — Self-help management proposal

4

5

Category 1, Honourable Mention

39


Category 1 Honourable Mention

EMBEDDING FOOD URBANISM

Edinburgh

Glasgow

Anna Roussou Bhairavi Dhoot Athanasia Vasdeki

North Ireland

United Kingdom

Ireland

London

Embedding Food Urbanism

Z

K TASK DESCRIPTION

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

Examine a UK city and work on design scenarios at the scale of a master plan and an individual building, addressing complex issues of site and programme from a sustainable perspective.

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

SITE DESCRIPTION

John Brennan

The site taken into consideration is the city of Edinburgh and its counterpart, Leith. In particular, a transverse section across Leith Walk, which deals with different contextual neighbourhoods ranging from an active industrial estate, the Pilrig Park, to residential developments and residential blocks. The fragment was once the Caledonian rail route, planned as Leith Walk Station, which, however, never attained its status for public transport. The site now consists of vacant land â&#x20AC;&#x201C; former allotments for growing food at individual family unit levels, a warehouse and the elevated Caledonian railway viaduct structure, now used as automobile garages. The remains of the railway have created a manmade topography, which has become an indispensable part of the area today.

The project uses the strategy of Continuous Productive Urban Landscapes (CPULs) as a productive urban corridor that connects the local with the supra-local through social and ecological intensification, biodiversity, sustainable water drainage systems and other sustainable systems. The project aims at understanding the site of Leith Walk, its history and its value to the strategy of continuous productive urban landscapes. Due to the nature of its large-scale theme, the project is divided into parts that help to generate a sequential experience towards urban food production, facilitation, distribution and management along the designed green infrastructure. These parts are: a neighbourhood scale urban farm, a collective market and an urban agriculture development centre. All these insert scope for more social and economically viable ideas in combination with extra opportunities as highlighted in the master plan as: the microdistillery, the bridge, open spaces for flea markets, cycle tracks, etc.

UNIVERSITY

40

Embedding Food Urbanism


W »A very realistic project in so far as it has many applications in urban situations, where urban space becomes redundant or with suggestions on how it can be used for the future.« Sir Michael Hopkins

A

1

»One of the strong points is the use of old, traditional materials in a modern way to design contemporary architecture.« Dominique Gauzin-Müller

Z JURY STATEMENT

The authors have carefully studied the different dimensions of the task: environmental, social and economical aspects together with issues of sustainability and energy-consumptions. Studying the “global” or wider environment of the chosen situation (city of Edinburgh), the authors came to a local solution for implementing a sustainable city development, using the given infrastructure. Urban sustainability is realised in larger contexts as well as in small details. For the members of the jury, the project represents an urban strategy, and they consider that the approach appears realistic: it is appropriate to establish a new route and to think of forms of recreation attached to it.

Category 1, Honourable Mention

41


knowhow supralocal

Agriculture Industry Enterprise

Collective memory

Periurban farms

Public Private sector interaction

Scottish Agricultural College

CSA Model

local Community engagement

Urban Farm Urban Agriculture Development Centre

The Bridge resource exchange... barley

Public Space

resource exchange... heat recovery

Collective Market shared managment exchange of information

Micro Distillery Gallery resource exchange... ddgs- food for animal resource exchange... methane gas

resource exchange... pot ale, draft organic waste

Seafilled Recycle Centre

1

2

42

Embedding Food Urbanism


I

Environmental Features 1.Skylight and ventilation shaft 2.Reflecting surfaces 3.Light reflecting surfaces 4.Protected skylight 5.Operable glazing surface 6.Public deck – timber

Interacting levels of public awareness and engagement

»Remarkable is the choice of the subject in so far as agriculture is a theme for an urban programme, that agriculture can be considered for an urban development…« Dominique Alba

Consultation and awareness zones cross over public spaces to facilitate engagement

»…and Scottish agriculture is on the top of organic agriculture in the world.« Albert Dubler Industrial enterprise have self controlled public interface

Section A

Features

ation shaft s rfaces

Environmental Features

Interacting levels of public 1.Mechanical ventilation toilets awareness and engagement

1. Public Area

urface er

2. Public – Private interface

3. Private Enterprise

2.Plantation for protection 3.Light reflectors 4.Glass louvres for ventilation 5.Displacement air ventilation

Consultation and awareness zones cross over public spaces to facilitate engagement

Industrial enterprise have self controlled public interface

Features

5. Light well / Ventilation shaft

Light and ventilation shaft to connect the overhead public corridor with spaces beneath

Cohesion of design elements 3

ection A

ation toilets ection

4. Internal circulation

Continuous rear corridor makes an internal administartion corridor

Section B Continuous rear corridor makes an internal administartion corridor

Environmental Features 1.Skylight and ventilation shaft 2.Reflecting surfaces 3.Light reflecting surfaces 4.Protected skylight 5.Operable glazing surface 6.Public deck – timber

entilation entilation

Light and ventilation shaft to connect the overhead public corridor with spaces beneath

Cohesion of design elements

Section B 4

Section A Category 1, Honourable Mention

43

Environmental Features 1.Mechanical ventilation toilets 2.Plantation for protection 3.Light reflectors 4.Glass louvres for ventilation


K 5

44

Embedding Food Urbanism


CAPTION 1 — Diagram of the programmatic relationships 2 — Floor plan of the urban agriculture development centre 3 — Cohesion of design elements: the building design is a subtle adaptive re-use of existing viaduct structures through an innovative passive design technique of shafts. 4 — Section of the urban agriculture development centre 5 — Site plan 6 — Diagram of the environmental response of the everyday market

4

6

Category 1, Honourable Mention

45


A H

CB N

B

A D

R

B


Z

F Category 2 Ecological Building

Sustainable building touches upon the entire act of form-giving. The projects are to reveal the basic principles of sustainable planning and construction, including its social, economic and ecological 足factors, in the form of an architectural design.


O

I

A SCHOOL FOR ANAJÔ

Category 2 Prize Winner

Venezuela

Columbia

City of Guarabira

Brasil Peru

Brasilia Bolivia

K

Paraguay

Gregor Fasching

Uruguay

W C

L

Y

PM

G X I K

A School for Anajô Escola Anajô

TASK DESCRIPTION

UNIVERSITY

Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

T

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Cuno Brullmann

The project task is an integral, sustainable concept for the construction of a two-storey school building in earth and bamboo construction for the NGO Fundação Anajô, which supervises a group of approximately 100 street children in the city of Guarabira, Paraíba State, in the north-east of Brazil. The focus of this design is in the feasibility and viability of a social project, from a socio-cultural as well as from an ecological-economic perspective. In addition to designing the school and its technical implementation, the quality of the process is part of the design work.

A

SITE DESCRIPTION

48

Q

The Anajo project is located in the three districts of the eastern suburbs, Bairro Nordeste I, II and Bairro Nordeste the Nações. The children who grow up in these outlying areas often have no chance of a better future. Child labour, prostitution, drug addiction and alcoholism are part of everyday life. About 25,000 people live in these

A School for Anajô

neighbourhoods. The building site is near the most important square of these Bairros and was selected with the project team based on sustainable criteria. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The proposed school building has an experimental character, which is achieved by the use of ecological building materials such as clay and bamboo as role model for the rural area on site. Through a participatory approach, unemployed people are supported and encouraged to increase their career prospects by improving qualifications. The design concept is based on a sustainable understanding and has been developed together with the project team on site. The building layout consists of a ground floor with massive rammed earth walls, a kiosk, a teacher’s office, an open utility room, lounge area and sanitary facilities. The top floor with three classrooms will be built of adobe brick.


