__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Finding love at a Tulsa clock shop February 2019

BIG CI T RU S F L AV OR IN F U S E S T H E L OC A L PA L AT E 2019 PRIVATE SCHOOL GUIDE

PLU S Legacy Businesses

DISTRESS IN THE CLASSROOM


HEALTHY “Trust is vital to having a healthy relationship with my patients. And my bank feels the same about me. They’ve earned my trust with exceptional, personal service for over a decade now. That’s why MY BANK IS MABREY.”

Dr. Jay Williamson Obstetrics & Gynecology

Read more at MyBankIsMabrey.com/Williamson

MABREYBANK.COM | 888.272.8866 | MEMBER FDIC


Adult Eating Disorders Program offers real hope and real results.

The first thing Dr. Katherine Godwin wants people with eating disorders to know is that there is hope. “At Laureate, we believe recovery is possible, and we see it again and again,” said Dr. Godwin. “Our goal is to get to know our patients as individuals, as members of their family and their community, and get them back to functioning in those roles.” A part of Saint Francis Health System, the Laureate Eating Disorders Program provides personalized treatment for adult and adolescent females. Offering acute, residential and outpatient care, the comprehensive program includes Magnolia House, a unique transitional living home that helps adults regain their independence and resume responsibilities at their own pace. “I love working with patients across all levels of care— acute, residential and partial residential,” she said. “We get to know them, and customize a treatment program that is just for them.” For more information on the Laureate Eating Disorders Program, please call 918-491-5775 or visit laureate.com/eatingdisorders.

Katherine Godwin, M.D. MEDICAL DIRECTOR AND ATTENDING PHYSICIAN ADULT PROGRAM LAUREATE EATING DISORDERS PROGRAM

laureate.com/eatingdisorders SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL | THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | WARREN CLINIC | HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH | LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL MUSKOGEE | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL VINITA | SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW | SAINT FRANCIS CANCER CENTER | SAINT FRANCIS HOME CARE COMPANIES | SAINT FRANCIS GLENPOOL


Located in the heart of Owasso, Stone Canyon is luxury living at its finest. Amenities within Stone Canyon include a 100+ acre stocked lake, a 22 acre park with walking trails, a resort style pool, an award-winning elementary school & neighborhood events. Currently, there are approximately 425 custom homes in Stone Canyon with room for many more in the years ahead. Stone Canyon sits on approximately 2000 acres and is home to the Patriot Golf Course and the Folds of Honor Foundation.

www.stonecanyonliving.com

918.376.6764


Local Care. National Recognition.

An independent analysis of clinical outcomes at over 4,500 hospitals found only one facility in all of Oklahoma to be among the top 100 in the nation for spine surgery – Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital. When your back tells you that it’s time to see a doctor, choose one that is affiliated with Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital.

A Physician-Owned Hospital

6901 S. Olympia Ave. • Tulsa, OK • 918-388-5701 • TulsaSpineHospital.com


FEBRUARY 2019 | VOLUME 33 ISSUE 4

Confidence and character for all

Bold and bright

P. 18

P. 31

P. 98

Tulsan brings Girl Scouts to Muslim community.

Citrus boosts flavor in local dishes and recipes.

Bentonville’s 21c Museum Hotel

31 BOLD AND BRIGHT

Wendy Songe’s mobile music. A landmark Girl Scouts troop. Styled by Harry Cramton. Two recent benefits. Newsworthy tidbits.

Let the sunshine in with these recipes that impart big citrus flavor. BY NATALIE MIKLES

28 PERFECT TIMING A young couple finds love at a Tulsa clock shop, then carries on the legacy of its founders. BY MORGAN PHILLIPS

4

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

40 DISTRESS IN THE CLASSROOM Adolescents with suicidal thoughts often are unable to excel in the classroom.

36 TABLE TALK

BY GAIL BANZET-ELLIS

Bishop’s was the place to be. Three brunch bites. Bowled over with nutrients and flavor. A love of chocolate.

44 2019 PRIVATE SCHOOL GUIDE Details on Tulsa’s private education options BY KIRSTEN DOMINGUEZ AND MADELINE EWING

95 LIFESTYLE A quick trip to northwest Arkansas. Information on vaccinations for adults. Clean up in the new year. Connie Cronley reminds us to wash our hands.

SPECIAL SECTIONS 59 Legacy Business Profiles 77 A-List Hall of Fame

GIRL SCOUTS: VALERIE WEI-HAAS; TRAVEL: COURTESY 21C MUSEUM HOTELS

9 CITY DESK

Short trip, big rewards


Heart care close to home Connected to a national network of specialists When it comes to caring for your heart, AscensionÂŽ care teams at St. John are close to home, delivering the care you need. We collaborate with our integrated, national network of cardiologists, sharing best practices for emergency heart care and advanced treatment options for ongoing heart conditions. By taking the time to understand you, we can provide the personalized care you need.

Get the heart care that’s right for you at ascension.org/tulsaheart


WHAT’S ONLINE TULSAPEOPLE.COM Follow us on Twitter @TULSAPEOPLE

Find us on Facebook FACEBOOK.COM/TULSAPEOPLEMAG

Follow us on Instagram @TULSAPEOPLE

Follow our CONTRIBUTORS

VOTE FOR THE 2019 A-LIST and you could win a $500 DINING package! Visit TulsaPeople.com starting February 15! VALERIE WEI-HAAS, CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER @valweihaas

The founder of the @blackwallstreetgallery, Ricco Wright (@moderndayplato) shot for @tulsapeople.

Subscribe for FREE on Apple Podcasts, Google Play or Spotify.

SEASON 2 HAPPENING NOW!

DID YOU MAKE THE MAG? TIM LANDES, WRITER @timlandesjr

Not that long ago Jose Antonio Pantoja Hernandez was a street artist in Cuba. His political art made him a target, so he fled and entered America seeking asylum. He’s now a Tulsa resident who is free to paint what he wishes. Link in bio for my @tulsapeople story about his work and the @gilcreasemuseum exhibit.

Give us a tag! @longevityeffect

We are so honored to be featured in @tulsapeople’s 2019 Wellness Guide. Pick up a copy ASAP and read our section where @dr.brandon.washatka explains the Magnesphere and Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber!

PLUS Bend our ear, take quizzes, win prizes and more by joining our Facebook fan group. TULSAPEOPLE.COM/FBGROUP

THE NEW 2019 TULSA GUEST GUIDE IS NOW ONLINE! The Guest Guide is a great resource for both Tulsans and visitors! 6

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

Treat yo’ self with our fabulous monthly giveaways. TULSAPEOPLE.COM/GIVEAWAYS RHYS MARTIN, WRITER @rhysfunk #blessed

Listen up! Tulsa Talks is available on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play and TULSAPEOPLE.COM/PODCAST.


FROM THE EDITOR

Volume XXXIII, Number 4 ©2019. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. TulsaPeople Magazine is published monthly by

“And you? What would you do for love?”

1603 South Boulder Avenue Tulsa, Oklahoma 74119-4407 918-585-9924 918-585-9926 Fax

PUBLISHER Jim Langdon PRESIDENT Juley Roffers VP COMMUNITY RELATIONS Susie Miller

As much as I adore all things high fashion and Natalie Portman, I can’t help but roll my eyes

and mutter something irreverent in response to

(if you come, please boo for me, because I’m a bad guy).

But as far as doing uncommon things for love,

that particular ad for Miss Dior, a perfume I can

I’m actually in great company:

glossy fashion magazines (which would be pretty

obsession, the adorably anachronistic couple on p.

