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LACROSSE IN TULSA

REAL WEDDINGS

WOMEN IN BUSINESS May 2017

44TH ANNUAL

35 DESIGNERS WOW THE SENSES

51 WAYS TO E LIVE THE LIF AQUATIC

AN INVISIBLE POPULATION: One Tulsan’s story


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SAINT FRANCIS HOSPICE

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS OF SERVING THE COMMUNITY

Dr. Rider and his team are dedicated to making every moment count.

After 16 years as a Warren Clinic primary care physician, Dr. Bart Rider now serves patients in a different capacity— as medical director of Saint Francis Hospice. “Instead of patients coming to see me, I go see them,” he said. “And I’m not the primary caregiver; the patient’s family is. A lot of my work involves educating and supporting them.” Joined by an outstanding team of nurses, home health aides, volunteers and more, Dr. Rider is the region’s only full-time, on-site hospice medical director—on call 24/7. “For patients and caregivers, facing this phase of life is difficult to do alone, and hospice care can be profoundly important. Saint Francis Hospice has a remarkable staff and it’s our goal to support patients and families in their time of need.” For more information about services provided by Saint Francis Hospice, please call 918-494-6465.

Healthcare for life.

Bart Rider, D.O. MEDICAL DIRECTOR SAINT FRANCIS HOSPICE

saintfrancis.com


O NLY T HE B EST.

FOR YOU. AND YOUR HEART. When it comes to matters of the heart, which physician you choose really matters. The patients of Oklahoma Heart Institute are living proof. They trust the OHI team of subspecialists with every kind of heart problem, from the most complex to the more common. Heart attack, heart failure, rhythm disturbances, valve and vascular conditions, aortic aneurysms, peripeheral artery disease, metabolic and sleep disorders – all of this and more is treated by the OHI team, with success rates that are second to none. If you want only the best doctors who have been trained at the finest centers in the country, trust the doctors of Oklahoma Heart Institute. Aren’t you’re worth it?

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Orthopedic Care

Standing: Dave Stoll, PA-C; Jeremy Thomas, D.O.; Zee Khan, M.D.; and Chad Crawley, D.O. Seated: Mary Ferraro, APRN-CNP; Clint Cator, PA-C; and Jon Orjala, D.O.

The orthopedic health care providers at Utica Park Clinic offer exceptional care, diagnosis and treatment for a wide variety of orthopedic injuries, pain and disorders of the musculoskeletal system. This includes:

Close to home.

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69


WITH A STROKE, TIME IS NOT ON YOUR SIDE.

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MAY 2017 | VOLUME 31 ISSUE 7

FEATURED

38 Female factor Overcoming fear is just one of many challenges women face as entrepreneurs.

BY ANNE BROCKMAN, MORGAN PHILLIPS AND JULIE WENGER WATSON

43 Madison’s world A day in the life of a teenager who is part of an invisible population

BY JULIE RAINS

46 Life aquatic A roundup of ways to spend summer on the water

Tulsa students are playing a sport new to middle America: lacrosse.

BY TIM LANDES

Sunglasses provide more than just style. A new shop celebrates the art of letter writing. Keyhole gardens unlock secrets to successful gardening.

21 TABLE TALK

Ol’Vine tempts diners on Brookside. Beat the heat with popsicles made in Tulsa. Marshall’s is brewing success.

29 COMMUNITY Mayra Hernandez takes us inside the ring. Learn what it’s like to film in the Andes mountains. Tulsa’s Greek roots run deep.

113 GIVING BACK Stephen Johnson is a volunteer with drive. Construction progresses on A Gathering Place for Tulsa. Mark the calendar for your favorite nonprofit events this month.

SPECIAL SECTIONS 38 67 89

Women-owned Businesses Designer Showcase Real Weddings

LACROSSE IN TULSA

REAL WEDDINGS

WOMEN IN BUSINESS May 2017

44TH ANNUAL

MAY 2017

52 Game changer

57 LIFESTYLE

New murals descend on downtown. Casii Stephan and other female musicians take the stage at MisFEST. Monte Toon honed his watercolor talent while working in TV news.

TULSAPEOPLE

BY JAMIE RICHERT JONES

11 CITYGUIDE

35 DESIGNERS WOW THE SENSES

51 WAYS TO LIVE THE LIFE AQUATIC

AN INVISIBLE POPULATION: One Tulsan’s story

ON THE COVER Roger Wilson’s design for the master office at the 44th annual Designer Showcase, April 28-May 21. TulsaPeople.com

5


WHAT’S ONLINE Follow us on Twitter @TULSAPEOPLE

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Follow us. Use #MyTulsaPeople to tag your Instagram and Twitter photos of the people who make this city great. WE’LL FEATURE OUR FAVES!

PLANNING A WEDDING OR EVENT? The 2017 Venue Guide is available at TulsaPeople.com/directories!

THE 2017 TULSA GUEST GUIDE IS AVAILABLE AT TULSAPEOPLE.COM/GUESTGUIDE @jesskarin

The old man gave him a run for his money. #elwoods #tulsa #mytulsapeople #tulsariverparks

The Guest Guide is a great resource for both Tulsans and visitors!

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Published by:

STONE CANYON • YORKTOWN • FOREST RIDGE • WOOD HOLLOW ESTATES BERWICK on CEDAR RIDGE • HYDE PARK

Showcasing over 150 new homes from metro Tulsa’s top building companies

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LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME THIS YEAR?

Visit TulsaPeople.com/POH for the Official Parade of Homes Guide! 6

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@laurelandmarie

Happy International Women’s Day! What a wonderful thing it is to be a small, woman-owned business in the company of so many inspiring woman bosses here in Tulsa. #mytulsapeople #internationalwomensday #bosslady #whoruntheworld

2016 NEW HOME

June 18 to 26 • 1 to 7pm daily

Fighting chance (p. 35) Mayra Hernandez, an undefeated pro boxer, dreams of a world championship. PLUS Check out our Instagram Stories @TULSAPEOPLE for what’s happening right now. Subscribe to THE INSIDER for the best in entertainment, arts and culture this weekend. @kellystelly

That funny thing that day at that place ... #mytulsapeople

Catch up on past issues at TULSAPEOPLE.COM/ISSUE-ARCHIVE.


One of the country’s top doctors. Leading the charge against lung cancer right here in Tulsa.

Named 2016 Top Doctor by Castle Connolly Dr. Daniel Nader, Director of the Lung Center at CTCA® in Tulsa, has been recognized by Castle Connolly as one of America’s Top Doctors in pulmonary medicine for the last six years.

Since 1991, Dr. Nader and his team at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® in Tulsa have been dedicated to building a comprehensive Lung Center to fight this complex disease. With access to cutting-edge technologies, advanced treatments and supportive therapies, our experts specialize in personalized lung cancer care—helping our patients fight cancer.

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©2016 Rising Tide

A Network Provider For


FROM THE EDITOR

Volume XXXI, Number 7 ©2017. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. TulsaPeople Magazine is published monthly by

Summer technically begins June 21, but Oklahomans start celebrating Memorial Day weekend.

1603 South Boulder Avenue Tulsa, Oklahoma 74119-4407 918-585-9924 918-585-9926 Fax

PUBLISHER Jim Langdon PRESIDENT Juley Roffers VP COMMUNITY RELATIONS Susie Miller EDITOR CITY EDITOR DIGITAL EDITOR ARTS & BENEFITS EDITOR ONLINE CALENDAR EDITOR

Shortly after the May 29 holiday, pools and splash pads will finally open, and Tulsans will breathe a collective sigh of relief since we’ve seen swim-worthy temperatures for weeks already. Growing up, I spent most of my summers at Grand Lake, and it’s still my favorite place to be for Memorial Day. If, like me, you’re counting down the days until you’re pool- or lakeside, check out our Summer Fun Guide (p. 46), a six-page resource to the Tulsa area’s pools, splash pads, water playgrounds and lakes. You might even discover a new aquatic adventure: stand-up paddleboarding. In recent years, several Tulsa schools dived into another new sport: lacrosse. On p. 52, Tim Landes explains the game and why some local students are choosing lacrosse over more popular sports like football or soccer. And professional boxer Mayra Hernandez introduces us to her favorite pastime on p. 35. (See her in the ring in this month’s video on TulsaPeople.com.) After reading our “day in the life” feature on p. 43, it’s clear that parents of students like Madison Turner don’t take any physical activity for granted. Madison has cerebral palsy, which led her parents, Michael and Lisa Turner, to start Project Special Courage, a 8

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

nonprofit that advocates for children like their daughter. One of the best parts about my job is helping tell the stories of people like the Turners who use their own difficulties to help others. American Cancer Society volunteer Stephen Johnson is one of those Tulsans. Seven years ago, he turned his grief into action by simply getting behind the wheel (p. 116). I can’t wrap up this letter without addressing the obvious: the striking Designer Showcase home on our cover and in the guide on p. 67. Each year, Tulsa-area designers volunteer their time and talents for this Foundation for Tulsa Schools fundraiser. This year’s home, a Southern stunner, will not disappoint. Buy a ticket and be inspired through May 21. Then, dig out your swimsuit and flip-flops; summer’s here. TP

Anne Brockman Morgan Phillips Anna Bennett Judy Langdon John Langdon

EDITORIAL CONSULTING Missy Kruse, The Write Company CREATIVE DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER VIDEOGRAPHER ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES

CONTROLLER SUBSCRIPTIONS DISTRIBUTION COORDINATOR INTERNS

Madeline Crawford Georgia Brooks Morgan Welch Michelle Pollard Valerie Grant Greg Bollinger Andrea Canada Steve Hopkins Betsy Slagle Mary McKisick Gloria Brooks Amanda Hall Laura Dennis

Jennifer Ratliff-Towner Cassandra Scott

MEMBER

TulsaPeople’s distribution is audited annually by

Langdon Publishing Company sets high standards to ensure forestry is practiced in an environmentally responsible, socially beneficial and economically viable manner. This issue of Tulsa People was printed on recycled fibers containing 20 percent post-consumer waste with inks containing a soy base blend. Our printer is a certified member of the Forestry Stewardship Council and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and additionally, meets or exceeds all federal Resource Conservation Recovery Act standards. When you are finished with this issue, please pass it on to a friend or recycle it. We can have a better world if we choose it together. Disregard any TulsaPeople subscription solicitation that is not directly mailed from the Langdon Publishing office at 1603 S. Boulder Ave. Contact Langdon Publishing directly if you are interested in subscribing or renewing your TulsaPeople subscription.

Morgan Phillips CITY EDITOR


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C A L E N D A R + E N T E R TA I N M E N T + C U LT U R E 5/13-14

HOLLY PEEVYHOUSE

D

HABIT FORMING

owntown’s upsurge of mural madness is thanks in part to the Habit Mural Festival, which began when a group of artists painted a single mural for the Tulsa Office of Film, Music, Art and Culture. In 2016, a weekend-long public art project was born. Each May, street artists repaint the exterior of a 49,000-square-foot downtown warehouse owned by Michael Sager. Sponsors donate art supplies and equipment.

The reason for the festival name? “Street art, graffiti and mural painting has a habitual nature to it,” explains event organizer Aaron Whisner. “Once you paint, you have to do more.” The 2017 Habit Mural Festival is May 13-14 at East First Street and South Lansing Avenue. Admission is free. TP VISIT HABITFESTIVAL.COM

TulsaPeople.com

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MAY

C OM PIL ED BY C A S S A NDRA S COT T

Weekends in May

Experience medieval mirth at the Castle of Muskogee’s Oklahoma Renaissance Festival. Through June 4.

Celtic Woman brings heavenly harmonies to the Mabee Center on a new tour, “Voices of Angels.”

4

Alice Cooper, the Godfather of Shock Rock, performs at the historic Brady Theater.

5-7

The German-American Society of Tulsa hosts Germanfest — lauded for its food, dancing and beer — at the GAST Center.

6

Enjoy delicious food and live tunes at the Jenks America Food Truck Festival in downtown Jenks.

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The BOK Center hosts Tim McGraw and Faith Hill for the crooner couple’s “Soul2Soul” world tour.

13

River West Festival Park hosts MisFEST (Music Is She), a festival of local female talent that seeks to empower women entering the music industry.

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18-21

21

Tulsa International Mayfest returns to downtown with local art and music, great food and fun, free activities.

19-21

The Blue Dome Arts Festival has food trucks, art vendors, performers and more fun for kids, pets and adults.

20

Support Tulsa Police while getting in shape at the Cop Land Classic bike ride, which starts at the Tulsa Police Officers’ Memorial.

The Tulsa Athletics host National Premier Soccer League newcomers Ozark FC for the season opener in the team’s new venue, LaFortune Stadium. It’s the last day to experience “Steeped: The Art of Tea” at 108 Contemporary. The exhibit explores how the beverage has shaped our historical and cultural identity.

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New Kids on the Block comes to the BOK Center with Boyz II Men and Paula Abdul.

24-27

Six college baseball teams compete in the Summit League Championships at the J. L. Johnson Stadium at Oral Roberts University.

26-29

The Greenwood Swingout Dance Festival is a weekend of swing dancing, food and music at the Harvard Elk’s Lodge and Harvard Avenue Christian Church.

26

Tulsa Glassblowing School’s VETri program debuts its first exhibition at the Hardesty Arts Center. Veterans from five branches of the military created the pieces, which are for sale, with proceeds benefiting the VETri program. Through June 25.

26-28

Hit the road for Rocklahoma in Pryor. The rocking weekend features Def Leppard, Soundgarden and more. VISIT TULSAPEOPLE.COM FOR MORE LOCAL EVENTS.

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017

OKLAHOMA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL: COURTESY; ART CAR: COURTESY LIVING ARTS; GREENWOOD SWINGOUT: ASHLEE DUNCAN

3


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Special thanks to these zoo partners for building a better zoo through their continued support.

John Steele Zink Foundation Anderson Hutchison Family | Arrow Construction Resources | Helmerich & Payne, Inc. Osage Casino | Lynn & Barbara Owens | Hannah & Joe Robson | Radiology Consultants of Tulsa

The Helmerich Trust

The H.A. and Mary K. Chapman Charitable Trust

WA LT Z O N T H E W I L D S I D E . O R G F O R D E TA IL S


WHERE TO …

EXPERIENCE THE EXOTIC Wildlife brings far-flung places to Tulsa.

BY ABIGAIL SINGREY Take a trip to see exotic sights and sounds without ever stepping foot on a plane. From the roar of a tiger to sea turtles splashing or zebras grazing, Tulsans have lots of options close to home.

Sea Turtle Island The Oklahoma Aquarium is home to reef sharks, tropical fish and two 300-pound loggerhead sea turtles in a 65,000-gallon tank. The upper levels of Sea Turtle Island, open since March 2, have a light, airy feel, and the underwater experience provides breathtaking views of the endangered turtles. “We want our visitors to understand the plight of endangered species and to be appreciative of how decisions we make can impact their environment, even in Oklahoma,” Executive Director Teri Bowers says. The renovation allows visitors to view both new and longtime aquarium residents in a fresh way, she adds.

6421 E. 36th St. N. | 918-669-6600 9 a.m.-5 p.m., daily. | Zoo admission: $10, adult; $6, age 3-11; $8, age 65 and older tulsazoo.org 14

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

300 Aquarium Drive, Jenks | 918-296-3474 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Tuesday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday, Wednesday-Sunday. | Aquarium admission: $15.95, adult; $11.95, age 3-12; $13.95, age 62 and older and military | okaquarium.org

Woolaroc Wildlife Preserve Entering the gates of Woolaroc can feel like stepping into an old Western movie, where buffalo and cattle roam across the windswept prairies. During the 2-mile drive through the 3,700-acre wildlife preserve, visitors might glimpse the herd of 115 buffalo and 50 elk grazing or see longhorn cattle, water buffalo and even zebras. “We always say that you pass through the front gates of Woolaroc and you enter the museum right then … the building comes later,” says Kaci Fouts, director of strategic planning for Woolaroc. TP 1925 Woolaroc Ranch Road, Bartlesville 918-336-0307, ext. 10 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Wednesday-Sunday; closed Monday and Tuesday. | $12, adult; $10, age 65 and older; free, age 11 and younger | woolaroc.org

AQUARIUM: VALERIE GRANT; ZOO: PGAV DESTINATIONS; WOOLAROC: COURTESY

Lost Kingdom Animals play among the ruins of an ancient Asian temple in the Lost Kingdom, a $21 million complex opening this month at the Tulsa Zoo. Peek past the plantain leaves in the verdant gardens to catch the first glimpse of a red panda or a Chinese alligator. Watch a powerful Malayan tiger cross above visitors’ heads on a bridge between outdoor areas or interact with its keepers in a demonstration space. “As the physical barriers separating animals from the visitor become transparent through large-view windows, a sense of connection and shared experience emerges,” says Lindsay Hutchison, the zoo’s vice president of philanthropy and community engagement.


The Great Lenin Illuminated Our Path, 1969, Soviet Union

Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster April 7 through July 9, 2017

TU is an EEO/AA Institution.

Exhibition season title sponsor is the Sherman E. Smith Family Charitable Foundation. Support also TU is Titus an EEO/AA Institution. provided by Mervin Bovaird Foundation, C.W. Foundation and M.V. Mayo Charitable Foundation. Exhibition season title sponsor is the Sherman E. Smith Family Charitable Foundation. Support also provided by Mervin Bovaird Foundation, C.W. Titus Foundation and M.V. Mayo Charitable Foundation.

GILCREASE.ORG

TulsaPeople.com

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LOCAL TALENT Jillian Holzbauer of Vagittarius at the March 8 MisFEST preview show Casii Stephan and the Midnight Sun perform regularly at the Wine Loft.

PLAY LIKE A GIRL

CREATIVITY AND CONVICTION Talented transplant Casii Stephan finds success singing in Tulsa. BY TARA RITTLER

M

innesotan Casii Stephan, 27, had only a handful of performances under her belt when she moved to Tulsa in September 2014. When family invited her here for a change of scenery, she thought it would be temporary. Three years later, she is a staple of the Tulsa music scene, performing regularly at the Hunt Club, the Fur Shop and the Wine Loft with her sixpiece band, Casii Stephan and the Midnight Sun. Stephan recently represented Tulsa at South by Southwest’s Tulsa Music Showcase, alongside Hanson, BRONCHO and others, and helped organize MisFEST, this month’s music festival of local female talent (see sidebar). On a national level, her songwriting skills are receiving attention; her catchy “I Like the Way” won “Best Love Song” at the Independent Music Awards at the Lincoln Center for Performing Arts in November in New York City.

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Stephan attributes much of her success to her manager, Amira Al-Jiboori, who she met shortly after moving to Tulsa. “Amira said, ‘You have a voice; you need to start performing again,’” Stephan says. “So I did, and one gig led to another.” Tulsa quickly embraced her music, which Stephan describes as a blend of pop, rock and soul, influenced by a childhood love of Disney tunes and Jack White’s philosophy of valuing emotional expression over technical perfection. Stephan has a powerful, versatile voice and a fascination with “the challenge of writing a hook that will get stuck in people’s heads.” And she is convinced artists must stop buying into the idea that pursuing a creative career is fruitless. “There’s this idea that, at a certain age, you should give up music and get a normal job,” Stephan says, “but that’s not what you’re made to do. You have this creative aspect that needs to blossom; you can’t ignore it.” TP

May 13 MISFEST 1-11 p.m. River West Festival Park, 2100 S. Jackson Ave. $25-$65. Benefits YWCA Tulsa and River Parks. misfest.com

CASIII STEPHAN: VALERIE GRANT; MISFEST: RYAN HOWELL

O

n May 13, River West Festival Park will host MisFEST, a new music festival celebrating the many women who make Tulsa’s music scene groovy. The all-lady lineup features local favorites Branjae, Casii Stephan, Fiawna Forté and more. According to event organizers, representation in music is still a major issue. “It is still a bit of a novelty to see a female-fronted band on a Tulsa stage,” says MisFEST Communications Coordinator Tina Crouch. “The women we have in our lineup are brilliant. It’s time for Tulsa to invest in the female talent we have here.” MisFEST — short for Music Is She — aims to provide a platform to help women succeed in the music industry, whether in songwriting, music production, orchestration, sound engineering or performance. “It’s about the promotion of equality and collaboration among female artists,” says Mary Fencl, the event’s logistics coordinator. This mission makes the YWCA of Tulsa a fitting beneficiary. A special brunch the day of the festival also benefits YWCA Tulsa and features an intimate performance and Q&A session with regional female musicians. Other attractions at the all-ages festival include food trucks, beer and wine sales, and a VIP area, but the music remains the star. “The most important part of this event is to showcase female artists and their talents in Tulsa and surrounding areas,” says MisFEST Co-producer Amira Al-Jiboori. She will keep singing this tune until having a female drummer isn’t a “thing” anymore — until she’s just another band member. — ANNA BENNETT


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ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

Monte Toon showed a collection of watercolors at OSU Institute of Technology in late 2016. He is an OSUIT alumnus.

Inset: Mayfest artwork by Matthew Bearden

MAYFEST RAFFLES OFFICIAL ARTWORK

DOWN TO A FINE ART Watercolorist honed talent while working in TV news. BY GAIL BANZET-ELLIS

O

klahoma artist Monte Toon began drawing with his brother at the young age of 5. Sketching cars or whatever else inspired them, art was a pastime during the 1940s on their farm just west of Coffeyville, Kansas. By high school, Toon had decided to become an art teacher, and after serving in the U.S. Navy, he earned an art degree from Kansas State Teachers College (now Emporia State University). Toon taught three years but soon realized he was more interested in producing commercial art. He continued his education in commercial art and graphic design at OSU Institute of Technology in Okmulgee, and in 1973 landed a job as assistant art director at Tulsa’s KTUL Channel 8. The following year, Toon was promoted to art director over set design, signage, logos and promotional materials. He spent the next three decades at KTUL while honing his talent in watercolor. Now retired, Toon recalls that participation in a workshop with painter Charles Sanderson

18

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

changed the course of his life. “Charles had mastered the art of watercolor, and I was amazed by what you could do with it,” Toon says. “With watercolor, you’ve got to plan ahead. There’s a process involved in it, and he was able to convey that to a depth I’d never seen before.” Aged, architectural pieces such as old barns, houses and stores are some of Toon’s favorite subjects. “I would rather paint a weatherworn piece with elements that have developed character over the years,” he says. “That’s the Midwest. That’s what I was exposed to.” Toon, who lives on Lake Keystone, says his techniques, which include smattering, painting with salt and experimenting with different brushes, contribute to his distinct style. “Some say my work epitomizes the feeling of longing, maybe for childhood or the past,” he says. “To move a viewer to tears — that’s an accomplishment.” TP

May 18-21 MAYFEST 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Friday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday. 400 S. Main St. | Free admission. tulsamayfest.org

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: VALERIE GRANT; MAYFEST: COURTESY

M

ayfest 2017 brings a new and exciting opportunity to its festivalgoers. One lucky winner will take home the original artwork that inspired the design for this year’s posters and T-shirts. “We’re going to raffle it off,” says Heather Pingry, executive director for Tulsa International Mayfest. “That means someone will win a $2,000 piece of fine art for just $10.” Local artist Matthew Bearden created the framed 3-foot-by-3-foot original acrylic on canvas. It depicts the Tulsa skyline behind trees forming the outline of a bison. Raffle tickets are $10 and can be purchased at Ziegler Art and Frame through May 17 and on the festival’s website until 11 p.m., May 20. The drawing will be at 4 p.m., May 21, on the Bartlett Square Stage at East Fifth and South Main streets. — LAURA DENNIS


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FIRST OKLAHOMA BANK EXCEEDS $500 MILLION IN ASSETS The fact First Oklahoma Bank has reached this target sooner than originally planned is a testament to a dynamic group of leaders and people working behind the scenes to build businesses, create jobs, help customers pursue their financial dreams, and serve the communities where they work. And to all those who have contributed to this remarkable growth story, First Oklahoma wants to say, “Thank you!” Thank you to investors who believed in a bold dream to build a better bank in the Tulsa area. Thank you to the dedicated employees who daily have worked hard to turn that dream into reality. Thank you to friends and customers who have placed their trust and confidence in First Oklahoma Bank to help them pursue

dreams of buying homes or expanding and building businesses. And, our thanks to God for His blessings on this endeavor.

Sue Bennett. The discussion expanded to a group of veteran bankers. After a lot of prayer and planning, the dream began to come to life.