F Z

R JURY STATEMENT

I

Z

The project is an example of social integration using a simple but effective typology solution for a school, including very efficient use of local materials. The simple but very effective typology uses a big roof and creates inside and outside spaces underneath for efficient cross ventilation. The logical bamboo structure system harmonises well with the thick walls in rammed earth used for cooling. A very sensitive approach is the arrangement of hanging bamboo sticks to provide a kind of modern shade as well as the modern interpretation of a bamboo roof structure. The idea of prefabrication and reproduction has been considered. The use of old, traditional materials in a modern way convinced the jury. For the jury, the project is a masterful example of ecological building in a socially difficult context. It seems like a very nice place to go to school.

Category 2, Prize Winner

49


Sewe

rage

& wa

Access axis Foot path - delivery (rammed earth & wooden beams)

ANAJÕ SCHOOL 2012 / 2013

ter s

upply

Public kiosk & veranda Public square Praça do Encontro

Playground

Volunteers house 2014

N

N

Existing public 1 2 soccer field

1 :10 0

0

N 1 :10 0

0

1

2

0

1,5

3

5 m

Outdoor classroom (used tires)

5 m

N

1 :15 0

PROJECT 6,5 m

SCHOOL GARDEN

Outdoor arena (used tires)

Part of the education concept 1 :15N 0

0

1,5

3

6,5 m

MULTI-USE HALL School and comunity use

N

1

1 :50 0

0

5

10

25 m

N

0

5

10

25 m

PUBLIC SQUARE

OLD FRUIT GARDEN

Praça do encontro

MULTI-USE SPACE INDOOR Lunchbreak playground Dance & Music lessons Capoeira training Theater & Cinema & Music Conference Partys

3

50

A School for Anajô


OMIC ECON KING THIN Multi-purpose room

Multi-use hall

Multi-use hall

Classrooms

(Space for renting)

SOCIA RESP L ONSA B

ILITY

IC OG G OL IN EC LIV

Public kiosk / bar

I

SUSTAINABLE THINKING / PROJECT GOALS

Refectory

ECONOMIC USE — GROUND FLOOR

Kiosk / Project kitchen

Refectory

SOCIAL USE — BOTH FLOORS

2

UNDER ONE ROOF

»The author of this project did not forget that public equipment is also a sort or kind of symbol of the city and that these symbols also need architecture.” Dominique Alba

OUTDOOR CLASSROOM Lessons Workshops (made of used tires)

OUTDOOR ARENA Open Air Events Theater & Cinema (made of used tires)

Category 2, Prize Winner

51


GROUND FLOOR 1

Entrance / Refectory

2

Multi-use hall

3

Kiosk / Project kitchen / Bar

4

Multi-purpose room

5

Circulation

6a

Staff room / Library

6b

Administration

7

Water supply

8

Staircase

9

Wardrobe / Lavatory

10

Technical devices

7-14

680

36

620

UPPER FLOOR

4

Circulation / Classroom

12

Pre-school room / Play area

13

Classroom 1 / Seminar room

14

Classroom 2 / Seminar room

KIOSK & VERANDA

CLASSROOMS

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM

CLASSROOMS

Entrance

Classrooms

Room to rent

Classrooms

Refectory

Seminar rooms

Classrooms

Seminar rooms

Lunchbreak Public area Kiosk

5

52

11

A School for Anaj么

Seminar rooms


R T

6

U

B

»One of the strong points is the use of old, traditional materials in a modern way to design contemporary architecture.« Dominique Gauzin-Müller

M

MULTI-USE SPACE INDOOR Lunchbreak playground Dance & Music lessons Capoeira training Theater & Cinema & Music Conference Partys

Category 2, Prize Winner

53


ROOF CONSTRUCTION

ROOF CONSTRUCTION

Fiber cement sheet

Fiber cement sheet

Insulating board 2mm

Insulating board 2mm

Loam-layer 1,5cm

Loam-slope 3%

Bamboo shuttering Ø2-4cm

Bamboo shuttering Ø2-4cm

Folded-plate framework

Folded-plate framework

Bamboo tubes Ø14-16cm

Bamboo tubes Ø14-16cm

DETAIL

Wooden beam 6/16cm

GUTTER Insulating board 2mm Loam-slope 3%

Bamboo column Ø14-16cm

Bamboo Ø2-4cm

CEILING CONSTRUCTION SHADING

Loam screed 4-14cm

Bamboo curtain Ø2-4cm

Bamboo slab – 3 layers Bamboo tubes Ø10-12cm

Bamboo beam Ø10-12cm

FLOATING FLOOR PANEL Cement screed 2cm Concrete 10cm Bamboo beam Ø14-16cm

Wooden beam 6/16cm

FLOATING FLOOR PANEL

Gravel chips 5cm Insulating foil

Cement screed 2cm

Fundation Fired bricks

Concrete 10cm

Blinding concrete 10cm

Gravel chips 5cm

Bamboo column Ø14-16cm

7

Shading bamboo curtain

Cross venti

Cross venti

2. Folded-plate framework in

1. Erecting the bamboo columns

9

4. Beginning of the rammed earth wa

3. Bamboo shuttering and

prefabricated bamboo elements

construction

fiber cement sheets

Construction basics Shading bamboo curtain

Cross ventilation

Cross ventilation

Public water will be used in addition (2 months without enough rainfall)

Protect bamboo and clay surface from permanent rain Provide them good air circulation

30%

Provide shaded space Public water source

11

12

54

A School for Anajô

Ra 40


CAPTION 1 — Site plan 2 — Diagram of the design concept 3 — Elevation north 4 — Floor plans 5 — Section 6 — Renderings 7 — Detail roof joint 8 — Section façade 9 — Construction process 10 — Material tests December 2011 (bamboo, clay/loam, adobe bricks, sugarcane and sisal fibre) 11 — Section diagram: technical concept 12 — Section diagram: water management 13 — Section diagram: material concept BAMBOO

ROOF CONSTRUCTION Fiber cement sheet Insulating board 2mm Loam-slope 3% Bamboo shuttering Ø2-4cm

DETAIL

Folded-plate framework Bamboo tubes Ø14-16cm

Adobe wall clay bricks 19cm Loam plaster with sisal fibres Bamboo column Ø14-16cm (clamped)

Roof construction Bamboo Superstructure bamboo

Loam screed Ceiling — Bamboo

Adobe bricks (Loam plaster with sisal fibres)

Rammed earth walls (with sugarcane fibres)

Concrete floor

Fired brick foundation

CLAY / LOAM

ADOBE BRICKS

Source: Neighbourhood Transport 200m

Source: Neighbourhood Transport 200m

Superstructure bamboo

SUGARCANE

SISAL FIBRE

Adobe bricks (Loam plaster with sisal fibres)

Source: Neighbourhood Transport 2km

Source: Professional plantation Transport 50km

Source: Professional plantation Transport 100km

WALL CONSTRUCTION Adobe wall clay bricks 29cm Loam plaster with sisal fibres

WALL CONSTRUCTION

Roof construction Bamboo

Rammed earth wall with Loam screed Ceiling — Bamboo

sugarcane fibres 50cm Loam plaster with sisal fibres (Inside)

Rammed earth walls (with sugarcane fibres)

Concrete floor

Insulating foil

Fired brick foundation

Fundation Fired bricks Blinding concrete 10cm

BAMBOO

CLAY / LOAM

ADOBE BRICKS

Source: Professional plantation Transport 100km

Source: Neighbourhood Transport 200m

Source: Neighbourhood Transport 200m

SUGARCANE

SISAL FIBRE

Source: Neighbourhood Transport 2km

Source: Professional plantation Transport 50km

MATERIAL TEST DECEMBER 2011

8

Construction basics Cross ventilation

Cross ventilation

Protect bamboo and clay surface from permanent rain Provide them good air circulation

10

MATERIAL TEST DECEMBER 2011

Provide shaded space

ng of the rammed earth wall

ction

One-roof-strategy

Rain water tank 4000 liter

300 m2 roof area collects enough water to supply the school for more then 10 months of the year.