Oh, what would I do for love? I’d put it in

For the love of his profession, 83-year-old

only assume makes you smell like a stack of unread on-brand for me, to be honest).

For the love of one another and their shared

28 waited until the timing was just right.

a cute planter and kill it through either over-

Harry Cramton (p. 22) keeps his salon chair occu-

ends of the earth, so long as I could take a Lyft

For the love of the great outdoors, Jeremy

watering or utter neglect. For love? I’d walk to the

pied.

back home. For love? I’d write all my wishes and

Buller takes his shop to new heights (p. 96).

origami crane so you can shove it up your ... you get

fessionals (p. 40), a bookish entrepreneur (p. 20)

But as it turns out, there’s an awful lot I would

are all going above and beyond to make the future

dreams on cute pink stationery, then fold it into an the idea.

do for the sake of love. Like, leave my hometown for the big city of Chicago. And in the intervening time, whatever I do is done from a place of love for Tulsa:

For my love of all things four-legged and furry,

I’ve fostered an increasingly adorable string of

For the love of Tulsa’s youth, mental health pro-

and an intrepid Girl Scouts troop leader (p. 18)

develop a new work for the New Genre Arts Fes-

EDITORIAL CONSULTING Missy Kruse, The Write Company CREATIVE DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER VIDEOGRAPHER

Madeline Crawford Georgia Brooks Morgan Welch Michelle Pollard Valerie Wei-Haas Greg Bollinger

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Andrea Canada Steve Hopkins Betsy Slagle CONTROLLER Mary McKisick SUBSCRIPTIONS Gloria Brooks DISTRIBUTION COORDINATOR Amanda Hall

MEMBER

TulsaPeople’s distribution is audited annually by

I hope you’ll find something to love in the issue.

This magazine is something we work to create each and every month because we love our readers and our city. TP

Langdon Publishing Company sets high standards to ensure forestry is practiced in an environmentally responsible, socially beneficial and economically viable manner. This issue of Tulsa People was printed on recycled fibers containing 20 percent post-consumer waste with inks containing a soy base blend. Our printer is a certified member of the Forestry Stewardship Council and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and additionally, meets or exceeds all federal Resource Conservation Recovery Act standards. When you are finished with this issue, please pass it on to a friend or recycle it. We can have a better world if we choose it together. Disregard any TulsaPeople subscription solicitation that is not directly mailed from the Langdon Publishing office at 1603 S. Boulder Ave. Contact Langdon Publishing directly if you are interested in subscribing or renewing your TulsaPeople subscription.

For my love of the arts and Tulsa’s creative

rabbit holes and picking up odd new skills to

Anne Brockman Morgan Phillips Anna Bennett Judy Langdon John Langdon

better and brighter.

pooches through Puppy Haven Rescue.

scene, I’ve found myself going down long research

EDITOR CITY EDITOR DIGITAL EDITOR ARTS & BENEFITS EDITOR ONLINE CALENDAR EDITOR

Anna Bennett DIGITAL EDITOR

tival happening April 5-6.

For my enduring love of Elote, I’ll soon find

myself literally on the ropes, masked-up and officially licensed to fight on Lunchatines, Feb. 16 8

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

S AY N O T O H A T E


C A L E N D A R + C A U S E S + C U LT U R E

Wendy Songe provided more than 150 hours of service to OASIS before creating Mobile Outreach Music. She later expanded time and services provided to include veterans at the Coffee Bunker, pictured here.

THE GIFT OF MUSIC

VALERIE WEI-HAAS

I

n summer 2015, a storm destroyed Tulsa musician Wendy Songe’s van weeks before she was scheduled to go on tour. Short on funds and time, Songe turned to her fans for help and quickly raised the cash needed for a used vehicle. Then, she made a promise: to provide an additional 50 hours of music outreach to OASIS, a Sapulpa nonprofit providing adult day care services. From that experience, Songe’s passion project, Mobile Outreach Music, was born. Its mission is to provide music outreach to people in need and who cannot

afford to pay for the services themselves. The outreach is privately supported through patrons of the online platform Patreon. Through Mobile Outreach Music, Songe has taught and performed for hundreds of people, including veterans, seniors who are homebound, hospice patients and adults suffering from dementia. “I would love to see this grow to a point where there are other musicians, artists and givers — just loving people — who would want to be the hands that take it to different places so we could be in more places at one time,” she says. TP

FOR MORE ON SONGE’S MUSIC CAREER, SEE PAGE 14. TulsaPeople.com

9


FEBRUARY C OMPIL ED BY JUDY L A NGDON

kids can experience the world of 1 Tulsa agriculture at the free “Kids, Kows and

“American Endless Energy for Limitless Living,” oil on canvas by Rockwell Kent

More” in Expo Square’s Exchange Center.

and Junk” comes to 1-2 “2ExpoFriends Square’s Central Park Hall playwright Nassim 1-3 See Soleimanpour’s widely

National Rod and Custom Car Show returns to Expo Square.

acclaimed “White Rabbit Red Rabbit,” performed by the University of Tulsa Theatre Department at Tyrrell Hall.

15-17, 22-24 American Theatre Co. presents the

Maestro Gerhardt Zimmerman 2 Guest conducts Tulsa Symphony, playing

musical “Sunday in the Park with George” at the Tulsa PAC.

“Shostakovich’s Seventh Symphony” at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center.

Joint at Hard Rock Hotel and 17 The Casino welcomes country legend Willie Nelson and Family.

10 The Joint at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino welcomes The Commodores with music to romance your valentine.

15-16 of riders 8-10 Hundreds compete in an exciting weekend of racing at the BMX Sooner Nationals in the Ford Truck Arena at Expo Square.

Take your valentine to hear some Big Band when Signature Symphony presents Walter White in “Breaking Good” at Van Trease Performing Arts Center for Education.

9-10

favorite contemporary North presents 10 Hear 3-10 Theatre Christian artists when the Winter “The Green Book,” a play

someone 7 Iswhistling

“Sweet Georgia Brown”? The Harlem Globetrotters hit the court at the BOK Center.

10

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

Jam concert returns to the BOK Center.

Paintings, photos and prints from 1900-1960 explore a complex range of responses to the rapid rise of American industry in the exhibition “Making Modern America,” opening at Philbrook Museum of Art. Through May 26. Dunham 14 Jeff and his character

puppets present adult comedy when his “Passively Aggressive” tour hits the BOK Center.

Center with special guest Bonnie Raitt.

The story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons comes to life, complete with all their hits, when Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center presents “Jersey Boys.” Bolton brings his 21 Michael “Symphony Sessions Tour” to

Paradise Cove at River Spirit Casino Resort.

Tulsa Survival and Green Living gives ideas for living green and off the grid at Expo Square’s Exchange Center.

free lunchtime “Brown Bag It.”

singer-songwriter 18 Legendary James Taylor returns to the BOK

8-10

‘MAKING MODERN AMERICA’: COURTESY DAYTON ART INSTITUTE/PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART; BMX: GORK BARRETTE

8

Multi Grammy Award-winner Kelly Clarkson brings “Meaning of Life” to the BOK Center, joined by Kelsea Ballerini and Brynn Cartelli.

Jass Band presents Cajun 6 Jambalaya jazz for the Tulsa PAC’s

enchanting tale of adventure, friendship and love told through the eyes of a child at the Tulsa PAC.

all Hotrodders: 15-17 Calling Darryl Starbird’s

for shopping till you drop.

about African Americans’ car travel safety concerns during the Jim Crow era, from the 1930s-’60s, at the Tulsa PAC.