In a little over seven years, First Oklahoma Bank has become the fastest-growing bank in Oklahoma history and the fastest-growing community bank in Tulsa County, effectively competing with super-regional and national banks for local deposits. At the end of December 2016, First Oklahoma Bank had become the seventhlargest bank headquartered in Tulsa County and the 31st-largest bank headquartered in Oklahoma, based on assets. Like many entrepreneurial endeavors, this dream began over a kitchen table when Tom Bennett III shared his idea of building another bank with his parents, Tom Jr. and

“FIRST OKLAHOMA’S ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT, CONSISTENCY AND A QUALITY-GROWTH BUSINESS MODEL SET IT APART. “We’re consistent …That formula is hard to get right, and it’s working! You can’t do it without support from investors, regulators and a group of talented employees who are all rowing in the same direction. First Oklahoma Bank is owned and operated by people living in this community. We understand our local economy and make our decisions locally. We can adapt to the needs of our customers and create better banking products and services without all the bureaucracy of big banks.” - TOM BENNETT III, President and Co-CEO First Oklahoma Bank serves customers from three banking centers, including a sixstory landmark headquarters in Jenks and bank offices in midtown Tulsa and Glencoe. Today, First Oklahoma Bank employs 95 people in the bank and 25 people in the mortgage company. Employees are active in the community and volunteer with many organizations, including the Tulsa Area United Way, Heart of the Shepherd, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Meals on SOUTH - 100 S. Riverfront Dr. Jenks, OK MIDTOWN - 4110 S. Rockford Ave. Tulsa, OK

Wheels, Habitat for Humanity, Orphan’s Tree, Jenks Public Schools Foundation, Junior Achievement and others. “We are grateful for the opportunity to help people fulfill their dreams of building and expanding businesses, buying homes, and creating wealth,” says Tom Bennett III. “We approach banking as a ministry of serving customers, investors, the community and each other. We want to treat each other like we want to be treated.” 918.392.2500 Fi rst Okl aho maB an k. c o m


V

TEA-TOWN

ictoria’s Tea Room has long delighted guests with breakfast and lunch and is a popular spot for luncheons and get-togethers. The Victoria’s Sensation lets diners try some popular items, including a slice of quiche-of-the-day, a cup of soup, creamy chicken salad, fruit salad and a roll. $12.95. TP 7853 E. 71ST ST. | 918-313-9204 | VICTORIASTEAROOMTULSA.COM

TulsaPeople.com

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DINING OUT

Wood-grilled salmon

Mediterranean platter

Along with its lunch and dinner menus, ol’Vine’s brunch has been popular.

FRESH TAKE BROOKSIDE EATERY BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO A POPULAR SPACE. BY NATALIE MIKLES

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017

D

on Jones inherited one of the best patios in Tulsa when he bought Café Ole in 2013. And he did it again when he bought Sonoma just a few months ago. In February, Sonoma became ol’Vine, and one of the busiest patios in Brookside was open once again. Outdoor seating, on the patio facing all the action in Brookside, and courtyard seating, offering quiet and shade in the summer heat, are expected of the location. But what about the food? Jones had to decide if he would keep the California-style cuisine of Sonoma or go another path. Jones, who has been in the restaurant business in Tulsa for decades, isn’t one for labels. So the first thing he did was ask friends what “California style” meant to them. The No. 1 answer he heard was “fresh.” “I’m a country boy, raised on a farm, so I’m familiar with fresh — from a necessity standpoint,” Jones says. For the purposes of ol’Vine, fresh means sourcing the best ingredients possible. Jones and his chefs tasted and discussed each item on the menu, then made variations of those dishes and tasted and evaluated again. From all that tasting came a menu with customer favorites and updates from Sonoma, to new dishes with an emphasis on freshness and flavor. Jones took a fryer out of the kitchen since there’s not a lot of need for one in a menu with an emphasis on “fresh.” In its place, he added a woodburning charbroiler for grilled meats and fish.


Triple-chocolate brownie

#1 in Community Collaborations.

BECAUSE THERE’S ONLY ONE

We visited ol’Vine on a weekday. Most tables were full with couples and families, and every seat at the bar was taken. The bar is slightly set apart from the restaurant, giving it its own modern, sophisticated vibe. Pan-seared Crab Cakes ($16) were shared with the table. The generous portion was perfect for our party of five. A nice green salad with vinaigrette was served alongside, which was a good diversion from the richness of the crab cakes. The wood-grilled entrees, including salmon ($23) and a prime Angus filet ($32) are two stars of the menu. Diners choose two among several great side dishes to pair with these entrees. The creamy risotto, dotted with peas, was a favorite at our table. We also enjoyed the sautéed mushrooms. Some favorite dishes from Sonoma have remained on the menu. The Citrus and Garlic Chicken ($18) remains as good or better than ever. The garlicbutter sauce in this dish is delicious with the spinach and new potatoes. Most popular on the menu so far are two newMike items: Castiron Redfish Master of Human Relations Student ($19) served with cheese grits, and the shrimp and grits ($18). All of ol’Vine’s desserts are made in-house, and we especially liked the Ooey Gooey Blueberry Butter Cake ($7). Served in a shallow ramekin, the cake combines the richness of a pound cake with the creaminess of a cheesecake. Full of blueberries, this was a favorite among all. Also popular are carrot cake and a rich chocolate brownie. Jones says weekend brunch has been as busy as Friday and Saturday nights. Standouts on the brunch menu include wings and waffles, a deep-dish quiche and French toast stuffed with mascarpone and berries. Ol’Vine also has house-made granola, smoothies and tangy Bloody Marys. Jones says he’s enjoying the mix of crowds at ol’Vine and watching tables of families and friends gather for meals. “Magic happens over food,” he says. “It’s where you build relationships.” TP

ol’Vine 3523 S. PEORIA AVE. | 918-747-9463 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Tuesday through Thursday; 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday; 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Saturday; and 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday.

Toneille MHR Graduate, City Year Tulsa Managing Director

Learn more at www.TulsaSooners.com The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

TulsaPeople.com OU-Tulsa_TPVert_Camp4.indd 9

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1/26/17 4:45 PM


CHEERS!

A LA CARTE

Many of us have the habit — good or bad — of ordering the same thing at the same restaurant, over and again. Consider branching out with these outside-the-box dishes at some of Tulsa’s favorite (PRICES: $: LESS THAN $10 $$: $10-$15 $$$: $16-$25 $$$$: OVER $25) restaurants. — NATALIE MIKLES

THE BOX

O

pen Container, the latest offering from Noah Bush — proprietor of Hodges Bend, Saturn Room and Torero Bar and Kitchen — sits atop downtown’s newest retail spot, the Boxyard (502 E. Third St.), with an expansive view of the downtown skyline. It’s likely to be another scorching summer, so you’ll want to get to Open Container before the sun goes full bore on its patio. The navy blue metal shipping containers that make up the Boxyard create a warm atmosphere as it is, and with the bartenders facing the setting sun, the earlier you go, the better. They do have umbrellas, but it’s a popular (and small) spot. Tables fill up quickly. Expect to hear your favorite Beatles, Beach Boys and other nostalgic or current top hits. And if that’s not sweet enough for you, or you need more help beating the heat, Rose Rock Microcreamery — specializing in small-batch ice cream — is just around the bend on the Boxyard’s second level. When I visited Open Container, I had a gin and tonic and my partner a tequila and soda — both with lime, both the right amount of refreshing on a hot afternoon. My mistake was not asking for bitters to be added to the G&T. It’s a good addition to a classic drink — simple, but it makes all the difference. — LIZ BLOOD

The Tavern

Smoke. on Cherry Street

The Tavern is loved for its burger, steak frites and roasted chicken. But next time you’re there, try the poke tuna bowl. The dish is served with pickled cucumber, wasabi remoulade and avocado, making for a smooth, yet spicy plate.

All the salads at Smoke are great, but one is a standout beyond grilled romaine or beets and arugula. The pork belly and egg salad starts with bitter greens, topped with an over-easy egg and a sweet-tart dressing of mustard and apple cider.

201 N. MAIN ST. | 918-949-9801 $$

1542 E. 15TH ST. | 918-949-4440 $

Sisserou’s

It’s hard to beat the jerk chicken at Sisserou’s. But here’s something new to try next time you’re there: the roti wrap. For the wrap, the roti dough (a type of Indian flatbread) is molded around a split pea mixture and rolled thin. It’s then stuffed with a curried chicken potato filling.

Before you order your pasta with Bolognese or calamari fra diavolo, try the dates. Yes, the dates at Villa Ravenna are to die for. Dates alla Ravenna are an antipasta dish of four dates stuffed with mascarpone and goat cheese, then wrapped with bacon. It’s the perfect first bite before a Caesar salad and penne l’arrabiatta.

107 N. BOULDER AVE. | 918-576-6800 $$

6526 E. 51ST ST. | 918-270-2666 $$

Villa Ravenna

Dilly Diner 402 E. Second St. | 918-938-6382 | dillydiner.com

Brookside by Day 3313 S. Peoria Ave. | 918-745-9989 | brooksidebyday.com

Waterfront Grill 120 Aquarium Drive, Jenks | 918-518-6300 | waterfrontgrilljenks.com

Doc’s Wine and Food 3509 S. Peoria Ave. | 918-949-3663 | docswineandfood.com

La Villa Restaurant 2727 S. Rockford Road | 918-748-5367 | lavillaphilbrook.com

The Wild Fork 1820 Utica Square | 918-742-0712 | wildfork.com

24

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Brunch Brunch. It’s the best of both worlds, and Tulsa has plenty of choices for ways to spend a weekend morning. Presented here are the winners from TulsaPeople’s 2016 A-List Readers’ Choice Awards.

CHEERS: LIZ BLOOD

Inside


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To learn more or for information about our volunteer opportunities, contact Executive Director Gay Larson at (918) 284-4888 or gaylarson@heartgalleryofoklahoma.com. P.O. Box 33137, Tulsa, Ok. 74153

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TulsaPeople.com

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WHAT’S COOKING? The buzz on Tulsa’s tastiest products, restaurants and events BY NATALIE MIKLES

TERNAT TULSA IN

IONAL

1, 2017 MAY 18ww-2 w. tu lsa ma yfe st. or g Jared Toay at a recent Tulsa Farmers’ Market with his line of probiotic sodas.

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017

YOU KNOW GOOD-MOOD FOOD WHEN YOU SEE IT. Bright, fresh-fruit popsicles, tempting cake ball bites, Caprese salad — they’re all foods that make you happy just to see them. As soon as the weather warms, I stock my fridge with fruit popsicles. Sometimes I make my own. But my favorites are the specialty pops from the Pop House or Jared’s ProPops. These popsicles certainly aren’t just for kids. Jared Toay’s journey to better health began by adding fermented food, whose key component is natural probiotics, to his diet. When his youngest WE LESSEN YOURwith child WORK requested TO his dad make a dessert 24 x@JAREDSPROBIOTIC 365 probiotics, Toay had the idea for probiotic TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP O on Twitter, popsicles. The first few batches, he says, R facebook.com/jaredspropops were terrible. But, “I experimented a little hours a year bit and found a way to have them taste amazing,” Toay says. @POPHOUSEOK LED Lighting • Energy Audits Toay is a•fiDaylighting xture at the Tulsa Farmers’ on Twitter, Instagram Market on+Cherry Street, where Roof Repair Replacement • Up tocustom50% Coming from and Incentives Facebook ers line up for strawberry, pineapple, toasted coconut and Vietnamese coffeeretrofit popsicles.contractor The A comprehensive facility Vietnamese coffee pop, with fermented cream, is a customer favorite. the useful life of your roof assets, reducing Whether it’s extending Popsicles in the or winter in Oklahoma hard sell, so Toay expanded his energy expenditures simply improvingare thea interior work environbusiness to probiotic granola, soda and kombucha. Toay ships his products ment, Fleming 8760 serves as your trusted consultant and contractor. across the U.S. Chris and Robby Davis’ popsicle business could be described in one word: fun. OK, maybe one more: nostalgia. Their Pop House tricycle with a bicycle bell brings smiles when it shows up at Guthrie Green and events around town. The Pop House’s popsicles are bright and flavorful — with flavors including peaches and cream, pineapple mango and more adventurous ones like peach flemingconstructiongroup.com jalapeño. 5405Th S. is125th Ave. Tulsa, OKHouse 74146 is| opening 918-627-7800 summer, the Pop a location on Brookside. So along with the Pop House trike, customers can visit the shop. TP


CAPRESE KABOBS

Makes 8 servings

This salad, served on skewers, always gets “oohs” and “ahhs.” It’s a perfect portable salad for picnics and fun to pass around as an appetizer before a backyard barbecue. ¼ cup olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 fresh mozzarella ball or package of bite-size mozzarella pearls 1 pound cherry tomatoes 1 teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes Freshly ground black pepper  1 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves Baguette, cut into ½-inch pieces  Special equipment: long wooden skewers, soaked

In a bowl, whisk together olive oil and vinegar. Add mozzarella, tomatoes, salt, pepper flakes and black pepper. Let sit for about 15-30 minutes to meld flavors. Thread basil leaves, tomato, mozzarella and bread onto wooden skewers, then repeat. TP

LITTLE BITE, BIG FLAVOR

The cake balls at Ann’s Bakery, 7 N. Harvard Ave., are little bites of happiness. These beautiful morsels of cake and frosting dipped in chocolate or candy coating come in all the yummy flavors of Ann’s classic cakes, plus a few specialty flavors. We’re partial to the orange and lemon, which are perfect to give as a hostess gift for spring parties. Other flavors include vanilla, chocolate, red velvet, strawberry, carrot and Italian cream. Also delish are the cherry chocolate, raspberry chocolate and peanut butter. Shannon Harris, manager of the more than 75-yearold bakery, says she’s happy to take flavor requests. Cake balls start at $2 each.

W

e caught up with Eric Marshall to learn more about the brains behind one of Tulsa’s favorite breweries, Marshall Brewing Co. HOW DID YOU GET YOUR START IN THE BEER BUSINESS? After graduating from TU, I studied in Munich and then apprenticed at six different breweries all over Germany. When I came back to the U.S., I brewed at Victory Brewing in Pennsylvania before moving back to Tulsa to start Marshall Brewing Co. in 2007. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MARSHALL BEER? I love them all in their own special way. If I had to pick one, I would say Old Pavilion Pilsner. WHAT’S THE BEST BEER YOU’VE EVER TASTED, AND WHERE WERE YOU WHEN YOU DRANK IT? Augustiner Edelstoff fresh from the brewery in Munich or Chiswick Bitter on cask at the Fuller’s Brewery in London. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE BEER/FOOD PAIRING? German pork shank (Schweinehaxe) with a liter of either Dunkel or Helles, depending on the mood. WHO WOULD YOU MOST WANT TO SHARE A BEER WITH? My two grandfathers. One I never got to meet. The other passed away when I was in fifth grade, but to this day he is still one of the greatest men I have ever known.  WHAT’S ON THE HORIZON FOR MARSHALL BREWING CO.? We bought a building right next door to the brewery (618 S. Wheeling Ave.), and we are going to renovate it and build a bigger taproom.   TulsaPeople.com

27


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PEOPLE + PLACES + HISTORY

RINGLEADER G

VALERIE GRANT

rowing up in Tulsa, Mayra Hernandez loved to watch boxing on television with her family. Her father, a native of Mexico, would tune in matches on the Spanish-language stations every weekend. Her mom didn’t think it was an appropriate sport for girls. Approaching 30, Hernandez is now an undefeated professional boxer preparing for her sixth fight. Her dad is her biggest fan. Her mom, proud of her daughter’s accomplishments in the ring, no longer thinks boxing is just for guys. She’s at every match, cheering through every round. Learn more about Mayra Hernandez on p. 35. TP

TulsaPeople.com

29


NOTEBOOK BY MORGA N PHILLIP S

SOUTH TULSA

WELCOMES NEW MARKET

PCCT board member Carole Huff Hicks, Jennifer Bartley, Julie Noble, PCCT Executive Director Kristine Bridges, Shelly Hopper, Chandra Jimenez, PCCT Board President Jamie McCoy, Courtney Cothren, Mildred Ramsey, Jennifer Hagans and PCCT board member Catha Studebaker

PostRock Plaza, an office and retail space at 10438 S. 82nd E. Ave., is the venue for a new market, the Sunday Post. On the second Sunday of the month, April through September, the plaza hosts various booths, live music and a kids’ zone. Vendors will sell art, gifts, crafts, food and beverages. Nonprofits and school and sport fundraisers also are welcome to exhibit. Admission and parking are free. The next Sunday Post is 1-4 p.m., May 14. Visit postrockplaza.com.

SANDITEN TO PERFORM MAY 22

May 22 MUSICAL MONDAYS FEATURING HAROLD SANDITEN 6 p.m., doors open; 7 p.m., concert. Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center, 2520 S. Yorktown Ave. $10. Call 918-664-9000, ext. 245; or visit lifeseniorservices.org. 30

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

THE COLOR PURPLE The Parent Child Center of Tulsa was honored recently by the National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome for its role in making Oklahoma a “Dark Purple State.” PURPLE is an acronym that refers to the “period of purple crying” — the normal period of infant development in which a child can be inconsolable. “Dark Purple” is the highest recognition available for states that utilize the national Period of Purple Crying program intended to prevent shaken baby syndrome. Through the Bright Beginnings program, a PCCT nurse educator visits the parents of each newborn born in Tulsa County hospitals to offer education on safe techniques for coping with challenging infant behaviors, such as calming a crying baby. “One risk factor for shaken baby syndrome is not being aware of child development,” says Kristine Bridges, PCCT executive director. “Beyond that, there’s the stress you’re under as a parent. And as a first-time mother or father, you’re hesitant. You might not know that it’s OK to put the baby down and walk away when you’re frustrated.” In the same hospital visit, PCCT nurses also provide parents information on the importance of talking, singing and reading to children. Approximately 9,500 babies are born annually in the Tulsa area, and the PCCT visits every one. “The idea is to prevent child abuse and neglect before it happens,” Bridges says.

Voices of Oklahoma “I always knew I wanted to be an architect. I would go with my parents to a friend’s house. They would play cards or something. I would sit there and memorize the room and all the furniture in it, and I could tell you when I went home exactly what I saw. So, it’s something I always wanted to be.” ARCHITECT AND HISTORIAN JOHN BROOKS WALTON “Voices of Oklahoma” is an oral history project supported by the Oklahoma Center for the Humanities at the University of Tulsa.

PCCT, VOICES AND HAROLD SANDITEN: COURTESY

Internationally known jazz/cabaret singer and recording artist Harold Sanditen returns to Tulsa this month for his second performance in his hometown. On May 22, the theater producer-turned-vocalist will perform as part of LIFE Senior Services’ Musical Mondays series. Born and raised in Tulsa, Sanditen has lived in London since 1987. Since his professional singing debut in 2008, he has performed six solo shows, touring to packed houses from Los Angeles to Paris, and has released three albums. He emcees Harold Sanditen’s Open Mic Party, the longest-running show at London caberet and jazz venue the Crazy Coqs. He first performed in Tulsa at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame in 2013.


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THE WAY WE WERE

CULTURAL CENTER BY DOUG EATON

T

housands of Greeks immigrated to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries seeking a better life. Many who arrived in Tulsa in the 1920s settled primarily on the southern edge of downtown. Demetrius Bereolos, a native Tulsan and lifelong member of the Tulsa Greek community, says many of the early Greek settlers focused on the entertainment or restaurant industries. They also faced a variety of challenges. Along with establishing families and livelihoods, “a big problem the Greeks in Tulsa faced in the 1920s was the Ku Klux Klan,” Bereolos says. “The Klan opposed not only blacks, but other ethnic groups, including the Greeks. It wouldn’t be uncommon for Greek storeowners to have their windows broken and stores vandalized by Klan members.” In response to the Klan, a national fraternal organization — the American Hellenic Educa-

32

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Top: The Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church is adding a Greek community center on its campus at 1222 S. Guthrie Ave. Bottom: Congregants of the original church at West 11th Street and South Guthrie Avenue in an undated photo.

tional Progressive Association (AHEPA) — was formed in Atlanta to help Greek immigrants assimilate into American life and to foster Greek culture, family values and education. Tulsa’s AHEPA chapter is one of the two oldest chapters west of the Mississippi, Berelos says. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, originally located at West 11th Street and South Guthrie Avenue, was established in 1928. Before that, individuals had church services in their homes or downtown buildings. “In the Orthodox church, culture has a unique and important role that differs from most traditional Protestant and Baptist religions,” Bereolos says. “The Greeks gravitated toward the church as their cultural center in addition to being their religious center.” In the late 1960s, the construction of the Broken Arrow Expressway forced the church and some in the Greek community to relocate. In

1968, the parish built a new church at 1222 S. Guthrie Ave. Holy Trinity continues to be the center of the Greek community in Tulsa. For over 50 years, it has hosted a Greek Festival that draws thousands of visitors. One of the largest of its kind in the Midwest, it features Greek culture, food and dancing during the third week of September. The church will soon add on a new venue to reinforce unity among Tulsa Greeks. This fall, it will open a Greek community center with seating for up to 300, rooms for youth and educational activities, an outdoor recreational area and a large kitchen. Deacon Michael Stevenson, who has attended the church for 35 years, is proud of the Greek neighborhood and its active participation in community affairs. “We are a tight-knit group who keep our children involved and look after our elders,” he says. TP

GREG BOLLINGER; INSET: COURTESY BERYL FORD COLLECTION/ROTARY CLUB OF TULSA, TULSA CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY AND TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Greek immigrants built their community in south downtown.


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ROOTS

WHAT WAS IT LIKE?

Michael Zinke, owner of Zinke Wines in Los Olivos, California, utilizes sustainable winemaking practices.

Peter Mychalecewycz, director of photography for “Los Bomberos (The Little Firemen)”; producers Brian Quattrini and Anne O’Shea; and Director Quincy Perkins

In 2012, Tulsa natives and independent film producers Anne O’Shea and Brian Quattrini spent several weeks in the Andes Mountains to shoot the documentary “Los Bomberos (The Little Firemen).” The film, recently available via Amazon Prime, follows boys and men ages 8-28 who leave their families to work as mechanics and lifesavers for stranded truckers along a treacherous stretch of road deep in the Andes.

HIGH ON THE VINE Native Tulsan pairs culinary know-how and winemaking. BY MEGAN SANDO

What are their working conditions like? BQ: They are quite primitive. They travel along steep mountain passes with wooden makeshift carts, saving lives and repairing the road. A clinic doctor told us a story about them pulling people out of wrecks, carrying them on these carts down to the clinic and going back up (the mountain) again to help others. Describe the terrain and housing of the area. BQ: Extremely steep and wet for a majority of the year. Many of the boys live in small huts while others don’t even have homes, but ultimately they all take care of one another. The leader, Hevert, invited us to stay with his family in their hut. We were shown how they live off the land, growing vegetables, raising pigs and chickens, and fishing for mountain trout. Imagine a very rural farm 10,000 feet up. — MEGAN SANDO 34

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alifornia winemaker Michael Zinke’s first memories are in Tulsa, making peanut butter cookies with his great-grandmother, Katy Huggins. The desire to be in the kitchen was a family affair. “It was never a requirement for me or my sisters to help out in the kitchen,” Zinke says. “It was simply where we wanted to be from an early age.” Zinke is the son of Tulsa oilman Bob Zinke and Osage County rancher Debbie Zinke. “They were both very supportive of my rather drastic decision to withdraw from the University of Oklahoma and move across the country to learn to cook (at Le Cordon Bleu in Pasadena, California) just as they were supportive of my decision to pick up my life and move to California to start a winery,” Michael Zinke says. He says cooking school opened him up to a “seemingly endless spectrum of flavors.” While in Pasadena, he was drawn to the Santa Ynez Valley for weekend wine tastings. “Winemaking was the natural progression for me and quickly became my focus,” he says. After graduating from culinary school, Zinke returned to Tulsa, eventually becoming assistant winemaker at Girouard Vines. In 2012, he began

Zinke Wines can be purchased at a variety of retailers and restaurants in Tulsa and Oklahoma City.

Zinke Wine Co. in Los Olivos, California, and its first vintage produced more than 1,000 cases. Zinke’s focus on small production allows for handcrafted wine. Most are Rhone varietals; all come from sustainable vineyards that utilize organic or certified organic processes. “I only intervene when necessary,” Zinke says. “I feel over-thinking often pushes wine past being an artisanal product and into becoming a manufactured agricultural product.” TP

ROOTS: RICH COX PHOTOGRAPHY; WHAT WAS IT LIKE: COURTESY MINERVA PRODUCTIONS

What went through your mind upon arrival in Peru? AO: We didn’t even know whether (the “little firemen”) existed. Would we even have a story to tell?


LOCKER ROOM Mayra Hernandez at the Engine Room Boxing Gym. She dreams of someday boxing in Mexico City.

VIDEO

at TULSAPEOPLE.COM

LIVING LEGACY TERESA MILLER, IN HER WORDS

After publishing her first book, Teresa Miller suffered from writer’s block for more than 15 years. She says it spurred her to start the Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers and become the host and executive producer of the OETA interview series “Writing Out Loud.” Miller, who taught writing courses for 40 years, is wrapping up her fourth book. On May 3, she will receive the Saidie Lifetime Achievement Award from the Tulsa chapter of the Association of Women in Communications.