Roof construction Bamboo Superstructure bamboo

Loam screed Ceiling — Bamboo

Adobe bricks (Loam plaster with sisal fibres)

70%

Rammed earth walls (with sugarcane fibres)

Concrete floor

Garden

Fired brick foundation

Category 2, Prize Winner

13

55

BAMBOO

CLAY / LOAM

ADOBE BRICKS

Source:

Source:

Source:


Category 2 Special Honourable Mention

COMMUNITY FARM IN USZKA

Slovakia

Ukraine

Austria

Uszka Budapest

Zsuzsanna Meszaros Hungary Romania

Croatia Serbia

Community Farm in Uszka UNIVERSITY

Moholy-Nagy Design University (Hungary) ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Gabor Turanyi

TASK DESCRIPTION

Z

The community farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aim is to establish a sustainable system for agricultural and educational activities, social networking and knowledge sharing. The agriculture on the farm and the farm buildings serve as a model for a sustainable lifestyle in this particular region. Most people in the area own land that is mostly uncultivated, because they have forgotten the ancient science of agriculture. Inhabitants of the region are welcome to work on the farm under the guidance of an experienced agronomist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in return for their work they get support to start their own farm and realise the knowledge they have gained on the model farm.

stantly increasing. The one-hectare site with two ramshackle old houses is owned by an agronomist whose aim is to create a knowledge basis for farming and to establish a network of supply and demand. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The project aims to combine residential, social, agricultural and educational functions on one plot and continues the economic and building traditions of the region in a sustainable way. The two houses and the outbuildings are a unity with vegetation and livestock. The seasonality and the nature of the model farm results in an adaptable building ensemble.

SITE DESCRIPTION

Uszka is a little village of 360 people. It can be found in an underdeveloped region in eastern Hungary where inhabitants are mostly unemployed and live in poverty, so improving welfare is also an aspect of the project. There are few job opportunities but the demand for rural goods is con-

56

Community Farm in Uszka

JURY STATEMENT

The project combines residential, social, agricultural and educational functions on one site. Through the interpretation of traditional building structures it shows possibilities of placing buildings on the site while saving some of the old houses.


K Thus the project presents a new interpretation of rural typologies without traditional attitudes. Wooden structures are used to create a flexible inside and outside space. The integration of existing buildings and porches are used to provide shade and cooling in the summer, thus creating inside and outside spaces; the project presents different ideas of how spaces in the courtyard can be used. According to the jury, the project is very sympathetic, while the amount of detail included is impressive. Students develop responsibility and examine the idea thoroughly. The project has been nominated because it deals with the idea of finding comprehensive new solutions for rural problem areas. The economic, spatial and typological analysis of the building site is considerable. The result is a reinterpretation of the spatial situation and a further development und reinterpretation of the building typology. Everything seems to be very logical and correct.

ÂťA coherent approach beginning from sustainable mapping up to a modern proposal.ÂŤ Dominique Gauzin-MĂźller

T Category 2, Special Honourable Mention

57


1

2

58

Community Farm in Uszka


ÂťThis is a very economical analysis of spaces and building types, finishing with a built product and starting with clear site photographs and beautiful drawings. The project is exemplary in so far as it shows what we should all be doing: taking something that exists and making it work better by adding new elements. This introduction of new elements is what gives the whole a new breath of life.ÂŤ Sir Michael Hopkins

3

Category 2, Special Honourable Mention

59


4

60

Community Farm in Uszka


CAPTION 1 — Analysis diagrams 2 — Floor plan frame work, floor plan filled with ideal functions 3 — Modelling a sustainable lifestyle for Uszka 4 — Renderings, elevation and model of the phases of fill-in of the open plan

Category 2, Special Honourable Mention

61


62

Category, What


Category 3 Building in Existing Structures (Urban Renewal)

The topics of the Building in Existing Structures (Urban Renewal) category are methods of renovation, adaptation and conversion. Beyond these established themes, awards will be given to projects that succeed in significantly increasing the average longevity and usage capacity of existing structures, as well as projects that reduce the volumetric demand of new construction.

Category, What

63


Category 3 Prize Winner

SHED TRANSFORMATION IN MARKOC Veronika Holczer Slovakia

Ukraine

Austria Budapest Uszka Romania Markoc

Croatia Serbia

P

Shed Transformation in Markóc UNIVERSITY

Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Hungary) ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Mihaly Balazs

64

TASK DESCRIPTION

SITE DESCRIPTION

Diploma theses are usually an architectural answer to a fictive programme chosen by the student. Looking for a real task, the student found it in a small village: to design a community space from an old shed. During stays in the village the student realised that the strongest connection between the village people is the community of interests. So community space has to be the place of common work and entertainment. As a simple, linear space, the structure of the village is a value to be protected, and the architectural intervention keeps it almost unchanged.

Located on the Croatian border, Ormánság, the former flood plain of the river Dráva, with a special way of farming, was a rich and self-supporting region of Hungary before the river regulation of the 19th century. Since then, the ground has dried out and its productivity has decreased, with the population becoming poorer and poorer. Markóc, the smallest village in Ormánság, has only 66 inhabitants. The structure of the sites is the same all along the only street in the village: narrow and long, houses at the front and the same-sized shed in the courtyard. The design terrain is one of the sites in the middle part of the street where the house functions as the office of the Ormánság Foundation.

Shed Transformation in Markóc


PROJECT DESCRIPTION

As a simple, linear space, the structure of the village is a value to be protected, and the architectural intervention keeps it almost unchanged. According to the new function, a bigger opening and some new windows are required on the middle wall of the shed, but details and the main structures remain virtually the same. To assure a minimum level of comfort, a complex block incorporating an eco-toilet, a kitchen and heating is incorporated in the interior. JURY STATEMENT

an example of the sustainable and low-budget reuse of an old shed in a small village. Most of the materials, such as bricks, wood and sand, can be found locally. It relates to the climatic and social conditions of the site, so that the building has an energy-efficient and ecologically sustainable performance. A very sensitive approach to the rural situation is to take up the local supply strategies and traditions, such as dry ovens, and to improve them with renewable energy systems. The project shows a form of involvement between an architect and the inhabitants participating in the construction. It is also a clear example of non computer-based design. Small, rural and appropriate.

