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A PUBLICATION OF THE TURLOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

SUMMER 2014

ISSUE 19

JAMES BRENDA

JKB LIVING AND JKB ENERGY: INNOVATION THROUGH SOLAR Business Magazine 19 Summer 2014.indd 1

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115 S. Golden State Blvd. Turlock, CA 95380 209-632-2221 Fax 209- 632-5289 Hours: Mon. - Fri. • 10am - 4pm

Cover James Brenda and JKB Living and JKB Energy

PRESIDENT / CEO

Sharon Silva sharonsilva@turlockchamber.com

7 Chamber earns President’s Circle Award 10 June Elections 12 Legislative voting records 14 New Members 14 City of Turlock conservation efforts 15 City moves forward with district elections 16 Turlock road tax makes November ballot 17 Minimum wage increase 18 Tips to sell your home 19 Chamber Ambassadors program 20 Main Street Footers 21 Turlock Scavenger 22 Senior living at Covenant Village 23 Economic recovery optimism 24 Drought impacts ag industry 25 Chamber members for 10-15 years 26 Ribbon Cuttings 27 Mixers 29 Try Turlock First 30 Events Calendar

DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS/ DEVELOPMENT

Desa Cammack Ext. 104 desa@visitturlock.com ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Sharon Berry Ext. 100 sharonberry@turlockchamber.com MEMBERSHIP / CVB ASSISTANT

Kassi Fortado Ext. 101 kassi@turlockchamber.com TURLOCK CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU DIRECTOR Morgan Aue 115 S. Golden State Blvd. 209-632-2221 Ext. 104 morgan@visitturlock.org

COVER PHOTO BY

Published by The Turlock Journal 138 S. Center St., Turlock, CA 95380 209-634-9141

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CHAMBER PRESIDENT & CEO

CHAMBER BOARD CHAIR

It’s not easy running a business in today’s economic and legislative climate. The Turlock Chamber of Commerce knows this and strives to help businesses of every size keep abreast of economic trends, best business practices and new employment laws — like the July 1 minimum wage increase. The one dollar change — from $8 to $9 an hour — is the first increase to the state minimum wage since 2008. Who will this effect most? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1.57 million SHARON SILVA Americans, or 2.1 percent of the hourly PRESIDENT & CEO workforce, earned the minimum wage in 2012. More than 60 percent of them either worked in retail or in leisure and hospitality, which is to say hotels and restaurants, including fastfood chains. Almost a third of minimum-wage workers are teenagers, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Whether or not your business has minimum wage employees, the law still may require you to make changes in your pay practices. For an employee to meet a “white collar” exemption from overtime (the commonly used administrative, executive or professional exemptions), he/she generally must earn a minimum monthly salary of no less than two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment, in addition to meeting all other legal requirements for the exemption. Effective July 1, the minimum salary requirements for these exemptions will increase to $3,120 per month (or $37,440 annually), from $2,773.33 per month (or $33,280 annually). Also, certain commissioned inside sales employees can be eligible for an overtime exemption. Generally, the exemption applies if the employee earns more than 1.5 times the minimum wage each workweek, and more than half of the employee’s compensation represents commission earnings. Employers will need to make sure that commissioned inside sales employees continue to meet this test after the July 1 minimum wage increase. Once you’ve updated your minimum wage compensation, reviewed your exempt employee pay practices and fulfilled notification requirements you can take breath and relax, right? Well, for a while. The minimum wage is set to increase a second time to $10 per hour on Jan. 1, 2016, and there may be more changes still to come. In May, lawmakers advanced legislation that would raise California’s minimum wage to $13 an hour and would require all employers to provide at least three paid sick days a year. Senate Bill 935 would raise the minimum wage in three phases, beginning at $11 an hour in 2015 and increasing an additional dollar for the next two years. In 2018, the minimum wage would begin to be adjusted for inflation. The Chamber of Commerce will continue to monitor the progress of this legislation and keep our members informed. More information on the July 1 minimum wage increase is inside this edition of the Business News. You can also contact the Chamber for more details at 632-2221. Sharon Silva President and CEO, Turlock Chamber of Commerce

We are experiencing posiANDREW B. WIGGLESWORTH tive growth and expansion CHAIRMAN, TURLOCK CHAMBER OF for Turlock. Our community COMMERCE BOARD continues to benefit from the improving business climate and the several new development/construction projects that are underway or about to start in the city. I believe our Chamber has done a tremendous job in both helping to attract and welcoming new businesses to the area with open and accepting arms. Supporting new businesses and helping our existing businesses are the keys to fostering positive economic growth. Speaking of members, the Chamber under the leadership of Board Vice Chair Kyle Kirkes will be launching a membership drive this summer. As Turlock grows, so must the Chamber! Having a strong and unified business community is critical to our advocacy success. With elections, water limitations, transportation/road funding to mention just a few of the issues, increasing the membership and participation of business in the Chamber, will benefit all of us. So please support this effort and make a point of asking your business colleagues if they are Chamber members and if they aren’t ask them to join! Lastly, I just want to thank our Chamber Board members and our Chamber staff for the hard work and dedication you provide to the Chamber and our community. Our volunteer Board members contribute enormous time and energy in so many ways! Our staff, led by Sharon Silva, has been repeatedly recognized by national, regional and statewide business organizations for our effectiveness and innovative approaches to serving the business community. In short it’s a great organization! If you are not fully plugged into the chamber, and wish to become more involved, we encourage you to speak with the Chamber staff or any member of the Board so we can understand your interests and get your engaged in our efforts to make Turlock the best place to do business, work and live in the Central Valley! It’s been a great year so far. With your help and involvement throughout summer and the rest of the year, I am sure the Chamber will achieve many more successes. Warm regards, Andrew B. Wigglesworth Chairman

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As we move into warmth of summer, I can tell you that the Chamber will also be heating up. We have several key events on the calendar, including our “Party Under The Stars” in September. I hope to see you all there at one or more of these events. As always, the Chamber events are a great opportunity to connect.