THE CHAMP Undefeated pro boxer preps for her next big fight. BY JULIE WENGER WATSON

LOCKER ROOM: VALERIE GRANT; LIVING LEGACY: COURTESY TULSA WORLD

P

etite and soft-spoken, 29-year-old Mayra Hernandez sits in the office of the Engine Room Boxing Gym near East Sixth Street and South Peoria Avenue. The rhythmic pounding of speed bags and the sharp buzz of the gym timer sneak in under the closed office door. With her friendly smile and relaxed manner, it might be easy to underestimate the power hidden in Hernandez’s compact frame or overlook the glint of determination in her brown eyes. But that would be a mistake. Hernandez is a professional boxer — and a very good one. Undefeated, with five pro fights to her name, she’s gearing up for another this month in Okmulgee High School’s Brock Gym. “I don’t have a social life right now,” Hernandez laughs. “Everything is devoted to working out.” She works 12-hour shifts, six days a week at Webco Industries in Sand Springs, where she

operates overhead cranes, affixing heavy chains to thousands of pounds of metal tubing and steel coils and transporting them around the plant. Most days she heads directly to the gym from work, putting in another three hours of cardio, boxing or weights before coming home to crash. According to Hernandez, it’s a far cry from the life she led in her early 20s. “I was partying and just living the life,” she says. Hoping to lose some weight, Hernandez joined east Tulsa’s King Street Boxing Gym, where she soon found herself in the ring. “I got in the ring with this girl,” she says. “We went at it, and I was crazy. I’d never really been in a fight.” Six years later, Hernandez dreams of a world championship and a trip to Mexico City to box. “I have family there who have never seen me fight. I’d bring the whole family to the event. It would be awesome.” TP

Early in your career you worked at a small newspaper to supplement your book writing. I was on the court beat ... eventually they asked me to also do graphic design. I inadvertently put an ad for an arthritis clinic next to the obituaries. It read, “Don’t wake up with that stiff feeling.” You can see why I want to be careful and take my time with this book and all of my writing. I’ve been holding myself accountable ever since. You’ve interviewed hundreds of writers. Who stands out? Sue Monk Kidd said something so striking: “So many times, when we run into problems with our writing, it can be attributed to failure of courage.” ... Really, the luckiest thing to happen to me was losing my voice (in my writing) because I was able to listen to others who touched my life in ways beyond their comprehension. What are you most proud of? Interactions with my students ... The greatest writers I’ve worked with are my students because they’ve found eloquence in everyday life. I wouldn’t be writing full time if my students hadn’t encouraged me to practice what I teach. — MORGAN PHILLIPS May 3 NEWSMAKERS AWARDS LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Southern Hills Country Club, 2636 E. 61st St. Honors 2017 Newsmakers Deborah Gist, Tina Pena and Michelle Hardesty and Saidie award recipient Teresa Miller. $55, AWC members; $65, non-members; sponsorships available. Benefits AWC Tulsa. awctulsa.org TulsaPeople.com

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MUSINGS

GRIEF BY CONNIE CRONLEY

J

ay Cronley would hate this column. He wrote thousands of newspaper columns, plus magazine articles, books and screenplays, but he wrote fewer than a handful of tender memorials. One column was about an Episcopal priest; one was about a newspaper sports editor. None of them was about his own grief. They were tributes to the people he liked and admired and who were now, abruptly, gone from his life. This column is not a tribute to him. It is about how my heart has been shattered by his sudden death. This column is about my consuming grief. I know no grief has been greater, and I know others have felt the same way in their own bereavement. Grief is universal. Don’t we all feel that our personal loss is beyond the ken of anyone else? The poet W. H. Auden is exactly exact in his funeral poem that begins, “Stop the clocks, cut off the telephone ...” “He was my North, my South, my East and West, My working week and my Sunday rest, My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song; I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong.” In days immediately after Jay died, I sobbed uncontrollably and said, in and out of panic and anxiety attacks, “I don’t want a life that doesn’t have Jay in it.” My sister was frightened for me. She thought I might harm myself. I meant it literally. I don’t want a life where the center isn’t Jay: big, courageous, outrageous, creative, adventurous, funny, daring, exciting, bombastic and authentic. I don’t want a timid mouse life. I want a life that blares in superlatives, where everything is the biggest, the worst, 36

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The late Jay Cronley and Willy

the funniest, the smartest, the greatest — and fills the whole blue sky. That’s what Jay brought to my mouse world. He was the smartest, funniest, most exciting person I’ve ever met and the best writer and editor I have ever known. He came into my life like a comet of fire, and I caught some of the sparks. None of my jobs — University of Tulsa, Tulsa Ballet, writer, Iron Gate — would have been as successful without him beside me goading, criticizing, encouraging, watching, helping and participating. He wasn’t a partner who supported with a hug, fresh-baked cookies and kind words. Partners can be blunt and active. We were married, divorced, partners and best friends for almost 50 years. Playing, laughing, partying, working, writing, fighting. Suddenly, one day,

the most important person in my life was packaged up, bagged and boxed, and gone. The best advice I got when he died was from my widowed friends near and away. Anna Norberg said, “People will tell you it will get better in time. Don’t believe it. It doesn’t. It never gets better. You just learn to live with it.” Martha Bonner said, “I don’t know which is worse. Losing someone suddenly or watching them fade away.” Abigail Westlake said, “It’s like being torn in half. I would have mood swings. All of a sudden, like weather. I named them: Meltdowns (bad), Sadness attacks (just sad). They pass.” Other people advised against beating myself with should-haves, could-haves, ought-to-haves. Wrong. When your heart tears open, you think: “Why didn’t I understand? Why wasn’t I kinder? Why didn’t I try harder?” I think those are the best questions. Those are the questions we need to ask ourselves every day as we peep out of our personal me-me-me selves. What counts more than my relationship to other people and other living things? Some are gentle souls who turn the other cheek. Jay did it a different way. He was a big secret chest of quiet kindnesses to people, but he was also impatient and didn’t tolerate fools, slights or insults. I want to grab a piece of that. Let’s all hold one another to better behavior. Don’t tell me jokes right now. Don’t try to cheer me up. Grief is a personal, precious country where I must live alone for a while. Then I’ll remember Jay’s great line from his book “Good Vibes” and movie “Let It Ride”: “You might be walking around lucky and not even know it.” Then I’ll stand up and walk around lucky. TP Editor’s note: Jay Cronley died Feb. 26, 2017.


QA &

From Tulsa Professionals

For information about participating in Q&A, please contact adservices@langdonpublishing.com.

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE What factors are most important in purchasing commercial real estate? In addition to the time-honored mantra “location, location, location,” I would suggest “zoning” and “access.” A prudent investor must ensure that property is zoned for the intended use. Access (meaning the right of ingress and egress from a public street) is also critical. A buyer should determine that a property abuts a public roadway, and that curb cuts and entrance drives are located in permitted areas. Enhanced title insurance coverages for zoning and access can address these concerns.

BEAUTY & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT What can I do to protect my skin this summer? It is essential to protect your skin from the sun, especially your face, neck, chest and hands. Choose a sunscreen that suits your skin care needs and blocks both UVA (causes premature aging and skin cancer) and UVB (causes burn) rays. Checking the SPF is not enough — SPF ratings examine only UVB rays. Circaidia® SPF 37 protects against both UVA and UVB rays. Its oil-free formula is safe for even sensitive skin, and it lasts all day under makeup and through sweat. Call to schedule a complementary consultation. Malissa Spacek and Dr. James Campbell BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place • Broken Arrow, OK 74012 918-872-9999 • www.baweightspa.com

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT My husband died recently. How do I minimize the chances of his ID being stolen? Sorry for the loss of your husband. You are smart to be concerned. We suggest the following actions: • Send copies of his death certificate to the three main credit reporting bureaus and request that a “deceased alert” be placed on the credit report.

• Unless done by the funeral home, report the death to the Social Security Administration at 800-772-1213 as well as to the IRS at 800-829-1040. • Notify your banks, insurers, DMV and credit card companies. • Close accounts or change joint ownership accounts to your name.

Rebecca Sherwood

J. Harvie Roe, CFP, President

Bluestem Escrow & Title 1924 S. Utica, Suite 802 • Tulsa, OK 74104 918-921-3478 • www.bluestemok.com

AmeriTrust Investment Advisors, Inc. 4506 S. Harvard Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74135 918-610-8080 • hroe@amerad.com

VETERINARIAN

WILL AND TRUSTS

Can I find my pet if it gets lost?

Can my estate end up in the hands of an ex-in-law?

There are many ways to find your pet if it gets lost. Keeping the rabies tag with your veterinarian’s information on the collar can help reconnect pet and owner. There are also many other tags that have the owner’s name engraved on them or small lockets that contain information. In case the collar is lost, a microchip or tattoo is the best way to locate a pet’s owner.

It is possible. With the divorce rate hovering around 50 percent, you cannot ignore this reality. When assets are distributed to children being cared for by an ex-spouse, the ex-spouse — as guardian — has complete control over how the inheritance is managed. A good estate plan will make provisions for such eventualities so that your assets will reach only those family members whom you intended to bless.

Ed Wagner DVM

Karen L. Carmichael

15th Street Veterinary Group 6231 E. 15th St. • Tulsa, OK 74112 918-835-2336 • www.15thstreetvet.com

The Law Office of Karen L. Carmichael 2727 E. 21st St., Ste. 402 • Tulsa, OK 74114 918-493-4939 • www.tulsawillsandtrusts.com TulsaPeople.com

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Female factor

Melanie Smith

OVERCOMING FEAR IS JUST ONE OF MANY CHALLENGES WOMEN FACE AS ENTREPRENEURS. BY ANNE BROCKMAN

There’s risk in any venture, but women entrepreneurs are taking the chance on themselves and their ideas in Tulsa. And it’s paying off.

Recently, Thumbtack.com named Tulsa the No. 1 city for women entrepreneurs, citing the optimism women have in their business prospects and a community supportive to female business owners. “There are a lot of great companies here, a lot of great entrepreneurs, and statistics like that are a rallying point for the broader community that

says there is some validation happening here,” says Dustin Curzon, executive director of 36 Degrees North. “It also raises the bar for our community. And it makes us ask the question as programmers, ‘How do we live up to that and make it a reality?’” Although women represent 50.8 percent of the U.S. population, only 35.5 percent of entrepreneurs are women, according to the 2017 State of

For many parents, juggling work and child rearing can be a major barrier to starting their own businesses. A new resource in midtown seeks to help Tulsa entrepreneurs balance the two. The Work Life Balance Studio at 3144 S. Winston Ave. offers shared office and conference space in a kid-friendly environment that encourages parents to work with their children in tow.

The company is the latest venture of Adrienne Kallweit, co-founder of the successful SeekingSitters franchise. At the Work Life Balance Studio, a SeekingSitters-member babysitter is available to provide on-demand childcare while kids’ parents work on site. This service is by reservation and for members only. Like 36 Degrees North, the Work Life Balance Studio offers various membership levels that allow

parents to drop in as needed or rent dedicated office space. Some areas of the facility are adults only, while other rooms allow parents to work alongside their kids. Young children are provided with age-appropriate activities when they arrive at the Work Life Balance Studio. Hangout areas are available for older children and teens. “The idea is to keep the kids engaged so their parents can work,” Kallweit says.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT COWORKINGKANGAROO.COM. 38

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

VALERIE GRANT

NEW COWORKING FACILITY ASSISTS ‘MOMPRENUERS’ BY MORGAN PHILLIPS


Dixie Agostino

36 Degrees North is an entrepreneurial hub that hosts women-specific events throughout the year. Pictured at the downtown Tulsa center are Operations Manager Shanese Slaton, Executive Director Dustin Curzon and Communications Coordinator Lauren King.

Entrepreneurship by the Kauffman Foundation. Research shows women excel in entrepreneurial roles but still face unique barriers, including a lack of mentorship, the misguided masculine perception of entrepreneurship and the additional pressure to maintain a work-life balance with family responsibilities. At 36 Degrees North, a basecamp for entrepreneurs that provides workspace, resources and a diverse community of members, 39 percent of its members are women. Among them is Melanie Smith. The Arkansas native moved to Tulsa to attend the University of Tulsa, where she earned her doctorate in computer science. After years employed with several organizations, she began working with 36 Degrees North. But while at the entrepreneurial hub, she caught the bug to start her own company, Blue Tree Data Consulting, in early 2017. “It has taken the fear away of starting my own venture,” Smith says of working from 36 Degrees North. The networking opportunities there have helped her lay her company’s groundwork, as well as connect her with future clients. Blue Tree Data Consulting is already doing business, and Smith expects $150,000 in revenue this year. Financing remains one of the biggest challenges with any start-up, but especially those owned by women, who begin companies with nearly half as much capital as men. Women only receive 4.4 percent of small business loan dollars — that’s $1 of every $23 in conventional small business loans — according to a report by the U.S. Senate. Women are one-third as likely to access funding through outside investors or venture capital, according to the Kauffman Foundation. To help provide meaningful and strategic mentorship opportunities, Curzon says 36 Degrees North will roll out a mentorship program, which will provide matchmaking, meetup space and training for interested individuals, both male and female. Gender-specific entrepreneurial events remain an integral part of networking for women, according to Curzon and Smith, who cite solidarity and relatability as key benefits to events of this nature. 36 Degrees North provides physical space and hosts women-centric programming like women’s co-working day, Curzon says. Research shows that women have a more strategic view and heightened sense of risk when it comes to starting a business, which often correlates to greater success. But they have to take that first step. “Walk it out,” Smith says of her own experience. “Don’t let fear be a hindrance. Take one step at a time.” TP

FIND AND REPLACE Tulsa’s Young Entrepreneur of the Year recruits talented pros. SWITCHGEAR SEARCH AND RECRUITING FOUNDER AND CEO DIXIE AGOSTINO

believes the key to successful corporate recruiting isn’t finding the people. According to her, that’s the easy part. Understanding what motivates them is the challenge. “Breaking up with your work family isn’t as emotional as a romantic breakup, but it has all of the same elements,” says Agostino, who is the Tulsa Regional Chamber’s 2016 Young Entrepreneur of the Year. “People are messy and wonderful and emotional and unpredictable. You have to understand people, or you don’t last in this business.” Agostino started Switchgear in 2010 after eight years working in transportation logistics. Her company recruits technical talent for engineering, financial and manufacturing businesses. “The only skill I had was being able to sweet-talk truck drivers into getting into their truck and doing their job,” she laughs. “And that honestly transitioned into something that paid pretty well.” The business has grown exponentially, garnering local and national recognition. Switchgear made the “Inc. 5000” list of fastest-growing companies in 2015, as well as its list of “50 Fastest Growing Women-Led Companies in America” — notably all eight of Agostino’s employees are female. Agostino manages her burgeoning business while raising four kids and regularly volunteering at Tulsa’s startup incubators 36 Degrees North and the Forge. She credits much of her own success to the support and mentoring she received from others. “Nobody is alone. I would never have accomplished any of these things if it hadn’t been for somebody else,” she says. “Somebody believed in me enough to say, ‘Hey, you should start your own business.’ Somebody gave me a shot to have space at the Forge when I would never have been able to start my own business from home.” — JULIE WENGER WATSON

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SPONSORED EDITORIAL

Oklahoma SBA Small Business Person of the Year, 2017

Melinda Stinnett

Stinnett & Associates Melinda Stinnett, Founder and Managing Director Melinda Stinnett is no stranger to navigating entrepreneurial success. Recently named 2017 Oklahoma Small Business Person of the Year by the U.S. Small Business Administration, she touts 27 years of experience advising companies on operational, compliance and financial matters. Melinda founded Stinnett & Associates, a professional advisory firm, in 2001 based on “doing the right thing” and a desire to provide valueadded solutions to help clients manage risk and improve performance. Fast-forward 16 years later and that philosophy has catapulted Melinda’s business from a one-woman show to a certified Women’s Business Enterprise with offices in Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio and Denver – boasting more than 100 team members. “The best indicator of Stinnett’s approach, reputation and resources is our client response,” Melinda notes. “We’ve been fortunate to provide advisory services to public, private and many Fortune 500 and Fortune 100 companies, with much of our growth attributed to satisfied client referrals.” Recognized as one of the few firms in Tulsa specializing in process improvement and internal control offerings, Stinnett & Associates caters to industries ranging from energy, financial services, manufacturing and 40

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

higher education to aerospace, governmental, non-profit and retail sectors. Areas of expertise include internal audit, Sarbanes-Oxley compliance, business process design and re-engineering, cybersecurity reviews, business continuity and disaster recovery, FCPA compliance, vendor audits and fraud investigations. Melinda appreciates that the Tulsa business community is large enough to add new service offerings yet still maintains a close-knit feel with a warm referral base. Coupled with support from the Tulsa Chamber and the revitalization of downtown, she sees engaging and advancing millennial talent as an exciting prospect. When asked for advice for fellow women entrepreneurs, Melinda notes to be tenacious in pursuit of what you believe is beneficial, evaluate the benefits of obtaining a WBE certification and find a great mentor. 8811 S. Yale Ave., Suite #300 918-728-3300 stinnett-associates.com


SPONSORED EDITORIAL

Jody Weise and The Uniform Shoppe team

The Uniform Shoppe Think of US first!

Donna Brollier, owner of Donna’s Fashions & More-2015 TulsaPeople A-List Winner

Donna’s Fashions Tulsa More than just fashion

For more than 50 years, The Uniform Shoppe has supplied Tulsans with professional apparel, including scrubs, lab coats, shoes, medical accessories, stethoscopes, chef apparel and aprons, polos, soft shell and fleece jackets and more. With Jody Weise at the helm today, the business distinguishes itself by offering wide selection, friendly service, knowledgeable staff and on-site sizing. Prices for every budget and a scrub exchange program also set the company apart. “Always be thinking about how you can improve your business,” Weise advises other 6221 E. 61st St. woman entrepreneurs. “Be open to oppor918.494.7682 tunity.” theuniformshoppe.com

For two decades, Donna’s Fashions Tulsa has been synonymous with quality lifestyle clothing. That tradition continues this season, and then some. “Our spring arrivals are amazing,” says boutique owner Donna J. Brollier. “Exciting changes are taking place here.” Following an expansion into menswear in 2008, Donna’s has become a Top 100 Tommy Bahama location. The boutique also recently underwent a highstyle renovation. Despite the changes, Donna’s still offers amazing service and 10051 S. Yale Ave, Suite #105 trendsetting styles! 918.299.6565 “It’s been 20 years of fabulous,” says donnasfashions.com Brollier. “And the best is yet to come!”

Kathleen Pence

Cynthia J. Stewart

Pence Law Firm, P.C. Counsel made convenient When Kathleen Pence founded her law practice a year ago, it was with the core understanding that everyday life doesn’t slow down to accommodate legal matters. “We understand that our clients are busy living their lives,” says Pence. “We endeavor to work around the client’s schedule and do as much communication via email and telephone conference as possible.” In fact, Pence Law Firm clients are only required to meet in person at PENCE LAW FIRM, P.C. the initial conference — from that point 320 S. Boston Ave., Suite 1026 forward, the legal team interferes minimally with the client’s schedule whilst 918.367.8505 keeping the client informed. pencelawfirm.org

CSuite For Women Faith-based peer advisory group for women in business Cynthia Stewart launched CSuite For Women in 2016 as a means of providing business expertise and peer advice for business owners to scale up their leadership growth, accelerate performance and ignite transformation. “Our clients draw on our rich and accurate insights gained from three decades of strategic expertise leading teams and growing businesses,” she said. CSuite partners with leaders to harness the power of a peer advisory group to enable participants to achieve “Ownership Excellence” in these areas: Cultural, Operational, Financial and Organizational. “We are a pathway for women to fulfill their goals, achieve prosperity and resolve struggles in a safe and trust918.557.0144 cynthia@evermoreservices.com ing environment,” Stewart said.

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SPONSORED EDITORIAL

Margo Nelson

Margo’s Gift Shop Three generations of family ownership Margo Nelson is the third-generation owner of Margo’s Gift Shop, now in its 87th year of business in Tulsa. Legendary oilman Waite Phillips encouraged Margo’s grandmother—Margo Kirberger—to open her gift shop in the lobby of downtown’s Philcade Building in 1936. Another oilman, Walt Helmerich, encouraged Margo Nelson’s mother—store owner Ann Nelson— to move the business to Utica Square’s Yorktown Alley in 1964. Today, Margo’s offers a large selection of unique gift items for every occasion and is known for its selection of Christopher Radko ornaments. “We have over 500 different Radko ornaments in the store, ones for a wide variety of professions, passions, 2058 Utica Square themes, special occasions and, of course, 918.747.8780 all the major holidays,” noted Nelson. themargoshop.com

Nicki and Jeff Argo, center, surrounded by their team.

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Sarah Lees & children

Urban Attendant The ‘Uber’ of personal assistance and home maintenance Every good business starts as a solution to a problem, and the problem Sarah Lees saw was right in front of her. “As a mother of four children, I needed a little extra help, and as I began to really think about it, I noticed that other friends seemed to need extra help, too.” All the moms shared a frustration over how quickly their children were growing and how they were missing out on truly important moments in life. They were too busy folding towels and buying groceries, and missing quality time with their families. So, Lees founded Urban Attendant, a Tulsa business designed to “offer a family a little extra help” on daily tasks from a person of trust. “We like to think of our business as the ‘Uber’ of home maintenance and urban 918.928.2242 assistance,” said Lees. “We invite busy people to learn more about Urban Attendant.” urbanattendant.com

Susan Boyd

Mary Murray’s Flowers

Purview Life

Unrivaled expertise and service for 54 years in Tulsa

Professionals helping families deal with aging issues

A longtime dream “bloomed” for Nicki Argo when she purchased Mary Murray’s Flowers from retiring owner Gaylyn Murray Wattman in January, 2015. “I began my career as a young designer in the floral industry 30 years ago,” said Argo, “and it’s been interesting and fun to learn to operate a business from the owner’s side of things. Operating a business presents challenges and opportunities each day; determining better ways to serve customers never ends.” Since 1963, Mary Murray’s has eanred a reputation for professionalism by offering the highest quality fresh bouquets, each designed with care and style. “Clients have learned they can trust us to advise them and properly 3333 E. 31st St. handle all of their floral needs, from a single 918.986.1349 plant to those needed for a special event.” marymurraysflowers.com

Susan Boyd’s and Imane Rose’s reason for starting Purview Life, a life care management company, was simple yet powerful. “We saw a need for helping families and professionals alike to deal with aging issues that extend beyond the customer and traditional agencies,” said Boyd. “We are specialized professionals who advocate and direct the care of older adults and others facing ongoing health and/or life challenges.” Through a unique combination of nursing experience, medical knowledge and social/case management expertise, Purview Life provides a holistic solution by offering professionals who understand the system and know how to manage it. 9810 E. 42nd St., Suite 110 Purview Life’s successful concept in Tulsa 918.935.2020 is now being franchised with the hope of expurviewlife.com panding it nationwide.

TulsaPeople MAY 2017


MADISON’S WORLD A day in the life of a teenager who is part of an invisible population BY JULIE RAINS

KELLY BROWN/ELLY PHOTOGRAPHY

ON A SCHOOL DAY, Madison Turner’s parents wake her up at 6 a.m. Nearing the end of her sophomore year at Memorial High School, Madison loves school. Waking up and putting on her school uniform, however, Madison loves less. Her father, Michael Turner, talks about his family’s morning routine with the same head-shaking and exhausted smile of all parents of teenagers. “It’s crazy,” he says over his second cup of coffee. “The mornings only work if we stay within routine.”

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Left: Madison is a sophomore at Memorial High School. She interacts with Kaelina Ellis, a peer tutor, to practice “Joy Chi,” modified tai chi movements that focus on movement and breathing. Center: Madison with her sister, Megan. Right: Lisa Schroeder, Jenny Joy and Madison during a recent school day.

After a smoothie breakfast, Madison and her 12-year-old sister Megan are driven to school by their mother Lisa Turner, who works at Mental Health Association Oklahoma. As she heads into Ms. Jenny Joy’s classroom Madison is greeted by her fellow classmates.

In 2001, Michael and Lisa were expecting their first daughter. Thirty-one weeks into an otherwise uneventful pregnancy, Lisa had extreme back pain. Madison was born nine weeks early with her umbilical cord wrapped around her neck. She was not breathing. Michael and Lisa waited a few agonizing minutes before hearing a “soft, faint squeak” and seeing Madison rushed to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. It was four weeks before they could take their daughter home. Over the next several months, they recognized Madison was not meeting growth and development markers. In early 2002, when Madison was 9 months old, she was diagnosed with cerebral palsy resulting from her traumatic birth. Michael says the diagnosis “sucked the air out of our lungs.” The Mayo Clinic defines cerebral palsy as “a disorder of movement, muscle tone or posture that is caused by damage to the immature, developing brain, most often before birth.” The condition manifests on a wide-ranging scale. For some, a cerebral palsy diagnosis is not associated with 44

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KELLY BROWN/ELLY PHOTOGRAPHY

intellectual disabilities. But others, like Madison, suffer from related cognitive impairments. By the time Madison was 6 years old, her parents had received additional diagnoses of autism, epilepsy, intellectual disabilities and a speech communication disorder. Thanks to guidance from their physical therapist, Julie Wilson, the Turners applied for the In-Home Support Waiver through the Developmental Disabilities Services Division of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (DHS) when Madison was a baby. When a person is selected from the waiting list, they receive financial support to help pay for supplies related to an intellectual disability diagnosis, such as diapers, formula and adaptive equipment. These services are funded through Medicaid Home and Community Based Services, waivers and state funds. Services provide for assistance for individuals to live safely at home rather than being placed in a nursing home. At the time the Turners initially applied, Michael says a family would typically wait seven or eight years to receive support through the Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD) of Oklahoma DHS. As of December 2016, DDSD was reviewing applications dated from 2006. In March 2017, 7,501 Oklahomans were waiting to receive this financial support. If a person applied to the waiting list today, they would likely wait at least 10 years.