The project fulfils the economic and especially the social aspects of sustainability and provides

Category 3, Prize Winner

65


O R

1

Z

T

»Remarkable is the very smooth integration of new, at the same time very old technologies in this building.« Albert Dubler

L

H »This is a very sensitive approach towards a rural situation and traditional, vernacular architecture. It shows an implication between architects and inhabitants and how to make people more interested in architecture as well as how to improve the situation of a population in small villages.« Dominique Gauzin-Müller

Y

Z

N V 66

B

C

E

Shed Transformation in Markóc

T

X


2

3

4

Category 3, Prize Winner

67


5

68

Shed Transformation in Mark贸c


6

7

Category 3, Prize Winner

69


8

70

Shed Transformation in Mark贸c


CAPTION 1 — Analysis diagrams of the re-articulation of the shed with minimal intervention 2 — Site plan 3 — Elevations 4 — Floor plan 5 — Roof details of the shed 6 — Section and floor plan of the drying stove 7 — Diagrams of the summer hot water system, the compost toilet and the bathroom furniture 8 — Elevations and sections of the inside block 9 — Phases of the construction

9

Category 3, Prize Winner

71


REDEFINE THE CITY

Category 3 Honourable Mention

U N A

Bulgaria

Macedonia

Turkey

Albania

Greece

B

Vasilis Ingvar Raptis Anna Vokali Maria Pappa

Athen

KU

S

O

K

C

P A Re-Define the City UNIVERSITY

National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

TASK DESCRIPTION

Based on the experience of Athens, the task of the project aimed at inventing a system that can combine a series of actions towards confronting the problematic quality of urban life in today’s densely populated cities.

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Tassis Papaioannou

SITE DESCRIPTION

Z

The project is situated in the city of Athens. It is aimed at the city’s urban network and it confronts the need for a better quality in urban life wherever there is urban overcrowding. As far as Athens is concerned, the majority of the areas with urban overcrowding are situated in or near the city centre.

The authors define the term “single system” as a harmonised group of actions that organise intervention in urban space. The actions are to respond to the problems and be able to integrate with the city without disrupting its structure. The main axes of the proposal are energy-saving, respect for the city fabric, and taking advantage of the hidden opportunities in free space and energy sources (Greece’s intense sunshine). The proposal is based on two basic elements: the existing urban fabric and the environmental approach to a sensitive urban and problematic area. With a low-cost proposal, no gentrification phenomena are expected. JURY STATEMENT

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The project Re-Define the City is an investigation of urban space. It aims to find a method of identifying the problems of urban space and organising actions to solve them under a single system.

72

Re-Define the City

With Athens, the authors focused on a highdensity urban situation and captured the potential of space that is not already occupied. Accepting the existing structure of the chosen site the proposal rejects big and expensive solutions, but


Turkey

T

focuses on the potential development of an urban landscape intervention, together with realistic proposals, easily realisable by the inhabitants themselves. The project offers space for various social interactions and increases not the population density but the intensity of used space in the city. It is also a contribution to slow mobility in big cities, supporting neighbourhood activities, showing possibilities for participation and awareness of the inhabitants themselves. The jury consider this project to be a sensitive one, which creates orientation and contributes to the social life of the city. Providing additional space in a very densely populated area is a convincing approach and the use of greenery supports and improves the microclimate of the city. For the jury the project is a prototype approach to the management of open spaces: it shows how we can improve an urban situation while taking account of sustainable values.

Category 3, Honourable Mention

73


U

U C

1

E

ÂťThe project shows the introduction of the idea of a tool box, so that many people can think about how they could do things like this by themselves. We find these solutions already in many European cities, but what is interesting in this project is the presentation of one part of an urban situation with a series of tools and how you can improve it.ÂŤ Dominique Alba

B Q A

Y

M

2

R

Re-Define the City

N

V

74


E

3

4

Category 3, Honourable Mention

75


W

X I

E

5

ÂťA prototype approach for the management of open spaces: the project provides an interesting link to social life and makes an interesting attempt at linking the upper side of these dense environments with each other, bringing the green and the air and the sun into the small gardens that have been built.ÂŤ Nikos Fintikakis

V M

X

G

Y V

N

J

76

Re-Define the City

X

L

6


CAPTION 1 — Rendering: redefining the roof 2 — Analysing the non-built area 3 — Morphology of the urban residential construction building 4. — Ideas: have you turned your terrace into a storage 5 — Isometric view of re-inhabiting the roof 6 — Floor plan 7 — Analysing the non-built area 8 — Concept for the urban space

7

8

Category 3, Honourable Mention

77


Q TRANS FORMATION

V

G

Category 3 Honourable Mention

Bolivia

Daniel Widman

Brasil

Paraguay

T

B

Asunción Caaguazú

Argentinia

C

UNIVERSITY

KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden) ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Markus Aerni

TASK DESCRIPTION

The task is to transform an old brewery and Coca Cola factory in Caaguazú, Paraguay, into a modern sustainable refinery for Stevia, a new natural sweetener for the international market. Part of the project is aimed at helping poor farmers in rural Paraguay to earn their living by growing Stevia and selling it to the factory. SITE DESCRIPTION

W 78

The location is a disused brewery in the district Caaguazú, about 180 km east of the capital, Asunción. The principal activity of the region is forestry, which provides the raw material for the timber industry. It is also one of the best areas for agriculture in the country. This is one of the areas in Paraguay that is most affected by deforestation. The building is strategically located near the Pan American Highway 7, which connects the capital with the neighbouring district’s provincial capital and the country’s second city, Ciudad del Este. The local climate ranges from subtropical to temperate, with substantial rainfall in the eastern

Transformation

areas. The temperature reaches 41 degrees Celsius in summer and drops to 0 degrees C in winter. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The project aims to be an integrated part of the local society and agricultural landscape, and also to serve as a social working site with the focus on the worker, with natural light, views and green recreation areas. The method is to use local knowledge, local material and low-tech but stable solutions. The project uses sun, wind, trees and water to deal with the subtropical climate, and tries to solve the climatic aspects with more or less simple methods. The architecture is an interpretation of local rationality, using local materials in a new form. Deep groundwater is used for air conditioning in the summer months. The industrial waste heat is used for heating. The façade consists of local materials (clay brick). A special ventilation system allows for permanent ventilation. Ample shade protects the workplaces from overheating and solar radiation. Rainwater harvesting collects enough water to provide grey water usage and to

J

T

Transformation

C

I

C

R

L


X T I

water the Stevia plants. The water is also collected on the roof and prevents the building from overheating during the summer. JURY STATEMENT

T

The innovation consists in applying sustainable concepts to industrial buildings. The project fulfils a wide range of aspects of sustainable planning as well as socio-economic development, e.g. use of local resources, consideration of the climate and the local flora. The proposal also guarantees sales for the local farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; products. The jury regarded use of the materials as excellent. The construction method is not always appropriate and the project does not show the process of production, but the idea of giving such a large building a new purpose could be an example as pilot project for similar contexts.