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2014 CHAMBER BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ANDREW WIGGLESWORTH CHAIR MedicAlert Foundation

DIANA BETTENCOURT Oak Valley Community Bank

STEVEN PADILLA Sunopta

MIKE ROMEO PAST CHAIR Romeo Medical Clinic

JEFF SEGARS CHAIR ELECT Foster Farms

JAMES BRENDA JKB Energy

FRED BRENDA Valley Tool & Manufacturing

LAZAR PIRO Piro Trading International

SUSAN QUIGLEY Oak Valley Community Bank

STEVE GEMPERLE TREASURER Gamperle Enteprises

MIKE ALLEN Allen Mortuary

DEAN DOERKSEN Central Ag Products

KYLE KIRKES Kirkes Electric

MIKE ROSE B&B Fluid Power

ASHOUR BADAL CSU Stanislaus

MIKE LYNCH Mike Lynch Consulting

MARTY JAKOSA EXOFFICIO MEMBER Foster Farms

PAUL PORTER Winton-Ireland, Strom & Green

2014 TURLOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF

SHARON SILVA PRESIDENT/CEO IOM, Institute for Organization Management, University of Arizona, Bachelor Arts Organizational Communication

MORGAN AUE DIRECTOR TURLOCK CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU Bachelor of Arts Communication Studies CSU Stanislaus

SHARON BERRY ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

KASSI FORTADO MEMBERSHIP/ CVB ASSISTANT

Bachelor Science Education Science Pacific University

Merced College

2014 CHAMBER CHAMPIONS

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Wester Association of Chamber Executives Graduate

JEANNE ENDSLEY ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

UPCOMING EVENTS

Allen Mortuary Emanuel Medical Center Garton Tractor, Inc. Gemperle Enterprises JKB Energy / Living Kirkes Electric MedicAlert Foundation Tower Health and Wellness Turlock Journal Turlock Scavenger Company / Turlock Recycling Winton-Ireland, Strom & Green Oak Valley Community Bank BUSINESS NEWS

DESA CAMMACK DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Mixer Brenda Athletic Club July 22 Mixer Rex Klein Insurance August 19 Mixer Prodigal Sons & Daughters September 16 6

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Chamber earns statewide recognition

AWARD

BY KRISTINA HACKER

T

he California Chamber of Commerce recognizes the efforts of outstanding local chambers every year with the President’s Circle award. The Turlock Chamber of Commerce was one of 26 local chambers to receive the prestigious award this year — and one of nine to have received the award all six years it has been presented. The award recognizes chambers for excellence in business advocacy and helping their members comply with California employment laws, both areas that Turlock Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Sharon Silva feels are essential to the business community. “The Chamber really focuses on advocacy for public policy and legislation; we don’t believe we’re doing our jobs if we don’t. Every piece of legislation affects business. We want to make sure legislators listen to the voice of business when they make decisions,” Silva said.

Helping businesses navigate the ever-changing laws and regulations regarding human resources is also something the Turlock Chamber takes pride in doing right. “We strive for excellence to meet all the requirements of human resources...we feel it’s important that we provide anything our businesses will need, from employee handbooks to compliance posters,” said Silva. Many of the President’s Circle award winners are from larger areas, such as Bakersfield, Long Beach, Riverside, and San Jose, making Turlock’s recognition a special honor. Silva credits the Turlock Chamber board and staff for making such a difference. “We have a board of directors that has a tremendous vision of how to serve the businesses of our community. We also have a staff that does the job of much larger chambers,” said Silva.

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COVER

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JAMES BRENDA

Building better homes, businesses with solar

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n 2007, business for James Brenda was booming. After 25 years of building homes as a contractor, JKB Living (formerly JKB Homes) was selling homes faster than they could build them. There was a three month waiting list for buyers, but they didn’t want just any home. They wanted premium options such as stainless steel appliances and granite counter tops, among other upgrades throughout. Brenda investigated and built homes more energy efficient; adding solar accomplished this and also helped JKB Living stand out in a bull market. It was an instant success. Customers were enthused at the opportunity to reduce their utility bill by almost 90 percent. While the market was at its apex Brenda made two observations — the housing boom wouldn’t last and solar energy was a very cost effective method for customers to lower their energy costs, especially for the valley business community. After diligent market research, Brenda formed JKB Energy in early 2008. Brenda and his team designed the product lines with a focus on the agricultural market. Brenda recalled, “We reached out to our contacts in the agricultural and business communities. We told them we thought we could reduce their energy costs and asked for a copy of their electric bills to work up the analysis.” By June 2008, five projects were under contract. The success of the initial projects fueled rapid growth with sales doubling in each of the first three years. Since then sales have increased 50 percent annually, despite the price of solar dropping by 75 percent over the last four years. The company now focuses on commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors and

is the leading solar integrator in agriculture with majority major market share. As solar becomes widely accepted, Brenda is preparing JKB Energy for the next big thing: large-scale renewable energy storage. In 2015 they will introduce a solar energy storage product that uses solar thermal to create high-pressure steam that can be stored and then used once energy is needed, via a steam power plant. Additionally, there is a standalone liquid battery product that stores energy in saltwater called an iron chromium Redox Flow battery, a technology invented by NASA. Both technologies have initial test sites up and running, one in Waterford and the other in Denair. Both projects have received national attention and strong support from the energy industry. While the national housing market has been weak, it has steadily been making a comeback and JKB Living is once again thriving. It might not be the boom of 2005-2007, but developments in Turlock, Oakdale, and Denair are underway and sales are increasing as the market strengthens. JKB Living has also branched out from residential homes by starting high-end multi-tenant developments in San Joaquin County. Furthermore, they are co-developing projects in Sonoma County and Oroville. Since the downturn in 2008, diversification has been a top priority for Brenda. He has also started a farming division, Sol Vista Farms, farming almonds in Stanislaus County and walnuts in Butte County. Brenda is optimistic for the valley’s future and is continuing to seek opportunities that support and promote the local community.

As solar becomes widely accepted, Brenda is preparing JKB Energy for the next big thing: large-scale renewable energy storage.

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SUMMER 2014

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ELECTION

VOTERS CHOOSE INCUMBENTS IN FIRST TOP-TWO ELECTION

Although low voter turnout was reported across the state, Congressman Jeff Denham managed to make it to the polls at Monte Vista Chapel on June 3.

BY CARA HALLAM

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PHOTO BY CARA HALLAM/ The Journal

D

espite having a low voter turnout, the June 3 elections will go down in history as California’s first primary election using the top-two system for all state races. Incumbents across the state holding their seats strong, including Governor Jerry Brown who garnered 54.5 percent of all votes with Republican challenger Neel Kashkari coming in with 19.4 percent, followed by Assemblyman Tim Donnelly with 14.8 percent. While Kashkari and Brown head to the gubernatorial election in November, the 10th Congressional District will see incumbent Rep. Jeff Denham face democratic challenger and local bee farmer Michael Eggman in the General Election. Similar to many congressional districts across the state, incumbent Denham took a strong lead, receiving 58.7 percent of all votes while Eggman received 26.5 percent. Holding an election night gathering as the results poured in at the California Republican Party headquarters in Modesto, Denham supporters were encouraged by the numbers coming in, saying it demonstrated the district’s continued trust in Denham. “Everything has been going well as the District really came out to show their support and trust in Denham,” said Chris Del Beccaro of the Denham campaign. “Jeff truly votes for the District, and represents them well. I think we saw that here tonight.” Around the corner at the IBEW Union headquarters in Modesto, Eggman joined a packed room of supporters enjoying the excitement of election night as the votes continued to come in. “Jeff ’s transparent attempts to keep us out of the general election has failed,” said Eggman. “It’s time for change in the Central Valley, with a positive vision, economic growth, new opportunities and solutions. The time for politics is over. It’s now time to make improvements for our children’s future.”