Eventually, Madison was approved to receive support that provided significant relief to the Turner family budget. But then Michael was offered a job in Texas, and the family relocated. “We got our services in Texas in a snap,” Michael remembers. But being so far away from the support of extended family, including Michael’s mother, who is a retired speech pathologist and has worked with Madison since her birth, became too great a burden on the family of four. The Turners returned to Oklahoma but were refused the services they had received before relocating. They signed up again, at the bottom of the waiting list. At the time, Michael and Lisa both worked in education. Money was tight. They reached out to their State House Representative Jeannie McDaniel for help. “(Rep. McDaniel) was very in-touch with our needs,” Lisa says. “She believed that adequately funding the waiting list needed to be a priority.” McDaniel has since termed out of office, but one of her last acts in the Oklahoma House was to sponsor a bill that financed disability expenses and provided tax-sheltered savings options for parents of children with disabilities. House Bill 2821 was signed into law in 2016. The Turners call this support a blessing, but they still face the costs of adaptive equipment, nutritional supplements, and necessary safety and accessibility modifications to their house. They are still on the waiting list.


At 16 years old, Madison is tall, with thick brown hair and an enviably clear complexion for a teenager. She usually says only one word at a time from her modest vocabulary. Most often, she repeats one of her favorite words, “happy.” She alternates between walking and sitting in her adaptive wheelchair. She generally wants to participate in whatever her sister is doing. Megan calls Madison a “greeter.” She thrives when she’s around people (unique for someone on the autism scale), likes for other people to shake hands or hug each other, and laughs when she hears a sneeze. When Madison was a toddler, the Turners were told she would never be able to walk. They attribute her ability to overcome that particular diagnosis to Bit By Bit, a therapeutic horse riding center for people with special needs in Oologah. Michael says the core strength and psychological courage she gained from horseback riding have carried her to new heights. She continues to ride every week and lights up around horses. Like many parents of teenagers, the Turners look toward high school graduation with some anxiety. Students like Madison can stay in school until their 21st birthday. But after her students graduate, Ms. Joy says many of them end up staying at home. Michael says this is “due to lack of

financial resources and very few opportunities for employment, recreation or opportunity to live with peers.” The ripple effect of an adult child with disabilities living permanently at home, with few prospects for outside interaction, is predictably trying for caregivers. The Turners worry that for many parents, high school graduation means the “beginning of a downward spiral when a caregiver is required to remain at home, leading to isolation, mental and physical health challenges, limited financial options and burnout.”

HOW TO BE AN ADVOCATE • Volunteer through Project Special Courage: specialcourage.org • Apply for the “Partners in Policymaking” nine-month course through Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council: okddc.ok.gov/partners_in_ policymaking.html • Contact your state representative to express support for adequate funding of the Waiver Request Waiting List.

Since Madison’s diagnosis, this fear of the unknown has become a common element of the Turners’ lives. A few years ago, they founded Project Special Courage, a nonprofit to educate others and advocate for families like theirs. Michael, a veteran of the U.S. Marines and a former administrator in higher education, spends his days in a small downtown office on Greenwood Avenue. As the executive director of Project Special Courage, he helps families navigate the support systems available to people with intellectual disabilities, acquire adaptive equipment and provide recreational opportunities like disability-friendly kayaking, swimming and hiking. He also works toward long-term systems change at the state level. Meanwhile, in order to address the need of child care for individuals with special needs during the summer, Lisa works with Ms. Joy, Tulsa Public Schools and the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges to organize transportation and facilities for an extended summer program for the students in Madison’s class. All of these additional responsibilities take a toll on the marriages, other children, finances and physical wellbeing of caregivers. “Until you experience life under our roof,” Lisa says, “it’s hard to understand how consuming it can be.”

Meanwhile, in Ms. Joy’s classroom, Madison is holding hands with her peer tutor. It’s midmorning, and the 11 special-needs students, one teacher, four para-professionals and two peer tutors form a circle for an innovation of Ms. Joy’s: Joy Chi. The modified tai chi exercises allow students to focus on intentional movement and breathing — a pause from their busy day of life skills-centered learning. After school, Madison goes home. She eats a snack, watches TV, plays with her sister and her dog, Linus, and loves to eat dinner on the couch. Sometimes, Linus stays with Madison on her bed until she falls asleep. Michael describes life as a roller coaster for parents of children with disabilities. “Except on this ride, you can’t see what’s coming,” he says. “Sometimes, when you hit the bottom, it’s like everything stops. There’s no operator. You are strapped in. You don’t know what to do.” One of the Turners’ goals in founding Project Special Courage was to shed light on their own personal roller coaster. “Our population is often invisible,” he says. “If you don’t know someone with an intellectual disability, you don’t think about it. So they disappear. And their parents disappear.” And that handicaps all of us. TP TulsaPeople.com

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LIFE AQU

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UATIC

Believe it or not, Oklahoma boasts more miles of shoreline than the Gulf and Atlantic coasts combined. The state is home to more than 200 lakes and offers over 1 million surface acres perfect for boating, swimming, fishing and water recreation of all kinds. In town, Tulsa has pools and water features galore. Here’s a roundup of ways to spend your summer on the water. BY JAMIE RICHERT JONES

KENT MOYE

BALANCING ACT Stand-up paddleboarding (SUP) is the newest fitness craze to hit Tulsa. Although it’s a sport that can be associated with tropical ocean destinations, all you really need are a paddleboard and a body of water. Fortunately, we have an abundance of both in Oklahoma. SUP has a short learning curve, but requires balance and core and upper-body strength. It can be a fun pastime with family and friends or a way to incorporate fun and fitness into a healthy lifestyle. KENT MOYE owns SUP Oklahoma, located at Red Bud Marina on Lake Oologah, approximately 50 miles from Tulsa. It sells equipment, handles repairs and offers classes, including SUP yoga. “You can go for a leisurely paddle and enjoy being outdoors on the water by yourself, or take a cruise with friends and enjoy a sunset paddle,” Moye says. “Others might want to do some sprints, distance paddling or other training.” Moye has seen a steady growth in popularity since he purchased the business in 2015. For Moye, at age 60, SUP has become a new way of life. He sees older adults enjoy the sport as it’s easier on the physique than other exercises, while the younger crowd also loves it for the sporting aspect. “The Tulsa area has been great,” Moye says. “We see a lot of people curious and wanting to try it.” TulsaPeople.com

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SAFARI JOE,S H2O

CHANDLER PARK POOL

(FORMERLY BIG SPLASH WATER PARK)

6500 W. 21st St. | 918-591-6051 | parks.tulsacountry.org 1-6 p.m., Sunday-Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday; closed Wednesday. Open June 3-Aug. 12. With almost 200 acres of natural beauty, Chandler Park provides panoramic views of Tulsa and numerous outdoor activities.

4707 E. 21st St. | 918-749-7385 | safarijoesh2o.com 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Thursday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Friday-Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday. This perennial family fun destination, which opens May 27, is undergoing many additions and improvements, including animal attractions featuring exotic birds and reptiles.

••••

••••

LACY PARK POOL

2134 N. Madison Place | 918-596-1470 | cityoftulsa.org Noon-6 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday; closed Monday. Open in late May. Lacy Community Center offers a fitness center, dance classes, social activities, education programs and special events.

••

LAFORTUNE PARK POOL

5501 S. Yale Ave. | 918-496-6223 | parks.tulsacounty.org 1-6:30 p.m., Sunday-Tuesday, Thursday-Friday; noon-6:30 p.m., Saturday; closed Wednesday. Open June 3-Aug. 12. Located inside LaFortune Park, which offers golf, baseball, tennis, a 5K trail, playgrounds, picnic tables, shelters, fishing and a community center.

•••••

NIENHUIS AQUATIC FACILITY

3201 N. Ninth St., Broken Arrow | 918-357-3483 brokenarrow.gov/317/swimming-pools 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Monday-Tuesday and Thursday-Saturday; 1-6 p.m., Sunday; closed Wednesday. Open May 29. Broken Arrow’s Nienhuis Park features a community center, ball fields, multiple picnic sites and playgrounds.

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O’BRIEN PARK POOL

6149 N. Lewis Ave. | 918-591-6008 | parks.tulsacounty.org 1-6:30 p.m., Monday-Tuesday, Thursday-Friday; 1-6 p.m., Saturday-Sunday; closed Wednesday. Open June 3-Aug. 12. Located in north Tulsa County, O’Brien Park also offers a walking trail, recreation center, outdoor basketball court, picnic shelters and a football field.

•••

REED PARK POOL

4233 S. Yukon Ave. | 918-591-4307 | facebook.com/reedcenter 1-7 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday; closed Monday. Open June 3-Aug. 12. Check out its Facebook page for details about the annual K-9 Splash event for dogs and their owners at the end of the summer.

•• POOL KEY • CONCESSIONS

• ADMISSION COST • DIVING BOARD

• WATER SLIDE • PLAYGROUND

• SPLASH PAD • WATER PLAYGROUND

DIVE IN THERE’S A PLETHORA OF POOLS IN TULSA. Here’s a short list of local public pools to take a dip in this summer. 48

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VALERIE GRANT

SOUTH COUNTY RECREATION CENTER (SOCO)

13800 S. Peoria Ave., Bixby | 918-746-3780 parks.tulsacounty.org 12:30-6 p.m., Sunday-Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday; closed Wednesday. Open June 3-Aug. 12. SoCo offers activities and programs year-round such as selfdefense, dance, craft shows and tennis.

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WHITESIDE PARK POOL

4009 S. Pittsburg Ave. | 918-746-5040 facebook.com/whitesiderecreationcenter Noon-6 p.m., Monday-Saturday; available for Sunday rentals with lifeguard. Open June 3-Aug. 12. The midtown park and community center offers numerous adult and child programs year-round, including fitness, dance, art classes and more.

••

EDITOR’S NOTE: McClure and Berry Park pools remain closed for improvements. All four county pools are available to rent for special events. See the website for additional info and admission discounts.


COURTESY CITY OF TULSA, TULSA DRILLERS AND GUTHRIE GREEN/SHANE BROWN

When temperatures spike, relief can be found at one of Tulsa’s 31 splash pads or water playgrounds. All are open to the public and free of charge. Splash pads and water playgrounds are similar; however, splash pads lack the playground element and often lack restrooms or parking facilities. Hours of operation for all 31 locations are noon-8 p.m., daily beginning in May. According to the City of Tulsa website, water playgrounds are available for rental. They can be opened up to three hours early for special occasions for a $25 fee per hour on weekdays or a $45 fee per hour on weekends. Each splash pad and water playground has its own set of rules, so be sure to check what’s posted for proper attire, age requirements and other regulations.

SPRINGDALE – 2223 E. Pine St. STARKS – 1622 N. Main St. TRACY – 1134 S. Peoria Ave. VETERANS – 1875 S. Boulder Ave. WHEELING – 2209 W. Wheeling Ave. ZEIGLER – 3903 W. Fourth St. ZINK – 3216 S. Trenton Ave.

SPLASH PADS

ARCHER – 2831 E. Archer St. BENEDICT – 1630 E. 12th St. BRADEN – 5036 E. Seventh St. CARBONDALE – 2802 W. 48th St. CRUTCHFIELD – 1345 E. Independence Ave. DAWSON – 2035 N. Kingston Ave. FLORENCE – 1936 S. Gary Ave. HIGHLAND – 4909 E. 36th St. JOHNSON – 6002 S. Riverside Drive LACY – 2134 N. Madison Place MAPLE – 404 E. 15th St. PENNEY – 531 S. 49th W. Ave. REED – 4233 S. Yukon Ave.

WATER PLAYGROUNDS

CHAMBERLAIN – 4949 N. Frankfort Ave. HELMERICH – 7301 S. Riverside Drive HUNTER – 5804 E. 91st St. KENDALL-WHITTIER – 2645 E. Fifth St. MANION – 3003 E. 56th St. MAXWELL – 5251 E. Newton St. MOHAWK – 5701 E. 36th St. N. OWEN – 560 N. Maybelle St. SCHLEGEL – 3825 W. 53rd Place VINING – 6502 N. Cincinnati Ave. WHITESIDE – 4009 S. Pittsburg Ave.

DOWNTOWN FOR SOME SUMMER FUN? With all the events going on at GUTHRIE GREEN, don’t forget about its splash pad. Located on the east end of the park, the splash pad is a hit with kids, and adults, on a hot Tulsa summer day. Open 6 a.m.-11 p.m., beginning in May. 111 E. M.B. Brady St. guthriegreen.com. At ONEOK FIELD, the splash pad is a homerun for kids. Splash pad use is only available to ticketholders. 201 N. Elgin Ave. tulsadrillers.com. The RIVER PARKS splash pad operates by an on-demand push button for 10 minutes at a time. Come summertime, this is an oasis for youngsters. Open May 15-Oct. 1, from 9 a.m.-9 p.m. East 41st Street and South Riverside Drive. riverparks.org.

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Hiking at Keystone State Park

The Wibit at Jellystone Park at Keystone Lake

Bernice State Park Nature Center Har-Ber Village

Har-Ber Village Legends No. 9 at Shangri-La Resort

Lake Tenkiller

SWIMMING HOLES ARE POPULAR WAYS TO BEAT THE OKLAHOMA HEAT. ILLINOIS RIVER Visitors flock to the Illinois River in the summer. The options are endless, but the most popular activity is a float trip. There are several outfitters and options, including canoes, kayaks or inflatable rafts for larger groups. Trips of various lengths and degrees of difficulty are available, ranging from 6- to 70-mile stretches. Offering a wide variety of accommodations, from campgrounds to resorts and attractions, including disc golf courses and waterslides, the Illinois River is a perfect weekend destination for the whole family. BLUE HOLE PARK Located 7 miles east of Salina, the Blue Hole swimming area has been cooling visitors off for generations. The main swimming hole is fed by three springs. There is an admission fee and concession stand. THE PAWNEE BATHHOUSE Take a step back in time and visit the Pawnee Bathhouse. A beautiful, sandstone rock bathhouse that includes a 2-acre fresh water pool, a sandy beach, water slide, high dive, diving board and paddle boats. Located about 60 miles west of Tulsa, the Pawnee Bathhouse is on the National Historic Register and was selected as Discover Oklahoma’s Favorite Summer Destination for 2003.

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SPRING CREEK Spring Creek is a natural, spring-fed, crystal-clear creek. The main area is located about 70 miles east of Tulsa off Highway 82. Although it’s mostly bound by private lands, there are several public and paid access points that are deep enough to swim. TulsaPeople MAY 2017


Lake Tenkiller

KEYSTONE LAKE

Keystone Lake is maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and has 16 recreation areas for visitors to enjoy. PERKS: Conveniently located 15 miles west of downtown, Keystone Lake has a plethora of activities, including fishing, hiking, camping and horseback riding. MUST DO: Opening Memorial Day weekend, Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park at Keystone Lake is the ultimate family fun destination. Activities include camping, fishing, stand-up paddleboard rental, kayak rental and a giant floating water park called the Wibit. Jellystone is located at 29365 W. Highway 51, Mannford. keystonelakejp.com.

GRAND LAKE

COURTESY OKLAHOMA TOURISM AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT, HAR-BER VILLAGE, SHANGRI-LA RESORT AND JELLYSTONE PARK AT KEYSTONE LAKE

Located approximately an hour northeast of Tulsa, Grand Lake is a perennial favorite for anyone who loves water activities. PERKS: Its 46,500 surface acres of water are ideal for boating, skiing, fishing, swimming and sailing. Many companies offer a wide variety of water sport equipment rental, including ski boats, skis, tubes, pontoon boats, bass boats, wave runners/jet skis and sailboats. Fishing has always been a popular activity on Grand Lake. In May 2013, Bassmasters Magazine ranked it among the top 15 bass fishing lakes in the country. The lake also has an abundance of catfish, crappie and paddlefish, to name a few. Grand Lake hosted the Bassmasters Classic, the Super Bowl of professional bass fishing, in 2013 and 2016. For the dedicated fisherman, Grand Lake hosts many tournaments throughout the year. For those wanting to learn more about the sport, contact one of the fishing guide services in the area. If you enjoy the water, but want to stay dry, Grand Lake offers a variety of land-based attractions. Grove’s Har-Ber Village, 4404 W. 20th St., is a pioneer history museum and village. Open March through November, Har-Ber Village offers demonstrations of frontier life, hosts artifacts and weekly workshops, including jewelry making, soap making, bread making and various cooking classes. Reservations are required for workshops and classes. For those interested in more immersive activities, the village offers Pioneer Camp, Art Camp and Nature Camp. For history enthusiasts, Har-Ber Village Museum has been chosen as a host venue for the 2017 tour of the Smithsonian Institution’s exhibit, “The Way We Worked.”

The exhibit will be at the museum through May 8. Visit har-bervillage.com for details. To reconnect with nature, check out the area’s five state parks. There are numerous waterfront campgrounds, including Bernice State Park. Campsites are available for tents and RVs. The park hosts an impressive nature center, ranked one of the 10 best in the state by Best of Oklahoma. Come meet the park’s newest resident, a 7-year-old coyote, or watch local wildlife in its natural habitat from two wildlife watchtowers. The Bernice State Park Nature Center, 54101 E. Highway 85A, Bernice, is open 9 a.m.-4 p.m., WednesdaySunday. Golfing is a popular pastime at Grand Lake. Many courses are available to the public along the vast shoreline, including Patricia Island, Grand Cherokee and Cherokee Grove. For those seeking luxury and relaxation, Shangri La has it all. After extensive, multi-million dollar renovations, this lakeside getaway boasts 27 championship golf holes and a stunning new clubhouse. Its course received 4.5 out of 5 stars from Golf Digest Magazine. Make a weekend out of it by booking a room at its new resort, spa and conference center. MUST DO: For those seeking more adventure, Sail Grand at the Shangri La Marina offers parasail rides. Fly high over the blue waters and enjoy panoramic views of the beautiful landscapes.

LAKE TENKILLER

Nestled in the foothills of the Ozarks, Lake Tenkiller is about an hour and a half southeast of Tulsa. Known for its steep bluffs and clear, blue waters, the lake offers opportunities for nature lovers of all kinds. PERKS: According to the Gore Chamber of Commerce, the area of the Lower Illinois River just below the Tenkiller Dam is the “Trout Capital of Oklahoma.” Year-round fishing is available at Lake Tenkiller with an abundance of bass, crappie, catfish and walleye. With approximately 1,400 acres available for camping, including two state parks, privately owned campgrounds, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-maintained campgrounds, stay around to explore this natural paradise. MUST DO: Lake Tenkiller’s clear water makes it a popular destination for scuba divers from the surrounding region. Dive shops are available to provide certification, scuba equipment and instruction. According to the Lake Tenkiller Area Visitors Guide, when the Illinois River was flooded to create the lake, a town was left behind on the lake bottom. Artifacts like horseshoes, buggies, homes and farm equipment — all protected by state law — are still accessible underwater. TP

LAKE EFFECT SUMMER Get out of the city heat and escape to one of our nearby lakes. Amenities are plentiful. Just pack your bathing suit, sunblock, shades and a picnic for the ultimate fun in the sun.

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GAME CHA

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IT’S AN UNSEASONABLY WARM EVENING IN EARLY

Tulsa students are playing a sport new to middle America: lacrosse. BY TIM LANDES

ANGER

March as the sun sets over the Bishop Kelley soccer fields. Kids of all ages are practicing for upcoming games, but they’re not kicking and chasing a soccer ball. Accompanying the bursts of whistles and coaches yelling are the sounds of lacrosse sticks clacking against each other. A little more than 10 years ago, lacrosse was predominantly played on the East Coast. Occasionally it could be seen on TV when games were televised in the spring during the NCAA season. This is Oklahoma, where football is king in high school and college. In youth sports, thousands participate in baseball, basketball, soccer and wrestling. In the past few years, however, lacrosse has exploded in popularity across the Tulsa metro and flowed over to smaller communities like Claremore and Skiatook. But what might seem like a sudden emergence of the sport actually goes back a decade. One of the people watching the practice is Christy Rawlings, a Bishop Kelley parent who helped generate interest in lacrosse in the Tulsa area. For Rawlings and her family, it began in 2009 when her eldest son, John, begged to join the kids practicing lacrosse across the street from their house. Little did she know, the moment would change her life. “I thought it was one of the most fun sports ever,” Rawlings says. “Football is real static. It’s stop. It’s go. With lacrosse, the minute it starts it never stops. It goes at a very fast pace. The kids are getting such good physical conditioning.” With no local league available, John and his friends played as members of WolfPack (middle school) and the Bulldogs (varsity) city teams comprised of metro middle and high schoolers that competed against teams from Arkansas and Missouri. Soon, more than 80 kids were playing in Tulsa on these teams. The seed was planted. In 2012, Coach Dustin Booth formed the Tulsa Youth Lacrosse Association to provide boys and girls in kindergarten through fifth grade a chance to play. The sport had grown enough by 2013 that a decision was made to break off from the city high school team and create club teams at schools. Bishop Kelley was one. In 2014, Rawlings helped found Comets Lacrosse Club Inc., a youth sports nonprofit that includes all K-8th grade teams and encompasses kids from all Tulsa Catholic diocesan schools and interested Tulsa Public Schools students without a lacrosse program. The Comets varsity program is just for Bishop Kelley students. At the same time Jenks Trojan Lacrosse Club was founded, creating two major programs in Tulsa. By 2014, the Tulsa Youth Lacrosse Association rolled into the Indian Nations Lacrosse Conference, which extended the competition through eighth grade. “I knew if Jenks did it then the trifecta of Union, Broken Arrow and Owasso would follow and, sure enough, they all started junior programs the following year,” Rawlings says. TulsaPeople.com

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LACROSSE 101

Coach Scott Smith came to Tulsa from Connecticut to coach Bishop Kelley’s lacrosse program. Here, he talks with Jackson Osentowski.

In lacrosse, players use a netted stick to carry, pass and throw a rubber ball along a field in an effort to score goals. The team that scores the most goals in the allotted time wins. HISTORY Native Americans began playing a form of lacrosse several centuries ago. French missionaries to North America gave lacrosse its modern name, as the stick the Indians played with resembled a bishop’s staff called “la crosse,” or “the cross,” in French. The game as it is played today originated around 1840. EQUIPMENT According to Bishop Kelley coach Scott Smith, it costs about $200 to purchase the necessary equipment, which includes a lacrosse stick, solid rubber ball, helmet with face guard and chinstrap, gloves, pads and cleats or sneakers. Girls’ lacrosse forgoes the helmet for eye protection. GAME LENGTH The game is divided into four quarters with a halftime. The length of the period/quarter is 12 minutes in high school and 15 minutes in NCAA. Each period begins with a face-off at midfield. Teams switch sides after each period. There are two timeouts per team per half. THE FIELD A lacrosse field is 110 yards long and can be from 53-60 yards wide. The goals are 80 yards apart with a playing area of 15 yards behind each goal. The length of the field is divided in half by a center line. IN THE CREASE Attacking players may never enter the opposing goal crease, which is an 18-foot circle surrounding the goal. They may only reach in with their sticks when attempting to get control of the ball. Defensive players may enter their own goal crease, but not when carrying the ball. And, the goalie cannot hold the ball in his crease for more than four seconds. Such fouls result in the loss of ball possession.

On this day in March, Rawlings is decked out in Bishop Kelley lacrosse clothing. Every coach and administrator stops to visit with her as they walk past. She reminds them about upcoming events or needs for the program. She’s a parent with a full-time job, yet she still finds time to do what she can to help the program and the sport succeed, even if it’s helping the kids sell and deliver mulch as an annual fundraiser. “It has turned into a massive amount of work,” says Rawlings, who credits the working board and volunteer coaches with amazing work and stamina. “We are a 501(c)(3) with 292 players, and we have 20 percent of our players on scholarship.” The scholarships allow kids to play lacrosse in the program who otherwise could not afford to play. This year, more than $5,208 has been awarded to athletes. Hard work is paying off in all Tulsa-area lacrosse. The Indian Nations Lacrosse Conference is still in its infancy as an organized youth league, but it continues to grow rapidly. More than 2,000

boys and girls play in the Heartland Conference, which has seven Tulsa high school clubs. With the sport booming, back at Bishop Kelley Rawlings and the Comets Lacrosse board knew it was time to bring in a varsity-level coach to take the program to the next level. They were looking for someone who had recent collegelevel lacrosse experience, could run a competitive travel program in the off-season, market players to colleges and bring more exposure to the area. They did a nationwide search last summer and hired Scott Smith to be the director of coaching and varsity head coach. He also runs a competitive travel program, boys and girls camps, leagues and clinics. Smith was coaching lacrosse at an inner-city school in Bridgeport, Connecticut, when the school dropped the program, forcing Smith on a job hunt. “I was looking for an opportunity to find another place where I could help grow the game,” says Smith, who has joined us on the sidelines. “I came out to Bishop Kelley and met with

CHECKING There are various ways to play defense, including body check, stick check, poke check, slap check and wrap check. OFFSIDE Called anytime a team has fewer than four players on its defensive side of the field, or fewer than three players on its offensive side. FOULS A player may not trip, slash, recklessly charge or use his stick or body to illegally check an opposing player. An illegal body check is a hit above an opponent’s shoulders, below the waist or from behind. It is further illegal to use the stick as a means to interfere with an advancing opponent. Depending on severity, the violating player sits out of play for one to three minutes in the penalty box. 54

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Callie Davis

Over the past few years, lacrosse has grown in popularity for kids in grades K-12.