Opera’s “The 15, 17 Tulsa Little Prince” is an


CHARITABLE E VENTS 2 Icons and Idols: The Power of Passion Benefits Tulsa Ballet. ICONSANDIDOLS.ORG St. John Catholic School Gala Benefits St. John Catholic School. SJCS-OK.ORG 7 Center Impressions Benefits the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges. TULSACENTER.ORG

21-24 romantic fairy tale en 21-24 Apointe: Tulsa Ballet’s 28-March 3 “The Sleeping Beauty” at the PAC. Akdar Shrine Circus Pavilion rolls into

22-23, 28March 2

town for big shows at Expo Square’s Pavilion. World Stage Theatre Co. presents “Best of Enemies” at the Tulsa PAC. TP

Watch professor Henry Higgins turn London flower girl Eliza Doolittle into a refined Victorian lady in Theatre Tulsa’s production of “My Fair Lady” at the Tulsa PAC.

the POSTOAK Challenge trail race.

Oddities and Curiosities Show at Expo Square’s Central Park Hall.

TU Golden Hurricane 24 The Women’s Basketball team plays

Tulsa Heart Ball Benefits American Heart Association. HEART.ORG / TULSA

the University of Connecticut in the Donald J. Reynolds Center.

‘THE LITTLE PRINCE’: COURTESY HOUSTON GRAND OPERA

Street Party Benefits Street School. STREETPARTYTULSA.COM

Leon Russell Tribute Concert and Piano Dedication Benefits Will Rogers High School Community Foundation. WILLROGERSFOUNDATION.NET

out-of-the23 Enjoy ordinary displays at the

26-March 3 The perfect play? Not! Celebrity Attractions

16 Tulsa Boys Home Junior Women’s Association Buttercup Bash Benefits Tulsa Boys’ Home. TULSABOYSHOME.ORG 21 Night of Dreams Benefits Tulsa Dream Center. TULSADREAMCENTER.COM Paws for a Cause Benefits Pets Helping People. MUDDY-PAWS.ORG 22 Whiskey Social Benefits Lindsey House. LINDSEYHOUSE.ORG 23 CASA Casino 2019: The Last Speakeasy Benefits Tulsa CASA Inc. CASACASINO.ORG Cooking Up Compassion Benefits Catholic Charities. CCEOK.ORG / CUC New Hope Mardi Gras Benefits New Hope Oklahoma. NEWHOPEOKLAHOMA.ORG Youth of the Year Banquet Benefits the Salvation Army Boys and Girls Clubs of Metro Tulsa. SALARMYTULSA.ORG 28 Different Strokes Benefits Town and Country School. TANDCSCHOOL.ORG

presents the musical comedy “The Play That Goes Wrong” at the Tulsa PAC.

the Reynolds Center.

8 Global Gardens’ GLOW Benefits Global Gardens. GLOBALGARDENSGLOW.ORG

9 Heart of Henry Benefits Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless. TULSADAYCENTER.ORG

86 miles of 22-24 Nearly trails were created for

TU Golden Hurricane Men’s 28 TheBasketball team meet Tulane in

Hearts Rebuilding Homes Benefits Revitalize T-Town. TINYURL.COM / HEARTSHOMES2019

12 Live United Luncheon and Awards Presentation Benefits Tulsa Area United Way. TAUW.ORG / AWARDS

15, 17

EDITOR’S NOTE: TULSAPEOPLE IS A SPONSOR OF THE HIGHLIGHTED EVENT.

TulsaPeople.com

11


NOTEBOOK BY MORGA N PHILLIP S

February

Community organizers broke ground Dec. 10 on The Joinery, a regenerative building project at 640 N. Denver Ave.

ARTS EVENTS “TRIBUTE TO HOBO NICKELS: A FOLK ART FORM FROM THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY” BY STEVE PHELPS Feb. 1-28 | Tulsa Artists’ Coalition Gallery, 9 E. M.B. Brady St. A longtime professional illustrator, painter and wood carver, Tulsan Phelps began carving on coins in February 2017. His hobo nickels demonstrate coin carving, an American folk art form that became popular in the early 1900s. “FOUND ON SIDE OF ROAD” BY JACK BRYANT Feb. 1-March 24 | ahha Tulsa, 101 E. Archer St. Fascinated with scenes he discovers during his travels across the state, Tulsa photographer Bryant constructs images that convey his own perspective of the complex realities of life in Oklahoma. “RICHARD BARLOW: THE SEA OF ICE, RECEDING” Feb. 1-May 19 | Philbrook Downtown, 116 E. M.B. Brady St. Acclaimed artist Barlow creates monumental, temporary and site-specific drawings of the natural world with chalk on blackboard paint. His drawings are erased at the end of each show.

Tulsa Club to be Hilton hotel LIVING BUILDING COMES TO NORTH TULSA A regenerative building project called The Joinery is underway in the Brady Heights neighborhood. When completed, the 3,180-square-foot, two-story, brick structure at 640 N. Denver Ave. will be a home for the family of owner Nathan Pickard, a local data analyst. Regenerative buildings are constructed not only to be self-sufficient, but also to give more than they take, including generating their own energy and water. In addition to housing Pickard’s family, the Joinery also will accommodate community gatherings such as yoga, cooking demonstrations and educational events. Pickard says he envisions “a space that connects neighbors to food, nature and community in an urban area north of downtown Tulsa.” The Joinery is the first project in Oklahoma to seek the Living Building Challenge certification from the International Living Future Institute. The challenge is considered “the world’s most rigorous proven performance standard for building.” Fewer than two dozen fully certified Living Buildings exist. The site of The Joinery neighbors the Tisdale Food Forest — Pickard’s ongoing project — where 500 trees are planted to restore food security and native species. Construction on the building will continue through 2019.

Hilton has added the Tulsa Club Hotel, 115 E. Fifth St., to its brand called Curio Collection by Hilton. When it opens in early March, the 96-room Tulsa Club Hotel will offer more than 7,000 square feet of meeting space, including a ninth floor ballroom for up to 400 guests, as well as rooftop meeting space and a fine dining restaurant, Le Caveau, overlooking the Deco District. Designed by world-renowned architect Bruce Goff, the 1927 Art Deco building originally was home to the Tulsa Chamber of Commerce and the Tulsa Club. However, it was vacant for more than 20 years. The Ross Group purchased the building in 2015 and is managing the renovation.

“… They brought all the white students down to the front of the class. And then at the very back of the class they put one chair with a sign over it saying, ‘Colored.’ When she (Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher) came into the classroom and looked around and she scanned the way the set-up was, and she saw that chair with ‘Colored’ in it, she realized that that was her spot. And so she had to march up the steps and sit in the colored chair. And that’s where she began her law school studies. … There would be times when she would walk in and the ‘Colored’ sign that was above her chair would be removed. What happened is, some of the students would come in and take the sign down and throw it away. And they’d have to put the sign back up again …” Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher

— Bruce Fisher, son of the late Sipuel Fisher, who was the first African American to attend University of Oklahoma College of Law in 1949. She eventually became a regent of the university that once denied her admission. “Voices of Oklahoma” is an oral history project founded by John Erling in 2009. Visit voicesofoklahoma.com.