PHOTO BY KRISTINA HACKER/ The Journal

PHOTO BY CANDY PADILLA/ The Journal

Michael Eggman speaks with a supporter at his campaign headquarters in Modesto on the night of the June primary election.

Assemblywoman Kristin Olsen, pictured above speaking at the Turlock Memorial Day service, came out on top in the June 3 primary election.

In the State Assembly District 12 race, Turlock Unified School District Board member Harinder Grewal received 33.3 percent of votes, while incumbent Assemblywoman Kristin Olsen held strong with 66.7 percent. Stanislaus voters also had a number of local offices on the primary ballot. Incumbent Assessor Don Gaekle led Turlock City Councilwoman Amy Bublak in the County Assessor race, while incumbent District Attorney Birgit Fladager led Frank Carson, an attorney and local businessman from Modesto. Additionally, incumbent Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christianson held a significant lead ahead of deputy sheriff Tom Letras, who supported Christianson in previous elections. To view all the election results from the June 3 primaries, visit www.stanvote.com. 10

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ELECTION RESULTS Governor

U.S. Representative — District 10

Edmund G. Brown Neel Kashkari Tim Donnelly

54.5% 19.4% 14.8%

Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom Ron Nehring David Fennell

State Senate — District 8 50% 23.4% 8.6%

Secretary of State Alex Padilla Pete Peterson Leland Yee

30.2% 9.5% 9.04%

Controller Ashley Swearengin Betty T. Yee John A. Perez David Evans

24.9% 21.8% 21.7% 21.1%

State Attorney General Kamala H. Harris Ronald Gold Phil Wyman John Haggerty

County District Attorney

58.7% 26.5% 14.8%

Jeff Denham Michael Eggman Michael M. Barkley

53.2% 12.4% 11.6% 8.2%

65.3% 34.7%

Tom Berryhill Paulina Miranda State Senate — District 12

63.8% 36.2%

Anthony Cannella Shawn K. Bagley

State Assembly — District 12 Kristin Olsen Harinder Grewal

70.85% 28.85%

County Sheriff-Coroner Adam Christianson Tom Letras

66.31% 33.50%

Proposition 41 Authorize $600 million in bonds for housing for veterans and their families. Yes 65.4% No 34.6%

66.7% 33.3%

Proposition 42

46.7% 29% 24.3%

Yes No

Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson Marshall Tuck Lydia A. Gutierrez

Birgit Fladager Frank C. Carson

Require local governments to pay for the costs of following state laws requiring public access to government information. 62% 38%

County Assessor 63.3% 36.43%

Don H. Gaekle Amy Bublak

Oak Valley COmmunity Bank

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n, he e, 3

Let us make your banking, our business. Oak Valley’s Peter Brown, Commercial Loan Officer, 209.844.7522 and Dianna Bettencourt, Turlock Branch Manager, 209.633.2867 pictured with TG&CC Board President, Mark Heald and General Manager, Michael Blevins

“Oak Valley listened to our needs and tailored a competitive financing solution that makes long term sense for us and the bank. It was a pleasure working with a professional team with an authentic interest in developing a lasting business relationship.”

Deep Roots ~ Strong Branches

www.ovcb.com • 1.866.844.7500 Oakdale • Sonora • Modesto • Turlock • Patterson Ripon • Escalon • Stockton • Manteca

– Michael Blevins, General Manager, Turlock Golf and Country Club

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SCORECARDS

FORREST WHITE

STEVEN NASCIMENTO

JOHN LAZAR

COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

BILL DEHART

MEETING

AMY BUBLAK

TURLOCK CITY COUNCIL VOTING RECORD

1.

3/25/2014

COMBINING ARTS COMMISSION WITH PARKS AND REC COMMISSION Y Y Y Y Y

2.

4/8/2014

1. INCREASING MONTHLY WATER FEES AND CHARGES

N Y Y Y Y

3.

4/8/2014

2. ASSESSING PROPERTIES FOR SIDEWALK REPAIR COSTS

N Y Y Y Y

4.

5/27/2014 3. BALLOT MEASURE ESTABLISHING ELECTORAL DISTRICTS FOR MEMBERS OF TURLOCK CITY COUNCIL AND MAYOR OF TURLOCK

Y Y Y Y Y

5.

5/27/2014 4. BALLOT MEASURE FOR LOCAL TRANSPORTATION TAX FOR POTHOLE REPAIR AND STREET MAINTENANCE

N Y Y Y Y

TURLOCK CITY COUNCIL VOTING RECORD EXPLANATION 1. Six rate increases will take place over the next five years, with the first increase taking effect July 1. The second increase is scheduled for Jan. 1, 2015, with the remaining increases occurring annually thereafter until 2019.

Compiled of three primary charges, the rate structure in July will charge a single/multifamily residency a commodity charge of 48 cents per 1,000 gallons, a capacity charge of $17.50 a month, and a customer charge of

$2.20 per month. 2. The Council voted to establish a lien for payment for repair cost of certain maintenance CONTINUED ON PAGE 14 

DISTRICT 5 JIM DEMARTINI

DISTRICT 4 DICK MONTEITH

DISTRICT 3 TERRY WITHROW

BOARD AGENDA ITEM

DISTRICT 2 VITO CHIESA

MEETING

DISTRICT 1 WILLIAM O'BRIEN

STAN. CO. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS VOTING RECORD

1.

3/25/2014 APPROVAL OF LABOR AGREEMENT BETWEEN IN-HOME SUPPORTIVE SERVICES OF STANISLAUS COUNTY AND UNITED DOMESTIC WORKERS OF AMERICA

Y Y Y Y Y

2.

4/1/2014 APPROVAL OF RE-LOCATING THE SHERIFF’S CORONER’S OFFICE TO A VACANT COUNTY BUILDING ADJACENT TO THE EXISTING SHERIFF’S CORONER’S OFFICE AT COUNTY CENTER III

Y Y Y Y Y

3.

4/29/2014 ADOPTED THE PROPERTY TAX ADMINISTRATION COST RECOVERY PLAN

Y Y Y Y Y

4.

4/29/2014 APPROVED THE VARIOUS ACTIONS NEEDED TO MOVE THE AB 900 PHASE II PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER EXPANSION PROJECT FORWARD TOWARD CONSTRUCTION

Y Y Y Y Y

5.

5/6/2014 DENIED FUNDING THE ADDITIONAL $9,200 FOR SHERIFF-COURT SECURITY AND DIRECTED STAFF TO RETURN THIS MATTER TO THE BOARD WITH AN UPDATE

Y Y Y Y Y

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FEDERAL VOTING RECORD U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AGENDA ITEM CONGRESSMAN JEFF DENHAM 1.

HR 4118 SUSPENDING THE INDIVIDUAL MANDATE PENALTY LAW (SIMPLE FAIRNESS ACT)

Y

2.

HR 3361 USA FREEDOM ACT

Y

3.

HR 4438 AMERICAN RESEARCH AND COMPETITIVENESS ACT OF 2014

Y

4.