Will Cunningham Kira Ziola, Katy Brennan and Kaylee Dawson

the Comets Lacrosse board and I instantly knew this is a place I wanted to be.” Smith brought with him a lifetime of lacrosse experience. He was an All-American and a fouryear letter winner at Johns Hopkins University. He played in three NCAA final fours. As the goaltender, in 2005, he helped his team win the NCAA Championship. He even made it on to SportsCenter’s weekly Top 10 Countdown for a pair of one-on-one saves in a contest that he says his players can hardly believe happened. The plays were pre-YouTube, the Wilton, Connecticut, native explains. “I don’t have any record of them since it wasn’t digital,” Smith says. “The kids ask me how come they can’t find any highlights online, and I tell them we didn’t have the internet when I was in college.” Lacrosse has a long association with money, privilege and Ivy League schools. “The sport is being played at some of the top institutions,” Smith concedes. “If you can get into a school based on your academics, you can get a world-

class education and pay for it with a lacrosse scholarship.” He is quick to add that there are opportunities for young people to excel and earn college scholarships while playing in Tulsa, no matter a family’s economic level. “It doesn’t matter whether it’s in Connecticut or Oklahoma, once a kid picks up a stick and their parents are educated on what the sport can provide, the game’s popularity will continue to grow exponentially,” Smith says. “The opportunities for girls are even better than for boys because there is a lot of scholarship money right now because of things like Title IX.” The sun has disappeared, and the fields are clearing for the night. Smith watches the last group of junior high boys run through final drills at a goal. Soon those students will play for him at the next level. “We’re about five years behind the East Coast in terms of competing at their varsity level,” Smith says. “It’s going to take time, but as we’ve

Bishop Kelley’s club lacrosse team is one of many at local high schools. Lacrosse is not a sanctioned boys and girls high school sport in Oklahoma.

seen over the course of the first month of practice, we’re getting a kid every week who wants to play lacrosse because of the experience their friends are having. I have 16 freshmen, who are going to make a great varsity team.” Smith recognizes he’s coaching a sport that will likely forever fall into the shadow of football, but he’s optimistic about the future of the game. “As we break down the football-only mentality, you’ll start seeing kids get more scholarships in lacrosse,” he says. Rawlings and Smith agree the next major challenge for lacrosse in Tulsa is becoming a sanctioned boys and girls high school sport across the state. Does he think that will take 10 years? Five? “I’m hoping sooner than that,” Smith says. “With the growth of the metro-wide Bulldogs, and as more players break off to represent their schools with teams, I think we could be there in the next two or three years. That’s the ultimate goal.” TP

TulsaPeople.com

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Betty D.

I’m keeping up

with my daughter again.

One day I woke up and my knee felt bone to bone. I couldn’t walk. After two years of unsuccessful doctor visits and physical therapy, I found Hillcrest South. Finally, I had someone willing to help me and figure out the cause of the problem. My therapist, surgeon and medical team all wanted me to get well, and my therapist went out of his way to help in any way he could. That’s hard to find. Now my mobility is a night and day comparison. The best part? I’m a mom of a 12-year-old daughter, and now I can keep up.

91st & Hwy 169, Tulsa, OK 74133 • 918.579.5777 • HillcrestSouth.com


SUNNY SIDE UP Welcome summer with a pair of fresh sunglasses, served with a side of style.

Top to bottom: Prada, $641; Velvet, $195; Catuma, $506; Velvet, $215; all from Eye Candy, 7891 E. 108th Place, Suite 3.

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HEALTH

M

ost of us know excessive exposure to the sun’s UV rays can have damaging, longterm effects on our skin, but what about our eyes? The National Eye Institute has deemed May “Healthy Vision Month.” And what better time to make sure you’re doing everything you can to protect those pools that harbor your view of the world outside? When it comes to shielding our eyes from the sun and its ultraviolet rays, Monte Harrel, O.D., of Harrel Eyecare says it’s just as important as wearing sunscreen. “Just like we protect our skin, our eyes need to be protected,” he says.

Age and risk factors

Ray of light LOCAL EXPERTS STRESS THE IMPORTANCE OF PROTECTING EYES FROM THE SUN. BY LAURA DENNIS Top to bottom: Catuma, $660; Etnia Barcelona, $287; Prada, $387; all from Eye Candy, 7891 E. 108th Place, Suite 3. 58

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

The longer our eyes are exposed to UV radiation, the greater our risk of developing cataracts, skin cancer around the eyelids, macular degeneration — a disorder that damages the retina and destroys central vision — photokeratitis (a sunburn to the eye’s surface) and pterygium, a growth that occurs on the white part of the eye, says Kali Cole, M.D., of Blink Optical. Children’s eyes in particular might have an increased risk of UV damage due to incomplete eye development and the amount of time children spend outdoors. The average child receives about three times the annual UV exposure as the average adult and reaches up to 80 percent of lifetime UV exposure before age 20, according to the American Optometric Association. In seniors, factors such as dry eye and cataracts become more likely with excessive sun exposure, Harrel says. In addition, adults who spend a great deal of time outdoors, use a sunlamp or tanning parlor, have had cataract surgery in one or both eyes or take over-the-counter drugs that increase sensitivity to light also are at a greater risk of UV harm, according to the AOA.


Thank you Tulsa!

2016

Adults who spend a great deal of time outdoors, use a sunlamp or tanning parlor, have had cataract surgery in one or both eyes or take over-the-counter drugs that increase sensitivity to light also are at a greater risk of UV harm.

BLURRY VISION & BURNING EYES…

are symptoms, not a way of life.

— American Optometric Association

Talk to the Dry Eye Experts 918 745 9962 harreleyecare.com

Prevention

With the potential dangers at hand, how can we be sure we are preventing disease and protecting our eyes from the sun? It’s an obvious answer: protective eyewear. “There are several ways to protect our eyes from UV damage,” Harrel says. “Prescription and nonprescription eyewear, clip-ons, fit overs — there are brands of contacts that include more UV protection than others for patients who wear contact lenses.” Liz Batchelor, O.D., of Triad Eye Institute suggests adding another layer of protection by wearing a hat and applying sunscreen around the eyes. “It is important to protect your eyes and the skin around your eyes from UV rays anytime you are outside, whether it’s sunny or cloudy,” she says.

Quality and protection

Although many of us own a pair of sunglasses to match our every mood, the accessory should be more than stylish. So what should you look for when shopping for shades? Cole says the most important thing to prioritize is the level of UV protection offered by the lens. The safest bet is to purchase sunglasses that provide 100-percent UVA and UVB protection. Typically, high-end brands such as Oakley and Ray-Ban offer such protection, but most inexpensive brands do, too. She warns, “Don’t be fooled by price.” That said, it’s important not to confuse lens quality with UV protection. When it comes down to it, Harrel says sunglasses’ quality typically is demonstrated in lens clarity. Generally, a higher

price tag equals polarized and anti-glare lenses that offer a better, clearer image, which allows for a comfortable viewing experience when driving and playing sports. At the same time, just because a lens is polarized does not mean it offers 100-percent UV protection, Cole says. It’s important to consider a proper fit, too, Batchelor adds. “Pick a frame that fits close to your eyes and contours the shape of your face to protect your eyes from all sides,” she says.

Optical care for your entire family!

Advanced innovations

New technologies are shifting focus to filter blue light, which is emitted by the sun and artificial light sources such as LEDs, computers and smart phones, Cole says. Some blue light is good for the eyes, but too much blue-violet light has been shown to cause macular degeneration. Crizal Prevencia no-glare lenses are designed to selectively block harmful types of blue light. A newly developed Light Scan process allows beneficial blue light to pass through the lens and filters out the dangerous blue-violet light.

Prevention vs. treatment

At the end of the day, it is easier to prevent harm from UV rays than it is to treat potential consequences. In addition, medical professionals remain uncertain about the amount of solar radiation exposure required to cause eye damage. Cole stresses, “Whenever you spend time outdoors, whatever the age, wear quality sunglasses that offer UV protection and a hat or cap with a wide brim.” TP

ALISON HANSEN, O.D. optometrist

KALI COLE, M.D. pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus

blinkopticaltulsa.com 1826 E 15th St, Suite B

Chanel • Jimmy Crystal

For appointments call: 918.574.2297

Ralph Lauren • Ray-Ban

Penguin • Lilly Pulitzer Oakley • Prada • Vera Wang Zac Posen • Converse Lucky Brand • Max Mara Juicy Couture • Crocs Carrera • Esprit • Elle • X Games Jonathan Adler • Flexon Calvin Klein • Nine West

eyeinst.com/dr-cole

Diane Von Furstenberg • Maui Jim

TulsaPeople.com

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TRENDING

Tray chic BY KENDALL BARROW

Stash your stuff in one of these stylish catchall dishes, $3.50$20, from Summer Snow, 4111 S. Harvard Ave.

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017


For Life of Tulsa ie Green, Brady Arts District

, May 29th l 6pm - Midnight Help finishfor info elayforlife.org/tulsaok

Colored and White Diamond Reversible Earrings

the fight against cancer.

orlife.org/ r time to ate, remember t back!

ncer Society, Inc.

JOIN US. Relay For Life of Tulsa

27.2345 River West Festival Park

Friday, June 23 6pm - Midnight It’s our time to celebrate, remember & fight back!

relayforlife.org/tulsaok

1.800.277.2345

Consortium | 3509 S. Peoria Ave., #180 Tulsa, OK 74105 | 918.748.8700

918.779.4165 www.anngarrett.com

TulsaPeople.com

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STOREFRONT

Merriment Paper and Gifts 3230 E. 15TH ST. | SHOPMERRIMENT.CO 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Tuesday-Friday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday.

Merritt Wakefield

Giftwrap by Bespoke Letterpress A double-sided giftwrap featuring bold, complementary patterns. Printed on heavyweight, 100-percent recycled paper and sealed with a satin protectant, it can be used to wrap gifts, line dresser drawers or frame as artwork. $5 per sheet.

Letter-pressed cards by Moglea Based in Iowa, this letterpress studio produces all of its pieces by hand. $5.50-$7.50.

Paper trails

Custom invitations by Bella Figura Extensively customized, every piece is sustainably printed. Price varies based on customization and quantity.

MERRIMENT FOCUSES ON PAPER GOODS FOR THE MODERN TULSAN. BY LAURA DENNIS Candles by Pomme Frites Candle Co.

M

erritt Wakefield’s personal stationery collection contains every card she has received since she was 8 years old. Her passion for the art of old-fashioned pen and paper was born early, and she dreamed of her own brickand-mortar storefront. But it wasn’t until November 2015 that she committed to stop talking and start doing. “I sat up in bed one night and decided I couldn’t wait a second longer,” Wakefield says. “So I got the laptop and started emailing designers about carrying a small assortment of their products.” What started as a mildly successful pop-up shop in Kendall Whittier Square has evolved into the thriving business that is now Merriment Paper and Gifts, which opened in October at 3230 E. 15th St. The stationery shop offers top-of-the-line, custom-made wedding invitations and a variety of paper goods and several retail items that can’t be found anywhere else in Tulsa. Public Supply notebooks, Bespoke Letterpress double-sided giftwrap and Blackwing pencils — utilized by literary, musical and artistic greats like John Steinbeck, Leonard Bernstein and Looney Tunes creator 62

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Chuck Jones — are among the more luxurious products the store carries. The cozy shop also boasts a heavily stocked wall of spirited greeting cards for all of life’s special and just-because occasions. Wakefield refers to it as the “card wall” and says it might just be her favorite store feature. “I’m a thoughtful person, but I’m a procrastinator,” she says. “You’ll find me an hour before your birthday brunch trying to find the perfect card. I’ll spend an hour doing it, and I’ll be late. But I’ll have found the perfect card for you.” Not unlike her card perusing, Wakefield continues to dedicate copious amounts of time to her growing business and plans to add products and incorporate craft workshops with local artists into the retail space. But her desire and passion remain focused on curating items that encourage a lost art. “There’s something really special about handwriting,” Wakefield says. “It gives you a chance to reflect on what you’re grateful for, what season of life you’re in. And it’s a permanent reminder of that.” TP

Made with domestically grown soy wax and cotton-core wicks, these candles are hand-poured, packaged and shipped in Los Angeles. Wakefield’s favorite scents are Golden Coast and Amber and Moss. $18.

Notebooks by Public Supply Elegant, sturdy and covered with embossed French paper, these 5-by-8 inch notebooks come with 96 pages and your choice of dot or ruled paper. $12-$20.

Ribbon by Studio Carta Made in Italy and designed and packaged in Brooklyn, New York, this cotton ribbon comes in vibrant colors. $16-$21.


Fine apparel

For all the colors of your world

www.TraversMahanApparel.com South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100

I wish...

... to be a policeman

3747 S Harvard • 918.712.8785 SweetToothTulsa.com

In 1982, wishes became reality: Make-A-Wish® Oklahoma was born. Oklahoma children with life-threatening conditions were offered hope, strength and joy.

... to have my own elephant

More than 2700 wishes later, our mission has never been stronger. This year, as we celebrate our 35th anniversary, we’ve asked a select team of 35 former Wish kids, families, volunteers and supporters to help spread the word. We’re calling it 35 for 35. Make-A-Wish ® America has agreed to match us dollar for dollar to help us reach our goal of $350,000.

... to meet a real airline pilot

d Custom Picture Framing

... to go to a Florida theme park

d Fine Art d Home Accessories

Andy Warhol

6 N. LEWIS 918.584.2217 zieglerart.com

... to have an NYC shopping spree

Be a part of our legacy. Help us continue to make wishes come true. Visit 35for35MakeAWish.com or call 918-492-9474. #Wish35

... to give a piano to my teacher

TulsaPeople.com

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GARDENING

Unlock a gardening secret AN YO N E CAN TRY TH E I R H AN D AT KE YHO LE GA R DE N I N G. BY ALLEN ROBINSON

A

Master Gardener Jim Long

s Oklahoma summers continue to get hotter and drier, gardeners are looking for ways to prolong the growing season while responsibly maintaining resources. Keyhole gardens, which were originally developed in arid African countries, have proven to be an effective way to grow vegetables year-round in moderate climates, semi-arid environments and locations with poor soil. This type of garden has helped many populations vulnerable to hunger and food insecurity improve resiliency to shocks such as drought. The name comes from its original design as a relatively small round garden For more information, with a low outer wall and a space in call the Tulsa Master Gardeners the middle to allow a person (esat 918-746-3701, or stop by the pecially those who were physically OSU Extension Office at 4116 E. 15th St. Either way, weak or had a disability) to work Master Gardeners will be on the garden with minimal effort. hand to personally answer all Construction of a keyhole garof your questions. den is rather simple and fun — you can even get your kids involved — and promotes the use of inexpensive and locally available resources. The outer wall can be constructed of anything resilient (e.g., brick, stone, wood, hard plastic, old tires, etc.) Internal materials include rocks and a combination of organic materials such as small tree branches, loose twigs, wood chips, cardboard, newspaper, grass clippings, green or brown leaves, manure, compost and soil. Only have a small space in which to work? No problem. The typical garden is only 6-7 feet in diameter. Several improvements have been made to keyhole gardens over the years. These include expanding the overall size, adding more organic layers, building it higher and replacing the center working space with an active composting pile in a basket-type structure that ensures moisture and nutrients can easily and effectively reach all layers. Once built, the garden requires little maintenance and few additional inputs, such as fertilizer. A keyhole garden might just be your ticket to garIn a keyhole garden, the raised bed is surrounded by stones or an equivalent dening success. TP material — like wood in Master Gardener Jim Long’s garden. Inside, the walls are built of layered organic material that serves the dual purpose of continually adding nutrients to the soil and retaining moisture. This makes it much more productive than a conventional garden, particularly in cold and dry winter months.

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Thank you to Tulsa County Master Gardeners for their expertise in this subject matter. Allen Robinson has been a Master Gardener since 2010.


Get tickets for the whole family to our

5th Annual DIG: Day in the Garden Saturday, May 13, 4 - 8pm

91st and Lewis | (918) 299-9409 www.southwoodgardencenter.com

For DIG tickets & May event details, visit TulsaBotanic.org 3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive tulsabotanic.org 918.289.0330

A place for escape exploration. A place of ever changing beauty wonder. A place to visit, to and become connected to the world around you.

MAGIC SPECIAL SAVINGS GOING ON NOW

B R AVO CHAIR FROM THE

COLLEC TION

CASTLEBERRY’S AN AUTHORIZED ETHAN ALLEN RETAILER TULSA 6006 SOUTH SHERIDAN 918.496.3073 Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com for details. Sale going on for a limited time. ©2017 Ethan Allen Global, Inc. ©Disney.

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interior design â?– residential/commercial â?– remodeling

221 West Main - Jenks 918.995.2100 www.ghdinteriors.com

Showroom Hours: T - F: 9a - 5:30p and by appointment


44

th

4457 S. Zunis Ave. April 28-May 21, 2017

BENEFITING


DESIGNER SHOWCASE 2017 4457 S. Zunis Ave.

Schedule

April 28-May 21, 2017 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday 5-8 p.m., Thursday, with designers present Noon-4 p.m., Sunday

LET TER FROM THE COMMIT TEE Welcome to Designer Showcase 2017! This marks our 44th year for one of Tulsa’s longest- running fundraisers that benefits the Foundation for Tulsa Schools and children in Tulsa Public Schools. Susan Eddings Perez, Paula Dellavedova, We are very happy to be able to showcase Brian Paschal and SueAnn Blair this year’s house located in the Bolewood Acres neighborhood. This year’s home is a fabulous Southern-style house that sits on 2 acres with an absolutely incredible yard including pool and tennis courts. Also this year we are happy to present an actual “tiny house” built by the Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa. This year’s house showcases the work of 35 local designers with their individual style and talents. Showcase could not happen without the dedication of our designers who donate their time and energy to make Showcase happen. “It Takes a Village,” literally! Thank you to all of our steering committee members and house volunteers. We could not do this without you! Enjoy your tour and remember that all proceeds from this event benefit the children of Tulsa Public Schools. SueAnn, Susan, Paula and Brian

Steering Committee SueAnn Blair Showcase Chairwoman · Paula Dellavedova Showcase Coordinator · Susan Eddings Perez Designer Liaison · Michelle Barnett · Roberta Clark · Karen Goldberg · Katie May Kay Myers · Jana McKee · Lyndelle Spellman 68

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Tickets

Advance tickets: $12 Tickets at the door: $15 TPS teachers and employees with valid school ID: $5 (only available at the door) Advance tickets (cash only) are available at the following locations: Creative Concepts, 7891 E. 108th St., Suite X-6 GHD Interiors, 221 W. Main St., Jenks Griffin Interiors, 8212 E. 41st St. Kitchen Concepts, 5936 S. Lewis Ave. Luxe Furniture and Design, 9922 Riverside Parkway The Market at Walnut Creek, 8281 S. Harvard Ave. Midtown Market, 2616 E. 11th St. Mirabella Salon, 1316 E. 36th Place Ribbons on Brookside, 3525 S. Peoria Ave. Sasha Malchi Interiors, 1307 E. 35th Place Summer Snow Gifts and Decor, 4111 S. Harvard Ave. Williams Sonoma, 2016 Utica Square Windsor Market, 6808 S. Memorial Drive

Special Events Thursday Evenings with the Designers May 4, 11 and 18, 5-8 p.m. Meet and mingle with this year’s designers.

Tulsa Public Schools Saturday event May 6 Celebrating TPS students, teachers and staff. Student performers will be showcased on the lawn throughout the day, and the house will be staffed with TPS student volunteers.

Mother’s Day Brunch Sunday, May 14, noon-2 p.m. PRESENTED BY

Intimate buffet with dessert and Champagne. Ticket includes fashion show by Jules Boutique, giveaways, home tour, grand-prize drawing and buffet. $35 per person; reservations required. Call Paula at 918-746-6602 or 918-902-0809.


DESIGNER SHOWCASE BENEFITS THE FOUNDATION FOR TULSA SCHOOLS Officers Susan Beach, Chair Tiffani Bruton Joe Creider Drew France Jim Hoffmeister Adam Kupetsky Matt Newman Shemeka Rodgers Steve Soulé

COURTESY TULSA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Directors

The Foundation for Tulsa Schools (FTS), a community-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit, was formed

in 2001 with the mission to build a better community through the support of Tulsa Public Schools. The organization is committed to raising revenues to increase educational opportunities, enlisting community support and business assistance in providing educational resources, and communicating the need for continued community involvement in providing a first-class public education. FTS works closely with Superintendent Deborah A. Gist to provide district-wide strategic funding support to advance the goals and vision of Tulsa Public School’s five-year strategic plan, “Destination Excellence.” Since its formation, the foundation has raised over $22 million in support of TPS. Key priorities for the foundation have included the support of Teacher Leader Effectiveness, the Office of Student and Family Support Services, Community Schools, STEM education, teacher and leader professional development and novice teacher supports. In 2016, FTS launched “Together for Tulsa,” an individual giving campaign that raised over $1.3 million in two months to support teacher professional development and provide grants to allow every classroom teacher to purchase supplies and materials for their students.  Please visit foundationfortulsaschools.org to learn how you can help support FTS. Together we can be the foundation for Tulsa Public Schools and its nearly 40,000 students.

Foundation Champion Sponsor

Dan Bowling Pete Burgess Jeff Couch Marc Delametter Larry Faulkner Aaron Fulkerson Chris Holder Ryan Haynie Deborah Hoss Rick Kelly Diane Murphy Susan Neal Monroe Nichols Shannon O’Doherty Daniel Regan David Stratton Angela Wells Lucas Daffern, TYPros Intern

Ex-Officio Deborah Gist, TPS Superintendent

Staff Paula Dellavedova, Executive office and Designer Showcase manager Brian Paschal, President/CEO

Foundation Supporting Sponsors

SPONSORS

Thank you to all our generous sponsors, who make the 2017 Designer Showcase possible.

Supporting Sponsor

Television Sponsor

Magazine Sponsor

Mother’s Day Brunch Sponsor

Designer Sponsors: www.spectrumpaint.com

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FRONT VERANDA

ENTRY, STAIRCASE AND UPPER LANDING

FRONT OFFICE

FRONT VERANDA

70

FRONT OFFICE

ENTRY, STAIRCASE AND UPPER LANDING

Designer: Susan Eddings Perez

Designer: Erin Harp

P.O. Box 445, Sperry 918-855-5570 susan@susaneddingsperez.com susaneddingsperez.com

ERIN HARP DESIGNS

Designer: Natalie Nirk

918-810-2662 erinharp22@gmail.com

NATALIE NIRK INTERIOR DESIGN

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

918-637-1335 natalienirk@gmail.com natalienirkinteriors.com


Proud Partner with tulsa Public schools since 1932 w w w.rfrlaw.com

• rosenstein, fist & r ingold • tulsa • oklahoma city


LIVING ROOM

MASTER WING POWDER BATH

MASTER OFFICE

LIVING ROOM

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MASTER OFFICE

MASTER WING POWDER BATH

Designer: G.K. Griffin

Designer: Roger Wilson

GRIFFIN INTERIORS

ROGER WILSON INTERIORS

Designer: Lisa Wakefield

918-810-2662 ggriffin1027@yahoo.com

918-408-4838 wroger2770@aol.com

JENKINS AND CO.

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

1335 E. 11th St. | 918-794-7844 lwakefielddesign@yahoo.com jenkinsandcotulsa.com


1 - 888 - 4 - K A L L I S TA

|

K A L L I S TA .C OM

KALLISTA‰ promises to captivate the senses and renew the spirit. Exploring the finest details of design and engineering, KALLISTA faucets, fixtures and accessories are created to bring pleasure to the most elemental of daily rituals. Each piece is crafted using only the finest materials and world-class technology to meet the most discerning of standards.

Taper™ by BIG Collection 13 4 5 S O u T h S h E r I dA n r OA d T u L S A , O K 74112 (91 8 ) 838 - 98 41 w w w. h E AT wAv ES u p p Ly.CO M

Let Jane help you find a solution for your home loan needs. Jane Christiansen, Mortgage Banker, mls #1509266 jane.christiansen@commercebank.com | 918.879.5401

WF10242 JChristiansen Mortgage Ad - 8x4.875.indd 1

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MASTER BEDROOM

MASTER BEDROOM Designers: Gina Miller and Brenda Rice GHD INTERIORS

221 W. Main St., Jenks 918-995-2100 design@ghdinteriors.com ghdinteriors.com

MASTER BATH

MASTER BATH

Designer: Francie Winchester FRANCIE WINCHESTER LLC

1414 E. 39th St., #210 | 918-671-4253 franciewinchester@gmail.com franciewinchester.com

MASTER CLOSETS

MASTER CLOSETS Designers: Kay Worley and JaAnn Beffer PARDON MY FRENCH

918-232-6899 (Kay) 918-630-0661 (JaAnn)

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MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE

5313 S. Mingo | 918-622-7692 | MetroAppliancesAndMore.com

Visit our stores for Tulsa Designer Showcase Colors!