12

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

VOICES: COURTESY; THE JOINERY: MOLLY EVANS

Voices of Oklahoma


LOCAL TALENT In November, Wendy Songe was named a winner of Silver Dollar City’s “Dream Big, Do Good” initiative, recognizing people who make a different in their communities. Ironically, the theme park is where she discovered the mountain dulcimer eight years earlier.

RARE FIND

Musician fell in love with the mountain dulcimer. BY JULIE WENGER WATSON

“I

’ve always loved music; I begged for a piano as soon as I could talk,” says musician Wendy Songe, who moved to Tulsa at age 9. “That’s really where I started, and it grew into an obsession from there.” Songe’s passion for music encompasses other instruments, as well. In addition to the piano, she has mastered the piano, guitar and ukulele. In 2010, she discovered the mountain dulcimer on a trip to Silver Dollar City. “It was mesmerizing. It was like nothing I’d ever heard,” she recalls. She fell in love with the fretted, stringed instrument that originated in the Appalachian Mountains but has roots all over the world. “There’s just something about the sound,” she explains. “It’s very warm and soothing and sweet

14

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

and rich and earthy. And there’s a drone, just like a hum, behind it. It’s the perfect instrument. It’s like playing guitar in my right hand and piano with my left.” Songe’s affection for the dulcimer is matched by her skill. She has released two albums, and in September, she won fi rst place in the prestigious National Mountain Dulcimer Championship at the Walnut Valley Folk Festival in Winfield, Kansas. She also has found her musical tribe. “The mountain dulcimer community is deceptively large,” she laughs. “So large that it’s become my livelihood. I teach and perform all over the country. It has become this huge family to me. When I travel, I know people all over the country who play this instrument that I play.” TP

TulsaPeople’s Nov. 18, 1993, cover featured Tulsa artist Otto Duecker. Tulsa photographer John McCormack staged and shot the cover photo, which was symbolic of Duecker’s popular “floating fruit” New Realism artwork. Twenty-five years later, he says, “The Floating Fruit Series — fruits and vegetables suspended above the plane of canvas — are fun to paint and enjoyed by collectors.” Another popular Duecker series depicts portraits of iconic men and women in the form of black and white photographs. “I never look for contrasts from one series to the next, or one work to the next,” the artist says. “I just want a steady evolution in subject, posing, lighting and paint quality.” Today his work is in galleries from San Francisco, Santa Fe and Boston, to London, as well as Tulsa’s M.A. Doran. Duecker still retreats to his mental “zone” while busy in his studio. “You have to get your mind as far away as possible from the physical work,” he says. “The three things that accomplish this for me are listening to podcasts, ancient history lectures on YouTube and a great audio book.” But he has never followed a personal mantra. “Other than just doing the best work I can with the skills I have, I don’t think I’ve ever had a philosophy about art. I do know that I have to paint every day.” His bucket list? “I don’t even have to leave my studio. Every day there are new subjects to explore and a new set of problems to solve.” — JUDY LANGDON

LOCAL TALENT: VALERIE WEI-HAAS

COVERS REVISITED


For over 25 years, at Oklahoma Heart Institute we’ve known that living well takes a healthy heart. That’s why our 43 specialists are dedicated to diagnosing and treating cardiovascular, metabolic and sleep problems with a team approach and unmatched, advanced technology. We tackle even the most difficult problems, so you can get better results. When you need complete heart care, trust the doctors of OHI. We have what it takes so you can live well. Our patients are living proof. TECHNOLOGY AND KNOW-HOW FOR RESULTS YOU CAN DEPEND ON.

Nationally Recognized Cardiovascular Specialists

918.592.0999 | www.oklahomaheart.com | 1120 S. UTICA AVE. Oklahoma Heart Institute (The hearT hospiTal) | 1265 S. UTICA (UTica physicians office) | 9228 S. MINGO (soUThpoinTe physicians office) | 8801 S.101ST E. AVE. (hillcresT soUTh)


ON DISPLAY

The opening reception for the Coffee Bunker’s Veterans Art Show, featuring Ken Brown’s “Tulsa Time” and the work of other veterans, is 6-8 p.m., Feb. 8, at the Hive, 115 S. First Street, Jenks.

Old country

S

and Springs artist Ken Brown’s graphite drawing “Tulsa Time” is one of his favorites because it combines some of the city’s most notable landmarks, including Tulsa’s oldest house, now located at Owen Park, into one imagined perspective. A U.S. Army veteran, Brown specializes in graphite and charcoal. He found art nine years ago, “as a type of self-therapy to help me get through pain and health issues after a car wreck, but I’ve always secretly worked as an artist: carpenter, hair stylist, etcetera,” he says. He now teaches art classes at Philbrook Museum of Art, volunteers at the Coffee Bunker and

16

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

mentors young student artists through Operation ART, a program of Operation Aware. His awardwinning work has been shown nationally since 2016, including at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. Brown is represented locally by Ziegler Art Gallery. His work will be on display at the Veterans Art Show from Feb. 8-27 at the Hive, 115 S. First St., Jenks. Exhibit hours are 1-5 p.m., Monday-Friday. — MORGAN PHILLIPS For more information about this artist, visit kenbrownpioneer.com.


CHANGEMAKERS

Drs. Sarah-Anne and John Schumann

Turning up

Mariam, Haniya, Noor and Yara, members of Girl Scouts Troop 2158, meet at Peace Academy, an Islamic private school.

CONFIDENCE AND CHARACTER FOR ALL Tulsan brings Girl Scouts to Muslim community. BY ABIGAIL SINGREY

U

mmFatima Amjad had a mission. She wanted to bring the Girl Scouts experience that she loved growing up to Tulsa’s Muslim community. When her family moved here in 2017 from upstate New York, she partnered with the Girl Scouts of Eastern Oklahoma to create the first Girl Scouts troop comprised of Muslim girls in the Tulsa area. “I wanted to provide my girls with the opportunity to get to know girls around them from different cultures,” says Amjad, the troop leader. “I saw a void in the Muslim community, and I wanted to have something for the girls.” Troop 2158 meets at Peace Academy, a private school committed to building a generation of Muslim Americans who excel in both school and representing Islam in the broader community. The Daisies and Brownies, the younger Girl Scouts, meet after school, while Juniors and Cadets meet on weekends. The troop started in April 2017

18

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

and now has 44 girls participating. In addition to Amjad, eight other mothers are troop co-leaders and volunteers. “(UmmFatima’s) leadership and passion has been contagious,” says Sarah Henley, Girls Scouts membership development manager. The troop’s first activity was cookie decorating, and since then, it has focused on a variety of activities to build the girls’ skills and confidence. The girls love anything outdoors, Amjad says, with a recent trip to a farm ranking as a favorite experience. But one Girl Scouts tradition trumps them all. “The girls are very excited to sell cookies,” Amjad says. Troop 2158 joins a large community of girls focusing on confidence and character. The Girl Scouts welcomes girls of all religions, races and backgrounds, and over 500 troops meet in eastern Oklahoma in religious buildings, schools and public spaces. “It’s been great bringing the Girl Scouts experience to a new group of girls,” Henley says. TP

Tulsa CARES, a nonprofit that provides social services to people affected by HIV/AIDS, has enlisted two prominent Tulsa physicians to chair its upcoming Red Ribbon Gala. For Dr. John Schumann, president of OU-Tulsa, and his wife, Dr. Sarah-Anne Schumann, medical director at United Healthcare and family doctor at Community Health Connection, the March 2 fundraiser represents how far treatment has come for the once-deadly conditions. “The history of HIV is really an unbelievable story about advocacy and science,” John says. “In less than 40 years, we’ve developed this incredible understanding of the virus itself, while advocacy for the marginalized group of people affected by HIV has played a strong role in getting more government funding for research.” He says the biggest change was the advent of so-called triple therapy or HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy) that began in the early 2000s. The approach resulted in HIV being managed as a chronic condition, not seen as a death sentence. Another shift has been the rise in treatment as prevention, John says. Sarah-Anne emphasizes how easy it was for her and John to accept the offer to support Tulsa CARES, with which they have been involved for about a year. “We think a lot about the social determinants of health and how it’s not just about treating disease with medicine, but also about looking at the whole person,” she says. “What we love about Tulsa CARES is that they are thinking about all of the needs of people who are living with HIV — nutrition, housing, mental health and counseling.” — BRANDON SCHMITZ

MARCH 2

RED RIBBON GALA: TURN IT UP 6 p.m., Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center. Tickets start at $500; sponsorships, $1,000$25,000. Benefits Tulsa CARES. Visit redribbongala.org.