C

R

L

Category 3, Honourable Mention

79


7.PICK UP POINT 6. FARMERS

HIGH WAY NR 7

FACTORY

6. FARMERS

1. MOTHER PLANTS

6. FARMERS 7.PICK UP POINT

PROCESS, FROM SWEET LEAF TO NEW SWEETENER

Stevia Reubadium

1. Mother plants

2. The cuttings

3. Green house

4. Shaded area

1

SECTIONS BEFORE AFTER

HOW TO LIGHT AND COOL A BUILDING IN A SUBTROPIC CLIMATE

Natural ventilation with Venturi effect The gutter also works as sun shaders Deep window nisches Radiant cooling in the ceiling

2

W

The roof allows natural daylight and ventilation

Low air intake, the incoming air is also cooled with water from aquifer

»I am interested in this project because it works with a common situation that you find all over the world: large industrial buildings, related to the 20th century process, which have become redundant. How can one re-use the buildings giving them a new purpose? There is a lot of 13 C Cool water from aquifer environmental value in the building. How can one give life to these buildings?« Sir Michael Hopkins

U COLLECT WATER FOR IRRIGATION

LOW TECH SOLUTIONS

Reuse the old factory

3

80

Transformation


a

SECTIONS BEFORE AFTER

HOW TO LIGHT AND COOL A BUILDI

Natural ventilation with Venturi effect The gutter also works as sun shaders

4. Shaded area

5. The processed 5. The processed cuttings6. Farmers cuttings

6. Farmers 7. Pick up points 7. Pick up points 8. Dry bales

9. In the storage 8. Dry bales 9. In the storage 10. Refining

11. The new sweetener 10. Refining Deep window nisches 11. The new sweetener Radiant cooling in the ceiling

The roof allows natural daylight and ventilation

Low air intake, the incoming air is also cooled with water from aquifer

TE

13 C Cool water from aquifer

COLLECT WATER FOR IRRIGATION

LOW TECH SOLUTIONS

Blocks the sun

High trees lining the streets of the fields creating shadowed communication without blocking the wind

Doesn´t block the wind

Stevia mother plant field Stevia mother plant field Walls with water supply for irrigation. The moving water also cools the communication area

4

The walls also works as benches for the workers Same stone pavement on the whole site

Category 3, Honourable Mention

81


3 3

2

1 2

1

5

4

1. Shaded communication

2. Office

1. Shaded communication

2. Office

1 1

5

4

3. Visitor communication platform 3. Visitor communication platform

2

3

2

3

4. Evaporation 4. Evaporation

7

6 6

7

8

5. Extraction 5. Extraction

6. Light shaft and air intake 6. Light shaft and air intake

4 4

8

7. Rock drop 7. Rock drop

8. St

8. Storag

5 5

5

1. Delivery point Stevia seedings 2. Shaded loading zone 1. Delivery point Stevia seedings 2. Shaded loading zone

3. Delivery dried leaves 4. Parking workers 3. Delivery dried leaves 4. Parking workers

Construction

6

82

Transformation

5. Refinery, decolorization 6. Refinery, evaproation 5. Refinery, decolorization 6. Refinery, evaproation

7. Spray drying 8. Light shaft, shaded communication 7. Spray drying 8. Light shaft, shaded communication

9. Room 10 Packing, clean tech envi 9. Room 10 Packing, clean tech environm


CAPTION

drop

p

1 — Process diagrams: transformation, from a global multinational factory to a local, social, sustainable refinery 2 — Section before/after: using the local natural resources with stable low tech solutions – the roof allows natural daylight and ventilation 3 — Strategy for the structural transformation 4 — Field section 5 — Cross and longitude section 6 — Construction and material: using knowledge and building tradition in combination with contemporary form

8. Storage dried leaves 8. Storage dried leaves

7

6 6

clean tech environment

an tech environment

7

8 8

9 9

10 10

11. Internal Communication 12. Pan American Highway No 7 11. Internal Communication 12. Pan American Highway No 7

Material

Local material

Perforated brick facade

Local building tradition

Category 3, Honourable Mention

83


T

F

N

L

F

Y

A


The 2012 Blue Award particularly emphasises and supports architectural efforts in hot and dry climates. Projects in crisis areas and in environ足 mentally threatened areas will be given special consideration.

X

Q

F

B

L Special Award

O

T

A


L

DUMPLAB

Category 1 Special Prize

Philippines

Georg Pichler

N

G

Tondo

F

A I

DS

UNIVERSITY

Graz University of Technology (Austria) ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Klaus Loenhart

C Y

F 86

Y

DZ

Dumplab

TASK DESCRIPTION

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Dumplab aims at developing a model for selfpreserving, decentralised waste processing based on the informal sector. The project approaches an autonomous infrastructure for inhabitants of waste disposal sites. Its aim is to help them to gain the most profit from their work by optimising processes related to the work with waste and to their way of living, following ideas from cradle to cradle and social business strategies.

The project proposes a step by step model over several years. The first step will be to work with the people on site, alleviate basic needs such as hunger, sanitation, working conditions and easy access to drinking water. All further steps, the work with waste and the optimisation of all the working processes, will follow.

SITE DESCRIPTION

The project site, “Pier 18”, is an 11 ha waste transfer site in the Manila district of Tondo, Philippines, located near the former “Smokey Mountain” waste dump site. About 5,000 people live on “Pier 18”. Most make their living from waste picking, but there is also a community of charcoal makers in the north-western corner. The immediate surroundings of the dump are characterised by overpopulated relocation facilities such as “Happy Land”.

Dumplab

JURY STATEMENT

According to the jury, the project reflects the current situation very well – waste is a considerable problem globally. The project considers incorporating existing, social and cultural structures and its concept and realisation pay attention to the needs of the communities living there. Regarding sustainability, the project’s contribution refers to further economic social and cultural development. It comprises social and economic sustainability. Existing structures are used and optimise the yield from waste for the people living there. Traditional construction techniques and regional


T

B

ÂťThe project pays attention to the needs of the communities living there, considering the social and cultural development. In its designed strategy it presents a sort of business plan, a stable business model that also helps to reduce pollutionÂŤ Robert Korab

materials are used. It uses rainwater harvesting and recycling, solar energy, closed, independent sewage systems, dry toilets, filter systems and biodigesters. The project is concerned with providing a sustaining and sustainable basis for autonomous development. The proposed measures seek to reduce the dangers of waste disposal for the inhabitants. The work can easily be redesigned and adapted by the users. Forty per cent of all settlements in Manila are informal. There is a strong will to proceed and to develop the public sector. The presented work aims to ameliorate the extremes of poverty and violence. It embodies an interesting proposition and appears very ambitious. But the result has been questioned. It is impressive how the waste is used and treated as a source of income. This is an existing economy. In town planning,

many aspects need to be considered. Currently in urban strategies a planning is important that can change as needed. Thus it is more a business plan rather than an architectural concept and so provided a proposal for a stable business model that also reduces pollution.

Category 1, Special Prize

87


1

2013

2

2014 88

Dumplab


3

2016

4

2020 Category 1, Special Prize

89


2027 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Autonomy

5

90

Dumplab


CAPTION Development in time, principal steps: 1 — 2013 Water purification, cook shop, san-unit (dry toilet), plastic washing unit 2 — 2014 Bio-digester (biogas), community centre, playground, bamboo cultivation, garbage collection units, pyrolysis kiln 3 — 2016 Compost, storage place, general workshops, garbage collection centre, sports ground, bamboo vegetable cultivation, construction material, private workshops, improvement of private home 4 — 2020 Training centre, private homes “nipa”, add-ons 5 — 2027 Autonomy: garbage flow ideal case: input 350 t per day, output 0 6 — Analysing different type of circulations

Water Circulation

Charcoal Circulation !

organic waste 2 0 15

rain water

!

!

bought wood 2 0 12

not for drinking

!

drinking water puri cation

technically damanding -> external contractor

!

cook shop

Filter

!

closed service water circle

!

pyrolysis kiln 2 0 15

!

charcoal kiln 2 0 12

sediment, reverse osmosis or activatied carbon lter

mixing 3:1

!

!

gray water

biochar

composting plant household 2022

!

San-Unit, composting toilet 2012

!

!

!

san-box, feaces tank

6M

bio-digester

!

!

charcoal

!

urin

!