“Oklahoma’s Paint Source”

WWW.SPECTRUMPAINT.COM

Since 1986. Now with 8 Tulsa Area Locations NEW! Broken Arrow: 1206 E Kenosha, (918) 994-1605 South Tulsa: 10807 S. Memorial, Tulsa, (918) 369-1264 Tulsa Brookside: 4520 S. Peoria, Tulsa, (918) 749-0383 Tulsa I-244 & Yale: 4621 E. Admiral Blvd., (918) 836-9911 Owasso: 7738 N. Owasso Expressway, (918) 274-9966 Tulsa Skelly: 15247 E. Skelly Dr., (918) 398-2188 Claremore: 1301 W. Country Club Rd., (918) 923-6497 Bartlesville: 205 NE Washington Blvd, (918) 333-6340 TulsaPeople.com

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KITCHEN

KITCHEN

Designers: Laura Ellis Barnes, Mel Bean, Bailey Austin Bird and Erin Hardwick AUSTIN BEAN DESIGN STUDIO

918-794-7020 design@austin-bean.com austin-bean.com

WINE ROOM

FORMAL DINING ROOM

Designer: Cheri Sitton DOUBLE EAGLE DESIGN

8281 S. Harvard Ave. 918-760-7115 cherisitton@me.com doubleeagledesign.net

WINE ROOM

Designer: Leslie Story LESLIE STORY DESIGN

2616 E. 11th St. 918-346-9002 design@lesliestorydesign.com facebook.com/lesliestorydesign

FORMAL DINING ROOM 76

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Remodeling Homes

and Making Memories Since 2000, Sonrise has served over 11,000 highly satisfied customers! Awards and certifications serve as testament to our attention to detail, great customer service and superior quality of installation. • Angie’s List: Certified and an A+ rating

• Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling

• Home Advisor: Certified as a Preferred Contractor

• Preferred Builders with the City of Tulsa and BA

• Professional Memberships: Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa, HBA Remodeler’s Council & OSHBA, NAHB

“We Build Dreams!” See client projects and full list of our services at: SonriseConstruction.com 918-357-7777

FIND US ON:

You are invited! The luxury of more

AMA WATERWAYS RIVER CRUISE RECEPTION WHEN: Jun 7, from 5:00pm to 6:30pm WHERE: Tapestry at Woodland Hills, 7345 S. 99th East Ave. in Tulsa The Regional Business Development Manager for AMA Waterways will present a fascinating review of European and Asian river cruising and answer any questions you might have about the ships and accommodations, the rivers and ports, and offer the best pricing and opportunities for you to experience river cruising at its very finest.

R.S.V.P: (918) 494-0649 or david@thetravelgroup.biz For a full list of our current tours and cruises:

THETR AVELGROUP.BIZ

9999 S. Mingo Rd., Ste T • (918) 494-0649 TulsaPeople.com

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HALLWAY NOOK

Designers: Heather Miller and Lindsay Clyma THE HOME COLLECTION

8281 S. Harvard Ave. 918-902-8968 homecollection1@aol.com HALLWAY NOOK

FAMILY ROOM

Designers: Dee Siegenthaler, Ronda DeLaughter and Rachel DeLaughter CREATIVE CONCEPTS

7891 E. 108th St., Suite X-6 | 918-394-1880 creativeconceptsok@gmail.com creativeconceptstulsa.com FAMILY ROOM

GUEST BEDROOM AND BATH Designers: Darcie Blackerby and Judy Littrell THAYER FURNITURE

3309 S. Harvard Ave., Suite E 918-794-8388 info@studiothayer.com studiothayer.com GUEST BEDROOM AND BATH 78

TulsaPeople MAY 2017


WE ARE MOVING!

LIQUIDATION

SALE EVERYTHING IN THE STORE MUST GO BY

MAY 31ST!

Come find unique treasures to decorate your home! Check out our Facebook page and come see us today!

EVERY SATURDAY • 8-11:30 AM

Fresh local produce, eggs, wine, jelly, flowers, non-GMO beef, pork and chicken!

51st and Sheridan • farmshoppingcenter.com TulsaPeople.com 170152_FarmMarket_OKmag_QRT_1.indd 1

4/6/17 9:51 AM

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APARTMENT STAIRWAY, LIVING AND KITCHEN

APARTMENT STAIRWAY, LIVING AND KITCHEN Designer: Dixie Moseley JOIE DE VIE INTERIORS

12141 S. Elm St., Suite 113, Jenks 918-695-2341 dixie.jdv.interiors@gmail.com joiedevieinteriors.com

APARTMENT BEDROOM

APARTMENT BEDROOM

Designer: Pam Scott MONARCH DESIGN ASSOCIATES

918-607-7171 pamela-scott@hotmail.com

APARTMENT BATH

APARTMENT BATH Designer: Beth Zarbano R.E.Z. DESIGNS

3824 W. Fort Worth St., Broken Arrow 918-637-1996 rezdesignstulsa@gmail.com

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We Welcome You To Sunglow’s Shade Division…

Antiques, Accessories, & Interior Design Direct importer of European Antiques Cherry Street • 1345 E. 15th St., Suite A • (918) 295-7711

918-361-6624 We have a large variety of interior products to reduce the sun’s heat, glare and damaging UV rays, including roll shades, cellular blinds, wood blinds, roman shades, draperies, shutters, hardware and motorization. We only provide quality products and professional installation.

2016

WINNER!

4417 South Sheridan Road • 918.627.6996 • www.grigsbys.com TulsaPeople.com

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SOUTH HALLWAY

SOUTH HALLWAY BATH

SOUTH HALLWAY

Designer: Royce Myers ROYCE MYERS ART LTD.

1706 S. Boston Ave. 918-582-0288 roycemyersartltd@aol.com roycemyers.com

SOUTH HALLWAY BATH

Designers: Tania Cartwright and Michelle Nall 1231 INTERIORS

918-697-5104 tania.cartwright@yahoo.com houzz.com/pro/ taniacartwright/1231-interiors ID INTERIORS

918-230-7376 idinteriors@cox.net, idinteriorstulsa.com

CRAFT ROOM

Designer: Paula Wood PAULA WOOD CREATIONS

918-740-2228 paula@paulawoodcreations.com paulawoodcreations.com

CRAFT ROOM 82

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VISIT

Distinctive Interior Design services FOR EVERYTHING TULSA!

Designer g.K. griffin 14602 South Memorial Drive • Bixby, Oklahoma • 918-366-7440

918.810.2662

FREE TOURS AVAILABLE May 13 – June 24 Saturdays: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sundays: noon – 5 p.m.

6836 N. Wilderness Trail Owasso, OK 74055

Win this House Built by Epic Custom Homes in the Greystone addition at Stone Canyon of Owasso, estimated value $625,000.

Register for free at the Open House to win a $10,000 shopping spree at FFO Home.

Giveaway date: June 25, 2017

GET YOUR TICKET NOWNational | 800-853-1470 | dreamhome.org Sponsors National Sponsors Local Sponsors

Giveaway is conducted by and benefits ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital®. ©2017 ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (28612)

TulsaPeople.com

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GAME ROOM

LAUNDRY ROOM

KITCHEN PATIO AND GREENSPACE

GAME ROOM

Designer: Sasha Malchi

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KITCHEN PATIO AND GREENSPACE

LAUNDRY ROOM

Designer: Lindsay Bedell

SASHA MALCHI INTERIORS

Designer: Greg Hosterman

STUDIO DESIGN

1307 E. 35th Place 918-574-2588 sashamalchi.com

BRUTALLY MODERN

5808 S. Evanston Court 832-732-9688 lindsay@studiodesignok.com studiodesignok.com

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

3417 E. 66th St. 918-810-3934 greg@brutallymodern.com brutallymodern.com


GAZEBO

POOL AREA

PANTRY

TINY HOUSE

GAZEBO

POOL AREA Designer: Joseph Gilbert

Designer: Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa

Designer: Amity Edwards

MICHAEL BEARD

GILBERT ARTISAN WOOD WORKS

11545 E. 43rd St. 918-663-5820 tulsahba.com

4748 S. 101st E. Ave. 918-850-0877 918interiors@gmail.com 918interiors.com

Designer: Michael Beard 123 E. 18th St. 918-282-1965 dresserdesignmb@aol.com

1505 S. Owasso Ave. 918-277-2919 gilberartisanwoodworks @gmail.com gilbertartisanwoodworks.com

TINY HOUSE

PANTRY

918 INTERIORS LLC

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BOY’S BEDROOM AND BATH

GIRL’S BEDROOM

PLAYROOM

GIRL’S BEDROOM

Designer: Emma Sitton EMMA SITTON INTERIORS

8281 S. Harvard Ave. 918-760-6543 emma.sitton@me.com

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BOY’S BEDROOM AND BATH

Designers: Audrey Lackner and Kristin Yannaccone

PLAYROOM

Designers: Lynn Knight Jessee, Hillary Holt and Hannah Harrington

LUXE FURNITURE AND DESIGN

KITCHEN CONCEPTS

9922 Riverside Parkway 918-459-8950 audrey@luxetulsa.com kristin@luxetulsa.com luxetulsa.com

5936 S. Lewis Ave. 918-779-4480 lynn@kitchenconceptstulsa.com kitchenconceptstulsa.com


SUPPLIERS Adrian Cook • All American Wallcovering • Alvin Cruise Always Greener Oklahoma City • Amini’s Galleria • Amy Marsh Anderson Windows by Lantz Day • Andrews Lighting and Hardware Gallery ArcWorks • Arlan Receiving, Delivery and Storage • Armando Ambriz Painting B Hive Interiors • Baxton Studio • Beau Williams • Bedrock International Bellacor • Betche Upholstery • Blanco Silgranit Sinks • Bob Mills Furniture Brutally Modern • Butch Clifton • Cambria • Carolyn Finch and Co. Carpet One • Charles Rodriguez • Chavez Contracting Service Christy Hartung — The Paint and Paper Lady • Cobblestone Homes • Cohlmia’s Contract Cabinet Systems • CounterTop Solutions • Creative Concepts CR Interiors and Construction • David Babcock • David Miller Painting Displays2Go • Don Tracy Glass • Double Eagle Design • Draped in Style Elder Paint and Wallpaper • Elite Cabinets • Emma Sitton Interiors Embellishments Interiors • Endisco • England Custom Window Treatments Eric Campbell Plumbing • Erdos at Home • Estrada Painting Eurocraft Granite and Marble • Fabricut • Ferguson Enterprises Flash Flood Print Studios • Floorhaus Design Center • Fluff Pillow Co. The French Bouquet • Garbe’s Lighting and Home Accessories Gilbert Artisan Wood Works • GP Painting Grant Barron Renovation and Construction Services • Greg Gariepy Upholstery Greg Lelay • Gwen Elliott Upholstery • Hahn Appliance Warehouse Halverson Fine Furnishings • Hans and Alice • Heatwave Supply Home Hardware U.S.A. • Home Moda • Houzz.com • Installed Building Products Interceramic Tile • Janet Fadler Davie • Jeanne Creedon • Jerrid Horton Jody Abundiz • Joie de Vie Interiors • Jordan Herron • Juan Estrada Kiddlestix Toy Store • Kitchen Concepts • Langria • Leslie Elliott Interiors Linda Gross • Lindsay Bedell • Luther Quintana Upholstery • Masland Carpets and Rugs • Metro Appliances and More • Michael Beard • Mike Loper Painting Mile High Designs • Milliger Construction • Mill Creek Lumber Murphy Wallbed USA • Natalie Nirk Interiors • Nobilis • Omar Gonzalez One Kings Lane • Ouse Technology • Outlaw Electric • Overstock.com • Pablo Perez Pacific Shore Stones • Pancho’s Painting • Permastone Granite and Quartz • Philbrook Museum of Art •Plastic Engineering Co. of Tulsa • Pottery Barn • Pottery Barn Kids • Pro Source • Quadrille Fabrics • Refinishing and Restoration by Teresa Renaissance Hardwood Floors • Restoration Hardware • Richards Electric Room Service Draperies • Royce Myers Art Ltd. • Rubio Remodeling Rugs Unlimited • Ryan Farabough • Ryan’s HVAC • Saldivar Construction Sam Lee • Samuel and Sons • Sarah Machemehl • SCL Services • Serena and Lily • Shar Plus • Shoppe Sasha • Skeet Christensen Midtown Custom Painting • Soci Tile Spectrum Paint • Steve Curtis Customs • Stroheim • Surfaces • Susan Eddings Perez Susan Fielstra • TableLegs.com • Teresa Hunt Furniture Refinishing Thayer Furniture • The Difference • The Gift Oasis Ltd. • The Makerage The Market at Walnut Creek • The Tile Guy • Thibaut • Tim Ophoff Timber and Beam Solutions • Tiny Home Builders • TM Painting Tony Bloomfield • Tulsa Tech • Tulsa Trade Secrets • Vallier Construction Visions Tile and Stone • W Design • Wayfair Supply • Wayne Pate • Wes Jarvis West Steel • Western Window and Door • Whaling Painting Window Treatments by Bertha Upton • Woodstock Cabinet Co. • Yoler Ziegler Art and Frame • Zoffany Wallcoverings

We Welcome You To Sunglow’s Awning Division…

We are your complete one-stop shop for sales and service of functional and architectural awnings. Come see our wide selection of these stylish sun control products…including fabric awnings, retractable awnings, metal, canopies, patio/gazebo screens, and exterior shades. See us for sales and service.

1335 E. 11th St. Suite E., Tulsa, OK 74120 located on historic Route 66 jenkinsandcotulsa

TulsaPeople.com

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WEDDINGS | RECEPTIONS | SPECIAL EVENTS

Mike Fretz EVENT CENTER

11545 East 43rd Street www.mikefretzeventcenter.com • 918.663.5820 Scan the QR code for a virtual tour


Carrie Clark + Brandon Cross MARCH 11, 2017 PHOTOGRAPHER Tracy Arnold, Beautiful Exchange. • BRIDE’S HOMETOWN Tulsa. GROOM’S HOMETOWN Carterville, Illinois. • LIVE IN Tulsa. • HOW THEY MET Brandon joined a group of Carrie’s friends to help her move apartments. A few months later, they had their first date at Foolish Things Coffee. • WHAT HE LOVES ABOUT HER Brandon loves Carrie’s servant heart and willingness to listen to the Lord. She is a gentle, sensitive person. She extends grace not only to Brandon, but also to family and

friends. • WHAT SHE LOVES ABOUT HIM Carrie is constantly in awe of Brandon’s selfless nature, his incredible heart for people, his immense love of teaching and his thoughtful and kind actions.

feel about your spouse-to-be during the engagement process. • THREE ADJECTIVES TO DESCRIBE THE WEDDING Whimsical, romantic, Christ-centered. TIME TO PLAN THE WEDDING Nine months.

THE PROPOSAL After a friend’s downtown wedding and reception, Brandon drove Carrie to where they first met: the Mayo Apartments. He popped the question, she said “yes,” and Carrie’s parents hosted a celebration for the pair. • WEDDING DAY Cold and rainy, but this only added to the excitement of the day and the beauty of the pictures. • ATTENDEES 180. • HER ADVICE TO OTHER BRIDES Don’t be consumed by the details of the wedding day. No matter what comes on that day, you will be married in the end. The marriage, not your wedding day, is what will last. • HIS ADVICE TO OTHER GROOMS Seek out and listen to wise counsel throughout the engagement. Remember to write down how you

CEREMONY First United Methodist Church. • RECEPTION AND CATERER The Silo Center. • GOWN Mori Lee from Bridal Elegance. • MENSWEAR The Suit Connection and Jos. A. Bank. • WEDDING JEWELRY Kendra Scott and David Yurman. • REHEARSAL DINNER Orr Catering at Foolish Things Coffee. • MUSIC Royal Dukes Band. • INVITATIONS, PROGRAMS AND CALLIGRAPHY Hannah George. • FLOWERS Anthousai Florals. • VIDEO Bryan Roberts. • MAKEUP Starla Ward. • HAIR Ash Franke. • FAVORS Bubbles and jelly beans. • RENTALS Party Perfect and Party Pro Rents and Events. • HOTEL The Ambassador Tulsa. • OFFICIANT Hal Hamilton. • HONEYMOON Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. TulsaPeople.com

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Corie Layson + Diego Ramirez OCT. 15, 2016 PHOTOGRAPHER JAG Digital Photography. • BRIDE’S HOMETOWN Tulsa. • GROOM’S HOMETOWN Mexico City. • LIVE IN Tulsa. • HOW THEY MET Corie’s family owns Party Pro Rents. In March 2014, she went in to help and met Diego, who works there. • COURTSHIP Scott Layson, Corie’s dad and the owner of Party Pro Rents, took a liking to Diego and mentioned him to Corie a couple of times. Unfortunately, Scott died on July 24, 2014. Diego helped 90

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Corie through those tough emotional days following her father’s death. Shortly after that, they officially began dating. The pair broke up after Corie moved to Stillwater to attend college, but they reconnected when Party Pro set up a tent on campus. • FAVORITE DATE Diego took Corie and her daughter, Ava, to Blue Hole Park in Salina, Oklahoma. WHAT SHE LOVES MOST ABOUT HIM She loves his witty sense of humor and his general loving personality that allows him to befriend everyone he meets. • WHAT HE LOVES MOST ABOUT HER Diego loves Corie’s compassion and her unique personality. • THE PROPOSAL After a day of Memorial Day fun, Diego challenged Corie to a video game competition. She won and her “prize” was an engagement ring. Then, Diego gave Ava a ring, too, and asked if he could officially become her daddy. (The answer was yes.) • WEDDING DAY Sunny and hot. • ATTENDEES 150. • FAVORITE

DETAILS Including Ava in the wedding ceremony and vows. • WHAT WAS UNIQUE Corie’s dad built the house where the couple was married. This was a neat way for him to be part of the ceremony. THREE ADJECTIVES TO DESCRIBE THE WEDDING Creative, beautiful, heartwarming. • TIME TO PLAN THE WEDDING Five months. • REHEARSAL DINNER, CEREMONY AND RECEPTION The Layson residence. • GOWN Maggie Sottero, Faccianos. • BRIDESMAID DRESSES Amazon. • MENSWEAR Men’s Wearhouse. • WEDDING JEWELRY Kendra Scott. • HAIR AND MAKEUP Glamour Artz Studio. • CAKE Ludgers Bavarian Cakery. • CATERER Just Catering by Orr. • MUSIC LionsRoad Studios. • RENTALS Party Pro Rents and Events and Mom and Me Events. • FLOWERS Jeanne Easterlund and Mom and Me Events. • HONEYMOON A week in Orlando, Florida, and a week on the beach in Gulf Shores, Alabama.


918.622.8102 918.622.8102 6820 East 41st Street, Tulsa OK 74145 6820 East 41st Street, Tulsa OK 74145 www.partyprorents.com www.partyprorents.com

Chairs and Furniture • Luxurious Table Tops • Fabulo Designer Chairs and Furniture • Luxurious Table • Fabulous Tents Unique Dinnerware • Fine Linens • Tops Glitz and Glamou DesignerUnique Chairs Dinnerware and Furniture • Luxurious • Fabulous Tents • Fine Linens •Table Glitz Tops and Glamour Superior Unique Service • Experienced Event Consultants Dinnerware Fine Linens •Event Glitz and Glamour Superior Service • •Experienced Consultants Superior Service • Experienced Event Consultants


Mary Ulmer + Philip Leon OCT. 8, 2016

favorite restaurant, Dalesandro’s, then drinks downtown. • WHAT HE LOVES MOST ABOUT HER Mary is ambitious, and Phil loves that she always wants to take care of him and others. • THE PROPOSAL Phil proposed in Crested Butte, Colorado, at Uley’s Ice Bar on the mountain. It had been snowy and cloudy all day, but right before the proposal, the sun came out, and it was perfect weather.

PHOTOGRAPHER Redeemed Productions. • COUPLE’S HOMETOWN Tulsa. • LIVE IN Tulsa. • COURTSHIP Phil and Mary met in 2010 through mutual friends at the Colony and became good friends. Phil asked Mary on a date six months later, and they have been together ever since. • FAVORITE DATE Dinner at their

WEDDING DAY WEATHER Sunny and 70. • ATTENDEES 175. • FAVORITE DETAILS Food stations, flowers, an inflatable swan, custom cups and koozies. • HER ADVICE TO OTHER BRIDES Forget about everything you have planned and just enjoy the day. • HIS ADVICE TO OTHER GROOMS Pretend you care about the details. • THREE ADJECTIVES TO DESCRIBE THE WEDDING Mag-

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ical, fun, romantic. • TIME TO PLAN THE WEDDING 12 months. CEREMONY AND RECEPTION Philbrook Museum of Art. • GOWN Maggie Sottero, Moliere Bridal, Oklahoma City. • BRIDESMAID DRESSES Belsoie, Facchianos. • MENSWEAR Vera Wang, Jos. A. Bank. • WEDDING JEWELRY Mother’s Tiffany pearl and diamond earrings. • CAKE Icing on the Top. • CATERER PartyServe. • MUSIC AND LIGHTING Banks Entertainment. • WEDDING PLANNER Doug Deckard and Lyla Sawyer. • INVITATIONS AND PROGRAMS Dianne Rusher. • VIDEO Redeemed Productions. • MAKEUP Kelsie Lloyd, Soul Beauty. • HAIR Julie Hudson and Jane Clayton, iidentity Salon. • FAVORS Gracious Bridal Etsy shop. • RENTALS Party Pro Rents and Events. • HOTEL The Ambassador Tulsa. • OFFICIANT Jim Rusher. • HONEYMOON Hawaii.


The Campbell Hotel Where Your Fairytale Becomes Reality

Two Spacious Event Centers

Twenty-Six Uniquely Designed Guest Rooms for Your Comfort

Catering Available by Our Very Own Maxxwell’s Restaurant* *Or by the approved caterer of your choice

Located on Historic Route 66, and National Register of Historic Places.

2636 E 11th St • 918-744-5500 • www.thecampbellhotel.com

8350 West 590 Road • I nola , oK • 918.829.0707

thethompsonmansion.com

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Andrea Lewis + Rob Redwine JULY 23, 2016 PHOTOGRAPHER Imago Vita Photography. • COUPLE’S HOMETOWN Tulsa. • LIVE IN Tulsa. • HOW THEY MET Rob and Andrea were set up on a blind date by a mutual friend. • COURTSHIP They began dating the summer of 2014 and dated long distance 94

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

while Rob finished law school in Norman and Andrea worked in Tulsa. Rob returned to Tulsa to begin his legal career. • FAVORITE DATE On their second date, the pair played tennis. This was Rob’s first look at Andrea’s competitive side. • WHAT SHE LOVES MOST ABOUT HIM Andrea loves how good Rob is at making her laugh. He looks for the best in every situation, which makes Andrea’s life so much more joyful. • WHAT HE LOVES MOST ABOUT HER He loves how thoughtful and caring she is. • THE PROPOSAL Rob surprised Andrea at his house with candles, sweet words and a ring. They celebrated with family and friends at Andrea’s parents’ home. FAVORITE DETAILS The doughnut bar from Livi Lee’s Donuts. Music from SquadLive. The Summit Club for its beautiful Tulsa view.

• UNIQUE ASPECT OF THE WEDDING Andrea and Rob were married by the Rev. Deron Spoo, pastor at First Baptist Church, who also married Andrea’s older sister. The way he led the ceremony was a special beginning to the marriage. • THREE ADJECTIVES TO DESCRIBE THE WEDDING Meaningful, joyful, rowdy. TIME TO PLAN THE WEDDING • Eight months. ATTENDEES 275. • CEREMONY First Baptist Church of Tulsa. • RECEPTION AND CATERER The Summit Club. • WEDDING JEWELRY Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. • REHEARSAL DINNER Southern Hills Country Club. • CAKE Ann’s Bakery. • VIDEO Emily Watson. • MAKEUP April Mary, Faccia Bella. • HAIR Lana Duis, Z Studio. • TRANSPORTATION Old Urban Trolley. • HOTEL The Ambassador Tulsa. • HONEYMOON Cape Hotel, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.