CHANGEMAKERS: VALERIE WEI-HAAS; SCHUMANNS: GREG BOLLINGER

SUPPORT


One of the country’s top doctors. Leading the charge against lung cancer right here in Tulsa.

Named 2018 Top Doctor by Castle Connolly Dr. Daniel Nader, Director of the Lung Center at CTCA® in Tulsa, has been recognized by Castle Connolly as one of America’s Top Doctors in pulmonary medicine for the last eight years.

Since 1991, Dr. Nader and his team at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® in Tulsa have been dedicated to building a comprehensive Lung Center to fight this complex disease. With access to cutting-edge technologies, advanced treatments and supportive therapies, our experts specialize in personalized lung cancer care—helping our patients fight cancer.

800.515.9610 | cancercenter.com/tulsa A Network Provider For

© 2018 IPB


APPLAUSE

Shionka McGlory

PLANTING SEEDS

Global Gardens adds new site, offering students ‘seed-to-plate’ experience. BY MADELINE EWING

G

lobal Gardens, a nonprofit dedicated to empowering Tulsa students, is joining forces with its fi fth school, Unity Learning Academy at 2137 N. Pittsburg Ave. Global Gardens’ other school sites are Eugene Field Elementary School, Rosa Parks Elementary School, McAuliffe Elementary School and the Union 6th/7th Grade Center. Three years ago, the owners of Darby Equipment Co. in north Tulsa planted the seed for an expansion to ULA and offered to match contributions made by other community members. “It was the incredible generosity of the Darby Family that really spearheaded the whole thing,” explains Maryann Donahue, executive director of Global Gardens. For every school site, Global Gardens works with students in pre-K through seventh grade during and after school with the goal of having every student receive a “seed-to-plate” experience. Students plant seeds in the ground and tend the plants until harvest, when they cook dishes incorporating their crops. Ultimately, every class

20

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

in the schools will have a class garden. Global Gardens’ after-school program offers more advanced and independent gardening experiences for third- through sixth-grade students. Here, the students have the opportunity to care for their own individual gardens. Global Gardens leaders say that offering these experiences stimulates students to learn more about health, science and the environment, and challenges them to become caring and forward-thinking. In the words of Audrey Hepburn, “To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow.” TP FEB. 8 GLOW 6:30 p.m. Spain Ranch, Jenks. A garden-to-table dining experience from award-winning chef Matthew McClure of the Hive Restaurant in the 21c Museum Hotel in Bentonville, Arkansas. Cocktail attire. $500, tickets; sponsorships available. Benefits Global Gardens. Visit globalgardensglow.org

S

hionka McGlory’s love of books grew after watching her own children fall in love with reading. As their passion blossomed, the 31-yearold pre-K teacher’s assistant wanted to fan the fl ame by helping them fi nd books to which they could relate. But McGlory soon identified a lack of brown and black characters in children’s literature, particularly as heroes or characters of influence. “Most books where you can be a doctor or chef were not geared toward African Americans, or they were not the main character,” McGlory says. “You can’t see a different perspective of the world if you don’t see yourself in the world.” In 2017, she founded Mocha Books from her Tulsa home. “You have to start where you are,” she says. The business is now an online platform with the mission to promote literacy through new and used, culturally represented and diverse books for children and adults. The site has grown to provide book reviews and literary resources and spotlight authors who write about diverse characters. McGlory introduces readers to her finds daily from her Instagram page, @readwithmochabooks. “I get to combine my passion for working with youth and families with my passion for books,” she says. — JORDAN COX

APPLAUSE: COURTESY GLOBAL GARDENS; MOCHA BOOKS: VALERIE WEI-HAAS

Members of Global Gardens’ after-school program at Unity Learning Academy presented plans for the school’s new gardens to teachers, students and parents at a “family dinner” on Dec. 18 at ULA.

BALANCING BOOKS


Move UP to Better Banking! At First Oklahoma Bank, we take seriously our call to serve you as a trusted friend or business partner would. We believe that building a better bank is about building a better future for you. Not only do we provide high-quality products and services, we focus on providing extraordinary personalized service. Our overarching value is to treat others the way we want to be treated and to build solid, long-term relationships. We invite you to experience the difference that such a relationship makes. Let us show you how to improve your banking relationship. • Treasury/Cash Management Services • Working Capital Lines of Credit

• Equipment Loans • Real Estate Loans

CALL (918) 392-7437 or email Ray.Foreman@FirstOklahomaBank.com or LaDonna.Parks@FirstOklahomaBank.com South: 100 S. Riverfront Drive, Jenks | Midtown: 4110 S. Rockford Avenue

FirstOklahomaBank.com


PASSIONS

PINK GIVING

Harry Cramton styles his clients’ hair three days a week at the Ranch Acres Beauty Center.

Longtime stylist Harry Cramton has been cutting hair for 60 years. BY TIM LANDES

H

arry Cramton is considering purchasing a $400 hair dryer that completely dries hair in minutes. He’s just not sure he’ll get his money’s worth. The 83-year-old has been cutting hair for 60 years as of this spring, and he’s uncertain how much longer he’ll work. Cramton works three mornings a week in a throwback of a booth he has rented at the Ranch Acres Beauty Center for the past five years. “I’m not trying to build a clientele because it’s too late,” Cramton says. “I joke with my kids about it. They’re not going to say ‘Young Hairdresser Found Dead’ (laughs). I finally got so old, but I’m still here and still working, and that’s good.” Cramton’s family moved from Chicago to Tulsa in 1952. Following graduation from Central High School, Cramton worked at a flower shop and enlisted in the Air National Guard, serving eight years. “I never even thought of going to beauty

22

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

school,” he says. “My parents wrote and said they’d pay for me to go to beauty school if I promised to do it for a year.” So, he attended Roberts Beauty School at East 11th Street and South Rockford Avenue years before eventually owning it for more than a decade. During his six decades of cutting hair, Cramton was a traveling consultant, ran the salon in Hillcrest Medical Center’s physician building for 25 years, owned two beauty schools and ran his own shop on East 15th Street. At the time he started, a haircut cost $4. Today they start at $30. “I was reminiscing about the beginning of hair dressing for me to where I am now,” says Cramton, who in his free time enjoys going to movies at Circle Cinema and playing bridge. “There were so many clients that I touched their lives and they really touched mine. Everything I know I learned from them. “That’s what it’s really about. It’s about an interaction between two people.” TP