Terra Preta

1:5

!

cooperative

NGO

!

plant lter

bamboo cultivation

6

bamboo

!

!

!

vert. gardens

!

!

vertical garden

NGO farms (external)

!

!

public market

do not use directly on plants!

Category 1, Special Prize

91


Category 2 Special Prize

Z CA

LIVING WITH THE EARTH Demonstration Design Study of Ecological Architecture Suited for Poor Villages on China’s Loess Plateau

Russia

Kazakhstan

Mongolia

Kyrgyzstan

Chi Lu Bin Xie Zi’ang Wang Shuo Liu

Xiaohuata Villiage China

Nep

al

India

D

U

Laos

Thailand

TASK DESCRIPTION

Living with the Earth – Demonstration Design Study of Ecological Architecture Suited for Poor Villages on China’s Loess Plateau UNIVERSITY

Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology (China) ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Jun Mu

Responding to the typical challenges for ecological architecture in the poor rural region of China’s Loess Plateau, with Xiaohuata Village as a prototype, the project aims to demonstrate to the local builders and villagers how to reach their most effective ecological approach by utilising locally available resources and their traditional technology. Furthermore, according to a series of experimental and design studies on methodology, principles and strategies, it illustrates an affordable, easy, healthy and feasible way towards ecological architecture and lives for the region that local villagers can take, own and pass on. SITE DESCRIPTION

Xiaohuata is a typical village on the Loess Plateau, where the feasibility of ecological architecture is always limited by the serious challenges of low levels of the economy and education, remote and difficult traffic conditions, limited conventional resources for building, severe climate, complex landforms, etc. It is cold in winter and moderate in summer. The richest but only “resources”, here are

92

Vietnam

Living with the Earth

just the soil, its products and traditional soil-based technology in the form of cave dwellings. During the burgeoning urbanisation, the rural community with 15 families is declining, with the village spirit being lost and the traditional construction being abandoned and replaced by the energy-intensive form outside the village. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The project is based on a scientific study combined with condition analyses and computer thermal simulation experiments. By filtering locally available resources and techniques, it is found that the most basic building techniques based on the soil and local natural products is most effective in both cost and environmental performance. Moreover, a series of principles, strategies and localised eco-techniques for local dwelling design and construction were also carried out. These study outcomes are further implemented in the demonstration design for two aspects of common cases during the development of the village, i.e. renovation of existing buildings and space, and new dwelling construction.

Beijin


S

JR F Z T

ohuata lliage

Beijing

Japan

Taiwan

V

am

N

M

T

N

O

F

The project was nominated because it makes use of traditional building systems and reinterprets them. Local building materials are employed and slightly added to by easily available elements, to achieve climatic and energetic improvements. The use of existing buildings and their extension by additions and new constructions combine into a complete whole. The bachelor work presents many ideas to extend traditional building methods by new elements in order to improve the ecological, social and economic conditions of its inhabitants. The project is considered suitable for hot and dry climate conditions. According to the jury, the intention to use the existing caves and extend them by new elements is very interesting. In particular the use of existing resources and a revival of the building traditions seems to be remarkable.

Y E

JURY STATEMENT

Category 2, Special Prize

93


ÂťThe project presents a notion, that is the principal idea of re-using caves and existing buildings, and making them liveable again by introducing elements, which improve the lighting or the ventilation. These newly designed elements consider the ecological, social and economic conditions of the inhabitants.ÂŤ Sir Michael Hopkins

Z

94

Living with the Earth


L 1

Category 2, Special Prize

95


F

ZF 2

U

96

Living with the Earth


CAPTION 1 — Work model 2 — Public facilities, dwelling renovation and new buildings 3 — Rendering “Living with Earth” 4 — Section and elevation of micro-surrounding

3

4

Category 2, Special Prize

97


N

T

J N

AF

B

D

C

R

QU

BD

B

FN


H

A

T

T

N


F

SUBMISSIONS CATEGORY 1 Urban Development and Transformation, Landscape Development

Q A

N Daniel Spence University of Sydney (Australia)

Jenull Sebastian • Graz University of Technology (Austria)

Reinhold Weinberger • Graz University of Technology (Austria)

Leo Habsburg • Graz University of Technology (Austria)

Special Prize Georg Pichler Graz University of Technology (Austria)

Gunnar Ploner Leopold Franzens Universität Innsbruck (Austria)

Benedikt Hörmann Leopold Franzens Universität Innsbruck (Austria)

Michaela Gritsch • Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Martin Mic Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Andreas Lint Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Marlies Fellinger Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Marlies Rosenberger Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Rainer Stadlbauer • Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Sabine Weber Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Christina Steininger • Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Josef Georg Schuster Leopold Franzens Universität (Austria)

Yen Van der Voort Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium)

Conor O’Brien Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium)

Anton Naydenov New Bulgarian University (Bulgaria)

Yang Ye • Beijing University of civil engineering and architecture (China)

Nike Zhang • Beijing University of civil engineering and architecture (China)

Yang Liu • Beijing University of civil engineering and architecture (China)

Yuanfang Lu • Beijing University of civil engineering and architecture (China)

Stacie Zuo Chang’an University (China)

K

Mirzeta Kashnica • Polis University (Albania)

U

100

Person representing a team


Yun Yan • Chang’an University (China)

Sufan Wang Chang’an University (China)

Honourable Mention Jing Lang Xia • Harbin industrial university shenzhen graduate school (China)

Yujiao Wang • Huazhong University of science and technology (China)

Yiwei Gao Hunan University (China)

Fang Bian Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology (China)

Zhang Ranran Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology (China)

Shan Jiang Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology (China)

Xu Chao ZheJiang university city college (China)

Zhu Dongxing Zhejiang University of Technology (China)

Jiri Serek Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic)

Michaela Fišerová Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic)

Katerina Vondrova Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic)

Marco Philipsen Prahm • The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation (Denmark)

Nicolas Baurssion • Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Malaquais (France)

Veronica Sereda • Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Malaquais (France)

Alice Gras National School of Architecture, Grenoble (France)

Stephanie Grümer • HafenCity University (Germany)

Markus Kaltenbach Karlsruhe Insitute of Technology (Germany)

Fabian Brenne Stuttgart State Academy of Art and Design (Germany)

David Kaufmann Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Lena Flamm • Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Theresa Schlutter • Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Arlett Gehrke Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Sebastian Rübenacker Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Danil Chekushkin Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Eunkyoung Song Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Anna Opalla Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Alyssa Weskamp Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Margit Sichrovsky • Technische Universität Berlin (Germany)

Hannes Langguth Technische Universität Braunschweig (Germany)

Stefanie Reinke Technische Universität Dresden (Germany)

Florian Strauss • Technische Universität München (Germany)

Sonja Weber Technische Universität München (Germany)

Maximilian Mehlhorn Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

101


Meike Hammer Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

Anna Kübler • Universität Stuttgart (Germany)

Eleni Vlassi National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Honourable Mention Vasilis Ingvar Raptis • National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Daphne Lada National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Vasiliki Christakou • National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Stella Konstantina Papaspyrou National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Eliza Neofytou • National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Suryabala Sah Birla institute of Technology (India)

Neha Mungekar Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (India)

Prize Winner Nikhil Chaudhary Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (India)

Jayesh Ganesh Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (India)

Rajat Mukherjee Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (India)

Yogesh Agashe Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (India)

Kaushik Keshava Ramanuja Manipal University (India)

Anisha Menon Rizvi College of Architecture, Mumbai University (India)

Lisana Shidqina • Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (Indonesia)