Ariel Helms + Jeremy Thames OCT. 22, 2016

PHOTOGRAPHER Kathy Sue Portrait Design. • BRIDE’S HOMETOWN Bixby. • GROOM’S HOMETOWN Tyler, Texas. • LIVE IN Chicago. • HOW THEY MET Ariel and Jeremy met their junior year at Vanderbilt University, through a mutual friend, when Ariel picked up both classmates from the airport. • FAVORITE DATE On their first date, the couple went to a Vanderbilt basketball game,

then out for pizza and ice cream. The next day, they both called their parents and told them of their last first date. • WHAT SHE LOVES MOST ABOUT HIM Jeremy is a guy’s guy with a tender heart. He surpasses his years in his wisdom and would do anything for a friend. • WHAT HE LOVES MOST ABOUT HER She is always encouraging and has the ability to brighten everyone’s day. She is also highly creative and capable. • THE PROPOSAL On Ariel’s 22nd birthday, Jeremy proposed at the Tulsa Garden Center under a pair of Texas magnolias. WEDDING DAY WEATHER Warm, sunny and in the 70s. • ATTENDEES 200. • HER ADVICE TO OTHER BRIDES The most special moments are the ones you can’t plan for. The small details you’ll worry about leading up to the day fade away, and what you really remember is how each guest blessed you. • HIS ADVICE TO OTHER GROOMS Be extra supportive to your fiancée during the wedding planning process. Remember to give lots of encouragement

and offer many thanks for her efforts. • THREE ADJECTIVES TO DESCRIBE THE WEDDING Meaningful, blessed, joyful. • TIME TO PLAN THE WEDDING Nine months. CEREMONY Redeemer Covenant Church. • RECEPTION Tulsa Historical Society and Museum. • GOWN Justin Alexander from Dress Me Bridal Boutique in Tyler, Texas. • BRIDESMAID DRESSES David’s Bridal. • MENSWEAR Men’s Wearhouse. • WEDDING JEWELRY Blue Nile. • REHEARSAL DINNER The Bistro at Seville. • CAKE Merritt’s Bakery. • FLOWERS Ted and Debbie’s. • CATERER Ludger’s Catering and Events. • MUSICIANS Lisa and Courtney Kleefeld, Greg Taylor and Vicki Walker. • INVITATIONS AND PROGRAMS Amy Hellen, Arnold Graphic Design. • VIDEO Nick Branston. • MAKEUP Destry Davis, Glamor Artz • HAIR Kristy Shackelford, the Beauty Shop. • TRANSPORTATION First Class Limousine. • RENTALS Party Pro Rents and Events. • HOTEL The Mayo. • OFFICIANT The Rev. Dr. Joe Scruggs. • HONEYMOON Cancun, Mexico. TP TulsaPeople.com

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2017 VENUE GUIDE

SPONSORED EDITORIAL

EVENT & WEDDING VENUE GUIDE When planning an event — large or small — there are so many details to coordinate. From finding a place with the right amount of space to choosing from catering options and amenities, the to-do list can be overwhelming. Use this guide to wedding, event and conference venues around Tulsa as a resource.

624 CATERING

EXPO SQUARE

THE BLUE COTTAGE

FOREST RIDGE GOLF CLUB

409 East “A” Street, Jenks (918) 299-8204 bluecottagejenks.com Event rental contact: Kay Greer Capacity: 50-60 (upstairs, no elevator)

7501 East Kenosha Street, Broken Arrow (918) 357-4407 forestridge.com Event rental contact: Brian Bodenstob Capacity: Up to 150

THE CAMPBELL HOTEL & EVENT CENTERS

THE GAST EVENT CENTER

624 South Boston Avenue (918) 779-6333 624catering.com Event rental contact: Brittany Downs Capacity: 200 Reception, 125 Seated

2636 East 11th Street (918) 744-5500 thecampbellhotel.com Event rental contact: Tyler Funk Capacity: 225

COX BUSINESS CENTER

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

1429 Terrace Drive (918) 744-6997 thegasthouse.com Event rental contact: Sara Gonzales Capacity: 220

GILCREASE MUSEUM

100 Civic Center (918) 894-4260 coxcentertulsa.com Event rental contact: Kathy Tinker Capacity: 100-1,000

1400 North Gilcrease Museum Road (918) 596-2771 www.gilcrease.org Event rental contact: Brittney Pitts Capacity: 60-250 in various locations

DOUBLETREE BY HILTON TULSA DOWNTOWN

GLENPOOL CONFERENCE CENTER

616 West 7th Street (918) 587-8000 tulsadowntown.doubletree.com Event rental contact: Barbara Gresh Capacity: Up to 900

12205 S. Yukon Ave., Glenpool, OK 74033 Phone: (918) 209-4632 Fax: (918) 209-4626 glenpoolconferencecenter.com Event rental contact: Lea Ann Reed, lreed@cityofglenpool.com Capacity: flexible, up to 500

DRESSER MANSION

LIVING ARTS OF TULSA

235 West 18th Street (918) 585-5157 dressermansion.com Event rental contact: Bethany Faber Capacity: 200

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4145 East 21st Street (918) 744-1113 ext-2090 exposquare.com Event rental contact: Sarah Thompson Capacity: Multiple facilities available

307 East Brady Street (918) 585-1234 livingarts.org Event rental contact: Chris Henson Capacity: 260


2017 VENUE GUIDE

SPONSORED EDITORIAL

MIKE FRETZ EVENT CENTER

WHITE HOUSE MANSION

OKLAHOMA AQUARIUM

ONEOK FIELD EVENTS

PINOT’S PALETTE

THE THOMPSON MANSION

Broken Arrow, Cherry Street and Riverwalk locations (918) 893-6447 (BA); (918) 794-7333 (CS); (918) 518-5433 (RW) pinotspalette.com Event rental contact: Contact desired location Capacity: Broken Arrow-54; Cherry Street-44; Riverwalk-60

8350 West 590 Road, Inola, OK (918) 829-0707 thethompsonmansion.com Event rental contact: Jenni Campbell Capacity: Differs with each area, max 300

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH

TULSA ZOO

11545 East 43rd Street (918) 663-5820 mikefretzeventcenter.com Event rental contact: Gabby Bridenbaugh & Marlena Chase Capacity: 256

1 West 81st Street (918) 313-0808 www.whitehousemansiontulsa.com Event rental contact: Julia Kwok Capacity: 200+

201 North Elgin Avenue (918) 574-8324 ONEOKfieldevents.com Event rental contact: Courtney Gemmett Capacity: 20-350

300 Aquarium Drive (918) 296-FISH okaquarium.org Event rental contact: events@okaquarium.org Capacity: Varies with room/area, 20-1,000+

6421 East 36th Street North (918) 669-6605 tulsazoo.org Event rental contact: Nicolas Stolusky, Amy Watson Capacity: 100-600 indoor; 4,000 outdoor

501 South Cincinnati (918) 582-4128 trinitytulsa.org Event rental contact: Jan Schneider Capacity: 350

BRIDE GUIDE NS

Wedding details can be tedious and overwhelming, but these resources can help make planning a breeze.

PH

Living Arts of Tulsa

Living Arts is an open, airy contemporary art gallery in Tulsa’s Brady Arts District. Perfect for a sophisticated, unique wedding. 918-585-1234 ◆ livingarts.org

NG IL LO

DE

SIG

Performance Stage Inc.

Your professional provider of audio, visual, and lighting equipment. You only get one chance to make your wedding perfect! 918-832-8800 ◆ performancestage.com

The Thompson Mansion

Oklahoma’s newest luxurious wedding and event venue. Located on 27 acres with several water features, gazebo’s and the most breathtaking views. 918-829-0707 ◆ thethompsonmansion.com TulsaPeople.com

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YOU MAKE THE MEMORIES. RUTH’S WILL MAKE THE MEAL.

When you book an event with Ruth’s Chris, know that every detail, every nuance, every request that you and our team plan together will be executed flawlessly. So whether it’s an intimate dinner in one of our private dining rooms, a grand wedding reception for hundreds of guests or a catered party off-site, we’ll make sure every celebration is an unforgettable one. Contact our Sales Manager at salestulsa@ruthschris.com for more information on private dining and catering or to book your next event.

Tulsa • 918.995.8600 • 8330 Riverside Pkwy


McGraw Realtors Over 11,000 sq ft in Midtown. - Original residence in gated Royal Oaks has had an extensive remodel. The floor plan is extremely user friendly with areas for entertaining both formally and informally. 3 unique game rooms each with stunning appointments. Chef’s Kitchen. Private office. 4 bedroom suites each having private baths. Backyard oasis with double outdoor kitchens, covered living area with fireplace, koi pond and heated diving pool. 3 car side entry garage. Fully finished quarters. Call for your private showing.

Rodger Erker

918-740-4663 TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

theEHC

Extraordinary Home Collection

Extraordinary Homes Extraordinary Realtors 2411 E 27th Place, Tulsa

$1,600,000

Fabulous stone home in Woody Crest. Kitchen opens to family room. Large beautiful formals. Wine room off of formal dining. Huge his and her closets. Outdoor living with pool, hot tub, fireplace and built in heaters. ◆ 5 Bedrooms

◆ 4 Full, 2 Half Baths ◆ 4 Living Areas ◆ 4 Car Garage ◆ Tulsa Schools ◆ MLS 1710082

10538 S 94th E Avenue, Tulsa

$725,000

Stunning custom with lush greenbelt views in Legends. Distressed hardwoods, culinary kitchen, great room with fabulous view, study, master & guest suite down. Separate game room and media room up. In-ground safe room. ◆ 5 Bedrooms

◆ 4 Full, 2 Half Baths ◆ 4 Living Areas ◆ 3 Car Garage ◆ Bixby Schools ◆ MLS 1707214

5409 E 122nd Street, Tulsa

$419,000

Beautiful transitional style with easy functional floor plan. Handscraped hardwoods, custom cabinets, huge granite island, beams, spacious dining area and perfect colors throughout. Covered porch and patio. Sprinkler system. ◆ 4 Bedrooms

◆ 3 Full, 1 Half Baths ◆ 3 Living Areas ◆ 3 Car Garage ◆ Bixby Schools ◆ MLS 1706457

Curt Roberts 918.231.0691 100

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Katie Lieberman Hutto 918.698.3800

Laura Hawkins 918.260.7885


McGraw Realtors

theEHC

Extraordinary Home Collection

Extraordinary Homes Extraordinary Realtors 3915 W Tucson Place, Broken Arrow

$395,000

New construction home in Shadow Trails. Gorgeous hardwoods & luxurious amenities. Two bedrooms down, large granite kitchen open to spacious family room with stone fireplace. Custom pergola. Neighborhood Pool. ◆ 4 Bedrooms

◆ 3 Full, 1 Half Baths ◆ 2 Living Areas ◆ 3 Car Garage ◆ Bixby Schools ◆ MLS 1701092

2116 S Detroit Avenue, Tulsa

$1,295,000

Stunning renovation in Maple Ridge featured in OK Magazine. This 1920’s home features a warm & modern interior & amazing outdoor living with fireplace and pool. Spacious kitchen w/marble countertops & SS appliances. ◆ 5 Bedrooms

◆ 3 Full, 3 Half Baths ◆ 4 Living Areas ◆ 5 Car Garage ◆ Tulsa Schools ◆ MLS 1711171

4620 E 109th Place, Tulsa

$619,900

Beautiful backyard with heated saltwater pool! Culinary kitchen with newly refinished cabinetry, updated paint, lavish master with fireplace & guest suite down. Game room, 2 bedrooms & bonus room up plus safe room.

◆ 4 Bedrooms ◆ 4 Full Baths ◆ 3 Living Areas ◆ 3 Car Garage ◆ Jenks Schools ◆ MLS 1708185

Pam Case 918.809.3247

Chris Zinn Group 918.994.1235

theEHC

Extraordinary Home Collection

TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

theEHC

Extraordinary Home Collection

Extraordinary Homes Extraordinary Realtors 2450 E 32nd Street, Tulsa

$709,000

Incredible Mid-century Ranch Remodel! Spacious open floor plan delivers today’s modern design. Caeserstone counters, high-end stainless appliances, hardwoods, luxurious master suite plus insulated doors & windows. ◆ 4 Bedrooms

◆ 3 Full, 1 Half Baths ◆ 2 Living Areas ◆ 3 Car Garage ◆ Tulsa Schools ◆ MLS 1701905

10620 S Nandina Court, Jenks

$579,000

Outstanding backyard with covered deck overlooking greenbelt & custom gunite pool! Distressed hardwoods, granite island kitchen, game room with wet bar, study & beautiful master down plus theater & play room up. ◆ 4 Bedrooms

◆ 3 Full, 1 Half Baths ◆ 3 Living Areas ◆ 3 Car Garage ◆ Jenks Schools ◆ MLS 1635882

4354 S Victor Avenue, Tulsa

$2,595,000

Spectacular newer custom home features stunning great room, master or guest suite down plus second master up, utility up & down, large game rm with kitchen. Outdoor living with waterfall pool & playhouse! Gated driveway. ◆ 5 Bedrooms

◆ 5 Full, 2 Half Baths ◆ 4 Living Areas ◆ 4 Car Garage ◆ Tulsa Schools ◆ MLS 1711379

Curt Roberts 918.231.0691 102

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Katie Lieberman Hutto 918.698.3800

Laura Hawkins 918.260.7885


7+

Extraordinary Homes Extraordinary Realtors

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Ca

McGraw Realtors

theEHC

Extraordinary Home Collection

13870 S Hudson Avenue, Bixby

$795,000 624 W 80th Street, Tulsa

1236 E 27th Street, Tulsa

$799,000 13010 S 2nd Street, Jenks

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6709 E 109th Place, Tulsa

$339,000

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$1,049,999

$2,690,000 4219 E 97th Street, Tulsa

$1,895,000

Contact an

EHC Group Member today for help finding your Extraordinary...

Pam Case 918.809.3247

Pam Case

Chris Zinn Group 918.994.1235

Chris Zinn

Laura Hawkins

Curt Roberts

theEHC

Katie Lieberman Hutto

Extraordinary Home Collection

TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

Luxury Property Group at McGraw Realtors diana PaTTerson

918-629-3717 dpatterson@mcgrawok.com

Tim Hayes

918-231-5637 thayes@mcgrawok.com Tim@TimHayesJr.com

Kelly Howard

918-230-6341 khoward@mcgrawok.com

sHerri sanders

918-724-5008 ssanders@mcgrawok.com

Gordon sHelTon

918-697-2742 gshelton@mcgrawok.com Gordon@GordonShelton.com

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017

The esTaTes of hampTon hills 13127 S Yorktown Avenue, Bixby. Fabulous Custom on approximately 5 acres with 2 stocked ponds, salt water pool with hot tub, 6 Fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, butler pantries, formals, study, exercise, game & hobby room. Outdoor kitchen with fireplace. Expansion area. Elevator. Safe room. Shop with quarters and additonal 3 car garage. $2,199,900

Barnard Trace 2336 E 17th Street Brand New Contemporary Craftsman designed like a modern home with historic character. Wonderful floor plan. 3 beds, 2.5 baths, 3 car garage. Study and Formal dining. First floor Master with 2 vanities, tub and glass shower. Master closet connects to laundry. 2 Beds up with gameroom and niche. Safe room. $715,000.

maple ridge 1121 E 19th Street Immaculate newer home in Maple Ridge Historic District. 1st floor master suite with luxury bath, double walk-ins. Study off entry with custom bookshelves. Open kitchen and family room with FP. Formal LR with FP overlooks pool & pergola. Master on 1st floor, 3 beds up. 4,917 sq ft AP. $778,000.

Enjoy the Luxury Lifestyle you desire


McGraw Realtors

A Network of Realtors Representing the Finest Properties in NE OK

4300 BrooKTowne

Grand laKe

1372 E 43rd Place Located in Gated Brooktowne. Easy access to restaurants, Brookside, river trails, etc. This home has a flexible floorplan with Master bedroom down and 2 additional bedrooms or an office down. Covered patio and a firepit. Kitchen opens to family room. $409,000.

Awesome views from this incredible 3 Bedroom, 3.5 Bath contemporary lake home designed by Doug Campbell, located on the Langley Bluff. All finishes are over the top for this one-level home. Tulsa is only one hour away! $565,000.

sTanford elm

6601 E 113th Street, Bixby - Formal living/dining. Greatroom opens to kitchen. Hardwood floors thru-out. Master down, 2 beds up all with private baths. Gameroom. Outdoor living, lagoon pool, spa & waterfall. Gated. $575,000

avalon Place

3020 S Trenton Avenue - One owner custom built smart house. Architect Rachel Zebrowski calls it “Desert Mediterranean”. Pool overlooks greenbelt & Crow Creek. Home has an air bridge to full apartment with kitchenette. $950,000

sTanford elm

6707 E 112th Street S.- Gated neighborhood. Traditional brick home featuring granite kitchen, newer Trane matching H & A systems, H20 and 2008 roof. Formals + spacious family room/ kitchen combo. 1st floor master suite + office! $419,000

easTBrooK

1332 E 35th Place - Gorgeous Upscale Townhome in Brookside. Hardwoods & Fabulous Finishes throughout. 2 Master Suites. Master up has 2nd living w/wet bar & balcony. Master down has patio with green area. 3rd bedroom could be study. $500,000

Grand laKe

You will love this Vintage on Grand Lake stunning water front lake home! The 4 BR, 3 BA home has been completely updated. Wake up to incredible views of the sunrise on the covered deck. 40’ boat slip, gated, & community pool! $539,000

Call any of the Luxury Property Group Realtors about one of these homes, or any property that you have an interest in. They will provide you with superior personal service with the highest integrity.

The Luxury Property Group TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

Scott coffman

918-640-1073 scoffman@mcgrawok.com

14506 S. Florence Avenue One owner, Reserve at Harvard Ponds with open floor plan, 3 beds down and one up plus a game room. All new carpet, beautiful granite in kitchen with bar seating overlooks living with fireplace. Backs to vacant raw land. Walk to neighborhood pond, pool and park. Bixby Schools. $259,900

2813 E 56th Place - New Price. One level ranch with creek view. Very private, large yard, new driveway, 4 or 5 bed, flexible plan with possible mother in law or extra study/hobby room. Very unique original Jay Rambo retro kitchen. Amazing yard and trees. One block from park and schools. $285,000

HAWES HOUCHIN COLLINS At McGraw Realtors 2428 E. 24th Place

7967 S. 90th East Ave

4173 S. Birmingham Place

4 Bds/3 Bths/2 Gar | Stunning, custom Jack Arnold design in gated Balmoral. Back patio views overlook SHCC 9-hole golf course. Vaulted and beamed great room. Master suite plus second bedroom or office on first floor. Approx. 1000 SF unfinished space in walk-out attic for internal expansion. $699,000

3 Bds/3.5 Bths/2 Gar | Classic midtown remodel near Utica Square/Monte Cassino. Located on quiet cul-de-sac. Multiple living areas. Open kitchen with SubZero, Viking. Bonus fourth downstairs bedroom quarters with full bath. New outdoor living area. Basement clubroom. $665,000

4 Bds/4 Bths/3 Gar | Jack Arnold design in the exclusive gated community of Preston Place in The Villages of Highland Park. Amazing tiered patio with outdoor fireplace overlooking pond! 4531 square feet. $625,000

3 Bds/4 Bths/2 Gar | Completely renovated back to the studs. All 1-level. Beautifully landscaped. New Restoration Hardware finishes. Vaulted, open living/kitchen. New marble bathroom. Sep master suite w/luxury bath, double walk-in closets. Sep office w/full bth. New outdoor patios. $569,000

5834 S. Indianapolis

2435 E. 22nd Place

12277 S. 105th E. Ave., Bixby

2980 E. 56th Place

1906 W. Rockport Place

3 Bds/3.5 Bths/2 Gar | One-level, newly renovated patio home in gated Glenoak with 24-hour security, ponds, walking paths. Centrally located in the heart of Tulsa. High ceilings. Each bedroom with private bath. 3 spacious livings. Covered outdoor living. Minimal outdoor upkeep. $559,000

3 Bds/4.5 Bths/1+ Gar |Custom Midtown reno on oversized lot in prime location. New backyard. Flex space w/ open floor plan. New master suite w/ sitting rm, walk-in closet, gar add’n. 1st floor bdrm w/bath. Fin bsmt w/full bath. Pella windows/doors. New HVAC. Sep studio c/b 2-car gar. $559,000

4 Bds/3.5 Bths/3 Gar | Chisholm Ranch, Built in 2012. Perfectly maintained home with high-end finishes throughout, including beautiful wood floors & travertine bathrooms. Designer details. Amazing vaulted outdoor living space! House faces greenbelt and backs to privately owned, wooded land. $459,000

Fairway Estates | 4 beds, 3.5 baths, 2 Car Garage, Beautiful and complete renovation in 2016 with over 3200 square feet. Open living, granite island kitchen, master suite and 3 bedrooms down and game/bonus room with full bath up! Lovely hardwoods, all new stainless appliances. New electric gate. Near EIS School! $419,000

Shenandoah Valley in Battle Creek | 3 beds, 2 baths, 3 Car Garage l Beautiful one-level, one-owner home and culde-sac location within the golf club community of Battle Creek. Doublesided fireplace in Living and Kitchen. New hardwood floors, new carpet and new paint! $224,500

3703 E. 97th Street

4 Bds/3 Full, 2 Half Bths/3 Gar | Stately, well-appointed home in gated Crown Pointe. Two-story entry. Stunning formal living and large dining. Newly updated kitchen open to sep den w/vaulted ceiling and fireplace. French doors open to priv backyard w/pool, outdoor lvng. Sep office. 1st flr master, 3 bedrooms and gameroom up. $795,000

2521 E. 66th Place

Pam Hawes 918.640.7834 106

TulsaPeople MAY 2017

Katy Houchin 918.688.6509

Lindy Collins 918.645.3790


McGraw Realtors TulsaPeople.com

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McGraw Realtors

Bob David Sandy Rupe Angie Gregory Laura Mills 918-808-6792 or 918-691-1100

659,000

4 BR

559,000

5 BR

624,900

4 BR

739,900

5 BR

Sq Ft

4 BA

3530 Sq Ft

4.5 BA

4195 Sq Ft

6 BA

3077 Sq Ft

7 BA

1423 E 38th St Walk to Brookside! Quartz, marble & granite countertops, full size fridge/freezer, db. ovens, wine fridge, bar area plus butlers pantry hand crafted cement tile kitchen backsplash, laundry rm w/pet shower, wood floors Bob David 918-808-6792

2835 E 23rd St Walk to Utica Square! Farmhouse located in the heart of midtown! Wood floors, double ovens, chef's kitchen open to living room, oversized laundry room, front & back covered patio, corner lot, 3 car garage Bob David 918-808-6792

11626 S Louisville Ave Transitional, gated, 18' entry, crave fireplace, cosmo fusion tub, radius staircase with iron rail, office, wet bar & half ba off game & media rm, covered patio w/fireplace, neighborhood pool & clubhouse, Jenks Schools Sandy Rupe 918-691-1100

12210 S. 65th E Pl Under construction, over 1/3 acre lot w/mature trees, gated, corner lot, 3 car garage, 5 bds ea w/private baths, 2 half baths, quartz countertops, office, 2 dining areas, game rm, media rm, covered patio w/fireplace, Bixby Schools Sandy Rupe 918-691-1100

Bob David Sandy Rupe Angie Gregory Laura Mills Call today to tour a home! 918.691.1100

Gated Community Jenks SE Schools 649,000

6 BR

599,000

4 BR

569,900

4 BR

4764 Sq Ft

4.5 BA

4100 Sq Ft

3.5 BA

4195 Sq Ft

4.5 BA

12016 S Urbana Avenue Gated, large lot, great room w/50" stone fireplace, oversized office, chefs kitchen w/seperate working kitchen, db. ovens, full size fridge/freezer, wine room, quartz, incredible master suite & more!

918.691.1100 srupe@mcgrawok.com

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TulsaPeople MAY 2017

12013 S Toledo Avenue Gated, large lot, custom finishes, downstairs media/game room, chefs kitchen full size fridge/freezer, 2 fireplaces, office, game room up, master suite w/ wood floors

918.691.1100 srupe@mcgrawok.com

11915 S Toledo Avenue Gated, large lot, downstairs media/game rm, upstairs game room w/wet bar,great rm w/stone fireplace, wood floors, granite, mud room, double ovens, covered back patio, room for a pool

918.691.1100 srupe@mcgrawok.com

Exclusive Builder Group: Brad Dunlap Builders Castlerock Builders Cobblestone Homes Labadie Construction Company La Bella Homes Lee Signature Properties Build Your Custom Dream Home Starting in mid-$500’s Lots Remaining - Call Today! McGraw Leadership Team 918.691.1100 WindRiverCrossingTulsa.com


McGraw Realtors

New Spring Prices!

6124 S. Indianapolis Avenue $1,250,000 Custom built by the current Owners with no detail left untouched each room is bathed in natural light. Ann Sacks surfaces throughout the house. Large open living area with beamed ceiling opens to high-end kitchen. Master on first floor with his/her closets and luxerious bath plus private office. 3 additional bedroom upstairs each having private baths and walk-in closets. Gameroom. Pool plus outdoor living. Call for more details.

1642 E. 31 st $ 699,900 Located in Midtown Tulsa’s newest gated area. Designed by Jack Arnold with an open floorplan having soaring ceilings and hardwood floors. High-end kitchen with granite counters and stainless appliances. Master plus a second bedroom down each having private baths. Private courtyard. 3-car garage.

3727 S. Utica Ave. $465,000 Traditional house with beautiful hardwood floors and plenty of natural light. Spacious familyroom on 1st floor with eating space and built-ins. Granite kitchen with stainless applainces and pantry. Flexible bedroom floorplan has 4 beds and 2.5 baths. Gameroom on second floor with private bath could be a 5th bedroom. Beautiful backyard has covered patio. Call for your private showing.