Real Men Wear Pink, a campaign of the American Cancer Society, gives men a leadership role in the fight against breast cancer. In 2018, Jason Turner, president of Matrix North American Construction, a subsidiary of Matrix Service Co. in Tulsa, raised over $6,000, surpassing his $2,500 fundraising goal for RMWP, which helps the ACS raise awareness and find a cure for breast cancer. He did this by writing a personalized letter to 30 people he knew were generous and/or had a personal connection to breast cancer. “I sent it out and was surprised at the immediate response I got,” Turner says. “People gave from $15 to $1,000, and within a few hours, I had surpassed the goal.” The most impactful donation to Turner was his 9-year-old son Landon’s contribution. “He saw the campaign on my iPad and said, ‘I want to donate, too,’ so he gave from his allowance, which is $15. I thought he was going to give $5, but he gave all of it; it was everything he had.” Turner lives in Tulsa with his wife, Marci; Landon; and their 13-year-old twins, William and Vivian. Turner says he encourages his employees to give to a cause, whether financially, with their talents or with their time. “I want people to know that our (Tulsa) community cares and that they are generous,” he says. — KIRSTEN DOMINGUEZ

PASSIONS: VALERIE WEI-HAAS

STILL BEHIND THE CHAIR

Jason Turner, the top 2018 fundraiser for Real Men Wear Pink


Johnny Morris’ Wonders of Wildlife National Museum & Aquarium consists of an all-new 1.5-million-gallon Aquarium Adventure showcasing 35,000 live fish, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and birds, and immersive Wildlife Galleries that bring visitors eye-to-eye with the greatest collection of record-setting game animals ever assembled. Created by noted conservationist and Bass Pro Shops founder Johnny Morris, the 350,000-square-foot experience celebrates those who hunt, fish, and act as stewards of the land and water.

Great Afric an Wildlife Gal Hall leries

Located next to Bass Pro Shops National Headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, the campus is a centerpiece of America’s Conservation Capital in Missouri’s Ozark Mountains. Wonders of Wildlife has been voted “Best New Attraction in America” and “America’s Best Aquarium” by the readers of USA TODAY.

VISIT WONDERS OF WILDLIFE TODAY!

WONDERSOFWILDLIFE.ORG

e Shark Div Out to Sea nture ve d A m iu Aquar


THEN AND NOW

DOWNTOWN’S DOME First Church of Christ, Scientist, has seen 100 years of change. BY BRANDON SCHMITZ

H

aving celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2018, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, at West 10th Street and South Boulder Avenue is among Tulsa’s most historic sites. The structure’s original architect, Courtland Butler, took inspiration from Greek and Roman designs for the church’s grooved columns and iconic dome. Adah Robinson, who is credited with the design of Boston Avenue United Methodist Church, redecorated its interior in 1935. “The dome you see on the outside is not what you see on the inside,” says Judy Morton, a

24

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

church staff member who holds the position of fi rst reader. “When you go into the church and look up, you’ll see a dome with beautiful colors, but there’s another dome 40 feet above that one.” According to Morton, the building has been used solely for church services since its cornerstone was laid in 1918. “We don’t have a kitchen, so we don’t cook or anything like that,” she says. “It’s not like the other churches that have lots of stuff going on with active young people — we have not had that in recent years.” Morton, who has been a member of the church since 1966, recalls relatively little change

in terms of the building’s basic structure. “One year in the ’70s or ’80s, we had a really bad storm and we had to put storm windows over our stained glass windows,” she says. Morton also emphasized the church’s dwindling congregation throughout the years. “The church seats 700, and we used to nearly fill it up,” she says. Even so, members still meet every Sunday morning and Wednesday evening in the church, an icon of Tulsa’s downtown Cathedral District. TP

INSET: GREG BOLLINGER; HISTORICAL IMAGE: COURTESY BERYL FORD COLLECTION/ ROTARY CLUB OF TULSA, TULSA CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY AND TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND MUSEUM

Looking west from East 10th Street and South Boulder Avenue in 1953 and, inset, today


GETTING YOU BACK TO WHAT YOU LOVE Nothing should stand in the way of a healthier you. That’s why we offer a complete care team, guiding you past whatever is standing in the way. With same-day appointments and locations throughout Tulsa, we’re ready to help you get back out there, doing what you love.

www.OUPhysiciansTulsa.com The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

Schedule your appointment today. 918.619.4400 Most Insurances Accepted

TulsaPeople.com

25


MITA’s Foundation Banquet

2

1. Patrons Dustin and Christy Thames; Tina Peña, MITA’s Foundation founder; Dr. TJ Trad, founder of CURA for the World; and Rachael Wright 2. Grettel Loney, Peña and Clay Loney 3. Analilian Vasquez presented Felipe Andres Oyarzo with a Orgullo Hispano Award. 4. Musicians Hugo Salcedo, Heidi Rigert, Sydney Sloat and Kassidy Moore of the Tulsa Community College Music Department

3

4

ADIAIS MAGNO/HAVEN MEDIA PRODUCTIONS

1

A lively auction, a South American dinner and dancing to salsa, samba and rock music from DJ Alfredo Sampayo highlighted the eighth annual MITA’s Foundation Banquet on Nov. 11 at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Conference Center. The event was attended by 225 guests and honored Orgullo Hispano 2018 award recipients Samira Izaguirre, Felipe Andres Oyarzo, Lehabim Escoto and Jose Socorro. Funds raised will benefit more than 300 children and their families in Santa Rosa de Quives, in Lima, Peru. The foundation is named for the founder’s late mother, Mita.

Uncorking the Cure for MS Approximately 300 people attended Uncorking the Cure for MS on Nov. 2 at the Mayo Hotel. Mary Cogan entertained in the Grand Hall as guests arrived. Guest speaker John Platt of Pittsburgh, who lives with multiple sclerosis, is a marathon runner as well as a peer reviewer for MS research. The Fabulous MidLife Crisis Band performed in the Grand Hall during the after party. Uncorking the Cure for MS began in 2001 and has raised more than $1 million to support initiatives of the National MS Society. This year’s event raised $190,000.

1

2

3 26

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

4

CINDY JOHNSON

1. Standing, speaker John Platt; Newton Box and Patricia Box, event co-chairs; and Lucia Laughlin, honorary chairwoman; seated, John and Nancy Hawkins 2. Patron Debbie Foley; Debbie Garner, event committee member; and patron Dave Foley 3. Singer Mary Cogan and her band entertained in the Grand Hall. 4. Patrons Dr. Randall Webb, Dr. Insung Kim, Cheryl Beers and MS Hope Award recipient Craig Beers


NONPROFIT NEWS

Tulsa Area United Way Scott Robin, chair-elect of the Tulsa Area United Way’s Emerging Leaders Society; Jordan Didier-Lanning, chairwoman of ELS; Mark Graham, president emeritus; and Alison Anthony, president and CEO of the Tulsa Area United Way, at a roundtable discussion on leadership with Graham

IN-DEMAND DEGREES, FLEXIBLE OPTIONS OU-Tulsa’s more than 30 degree programs now includes a Bachelor of Social Work. At OU-Tulsa, we offer academic excellence with flexible options, including night, weekend and online classes.