Alice de Sisti IUAV (Italy)

Daniele Macor IUAV (Italy)

Enrico Forestieri Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

Matteo Motta Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

Parisa Vaziri • Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

Kristoffer Lobregat Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

Margherita Locatelli Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

Amanda Marquez Monroy Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

Elena Bellini Università degli Studi di Firenze (Italy)

Giulia Dogliotti Università degli studi di Genova (Italy)

Eleonora Gigantesco Università degli studi di Genova (Italy)

Honourable Mention Laura Marcheggiano University of Rome (Italy)

Vincenzo Andreotti University of Rome (Italy)

Khuplianlam Tungnung Kobe Design University (Japan)

Woemie Benoit Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

Alija Ishmukhametova Saint-Petersburg State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering (Russia)

Tatyana Yepimachova The State Technical University in Vologda (Russia)

Vladimír Hain Slovak university of technology (Slovakia)

102

Person representing a team


Keunyoung Ryu • Seoul National University (South Korea)

Matilde González Asteinza Pompeu Fabra (Spain)

Cristina Catalán Universidad Politécnica de Valencia (Spain)

Carlos González Vidal Universidad Politécnica Madrid (Spain)

Jose Maria Nunez Universidad Politécnica Madrid (Spain)

Ignacio Atienza Universidad San Pablo Ceu (Spain)

Eniko Nagy University of Granada (Spain)

Irina Maksimovich Lund University (Sweden)

Guoda Bardauskaite Lund University (Sweden)

Guoda Bardauskaite Lund University (Sweden)

Delia Roxana Moldoveanu Lund University (Sweden)

Delia Roxana Moldoveanu Lund University (Sweden)

Ania Zdunek Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden)

Philippe Jorisch ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

Ching-Hui Peng Chinese Culture University (Taiwan)

Mattika Chaimeerang Phandee Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University (Thailand)

Basak Atan Izmir Institute of Technology (Turkey)

Yasaman Mousavi • AA School of Architecture (United Kingdom)

Sophia Ceneda Centre For Alternative Technology (United Kingdom)

Joan Kerr Queens University Belfast (United Kingdom)

Honourable Mention Anna Roussou • University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

Miles Dake University of Colorado Denver (United States)

Derek Westby • University of Colorado Denver (United States)

Ryan Reilly • University of Colorado Denver (United States)

A

F N

U

K

Kaja Kos University in Ljubljana (Slovenia)

103

Q


SUBMISSIONS CATEGORY 2 Ecological Building

Daniela Fößleitner • FH Kärnten (Austria)

Corinna König • University of Art and Industrial Design (Austria)

Wolfgang Mitterer Leopold-Franzens-Universität (Austria)

Peter Fürschuss Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Christina Rosenberger Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Prize Winner Gregor Fasching Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Marlene Rutzendorfer Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Andrea Staudinger Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Manuel Ortner Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Samira Ableidinger Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Martina Weissenböck Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Nikola Haussteiner Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Franz Koppelstätter University of Art and Industrial Design (Austria)

Martin Thysell University of Fine Arts (Austria)

Labib Hossain Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh)

Yifan Zhang • Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture (China)

Xiaomeng Wu Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture (China)

Wei Chen • Beijing University of Technology (China)

Feng Sherry • Chang’an University (China)

Rui Wang • Chang’an University (China)

Qixin Li Qingdao Technological University (China)

Qixin Li Xin Qingdao Technological University (China)

lv Zhaobo Shantou University (China)

Liang Zeyuan Wuhan University (China)

Special Prize Lu Chi • Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology (China)

104

Person representing a team


Wei Li Xiamen University Tan Kah Kee College (China)

Zhong Shu Zhuhai College of Jilin University (China)

Juan Carlos Castillo Joya Catholic University of Colombia (Colombia)

Nicolas Bouisson • Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Malaquais (France)

Benjamin Le Naour Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Malaquais (France)

Filip Voß Alanus Hochschule (Germany)

Dimitri Geizenraeder Hochschule Bochum (Germany)

Felix Rebers • msa I münster school of architecture (Germany)

Anna Sumik • msa I münster school of architecture (Germany)

Oliver Krieg • University of Stuttgart (Germany)

Leslie Koch University of Stuttgart (Germany)

Paul-Rouven Denz University of Stuttgart (Germany)

Aris Kafantaris • National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Gabor Heckenast Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Hungary)

Special Honourable Mention Zsuzsanna Meszaros Moholy-Nagy Design University (Hungary)

Elnaz Pourabadeh • Islamic Azad University Khorasgan Branch Isfahan (Iran)

Chloé Virette Università degli studi di Cagliari (Italy)

Nina Ndichu University of Nairobi (Kenya)

Noémie Benoit Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

Xavier San Giorgi Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

Filipe Cunha Universidade Técnica de Lisboa (Portugal)

Nenad Ivkovic UNION Nikola Tesla (Serbia and Montenegro)

Tomas Hanacek • Slovak University of Technology (Slovakia)

Beatriz Alejandre San Pablo Ceu (Spain)

Isabel Moya Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)

Miriam Fernandez Ruiz Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)

Sara Ferreras Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

Claudia Gonzalez Almaraza • Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain)

Ezequiel Uson Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain)

Frida Öster • Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (Sweden)

Ulrika Lowén Horn af Rantzien Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (Sweden)

Helen Shapran Kyiv National University of Construction and Architecture (Ukraine)

Maksym Rokhmaniiko Kyiv National University of Construction and Architecture (Ukraine)

Lilia Obletsova Glasgow School of Art (United Kingdom)

Pilar Garcia University College London (United Kingdom)

105


Mairi Kyprioti • University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

Manuel Eduardo Gines Salazar University of Huddersfield (United Kingdom)

Eric Laine Clemson University (United States)

Caitlin Ranson Clemson University (United States)

Adrian Mora Clemson University (United States)

Miranda Römer Luna Columbia University GSAPP (United States)

Chuan Gao Eastern Michigan University (United States)

Timothy Williams University of Colorado, Denver (United States)

Chris Fowler • University of Colorado, Denver (United States)

Bennie McMullen • University of Colorado, Denver (United States)

Benjamin Rubenstein • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)

Rodrigo Ortega Zulia University (Venezuela)

SUBMISSIONS CATEGORY 3

Q A

Building in Existing Structures (Urban Renewal)

Anika Welebny • Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Alexander Brunner Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Jakob Sellaoui Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Jürgen Kunz Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Johanna Linsberger • Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Maresa Genboeck Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Margarete Sierek Technische Universität Wien (Austria)

Mishuk Datta Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh)

Maherul Prince Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh)

Han Jianwu • Beijing Institute of Civil Engineering and Architecture (China)

106

Person representing a team


Sijia Li Beijing Institute of Civil Engineering and Architecture (China)

Chaoyi Wang • Beijing Institute of Civil Engineering and Architecture (China)

Jing Guo • Beijing Institute of Civil Engineering and Architecture (China)

An Bingjun Chang’an University (China)

Zhang Xi Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)

Xiaoli Li • ShaoXing University (China)

Qi Zhang Southwest Jiaotong University (China)

Zeyuan Liang WuHan University (China)

Anna Tsareva University of Nicosia (Cyprus)

Aude le Stum • Ecole Speciale d’Architecture (France)

Stephane Herpin ENSA Marseille (France)

Heim Besson Elodie ENSA Paris Malaquais (France)

Hye Young Kim • Brandenburgische Technische Universität (Germany)

Ewelina Pawlik • Muenster School of Architecture (Germany)