HR 1871 BASELINE REFORM ACT OF 2013

Y

5.

SAVE AMERICAN WORKERS ACT OF 2014

Y

6.

ELECTRICITY SECURITY AND AFFORDABILITY ACT

Y

FEDERAL VOTING RECORD EXPLANATION

U.S. SENATE AGENDA ITEM

that an employee is required to work per week in order to be considered a full-time employee for the purpose of employer-sponsored health care coverage. 6. Requires the Environmental Protection Agency to base carbon emissions standards on technology that has been in use for at least 1 year.

1.

S 2223 MINIMUM WAGE FAIRNESS ACT

Y Y

2.

S 2199 PAYCHECK FAIRNESS ACT

Y Y

3.

HR 4302 PROTECTING ACCESS TO MEDICARE ACT OF 2014

Y Y

4.

HR 3370 HOMEOWNER FLOOD INSURANCE AFFORDABILITY ACT OF 2014

Y

FEDERAL VOTING RECORD EXPLANATION 1. Increases the federal minimum wage. 2. Establishes additional penalties for vio-

lations of equal pay requirements in the Fair Labor Standards Act. 3. Amends the penalty for an individual

SENATOR BOXER

3. Repeals the termination date of the research tax credit. 4. Removes from the budget baseline formula automatic inflation for future fiscal year budgets and requires the Congressional Budget Office to report on the Long-Term Budget Outlook for the next 40 fiscal years. 5. Increases the number of hours from 30 to 40

SENATOR FEINSTEIN

1. Amends the Internal Revenue Code to delay until 2015 the imposition of the monthly penalty amount on individual taxpayers for failure to purchase minimum essential health care coverage. 2. Amends the requirements for conducting electronic surveillance and other forms of information gathering for foreign intelligence, counterterrorism, and criminal purposes.

N

who does not maintain health insurance and amends the calculation of Medicare payment CONTINUED ON PAGE 14 

1. AB 800 AUTHORIZES THE FAIR POLITICAL PRACTICES COMMISSION TO CONDUCT AUDITS AND INVESTIGATIONS

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N

ASSEMBLYWOMAN KRISTIN OLSEN

AGENDA ITEM

SENATOR TOM BERRYHILL

SENATOR ANTHONY CANNELLA

STATE LEGISLATURE VOTING RECORD

N

N

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NEW MEMBERS The City of Turlock’s current and planned water conservation efforts and program

New Members AT&T Authorized Retailer (Parrot) Dataflow Business Systems David’s Painting DJ Rocha Trucking, Inc. GJ Gardner Homes Green Grub Hamilton Farms Infinity Dental International Student Exchange Program Law Office of Alan Eighmey Monte Vista 7eleven Transamerica Financial Advisors Vintage Lounge & Piano Bar World Tile Design

• A Water Conservation Task Force Committee has recently been established to focus efforts on water conservation strategies through operational efficiency improvements and by enhancing public education and outreach. • The City operates a tertiary wastewater treatment facility that allows for the unrestricted reuse of the City’s wastewater. Currently, the City provides up to two million gallons per day of recycled water to the Turlock Irrigation District for cooling purposes at the Walnut Energy Center. • Pedretti Sports Complex is irrigated with recycled water. • Summerfaire Park is irrigated with storm water. • The Northeast area of the city, Donnelly Park and Turlock Regional Sports Complex are irrigated with nonpotable water from shallow wells to preserve drinking water. • Nuisance water is filtered and reused for irrigation at city storm drain basins. • The city has implemented a state of the art automatic meter reading system that provides up to the minute meter readings and possible leak detection to aid in water conservation and reduce water wasting. • A recent water survey of all Fire Stations in Turlock resulted in 12 low-flow aerator and 6 low-flow showerhead installations. Further, Turlock Fire Department is evaluating ways to be more efficient with water usage at all four stations. • The city offers a free residential water survey. A Water Conservation Representative will tour your property to identify leaks and water-saving opportunities. Participants can receive water-saving equipment and information including low-flow showerheads, faucet aerators and other free items. To date, the City has conducted 48 water surveys for residents throughout the City. • The city offers new High-Efficiency Toilet and Clothes Washer Rebates for the purchase of high-efficiency toilets and clothes washers. Rebates are available for up to $75 per toilet and $100 per clothes washer. Since the program began in 2012, the City has provided 27 clothes washer rebates and 61 toilet rebates to utility customers. • The City of Turlock offers free assistance with automatic sprinkler timer set-up for residents. • The City of Turlock website is undergoing significant additions that will provide tools and resources for residents to utilize (with regard to water conservation efforts) in the near future. • An abundance of educational material is available through the city by either calling (209) 668-5590 to request directly from the department, disseminated through outreach activities or online at www.cityofturlock. org/gogreen.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

of curbs, gutters, sidewalks, curb cuts, and driveway approaches. Discussion before the vote included maintenance of street trees being the property owner’s responsibility, the abatement/noticing process, potential for implementation of a tree maintenance cost share program, making use of the services of Precision Concrete before sidewalks become irreparable, and the possibility of exploring/implementing a home presale inspection process related to sidewalks. 3. Switching to a district based election system will prevent the City of Turlock from being sued under the California Voting Rights Act, while ensuring equal representation in local government by drawing districts balancing the city’s populations. Throughout California, various minority advocate groups have sued cities utilizing an at-large voting system, often resulting in million-dollar settlements and pricey attorney fees. 4. If approved by voters in November, the transportation tax would raise an estimated $5.6 million per year. Although the tax would have a lifespan of seven years, the City included a provision stating the tax would immediately be terminated should a countywide transportation tax be approved, which the Stanislaus Council of Governments hopes to bring back before county voters in 2016 after abandoning the initiative discussed for this November’s ballot earlier this year.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

rates to physicians. 4. Prohibits the risk premium rate for flood insurance for any property participating in the National Flood Insurance Program from being increased by more than 18 percent each year, except for certain properties.

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CITY

CITY OPTS FOR ‘SENSIBLE’ VOTING DISTRICTS BY CARA HALLAM

CITY OF TURLOCK 2014 DISTRICTING

T

he Cit y C ounci l to ok another pivotal step towards replacing Turlock’s current at-large voting system with district-based elections by choosing to move forward with one of three proposed maps outlining district boundaries throughout the city. The proposed maps, which primarily use Turlock’s existing lines such as major roads and railroad lines as borders in most places, had been the center of two public forums held in May by the City Council where residents were asked to informally vote in favor of their preferred plan. Although attendance for both

special meetings was light, those present showed a clear preference for Plan A – the proposed map that many deemed as the most “sensible.” Throughout the two meetings, Plan A received 55 votes, followed by Plan C with 39 votes, and Plan B with 18. Having prepared the district map proposals, city consultant Doug Johnson, president of the National Demographics Corporation, explained that while each proposed map breaks the city into four quadrants with populations of approximately 17,000 persons, Plan A was developed specifically as the most straightforward approach. Switching to a district based

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election system would prevent the City of Turlock from being sued under the California Voting Rights Act, while ensuring equal representation in local government by drawing districts balancing the City’s populations. Throughout California, various minority advocate groups have sued cities utilizing an at-large voting system, often resulting in million-dollar settlements and pricey attorney fees. According to City staff, the outreach, study and preparation needed to place the district-based electoral system initiative on the November ballot is estimated to cost the City $30,000.