Find your fit at TulsaSooners.com

Signature Symphony Following Signature Symphony’s “Christmas in Tulsa” concert at Tulsa Community College’s VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education, a First Chair Society reception was held. Pictured are Jim Langdon and Juley Roffers, 2019 Overture honorary chairs; Leigh B. Goodson, TCC president and CEO; and Rachel and David Wagner, 2019 Overture chairman. Overture, the annual fundraiser for Signature Symphony at TCC, will be March 9 at the River Spirit Event Center.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

TulsaPeople.com

27


Perfect timing A young couple finds love at a Tulsa clock shop, then carries on the legacy of its founders. BY MORGAN PHILLIPS

W

hen clock shop owners Harley and Mary Hunter lost their longtime friend and principal clock repairman, Ron Hillstrom, to cancer in 2011, they were devastated. Their business was affected, too. “We just couldn’t keep up with demand,” Harley says. Clock repair is “a rare occupation” — an artistry that cannot be learned quickly, he explains. Years of observation and training are required for even the most mechanically minded people to pick up on such a precise craft. (Good clock repair-people don’t even identify as such, Harley notes. They insist they are merely “tinkerers.”) So replacing Hillstrom wasn’t as simple as placing a “help wanted” ad. In fact, the Hunters decided to retire and close Grandfather’s Clock Gallery and Clinic, the shop they’d founded in 1987. Before they did, however, a 24-year-old UPS package handler and college student named Travis Grether walked into the shop at 3105 S. Winston Ave. and inquired about part-time work. Harley decided to hear the young man out. “Within about 15 minutes, I found out he knew more than I did,” Harley says. “Mary and I were impressed by his knowledge of clocks, and we both knew we needed to give him a try.” So, the Hunters changed their minds about closing the longtime shop. Giving Grether “a try” initially meant a few hours of work per week. But over the next few months the position grew to 20 hours, then full time with benefits. The job was such a good fit, Grether saw a career path and didn’t return to college. Over the next six years, the clock shop not only survived; it thrived. Then, as if in return for its salvation, the shop granted Grether two gifts: first, business ownership and, then, love. 28

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

For everything, a season Grether grew up watching his grandfather, a professional clock repairman in Porter, Oklahoma, work on hundreds of clocks, and eventually spent three years working for him part time. That day in 2011, Grether says he was trying to figure out what he wanted to do next and decided to look for clock repair jobs “on a whim.” “He wrote down the three clock shops in Tulsa and, for some reason, came to ours first,” Harley recalls. “The rest is history.” Six months after Grether came to work at the shop, Harley brought up the topic of succession. “I said, ‘You’ll know when you’re ready (to take over the business),’” Harley recalls. Five years later, in January 2017, Grether went from employee to proprietor. Though they eased into retirement, the Hunters didn’t say goodbye to the shop they’d operated for three decades. Harley still makes four to five house calls each week on the shop’s behalf to work on grandfather and other large clocks that are difficult to transport. Mary volunteers a few hours each week in the office, helping with bookkeeping and fine-tuning the shop’s inventory and repair database, which she developed herself.

Lightning strikes twice Horology — literally “the study of time,” which refers to making and repairing clocks and watches — is in many ways a dying art, the Hunters say. A main reason? Technology. Quartz, or battery, clocks have grown in popularity over the years, the Hunters say, because they are more convenient. They are always accurate, and you don’t have to wind them, Mary explains.


Looking back further, the use of pocket watches peaked in the early 1900s, according to various sources. Then came the wristwatch, which for many was replaced by cell phones in the 2000s. Now, of course, there are “smart watches,” including the Apple Watch. The younger generations’ accessibility to such technology has resulted in relatively few millennials with skills or interest in horology, and few trade schools still offer courses in clock and watch repair. Oklahoma State University-Institute of Technology, for example, is phasing out its Watchmaking and Microtechnology program. Surely Grether was an anomaly. Yet one day, a fresh-faced, 20-something woman dropped into the shop to ask the Hunters if she could spend some time there simply to “watch people repair clocks.” “We thought it was odd, yes, but we thought it was odd when Travis came in,” Harley recalls. Who were they to begrudge the young woman a learning opportunity? A fan of the steampunk genre of science fiction, Talitha Moser was particularly fascinated with the history of clockmaking and automatons, which are self-operating mechanical devices. After a few weeks watching Grether and others repair clocks, Moser was hired part time at the shop, helping customers, testing and regulating clocks that had been repaired, and sorting parts. She took a public clock repair course developed by Grether, and the two began to work closely together. Eventually sparks were flying — and not just from the workbench. “(Talitha) was gorgeous and everything,” says Grether, with a faint blush. “I got to know her and just thought she was way out of my league.” He was wrong, as it turns out, and the two began dating, with the Hunters’ blessing. Their engagement on Aug. 21, 2017, was a rarer moment than most; it took place during the Great American Solar Eclipse. Grether took Moser on a road trip to Jefferson City, Missouri, which was in the eclipse’s path of totality. “There is a point at totality that is called the ‘Diamond Ring Effect,’” Grether says. “That’s when I asked her.” The two were married in December 2017 in a ceremony that incorporated sand in an hourglass and the exchange of pocket watches. The symbolism was fitting. “We fell in love with clocks first, then we fell in love,” Talitha says.

Travis Grether went from clock shop employee to owner in January 2017. Talitha joined the team and the two fell in love, eventually marrying in December 2017.

Clockwork continues Still newlyweds, the Grethers happily operate Grandfather’s Clock Gallery and Clinic six days a week. They have seven employees, counting Harley, and they’re taking some steps to modernize its marketing and social media presence, Talitha says. Clocks remain their second love, and it’s not just a mechanical appreciation. They feel an emotional connection to their customers and the history behind their work. In the shop, which also buys and sells clocks, watches and antiques, Talitha points to a 19th-century French statue clock. “This clock has seen families grow up,” she says. “It saw electricity come to homes.” And then there’s the feeling of “working on something that has already been worked on 10 times over the past 200 years,” she adds. She recounts some customers’ reactions when they find out their family clock can be repaired. “We’ve had people break down crying because they thought their family clock would never chime again, and it was like their father’s voice to them every hour,” she says. Although the Grethers’ customers are mostly Baby Boomers and older, they say the pendulum is starting to swing younger, especially with the rising popularity of some types of vintage furniture and collectibles. “(Clocks and watches are) something people don’t think about because it’s not mainstream right now, but we think it’s coming back,” Talitha says. Until the trends catch up, the Grethers will bide their time and continue to appreciate the life the little shop has provided them. “The clock shop was the best thing that ever happened to me,” Travis says. And though the Hunters founded and built the business for 30 years, they don’t take credit for the rest of the story. “You know how love is,” Harley says. “We didn’t have a thing to do with that.” TP

Harley and Mary Hunter founded Grandfather’s Clock Gallery and Clinic in 1987. The shop is known for its expert service and repair, along with selling a wide variety of time pieces and accessories. TulsaPeople.com

29


Bold & bright

LET THE SUNSHINE IN WITH THESE RECIPES USING BIG CITRUS FLAVOR. By Natalie Mikles

When summer seems so far away, we can bring brightness and zest to our kitchens with citrus. Citrus is what we crave in the cold days of winter. And it’s a good thing, because although it’s dreary here, huge grapefruits, Meyer lemons and mandarin oranges are being plucked from trees in Texas, Florida, South America and Mexico. Winter recipes conjure ideas of steaming bowls of soup and comfort food casseroles, but we need something else. We need risotto covered in lemon zest,

meats marinated in lime juice, fresh-squeezed orange juice and bright lemon bars so tart they make our mouths pucker. So we’ve gathered some of our favorite citrus-based recipes to beat the doldrums of winter. Gathering your ingredients will be pretty easy, since you can find many citrus varieties at local grocery stores now. Ethan Miller, produce manager at Whole Foods Market in Brookside, says citrus season kicks off in December, when big boxes of mandarins begin arriving. “Citrus gets big and bold and bright in the winter,” Miller says. Satsuma mandarins and clementines are the kickoff of Whole Foods’ citrus season. But the citrus customers most look forward to are the mandarins’ bigger cousins, the sumo mandarins.