Ho Kim Staatliche Akademie der bildenen Künste Stottgart (Germany)

Jens von Mulert • TU Berlin (Germany)

Margit Sichrovsky • TU Berlin (Germany)

Elisabeth Koch TU Berlin (Germany)

Lorenz Brugger University of Stuttgart (Germany)

Karoula Eleni National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

Prize Winner Veronika Holczer Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Hungary)

Júlia Stein • Széchenyi István University (Hungary)

Aditya Wallabh School Of Planning And Architecture (India)

Michael Sbrenna University of Rome (Italy)

Michal Ganobjak, Ing. arch. Slovak university of technology (Slovakia)

Matic Pajnik University in Ljubljana (Slovenia)

Honourable Mention Daniel Widman Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (Sweden)

Pi Hedberg Royal Institute of Technology, KTH (Sweden)

Shuai Feng Architectural Association School of Architecture (United Kingdom)

Kinga Rusin University of Westminster (United Kingdom)

107


Organizer

Media partner

Partner

ar.tuwien | faculty for architecture and planning

Sponsors

Our choice of paper reflects a commitment to sustainability: CyclusOffset, courtesy of Europapier Austria.

108


SPACE FOR LIVING SPACE FOR LIVING

Saint-Gobain is the world leader in construction markets and among the fifty biggest industrial enterprises of the world and is aware of the responsibility for the design of livable environments. We produce, process and distribute materials that we have been familiar with for a long time and have been consistently further developing: glass products for buildings, cars and packaging, castiron pipes, synthetic materials, ceramics, mortar and grout, building materials and systems of gypsum, insulation and many more. Saint Gobain provides products and systems for almost all purposes in the field of construction.

Through our broad expertise and through combining our forces we are able to cooperate with renowned universities and research institutions in the field of research and development, in order to provide high-quality and sustainable systems for the future.

SUPPORT EACH YEAR, AND THROUGH A NUMBER OF EVENTS, EDF REASSERTS ITS SUPPORT TO ARCHITECTS.

As a leader of electricity production and supply in Europe, EDF has been a key-actor in the construction of territories. And, as such, working hand in hand with architects has always been a natural way of building cities and developing land use planning. The quest for innovation and the constantly evolving legislative landscape have led EDF to act for the integration of new energy solutions into buildings, regions, and territories, for which architects often are effective actors to raise awareness among public policy-makers. For five years now, EDF has been organizing the “sustainable architecture awards” to enhance the emergence of integrated renewable and low-carbon energy solutions into a new framework of city: the sustainable city.

This is also the opportunity for EDF to support young and talented architects, who look for innovative and encouraging programs. In addition to its partnership with the Cité de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine in Paris, EDF also organizes a special evening in parallel of the International Real Estate Show for Professionals hosted each year in Cannes (MIPIM). This event is the great opportunity to gather well-known architects, city planners, local politicians and EDF officials in an original place: 2012’s edition gathered more than 100 persons in the beautiful Jean Cocteau Museum freshly designed by Rudy Ricciotti in Menton, near Nice. EDF is therefore very pleased to strengthen its initiatives by becoming a partner of the Architektur und Raumgestaltung, and to support young and talented architects throughout Europe

109


Blue Award 2012 International Student Competition for Sustainable Architecture

Initiator Blue Award Organiser

Françoise-Hélène Jourda Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design, Vienna University of Technology in cooperation with the registered Society of Architecture and Spatial Design: Betül Bretschneider, Esra Hayirli, Franz Karner, Anton Kottbauer, Anna Lugbauer, Günter Pichler, Sandra Vuckovic, Florian Wachter, Claudia Maria Walther, Luise Wucherer. Karlsplatz 13/2533, 1040 Wien www.raumgestaltung.tuwien.ac.at, office2533@raumgestaltung.tuwien.ac.at www.blueaward.at, office@blueaward.at

Project Management Preliminary examination and judging panel Graphic design

Homepage Media Relation Work

Video Photography Translations and copy-editing Exhibition Blue Award 2012

Thanks to

110

Claudia Maria Walther with the cooperation of Annalisa Mauri, Luca Paschini, Gregor Pils, Andreas Claus Schnetzer, Karin Stieldorf and Sibylla Zech. bauer – konzept & gestaltung www.erwinbauer.com System development and implementation: Zalán Somogyváry juicy pool. Communication Vienna University of Technology Public Relations Office Michael Kölbl, Franz Karner, Cornelia Schicker Michael Felix Denk, Franz Karner, Johanna Linsberger, Cornelia Schicker, Nienke van Oijen Dörte Eliass, Manfred Rudy Exhibition venue: Vienna University of Technology, April 26th, 2012 – May 3rd, 2012 Exhibition design and organisation: Manfred Pichler, Sandra Vuckovic and Claudia Maria Walther Exhibition realised with the support of SCA Packaging Austira GmbH and Bieling&Petsche Stanzformen GmbH Florian Aigner, Günther Benigni, Thomas Böck, Julia Brandt, Julia Eibel, Benjamin Fellner, Johannes Fink, Fiona Fleck, Susanne Geissler, Elisabeth Graf, Michael Hammerschick, Mascha Horngacher, Ute Koch, Michael Kölbl, Herbert Kreuzeder, Jakob Martinsson, Pascale Neuens, Thomas Rögelsperger, Monika Rosenkranz, Gudrun Schach, Tobias Schererbauer, Cornelia Schicker, Dominic Schwab, Michael Strasser, Team Dekanat für Architektur und Raumplanung der TU Wien, Team GUT der TU Wien, Daniel Vuckovic, Clemens Ullrich.


Blue Award 2012 Catalogue

Françoise-Hélène Jourda Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design, Vienna University of Technology Karlsplatz 13/2533, 1040 Wien www.raumgestaltung.tuwien.ac.at Claudia Maria Walther Pascale Neuens Sandra Vuckovic Dörte Eliass bauer – konzept & gestaltung (Erwin Bauer, Tobias Schererbauer & Zahra Shahabi)

Editor

Curated by Picture editing by

Copy-editing, proofreading and English translations Graphic design

The work is subject to copyright laws. All rights are reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image, may be used without prior written permission. Therefore, reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or retransmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, is strictly prohibited without prior written permission. The use of registered names, trademarks, etc. in this publication does not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the relevant protective laws and regulations, and therefore, free for general use. April 2012. All rights reserved.

Copyright

© 2012 Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design © 2012 for the texts by the authors © 2012 for the projects by the authors © 2012 for the projects descriptions by the authors: copy-edited by the Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design (Esra Hayirli, Franz Karner, Anton Kottbauer, Günter Pichler, Florian Wachter, Claudia Maria Walther) © 2012 for the jury statements by the Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design (Esra Hayirli, Franz Karner, Anton Kottbauer, Günter Pichler, Florian Wachter, Claudia Maria Walther)

Credits

© Department of Spatial and Sustainable Design (p. 7,16) © Michael Felix Denk (p. 12 – 15) © for the images and drawings by the authors Our choice of paper reflects a commitment to sustainability: CyclusOffset, courtesy of Europapier Austria.

Photo Credits

Paper

Print Run 1,300 copies Printed in Austria by Grasl This print was kindly supported by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research. ISBN 978-3-902816-16-0 First edition: April 2012

111


This print was kindly supported by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research. ISBN 978-3-902816-16-0

Blue Award 2012  

The Blue Award is a biennial, international student competition and awards projects addressing the topic of sustainability in the academic f...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you