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CITY

City road tax slated for BY CARA HALLAM

F

to vote on the issue. To guarantee that the initiative’s generated funds are being spent only on Turlock roadways, the proposed seven-year half-cent sales tax measure would include an annual financial audit in addition to establishing a fivemember Citizen Oversight Committee appointed by the Council to ensure the proper use of funds. Each year, an Annual Report will be prepared by City staff, reviewed by the committee and presented to the City Council, reviewing on expenditures and activities during the past fiscal year. If approved by voters in November, the tax would raise an estimated $5.6 million per year. Although the tax would have a lifespan of seven years, the City included a provision stating the tax would immediately be terminated should a countywide transportation tax be approved, which the Stanislaus Council of Governments hopes to bring back before County voters in 2016 after abandoning the initiative discussed for this November’s ballot earlier this year.

ollowing years of neglect, the poor conditions marking Turlock’s roadways – such as cracked pavement, dangerous potholes and deteriorated sidewalks – could soon be a problem of the past should voters support a long-awaited citywide transportation tax on the November ballot. Constructed to the standards and conditions of the early mid-20th century, many Turlock streets are no longer able to meet today’s traffic standards, often creating safety concerns for drivers and pedestrians. Without a dime of the City’s General Fund being dedicated towards the construction, replacement, repair and maintenance of Turlock’s roadway system, City officials and staff have relied on competitive Federal and State grants and transportation monies to fund any necessary improvements to its existing infrastructure. With many cities and counties throughout the state adopting various tax measures to help gain funds for costly transportation and infrastructure improvements, the Turlock City Council began discussing placing a similar initiative before Turlock voters this November after the Stanislaus County Council of Governments – the regional transportation planning agency – recently opted against pursuing its third attempt at a countywide transportation tax. Despite Councilwoman Amy Bublak’s vote in opposition due to her stance against tax increases, she agreed with other council members that Turlock residents had the right BUSINESS NEWS

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“If approved by voters in November, the tax would raise an estimated $5.6 million per year. ”

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:07:38 PM


LABOR

What businesses need to know about the minimum wage increase

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alifornia’s minimum wage increased to $9 per hour from the existing minimum wage of $8 per hour on July 1. This is the first increase to the state minimum wage since Jan. 1, 2008. The minimum wage will increase a second time to $10 per hour on Jan. 1, 2016. Employers need to adjust their wages accordingly and remember that state enforcement agencies have made it a top priority to stop employers from engaging in so-called “wage theft,” which includes not paying the minimum wage for all hours worked. Cal Chambers recommends employers examine all pay practices that might be affected by the minimum wage increase, including: • Minimum wage: California employers must pay employees no less than the state minimum wage per hour for all hours worked. The federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, but when state and federal laws differ, employers must comply with the more restrictive requirement. Since California’s state minimum wage is higher, most employers will be required to pay that rate. The obligation to pay the minimum wage can’t be waived by any agreement, including collective bargaining agreements. • Overtime rate: Effective July 1, employees who work for minimum wage and perform work that qualifies for overtime must be paid $13.50 per hour for time and one-half or $18 per hour for double-time. • Exempt/Nonexempt: For an employee to meet a “white collar” exemption from overtime (the commonly used administrative, executive or professional exemptions), he/she generally must earn a minimum monthly salary of no less than two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment, in addition to meeting all other legal requirements for the exemption. Effective July 1, the minimum salary requirements for these exemptions BEST PRACTICES • Display a poster that includes the current official Minimum Wage Order (MW-2014). CalChamber’s 2014 California and Federal Employment Notices poster already includes the required minimum wage update. • Update any necessary payroll documentation. • Review exempt classifications to make sure that the employees will still meet the minimum salary requirements on July 1. • Provide revised itemized wage statements in a timely manner when wages are paid and ensure the statements accurately reflect the new minimum wage increase. • Provide employees affected by the minimum wage increase with

• • • •

an appropriate wage notice showing the change in the rate of pay, if required. Adjust any meal or lodging credits to meet the new minimum wage obligation. Review any piece-rate compensation systems to ensure compliance with the new minimum wage standard. Review commissioned employee arrangements to make certain that any draws against future commissions use the new minimum wage rate as a basis. Confirm that those employees who are required to provide and maintain their own hand tools and equipment earn at least two times BUSINESS NEWS

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will increase to $3,120 per month (or $37,440 annually), from $2,773.33 per month (or $33,280 annually). Also, certain commissioned inside sales employees under Wage Orders 4 and 7 can be eligible for an overtime exemption. Generally, the exemption applies if the employee earns more than 1.5 times the minimum wage each workweek, and more than half of the employee’s compensation represents commission earnings. Employers will need to make sure that commissioned inside sales employees continue to meet this test after the July 1 minimum wage increase. Outside salespeople do not need to meet the minimum salary requirements. • Notice requirements: The minimum wage increase affects employer notice requirements related to the minimum wage posting, itemized wage statements and wage notices. First, employers must post California’s official Minimum Wage Order (MW- 2014) in a conspicuous location frequented by employees. The official notice has been updated by the Department of Industrial Relations and includes both the July increase and the second increase for Jan. 1, 2016. Second, California employers must provide each employee with an itemized statement, in writing, at the time wages are paid (Labor Code Section 226). Among other mandatory information, the itemized wage statement must include all applicable hourly rates in effect during the pay period and the corresponding number of hours the employee worked at each hourly rate. Third, employers in California must provide nonexempt employees with a wage notice pursuant to Labor Code Section 2810.5. The written notice must be provided at time of hire and again within seven calendar days after a change is made to any information in the notice. For more information about the minimum wage increase, contact the Chamber at 632-2221.

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the minimum wage (which will equal $18 per hour effective July 1). • If you use the “learner” rate, ensure that you follow the strict guidelines for when you can pay the lower rate and use the appropriate rate calculation beginning July 1. Keep accurate records of time worked; after the employee reaches 160 hours of work, you may not pay the subminimum wage to the employee. • Remember that local ordinances may impact your minimum wage obligations: San Francisco currently requires a minimum wage of $10.74 per hour and San José currently requires a minimum wage of $10.15 per hour. Note, however, that exempt/nonexempt classification is based on the state minimum wage, not local ordinances.

SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:07:49 PM


REAL ESTATE

6 essential tips to sell your home this summer

BY JIM THEIS

T

he Turlock area real estate market is returning to more of a normal market as the number of traditional listings grow and distressed properties (short sales and bank owned) shrink. As we move into the summer selling season when 60% of all homes are bought and sold, you need to get your home and yourself ready to capitalize on this active market time. Here are 6 tips to take now:

to allow potential buyers to visualize themselves in the home. Also these items can be a distraction to buyers – often times they spend more time looking at the pictures and collectibles than looking at the positive attributes of your home.