Debra Adamek 918-695-4945

Debbie.Adamek@gmail.com

Crown Jewel Collection

5720 East 118th Street Shadow Wood - English Country Mansion on private gated culde-sac. Designed & built by Mike Dankbar & featured in John Brooks Walton’s “Tomorrow’s Historic Tulsa Homes”. Travertine & hardwood throughout. Solid core doors. Fabulous fixtures. Unique wood inlaid ceilings $ 974,900

4933 E 88th Place - Southern Pointe IV - Transitional updates. Wood floors, granite & glass subway tile splash in kitchen. Master bath has new cabinetry, tile & marble. 1st floor study & master. 3 bed/2 full bath+game up. Sprinkler & circle drive. Newer HVAC, paint, water heater, fixtures, lighting. $309,000

New ListiNg

10652 S 93rd East Avenue - Legends II - Premier Greenbelt Location with new pool, spa & fire pit. Open living with stone fireplace & built-ins overlook pool & grounds. Wood floors, granite loaded. 2 private bed suites plus study down. Game + 3 beds/2 baths up. Sprinkler & Security. $650,000

8704 S Indianapolis Avenue - Harvard Pointe - Midtown Charm in Jenks Schools - Jack Arnold designed/Mike Dankbar built. 4 Bed/2.5 Bath/2 Car Garage Fresh remodel. Wood floors thru main level, marble counter tops. 2 living rooms + game and study. Beamed and vaulted ceilings. Fabulous pergola. 3 fireplaces. $ 325,000

11415 S Granite Place - Estates of Forest Park - Eternal traditional style on 1/2 acre flat lot. Saltwater pool & spa, gazebo, 4 car garage. 5 bedrooms/5 full 1 half bath. Master plus guest suite on main level. Multiple living areas. Jenks SE. $729,000

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McGraw Realtors

mike Keys 918.808.4780 D L O

D L O

S

S

11305 S Granite

1782 E. 30th St

McGraw Realtors has been locally owned and managed since 1938. The commercial division was founded in 2008 and since we have acquired some of the most sought after listings in The Greater Tulsa Area. McGraw Commercial Properties specializes in commercial real estate in all of northeastern Oklahoma.

We have over 70 Commercial Listings in the Greater Tulsa Area! McGraw Commercial Properties 4105 S. Rockford Ave. Tulsa, OK 74105 918.388.9588 www.mcgrawcp.com

/mcgrawcp /mcgraw-commercial-proper ties @mcgraw_cp 110

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McGraw Realtors

Judy Mendez

918-724-1263

918.629.4656 1502 S Boulder Avenue Unit#14F

!

D OL

S

14th floor SW corner w/River & Sunset Views, Updated w/ slate floors, granite counters in kitchen & baths, replaced carpets in bedrooms, newer shower in hall bath, replaced insulated slider door, dbl closets in master, 24 hr security bldg., inside parking. $142,000.

721 E Lakeview Drive EXCLUSIVE GATED ESTATE W/ OVER 1 ACRE ON A BEAUTIFUL PRIVATE LAKE.

Bovasso

& Beal Team

Sharna Bovasso (918) 605-2995 | sbovasso@mcgrawok.com Dee Ann Beal (918) 688-5467 | dbeal@mcgrawok.com

M TO US

C

3107 E. 88th Street Gorgeous dream home with chef’s kitchen and new high end appliances. 2 masters down and all bedrooms have private baths! Recording studio and 14 seat theater room. Backyard oasis with pool, spa, waterfall, Koi pond and outdoor kitchen. Located in beautiful gated Wellington South. New Price. $899,900. G IN ST I L W NE

NG

TI

W

NE

S LI

1740 S. Yorktown Avenue Charming Midtown cottage with nice curb appeal. New upstairs addition includes a 4th bedroom, 3rd full bath & gameroom. Granite & stainless appliances in the kitchen. All baths are updated! Spacious master suite with a fireplace. 2 living areas! Hardwoods. Great location near Cherry Street & Utica Square. $315,000.

ES

5

R AC

2679 E 69th St

Beautifully renovated throughout, this handsome home overlooks a spacious. wooded 1.04 acre lot. Fabulous views from all rooms. 3 fireplaces, 3 bedrooms, 4-1/2 baths, master w/his & her baths & closets. Upper and lower level decks with access to the patio and fire pit. $875,000.

Judy

12530 S. Cedar Place Pristine one owner full brick 4 bedroom home. Open floor plan is great for entertaining. Kitchen has center island. Spacious family room with a nice fireplace. Master bath has a separate soaking tub and double sinks. Backyard has a covered patio and a pool. Move-in-ready. $210,000.

S 177th East Avenue Rare opportunity to own property in a prime location just east of Indian Springs Golf and Tennis County Club. Build your dream home or subdivide. Five beautiful acres with paved county road access. $200,000.

Dunagan

SRES

When results matter call..

918-671-9315 TulsaPeople.com

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Tuesday,September 12,2017

6:00-9:00 PM

Tulsa’s Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center

Tickets start at $ 75

Patron sponsorships available from $50 0-$50, 0 0 0.

Please join us as Saint Simeon’s Foundation celebrates its 21st annual Western Days! With live music, world famous auctions, Western style dinner, raffles, general store, casual Western attire and more, Western Days benefits the Residents of Saint Simeon’s, Tulsa’s Senior Community. Saint Simeon’s provides an environment of dignity, individuality, and the highest attainable level of independence.

For more information and sponsorship opportunities, contact Carolyn Blair, Executive Director of the Saint Simeon’s Foundation, at (918) 794-1937 or visit our website, www.WesternDaysEvent.com

PATRON CHAIRS

PIONEER SPIRIT AWARD RECIPIENT

EVENT CHAIRS

AUCTION CHAIRS

HONORARY CHAIRS

Lisa and Tom Schooley

Anne Evans

Caron and Shawn Lawhorn

Marcia and Ron MacLeod

Ellen C.and Donald B. Atkins

Saint Simeon’s is a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma


BENEFITS + CAUSES + VOLUNTEERS

A group from the Kripalaya Dance Academy in Broken Arrow performs at 2017 Women of the Year — Pinnacle Awards.

KATIE O’TOOLE

E

LEADING LADIES

xplosive artistic tributes were a highlight of Women of the Year — Pinnacle Awards on Feb. 24 at the Cox Business Center. Entertainment included Branjae’s funky beats, jazz piano by Barron Ryan and majorette dance team the Prancing Pearls of Excellence. Each year the YWCA, in partnership with the Mayor’s Commission on the Status of Women, honors 10 of Tulsa’s brightest female figures at

Women of the Year — Pinnacle Awards. The 2017 Women of the Year are Caroline Abbott, Dr. Katherine Anderson, Stephanie Cameron, Stephanie Conduff, Dorothy Dillard, Michelle Nicole Evans, Ginnie Graham, Jocelyn McCarver, Su An Arnn Phipps and Suzann Stewart. Janet K. Levit received the 2017 Anna C. Roth Legacy Award for her contributions to the field of social justice. TP TulsaPeople.com

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Opera Ball

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1. George, Kadar and Christina Cohlmia 2. Katherine, Clair and Richard Castleberry 3. Tables in the Crystal Ballroom were set with framed photos of the Debutantes and Squires. 4. Stems arranged the flowers, which were white hydrangeas, roses and orchids. 5. Tulsa Opera chairs Suzanne Albright, Julie Nickel, Mary Lou Doudican and Kathy Raschen with Carmen Marc Valvo, center 6. Event patrons and sponsors Collin and Caroline Sniff

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ERVIN PHOTOGRAPHY

A stunning backdrop of champagne and ivory set the stage for the 57th annual Opera Ball on March 4 at the Mayo Hotel. Patrons numbered 170 at the presentation of the 2017 Tulsa Opera Debutantes and Squires. Also in attendance was fashion designer and Honorary Chairman Carmen Marc Valvo, who designed the debutante dresses for the fourth year. The Opera Ball season kicked off in September and included numerous events for the 30 Debs and Squires, such as a casino night, skeet shooting and a scavenger hunt, before culminating with the ball.

Carnivale The Mental Health Association Oklahoma’s gala, Carnivale Tribalé, was March 25 at the Cox Business Center. Adriane and Phil Lakin co-chaired “the best party in town,” as it is often called, that raised over $1.1 million for Mental Health Association Oklahoma’s nationally recognized housing and recovery programs.

2

1. Bob Thomas, a Carnivale Committee member, and brother Bill Thomas 2. William K. Warren Jr., Suzanne Warren, John-Kelly Warren and Lindsey Warren 3. Confetti rained from the jungle sky, and the dance floor never emptied. 4. Live entertainment included tribal dancers. 5. Fire-dancers also dazzled patrons. 6. Carnivale Tribalé Co-chairs Adriane and Phil Lakin

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TOM GILBERT

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Street Party

KELLY MCELROY AND KELSEY KENYON

Guests channeled the Mad Hatter of “Alice in Wonderland” at Street Party, Street School’s fundraiser Feb. 24 at the Cox Business Center. Over 400 people participated in the live auction, silent auction, raffle, wine pull and dancing to the music of Charlie Redd and the Full Flava Kings. The event raised more than $323,000 for Street School. 1. Street Party Chairwoman Katie Mabrey, left, and event patrons 2. Artwork by Street School students like Wiley Brown, pictured, was auctioned at the event. 3. Event patrons Nemar and Tom Noulles

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COMPILED BY JUDY LANGDON

MAY

5 Happy Feet Fun Run Benefits Happy Hands Education Center. HAPPYHANDS.ORG

12 Go Red for Women Benefits American Heart Association. AHATULSA .ORG

16 Games for May: Golden Reboot Benefits Crossroads Clubhouse. CROSSROADSOK .ORG

Through May 21 Designer Showcase Benefits Foundation for Tulsa Schools. FOUNDATIONFORTULSASCHOOLS.ORG / DESIGNER-SHOWCASE

5 TARC Shot in the Dark Tournament Benefits TARC, a nonprofit for adults with developmental disabilities. DDADVOCACY.NET

12 Rustic Cuff Run Benefits Joy in the Cause. RUNNERSWORLDTULSA .COM

18-21 Tulsa International Mayfest Benefits Tulsa International Mayfest. TULSAMAYFEST.ORG

6 Run for the Roses Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG

12 Vintage ’53 Wine Dinner Benefits Total Source for Hearing-loss and Access. TSHA .CC

20 Play Your pART Brunch Benefits Arts Alliance Tulsa. ARTSTULSA .ORG

6 Tour de Tulsa Benefits Pathways to Health. TULSABICYCLECLUB.COM

12 White Party No. 10 Benefits Family and Children’s Services. WHITEPARTYOK .COM

7 Fun at the Run Benefits Blue Star Mothers, Broken Arrow. BABLUESTAR.ORG

13 Biennial Status of Women Awards Benefits Alpha Xi Sigma chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. SGRALPHAXISIGMA .WEEBLY.COM

1 A Stately Affair in Tulsa Benefits Oklahoma State University-Tulsa and Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences. ASTATELYAFFAIR.COM 1 Great Plains Journalism Awards and Conference Benefits Tulsa Press Club. GREATPLAINSAWARDS.ORG 1 Tatas and Tinis Benefits Oklahoma Project Woman. OKLAHOMAPROJECTWOMAN.ORG 2 Friendship Dinner and Awards Ceremony Benefits Foundation for Tulsa Schools. 2017DIALOGUEANDFRIENDSHIPDINNER.EVENTBRITE.COM 2 Tulsa Tycoons: A Night of Monopoly Benefits Junior Achievement of Oklahoma. TULSATYCOONS.COM 3 Newsmakers Luncheon Benefits Association for Women in Communications. AWCTULSA .ORG / NEWSMAKERS 5 5x5 Art Show and Sale Benefits Tulsa Artists’ Coalition Gallery. TACGALLERY.ORG 5 Anne V. Zarrow Award for Young Readers’ Literature Benefits Tulsa City-County Library. TULSALIBRARY.ORG

8 CF Golf Classic Benefits Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. TULSA .CFF.ORG 8 Tee Off for Town and Country School Benefits Town and Country School. TANDCSCHOOL.ORG 8-9 TBH Frank R. Rhodes Golf Classic Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG 9 Madam President Benefits the League of Women Voters of Metropolitan Tulsa. LWVTULSA .ORG / MADAMPRESIDENT 9 Shooting Stars Sporting Clays Tournament Benefits Indian Nations Council, Boy Scouts of America. OKSCOUTS.ORG / EVENTS / SHOOTINGSTARS

13 CREATE Gala Benefits Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa. CREATEGALA .ORG 13 “Day Before Mother’s Day” MisFEST Brunch Benefits YWCA Tulsa. MISFEST.COM 13 DIG: Day in the Garden Benefits Tulsa Botanic Garden. TULSABOTANIC.ORG 13 Electric Lime Gala Benefits Tulsa Children’s Museum Discovery Lab. TULSACHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG 13-June 24 St. Jude Dream Home Benefits St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. STJUDE.ORG / GIVE / DREAM-HOME / TULSA .HTML

20 Cop Land Classic Bicycle Ride Benefits Tulsa Police Officers’ Memorial. COPLANDCLASSIC.RACEDIRECTOR.COM 20 Crime Stoppers Shred-to-Protect Benefits Tulsa Crime Stoppers. TULSACRIMESTOPPERS.ORG 20 Great Strides Tulsa Benefits Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. TULSA .CFF.ORG 20 Promise Ball Benefits Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Oklahoma Chapter. JDRF.ORG / TULSA / EVENTS /2017-PROMISE-BALL 22 Chip In to Rebuild Golf Tournament Benefits Rebuilding Together Tulsa. REBUILDINGTOGETHERTULSA .ORG / NEWS-AND -EVENTS / SPECIAL-EVENTS 31-June 2 2017 National Symposium, “Reconciliation Through the Lens of Arts and Culture” Benefits John Hope Franklin Center. JHFCENTER.ORG

VISIT TULSAPEOPLE.COM for a complete calendar of events.

EDITOR’S NOTE: HIGHLIGHTED EVENTS ARE SPONSORED BY TULSAPEOPLE. TulsaPeople.com

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APPLAUSE

VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT:

SHAWNDA SWEGER

Shawnda Sweger and husband Bradley Jones

Nonprofit: Soaring Eagles Youth and Family Services

DRIVEN TO SERVE A giving heart channels heartbreak into purpose. BY JACKIE WELTON DIPILLO

“I

don’t drive anymore, so this takes that worry off my plate,” explains 72-year-old Annetta Waters. “He is such a unique and interesting person to ride and chat with. It takes the emphasis off the disease.” Waters is speaking of Stephen Johnson, who drives cancer patients like her to chemo and radiation treatments as a volunteer with the American Cancer Society. For fi ve years, Johnson was the primary caregiver for the two women he loved most in this world. Then in 2002, his wife died from breast cancer, and he soon lost his mother to cancer, too. Johnson considers himself blessed to have held each woman’s hands as she drew her last breath. “It was as good as it could be,” the 62-year-old says. “When things are really bad, the spirit fi nds a way to lift people up.” After retiring in 2005, Johnson was looking for a way to give back. He’d spent a lot of the

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past few years in waiting rooms and recalled hearing patients discuss the difficulties of fi nding someone to take them to treatments. He had an “aha” moment. “I’ve got time on my hands, so use me,” Johnson told the ACS. He became transportation — and a friend. Once, while driving through Sand Springs, Johnson’s rider highly recommended Sweetie Pies diner. Shortly after, Johnson discovered its cinnamon rolls, which brought back wonderful childhood memories. Wanting to share that warm feeling, he now brings treats for the patients on his own dime. Now in his seventh year of volunteering, Johnson was named the No. 1 driver in a seven-state area at a luncheon hosted by the American Cancer Society this past fall. “I had no idea that was coming,” he says. Stephen Johnson is a rare breed, an angel among us, getting his wings from two special ladies. TP

Why is this event important to you? I volunteer at the Girls’ Teen Summit because I want to provide a story of hope for ladies who are struggling to keep going. This year, I will be a team leader. My duties include mentoring the young women throughout the event and ensuring they get to experience all that is offered. I also have the pleasure of getting to share my story, which creates an opportunity for a deeper relationship with my team. When I am vulnerable with them, I am giving back. I am showing them that they can have hopes and dreams higher than statistics suggest. I want my life to be a testament that anything is possible if you are willing to put in the work to become a survivor, not a victim. The “cycle” stopped with me. I graduated from Oklahoma State University, have a promising future with a reputable company and, most of all, I am happily married to a great man. I am a survivor. — JUDY LANGDON

June 2-3

Fifth annual Girls’ Teen Summit 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Friday; 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Saturday. Free. Open to girls age 13-18. Register at soaringeaglesyfs.org/ girlsteensummit.

APPLAUSE: VALERIE GRANT; VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT: COURTESY

American Cancer Society volunteer Stephen Johnson drives patients like Annetta Waters to chemo and radiation appointments.

As a teen in foster care, Sweger had endured years of abuse. Her counselor, Premadonna Braddick, used her own difficult past to relate to Sweger and help her work through her wounds. Today Sweger pays the healing forward by assisting Braddick at the Girls’ Teen Summit, an annual event to encourage, educate and empower at-risk teen girls.


NEWS TO YOU SPONSORED EDITORIAL

STORM THE CASTLE OF MUSKOGEE FOR THE ANNUAL RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL The Castle of Muskogee will host the 22nd annual Oklahoma Renaissance Festival starting the last weekend of April and running every weekend through May and the first weekend in June. On May 6, the Masque Ball is from 7-9 p.m. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, period music, drinks and dancing with the nobles and gypsies of Castleton. The Pirate’s Feaste, a dining experience full of rum, bawdy jokes and the company of Castleton’s pirates, is May 13 from 7-9 p.m. The Scottish Ceilidh is May 20 from 7-10 p.m. A traditional Scottish party, the Ceilidh features dancing, music and dining. Don’t forget to wear your best kilts and kirtles. If you prefer a daytime event, Saturdays and Sundays offer repeat events in the afternoons that are just as exciting, including the Queen’s Tea, the Royal Luncheon and the King’s Smoker. Before attending these events, browse through over 140 unique vendors and merchants and see performances on one of 15 different stages throughout the festival. The Castle of Muskogee is located at 3400 W. Fern Mountain Road, Muskogee. Tickets range from $5.95-$59.95 in advance, with a $2 gate admission. Visit okcastle.com for more information. — CASSANDRA SCOTT

Don Thornton Volkswagen won the 2016 Customer First Club Award for excellence in customer service. Pictured are team members Matt Giesow, Joe Odom, Katie Beadell, Doug VanDam, Zach Brown, Tom Tatro and Alex Trost.

OKLAHOMA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL AND TTCU: COURTESY

DON THORNTON VOLKSWAGEN OF TULSA WINS ELITE AWARD

Don Thornton Volkswagen of Tulsa has joined the ranks of Volkswagen dealers that excel in all aspects of the customer experience — including new car, pre-owned and service — by winning the coveted 2016 Customer First Club Award. Volkswagen customers select members of the elite Customer First Club through survey feedback. The local Don Thornton VW is one of only 60 Volkswagen dealers out of 651 in the U.S. that has been recognized for achieving this level of customer service. The Tulsa dealership was ranked No. 3 in the nation for overall customer experience in 2016. “The Don Thornton Automotive Group purposes to always make our business about people,” says David Litzinger, general manager of Don Thornton VW of Tulsa. “I am really happy that our customers are pleased with the level of service they receive at the dealership because our staff is working really hard to deliver genuine client care. This award really means a lot to our team because it speaks to our connection to people.” Don Thornton Volkswagen of Tulsa, located at 4240 S. Memorial Drive, was founded in December 2012 and is part of the Don Thornton Automotive Group. The Don Thornton Automotive Group represents six automotive brands: Volkswagen, Lexus, Audi, Cadillac, Land Rover and Jaguar. The group has sold and serviced cars in the Tulsa area for nearly 50 years. Don Thornton began his retail automotive career in Tulsa in 1969 as a minority partner of a Volkswagen dealership that was located near East 41st Street and South Yale Avenue. Today the Don Thornton Automotive Group has annual sales of over $250 million and employs almost 300 people.

St. Louis-based NewGround designed and constructed the new TTCU office at 9815 E. 81st St.

TTCU THE CREDIT UNION OPENS CORPORATE OFFICE In December 2016 — a short 17 months after groundbreaking — TTCU The Credit Union completed and moved into its new corporate office at 9815 E. 81st St., next to the TTCU southeast branch. With its technological infrastructure, advanced training centers and innovation-inspired environment, the new six-story, 90,000-square-foot facility is a key component in TTCU’s strategy to recruit and retain the best talent, and to nurture the next generation of leadKevin Blair, NewGround CEO; Andy McKenzie, TTCU ership. “Our new facility is a durable re- chairman; Tom Auer, NewGround senior vice president, design; Tim Lyons, TTCU CEO and president; and Mike minder of our core purpose: to enrich Neal, Tulsa Regional Chamber president and CEO, cut our members’ lives through financial the ribbon at the grand opening of TTCU The Credit leadership,” CEO Tim Lyons says. “TTCU Union’s corporate office at East 81st Street and South Mingo Road. now is well-positioned for the growth, development and innovation that will allow us the honor, privilege and opportunity to serve our members well into the future.” An official ribbon-cutting ceremony and reception was held in March, with community leaders and credit union officials in attendance. BUILDING FACTS: • Time from official groundbreaking to occupancy: 78 weeks • The property has an additional 30,000 square feet for future growth. • The entire campus sits on 6.5 acres. • The exterior is comprised of 1,234 glass panels and 135 precast brick and block panels (weighing 9,000-12,000 pounds each). • The building is made up of 682,000 pounds of concrete and 496 tons of steel. TTCU The Credit Union is the largest state-chartered credit union in Oklahoma with 15 branches. Established in 1934, TTCU is a $1.7 billion credit union serving more than 120,000 members who are educationally affiliated, including students and their families as well as hundreds of select employee groups in northeast Oklahoma, with a full complement of depository, lending and financial advisory services. TTCU is federally insured by the NCUA. TulsaPeople.com

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A PARK GROWS IN TULSA A GATHERING PLACE – PART 20

Peggy’s Pond

PARK PROGRESS ONEOK Boathouse

A Gathering Place takes shape as construction continues.

The Kathy Craft Grandchildren’s Sky Walk

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Forest

Less than a year before construction on A Gathering Place is set to conclude, the park’s major features can be seen from the air. For example, the Chapman Foundations Adventure Playground, Peggy’s Pond, Williams Lodge and the ONEOK Boathouse are near or at the halfway mark. The park’s terrain has changed immensely since construction began in late 2014. Riverside Drive is now spanned by two land bridges, and north and south land extensions into the Arkansas River have shifted the water’s edge. From now through the park’s completion, 5,789 new trees will be planted on site, adding to the area’s nearly 600 existing trees. Jeff Stava, executive director and trustee of Tulsa’s Gathering Place LLC, provides these updates on the park’s landscape and structures: • Peggy’s Pond, which spans nearly 3 acres, has been lined with river rock and bordered with large flagstone and trees. The pond will vary in depth from 6-15 feet. “Parkgoers will be able to board paddleboats, ocean kayaks or canoes on the floating dock at the ONEOK Boathouse,” Stava says. “The pond will also be stocked with fish, making it the perfect spot to spend some relaxing time outdoors.” • The ONEOK Boathouse is now positioned on the south end of Peggy’s Pond. With nearly 10,000 square feet of multipurpose space and a 12,000-square-foot pavilion with panoramic views, Stava says it will be a hub of activity and a favorite spot to enjoy food and drinks. • Williams Lodge’s steelwork is nearing completion, and floor-toceiling windows will soon be added. The lodge’s geothermal ground well closed-loop system is being installed, along with heat and air ductwork. • Chapman Foundations’ Adventure Playground is taking shape with the installation of the Kathy Craft Grandchildren’s Sky Walk Forest — an area comprised of treetop forts and netted climbing structures. TP

SHANE BEVEL

BY MORGAN PHILLIPS


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TAKE ME BACK

OUT OF THE RUNNING BY JUDY LANGDON

T

ulsa County’s fi rst racetrack hosted horse and dog races in the 1910s at the original Tulsa fairgrounds, located on 15 acres near North Lewis Avenue and East Archer Street. In 1913, the Oklahoma Legislature outlawed bookmaking and betting pools, though interpretations varied as to whether racing was specifically prohibited. Horse racing declined briefly across the state but recovered — in part because of a newspaper campaign touting the

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economic benefits of thoroughbred horse breeding and racing. A few years later, controversy found the Tulsa track. On April 19, 1917, the racetrack was under martial law, and Gov. Robert L. Williams sent the National Guard to Tulsa to stop illegal gambling. It’s unclear when the racetrack closed; the fairgrounds moved to its current location in 1923. The site of the former north Tulsa racetrack is now an empty lot and residential area across from the Las Americas grocery store. TP

COURTESY BERYL FORD COLLECTION/ROTARY CLUB OF TULSA, TULSA CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY AND TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Racing events at the original Tulsa racetrack included “harness” events like the one pictured in this undated photo.


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