4. REMOVE ANYTHING POLARIZING: When organizing your home, remove any controversial elements – primarily anything religious or political. Don’t give your buyer a chance to prejudge your home because of your political or religious beliefs.

1. TACKLE THE OBVIOUS REPAIRS: It is important to make a list of the obvious repairs and take care of them before your home is listed. Fix that leaky kitchen faucet, paint the kid’s bedroom, and have the carpets cleaned. Rather than having a potential buyer walking through your home making a mental list of the items that need to be fixed, they’ll be able to focus on the positive attributes of your home. You will also save time and money later by avoiding back-and-forth negotiations over minor repair issues – your actual cost of repairs will almost always be less than a buyer’s post-inspection estimate.

5. TAKE CARE OF PETS: If you have pets, be sure the home

is free of pet toys and odors. Make sure litter boxes are clean and out of the way. When the house is being shown to a prospective buyer, it is best for pets not to be present. A barking dog, even in an outside kennel, can be a distraction and may cause the buyer to rush through a showing. Also buyers may have small children that are not accustomed to being around pets and may try to approach and play with an unwilling pet.

2. REMOVE YOUR CLUTTER AND JUNK NOW: Simply put, clutter eats equity and kills deals. Look at each item in your home, and decide to save it, store it, sell it, or dispose of it. The concept that “less is more” is at the heart of making a home sellable. Once you have gotten rid of what you’re not going to use, organize the rest. Living and storage space are extremely important commodities, and a little extra space and breathing room will make your home more appealing. Remember that buyers will be opening cabinets and closets, so removing items from the room and filling the closet is not always the simple solution. Given the choice between have an item in the house or garage, put it in the garage.

6. PUMP UP THE CURB APPEAL: First impressions are every-

thing and an inviting entry will get buyers in the front door. If the front door is weathered, paint it and if the hardware is worn, replace it. Make sure the lawn is well manicured and do not forget to trim up shrubs and trees. It is also time to plant flowering plants to add color. Put away all children’s toys such as skateboards, bikes, and balls. If you have a pool, have it free of debris and if it has a water feature, have it on. Remember you never get a second chance to make a positive first impression. And finally when you are ready to put your home on the market, be sure to engage the professional services of a licensed Realtor to assist you in getting the best price for your home in the desired time.

3. DEPERSONALIZE YOUR HOME: It is time to take down the collectibles, family heirlooms, school photos, and other highly personal mementos. When it comes to selling your home, you want a slate that is blank enough BUSINESS NEWS

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— Jim Theis, PMZ Real Estate, CA Broker License 01290827

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:07:57 PM


MEET THE 2014 CHAMBER AMBASSADORS

CHAMBER

Chamber Ambassadors are business leaders who work with the Chamber in membership development, retention of members and are the link between the membership’s board and staff. These individuals are dedicated to meeting with Chamber members and prospective members to talk about the return on their investment and the beneďŹ ts of Chamber membership. The Ambassadors keep the communications open between the Chamber and its members. They attend the mixers each month and are there to introduce new members to the other attendees. They attend ribbon cuttings and show their support to new businesses or businesses that relocate. Each year they work on the membership drive to help educate and promote the mission, purpose, and vision of the Chamber. The Ambassador Program is a prestigious and integral part of the success of the Turlock Chamber. The Ambassadors serve as the public relations portion of the Turlock Chamber of Commerce. Those interested in becoming an Ambassador can get more information and an application by calling 632-2221.

Joy Biddle Creative Alternatives

Teresa Silva Western Valley Insurance

Anokeen Varani The Agency

Robert Rodarte US Bank

Cheryl Gerhardt Paramount Court

Michael Schulze US Bank

Kathy Hobby United Samaritans

David Silva Garton Tractor

Mary Matthews Clear Channel Media & Entertainment

Don Mundello, Jr. BNI

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Stephanie Talkington Lancaster Painting

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:08:22 PM


BUSINESS

Partners Glenn Newsum and Lisa Wilson have owned and operated Main Street Footers for the past 17 years.

BY ELIZABETH ARAKELIAN

Turlock’s ‘hometown deli’

PHOTO BY ELIZABETH ARAKELIAN/ The Journal

W

hen film director Corbin Bernson came to Turlock to scout out locations at which to shoot his upcoming film he stopped for lunch at Main Street Footers. One hot dog later and he changed his script to incorporate the restaurant into his film. “Originally in the scene, the two were going to be talking over a hamburger but after coming here he decided to make it a hot dog. They shot the footage here and our logo on our front window will be in his film which is pretty neat,” said Glenn Newsum, co- owner of Footers. While Bernson is new to Footers’ charm and tasty selection of deli items, locals have been frequenting the funky hot dog shop since 1982. For the pat 17 years partners Newsum and Lisa Wilson have owned and operated the restaurant, which has become an iconic Turlock land-

mark where locals of all ages can enjoy hot dogs, soups, salads and sandwiches. “We’re a hometown deli. It’s a place where people come in and they run into someone they know and I think that they enjoy that hometown feeling,” said Wilson. “A lot of our customers have been coming here for 30 plus years,” added Newsum. “Now their children come and their grandchildren. It’s the kind of place that people like to come back and visit.” A restaurant that prides itself on friendliness and consistency, locals are not the only ones to enjoy Footers’ offerings as the restaurant has drawn customers from around the country — especially since the advent of the Kap Dog. Shortly after Turlocker Colin Kaepernick’s success as quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers, Newsum conceived BUSINESS NEWS

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of the idea to hold a contest to create a hotdog to honor the hometown hero. With submissions from Turlock to Las Vegas and everywhere in between, a local Turlocker’s creation was voted into first place as the original Kap Dog. Turlocker Jim Yettman’s recipe featured special Kap-sauce made of thousand island, horse radish, mustard and cayenne pepper as well as chili, coleslaw and jalapenos on a Main Street footer. The success of the Kap Dog was larger than Newsum and Wilson anticipated and with customers lining around the block, the hometown deli became a national news sensation. While the craze around the Kap Dog has since died down, the restaurant still maintains devoted clientele many of whom enter under the restaurant’s bright yellow awnings every few days to get their Footers fix.

SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:08:30 PM


Turlock Scavenger

makes locals’ lives easier BY ELIZABETH ARAKELIAN

W

hen locals roll their trash cans to the street one evening a week, they rarely consider what happens to the waste they are discarding— if anything they’re just happy to have someone take it off their hands. That someone more than likely works for Turlock Scavenger. A family company for the past 79 years, Turlock Scavenger is presently owned and operated by the three sons of Italian immigrants: Alan Marchant serving as President, Greg Marchant as Vice President and Lee Marchant as Secretary and Treasurer of the corporation. Serving more than 14,000 residential customers, Turlock Scavenger picks up residential waste in areas of Stanislaus County as well as industrial and commercial waste in both the City of Turlock and the county. A conglomerate of four companies that serves to pick up, sort, recycle and transport refuse to the Stanislaus County Waste to Energy Plant, the Turlock Scavenger property is a vast sea of piles of, well, trash. “To anyone outside of the industry it looks like utter chaos, but in reality it is a really organized structure,” said Jesse Marchant, recycling coordinator. While developing efficient ways to process local customers’ trash is a priority at Turlock Scavenger, in recent years the company and waste industry in general has attracted more attention as consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the trash they are discard. While recycling and repurposing have become trendy ways to help preserve the ecosystem and save a few bucks in a recovering economy, the Marchants realize first hand that increased consumer awareness is key to longterm industry wide change. “The consumer’s role is definitely becoming more important, such as being vigilant in putting only recycling in the blue can. A lot of that comes from educating the consumer and that falls on us,” said Alan Marchant. In an effort to educate and engage with local consumers, Turlock Scavenger makes a point to participate in a multitude of community events. Whether that is providing classroom presentations or tours during the City of Turlock’s Go Green Week, Turlock Scavenger aims to connect with consumers to increase awareness as the company plays an integral role in locals lives whether they know it or not.

BUSINESS NEWS

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celebrating 30 years of business

OLDEST FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED JEWELRY STORE IN THE AREA

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:08:38 PM


BUSINESS

Covenant Village offers BY ELIZABETH ARAKELIAN BY ELIZABETH ARAKELIAN

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ovenant Village may be a retirement community, but that doesn’t mean it’s not an active campus. With hundreds of residents that span several generations, Covenant Village offers aging locals interested in accommodated living a dynamic lifestyle. “They may be 65 or they may be 96 when people move in – that’s 30 years and easily multiple generations and we can’t look at them as one group of people but several generations of people with difference experiences,” explained Executive Director Robert Howell. “We are able to bring a unique kind of care because we know our residents as people. We get to know their likes and dislikes and the issues they face so we have better internal systems as they age.” A staple in the community since the early 1990s Covenant Village is home to over 325 residents who vary in age and need from those in residential living for self sufficient residents, assisted living for those that need attention for things such as medicine and skilled nursing for those in need of 24/7 care. Currently at 85 percent capacity, Covenant Village has seen an uptick in residents since remodeling several of the facilities — including building the

three-storied Redwood Lodge in 2007. “We pulled back in 2008 once the economy hit and now with the census increase, there’s a pent up demand and we are able to bring some new standards for what the buildings looks like,” said Howell. Anchored by the Redwood Lodge which has “completely changed the dynamics of the community” and offered residents a central place to connect, Covenant Village recently invested $700,000 into assisted living facilities to bring the studio apartments up to date with amenities such as televisions, washers and dryers in each apartment. Covenant Village also features a pool, café, beauty parlor and plenty of communal space for residents to meet new

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people and convene with old friends. “It’s a continual process just like with any other large organization to meet the updated demands and needs of consumers, but we want residents’ apartments to change as the times change. Just like it would in your home,” said Howell. More changes are on the horizon for Covenant Village as the sale of Emanuel Medical Center to Tenet Healthcare Corporation is anticipated to be finalized in August, which means that Covenant Village will acquire Brandel Manor and Cypress Assisted Living of Emanuel. CovenantCare at Home, which was a part of Emanuel Medical Center, has already taken over operations of Hospice of Emanuel.

SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:08:44 PM


ALLIANCE

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Cautiously optimistic about signs of

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BY DAVID WHITE

A

s we recover from the recession we have to be careful to not celebrate too early. Who can forget the 2005 College Football National Championship game between USC and Texas when Reggie Bush was running down the field for a certain touchdown, started dancing around and ended up fumbling the ball before he made it to the end zone? USC had an exceptional team that year. Had Bush scored that touchdown, USC probably would have won the national championship. Instead, Texas got the ball back and ended up scoring the winning touchdown while running out the clock. I have learned to never spike the ball on the 5 yard line. That being said, it appears that the economy is improving. In the weeks ahead we here at The Stanislaus Alliance will be introducing an economic dashboard showing how Stanislaus County is faring in various economic indicators. It will give you a signal on what’s happening in our local economy. As many of you know, we have been conducting in-house surveys with base employers. We are close to having completed 90 surveys. The companies range from one employee to hundreds of employees. Of the 80 plus companies we have surveyed, more than half of them are planning to expand in the next year. That means they plan on adding new jobs and investment. We haven’t interviewed one employer yet that is planning to reduce its workforce. Having done these surveys in the past and in different markets, we can say that we are ahead of the curve in terms of the percentage of companies planning to expand. But we have many more surveys to complete before we will have a totally accurate picture. So we remain cautiously optimistic. Once we hit 100 surveys completed, we will start releasing some reports. We are getting close. On the business recruitment side, we know about three big announcements that will happen in the next few weeks. The three companies combined will create more than 500 new jobs. We know about several retailers who are considering coming into our county. Steven Ames, our Chief Business Development Officer, just returned from Las Vegas where he and other local partners, including Patterson City Manager Rod Butler, attended a national retail conference and held meetings with several retailers who expressed interest in our region. He and his team are now working those prospects. We hope you are aware of our Jumpstart Stanislaus campaign, an effort to put long-term unemployed individuals back into the workforce. We have already made you aware of the first component of the campaign, the On The Job Training component. Employers who hire eligible persons who are either veterans or long-term unemployed individuals can qualify for wage reimbursements up to 90 percent for a period of time. But this is just the beginning! Stay tuned. For more information about Alliance programs, call 209-567-4985.

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:08:54 PM


WATER

DROUGHT HITS

CALIFORNIA

BY CARA HALLAM

FARMERS

F

acing one of the driest years in California’s history, farmers throughout the state have seen major hits to agriculture and ag-related industries, as economists have estimated as many as 14,500 full time and seasonal jobs lost as a result of the drought and lack of adequate water supplies. In San Joaquin alone, approximately 410,000 acres may be left unplanted, studies have shown, as farmers across the state entered this year’s growing season with just two-thirds of the water needed, as most farmers in California rely on irrigation rather than rain. Due to the decreased supplies, many farmers in the Central Valley and other agricultural regions in California have turned to private groundwater wells – a trend that has had significant negative impacts on local groundwater supplies for many counties, including Stanislaus. To help make more water available to farms, Governor Jerry Brown eased several environmental pro-

tections for endangered fish while allowing increased flexibility in water rights regulations statewide, as part of his Emergency Drought Declaration issued in January. Since then, the Governor’s administration has ordered more drought measures, cutting red tape in various government functions to help water agencies find new supplies, fight wildfires and assist cities and farmers. The second executive order issued by Gov. Brown in early spring directed the Department of Water Resources and the State Water Resources Control Board to expedite approvals of voluntary water transfers to assist farmers. According to the California Farm Water Coalition, as of March 4, more than 90 percent of California's $44.7 billion farm economy was experiencing severe, extreme, or exceptional drought. “Unless a long-term solution to California's water supply is developed, including new surface storage, the flexibility brought

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about by groundwater pumping will be lost increasing the likelihood that consumer price protections won't exist in the future,” said representatives from the California Farm Water Coalition, releasing an economic report on droughts impacts on the Valley’s Ag industry conducted by UC Davis. Similar to many other water districts across the state, the Turlock Irrigation District opted for a shortened irrigation season in 2014 due to the drought, while also placing a record low 20-inch cap on water allotments for area farmers. “It’s going to be a tough year for everyone,” said TID President Ron Macedo as the Board of Directors set the irrigation rates for the 2014 season. “The district is going to continue doing its best job to conserve, and to police the irrigation rules. We know it’s not an exact science, but we’re asking all of our customers, not only the farmers, but everyone in TID to use water efficiently.”

SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:09:03 PM


The Turlock Chamber of Commerce would like to recognize businesses that have been members for 10-15 years!

We thank you for your continued support! 10 East Kitchen and Tap House

Delta Sierra Beverage, LLC

Stammerjohan Consulting

Ag Production Company

Teresa Dias- Realtor

Stanislaus County Farm Bureau

Almond Tree Restaurant

Sandra Kruthoff

Staples #0633

American Pacific Mortgage

Layer 3 Integration

Stewart & Jasper Company Store

Americold

MedicAlert Foundation

Success Capital Expansion Development

Anderson & Associates

Michael S. Warda — A Professional

Baez Design Group, Inc.

Law Corporation

Bank of The West

Monte Vista Crossings, LLC

Barrett Construction

Monte Vista Farming Company

Taylor Veterinary Hospital TelePacific Communications The Spa Tower Health & Wellness Center

Berger & Company CPA

Oak Valley Community Bank

BIA of the Greater Valley

Clarence Oliveira — Realtor

Bistro 234

Pacific Gas & Electric

Branding Iron Catering

Parkwood Apartments

Turlock Community Theatre

CAT Rental Store

Nancy Pedersen — Realtor

Turlock Historical Society

Trophy Works Turlock Commerce Bank

City of Turlock

PMZ

Vail Creek Jewelry Designs

Cornerstone Consulting, Inc.

Romeo Medical Clinic, Inc.

Valley First Credit Union

Costco Wholesale

Saunders Air Conditioning & Heating

Via Adventures, Inc.

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:09:57 PM


R I B B O N

C U T T I N G S

SECOND CHANCE BOUTIQUE MARCH

GREEN GRUB MAY

WORLD TILE DESIGNS APRIL

BUSINESS NEWS

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:10:10 PM


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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:10:21 PM


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BUSINESS NEWS

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SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:10:57 PM


MARKETING

Keep it local and

BY KRISTINA HACKER

T

he Turlock Chamber of Commerce is hoping to persuade shoppers to keep their dollars local by bringing back the Try Turlock First campaign. The Chamber, along with business leaders, have been promoting the ‘local first’ mentality since 1995. The movement was relaunched in 2008, to great success, but is ready for a social media upgrade says Chamber President and CEO Sharon Silva. “We really want to give it a big push and get it moving again as we go into the holidays,” said Silva. Although shopping locally has always been a

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good idea, according to Silva, it’s even easier for Turlockers to find what they need close to home. “What I think has happened is that Turlock has got to a position where you can do 90 percent of your business here, whether it’s retail or professional services or ag business — this community has developed such a great diversity of products you really don’t have to leave town,” said Silva. Shopping locally has two main benefits: keeping local dollars local; and reducing the number of vehicle miles traveled, part of the Healthy Air Living pledge promoted by the San Joaquin Valley Air District. The Chamber is seeking sponsors and partners to move forward with the Try Turlock First marketing campaign. For more information, call 632-2221.

SUMMER 2014

6/18/2014 12:11:04 PM


CALENDAR

C V B

T U R LO C K CO M M U N I T Y E V E N T S

P R O M O T E S . . . Fridays, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

July 11-20

Turlock Certified Farmers Market

Stanislaus County Fair

The Turlock Certified Farmers Market operates every Friday on Broadway in Downtown Turlock. The market offers fresh seasonal produce, unique hand-crafted items, music and entertainment, along with a host of new vendors.

The 2014 Stanislaus County Fair opens July 11 for its 10-day run. This year’s fair will feature a spectacular children’s area, with the popular Wizards Challenge Exhibit; 10 nights of concerts, included with fair admission; three stages of live entertainment; more than 30,000 local exhibits and 1,750 animals; and metalmashing motorsports and CCPRA rodeo in the FoodMaxx Arena.

Tuesdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to noon Recreation on Wheels

For more information on concerts, arena events and ticket prices, visit stancofair.com.

Recreation on Wheels, a mobile recreation program that utilizes a van stocked with equipment and fun activities to provide positive activities for youth, will be at Denair Park, 850 E. Main St., in Turlock. This free program will be open to youth age 3-18.

August 9, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Community Fair Templo Jordan will be handing out food baskets to the first 100 families to come to this community fair. This event benefits low-income families by handing out school supplies, toys and clothes. The fair will also feature free dental and vision check-ups, as well as family activities including games, jumpers, and face painting. Food and drinks will be provided. Templo Jordan is located at 655 Jordan Ave., Turlock.

Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Ballroom Dancing Ballroom dancing is held every Wednesday night at the Turlock Senior Citizens Hall behind the Turlock Library. There is a 12-piece live band and music from the 30s and 40s. The $3 admission includes food. Call 669-9226 for more information.

April 6, May 4 and June 1 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Toy Trains Operating Society The San Joaquin Valley Toy Trains Operators, Inc. will hold its monthly meeting in building E3 of the Stanislaus County Fairgrounds, 900 N. Broadway, Turlock. The organization is based on the collection and operation of model trains. For more information, visit www.sjvd-ttos. org, email: edrailroadman@aol.com or call 209-874-5544.

May 25 - August 17 Carnegie ROCKS! The Carnegie ROCKS! Exhibit is a showcase of Rock and Roll memorabilia that highlights the decades when Rock and Roll bands were pushing the boundaries of their predecessors. The exhibit includes more than 40 original electric and acoustic guitars that were strummed by some of Rock and Roll’s most iconic musicians. The collection spans the period from the 1930’s to the present, with an emphasis on the 1960’s and forward. The Carnegie Arts Center is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Sunday and is located at 250 N. Broadway, Turlock. General admission is $12.

For more information, call Karla Mancia at 818-1172.

September 26, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Party Under the Stars Party Under the Stars is a Chamber of Commerce event that features an evening of fun and dancing, as well as an opportunity drawing inspired by the enjoyment of great music, fine dining and socializing at Pageo Lavender Farm. For more information and tickets, contact the Turlock Chamber of Commerce at 632-2221.

For more information, visit CarnegieArtsTurlock.org.

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