Sumo mandarins are a cross between several citrus varieties, according to Miller. “People lose their minds when the sumos come in. They buy them by the box.” This also is the season you’ll find large grapefruits out of Texas and California. Lemons and limes, while always available, will sometimes have even more flavor at peak season. One interesting citrus variety Miller likes doesn’t actually have any pulp inside. Buddha’s Hand is an unusually shaped fruit, with finger-like sections coming from a base. No segments or juice can be extracted from it, but Miller says they’re often used for their aromatic zest or just as display. Let the sunshine in with these recipes using big citrus flavor.

TulsaPeople.com

31


If you’re trying to eat more plant-based foods in the new year, this is a great option. If you’re eating beyond plant-based, serve it with pita bread and lemon-yogurt marinated chicken kabobs.

QUINOA TABOULI

Serves 6 2 cups water 1 cup quinoa 1 pinch salt ¼ cup olive oil ½ teaspoon sea salt ¼ cup lemon juice 2 cups cherry tomatoes, quartered 1 cucumber, diced ¼ cup chopped green onions or chives 1 cup chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint

In a medium saucepan, bring water to a boil. Add quinoa and a pinch of salt. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Allow to cool to room temperature, then fluff with a fork. In a large bowl, combine olive oil, sea salt, lemon juice, tomatoes, cucumber, green onions, parsley and mint. Stir in cooled quinoa.

Citrus becomes your best friend when used as a marinade. No ingredient adds flavor more boldly than fresh citrus juice.

CITRUS-MARINATED FLANK STEAK Serves 4

Zest and juice of 3 oranges Zest and juice of 3 limes 4 cloves garlic, chopped ¼ cup finely chopped fresh cilantro 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon dried oregano ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper 1 ¼ pounds flank steak

In a large zip-close bag, combine orange juice, lime juice, zests, garlic, cilantro, salt, cumin, oregano and crushed red pepper. Add steak, seal bag and turn to coat with marinade. Marinate 1 hour and up to 8 hours in refrigerator. Let stand at room temperature for 20 minutes. Preheat outdoor grill to high. Oil the grates to prevent meat from sticking. Discard marinade. Grill steak 5 minutes per side for medium, depending on the thickness of the steak. Remove steak from grill, and transfer to a cutting board. Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing and serving. 32

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019


CEVICHE SAVANT

Here’s a salad that will make you forget winter.

WINTER CITRUS SALAD WITH ARUGULA Serves 6 4 cloves garlic, crushed 1 tablespoon whole grain mustard ⅓ cup olive oil Juice from 1 lemon Juice from ½ an orange Salt and pepper 8 cups torn butter lettuce 8 cups arugula 2 grapefruit, peeled and segmented 1 blood orange, peeled and segmented 1 navel orange, peeled and segmented 4 ounces goat cheese ¼ cup chopped pistachios

In a small bowl, combine garlic, mustard, olive oil, lemon juice and orange juice. Whisk until fully incorporated. Add salt and pepper, to taste. Toss butter lettuce and arugula with dressing. Divide among plates. Top with citrus, goat cheese, pistachios and dressing.

Whole Foods Market shared this recipe for a simple citrus smoothie.

SUNSHINE SMOOTHIE Serves 2 1 orange 1 lemon 1 red grapefruit ¾ cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt 2 tablespoons honey or agave syrup ½ cup ice cubes

Remove zest from orange and lemon; set aside. Remove peel from orange, lemon and grapefruit, and segment fruits into pieces. Chop, and remove any seeds. Place the fruits into a blender, and add half the orange and lemon zest, yogurt, honey and ice cubes. Blend until smooth and pour into two glasses; sprinkle with the remaining zest.

A skeptic might wonder if you could actually find good ceviche in Tulsa. Talking to Felipe Enciso leaves little doubt. Enciso was born in a town outside of Lima, Peru, that holds claim to being the city where ceviche originated. He grew up eating ceviche — a dish of both enormous simplicity and complexity — which is raw fish mixed with what can be as few as one other ingredient: lime juice. Ceviche often also includes onions, peppers and sometimes corn, sweet potatoes or garlic. When Enciso and his wife, Cecilia, opened their restaurant, Manos Peruanas, he knew there would be ceviche on the menu. “Let me explain this. We make it good,” Enciso says. “This is not because I’m the owner of the restaurant. You can find good ceviche in Florida. And I’m proud to say we do it really, really good.” There’s no doubt he knows the subject matter. Enciso says he ate ceviche at least twice a week growing up in Peru. He won’t give up his tricks, but Enciso will say he uses sea bass and imported Peruvian lemons. “That’s the trick. If you use a lime from here, it’s not going to taste the same,” he says. Many people come to Manos Peruanas, 6703 E. 81st St., for ceviche and other Peruvian dishes. The restaurant also has dishes from Venezuela and Colombia. Ceviche, though, isn’t as popular with customers in the cold winter months. It’s at this time customers crave the Encisos’ shrimp soup, chupe de camarones. But at the first sign of sunshine, customers begin asking for the ceviche. TulsaPeople.com

33


Take a tender butter cake, add a load of lemon and a touch of orange, and you have a luscious, lemony cake perfect for any celebration.

CITRUS LAYER CAKE 8 egg yolks ¾ cup butter, softened 1 ¼ cups sugar 2 ½ cups cake flour 1 tablespoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt

Serves 12 ¾ cup milk Zest of 1 orange Zest of 2 lemons Juice of 1 lemon 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease and flour three (8-inch) cake pans or spray generously with nonstick spray. Beat egg yolks at high speed with an electric mixer for 4 minutes or until thick and pale. Set aside. Beat butter at medium speed until creamy. Gradually add sugar, beating until well combined. Add egg yolks, beating well. In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder and salt. Add flour mixture to butter mixture a cup at a time, alternating with the milk, beginning and ending with the flour mixture. Beat at low speed just until blended. Stir in orange zest, lemon zest, lemon juice and vanilla extract. Spoon batter into cake pans. Bake for 12-16 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool in pans on wire racks for 10 minutes. Remove from pans onto wire racks, and cool completely. Spread with frosting between cake layers and on top. (Recipe follows.) 34

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

CITRUS FROSTING 1 cup butter, softened Zest of 1 orange Juice of 1 orange Zest of 1 lemon

Juice of 2 lemons 2 pounds (32-ounce package) powdered sugar

Beat butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Stir in orange and lemon zests and juices. Gradually add sugar, beating on medium speed for 3-5 minutes or until it’s a good consistency for spreading. You might need to add more citrus juice or powdered sugar, depending on thickness or thinness of frosting.


COURTESY EDIBLEND SUPERFOOD CAFE

Ediblend’s Tropical Orange juice

CITRUS JUICES “We literally can’t get enough citrus,” says Joy Hulver with Ediblend Superfood Cafe. With locations at Utica Square and in south Tulsa at East 101st Street and South Sheridan Road, Ediblend makes juices and smoothie blends to order and has refrigerated cases of juices ready to go. And many of those juices are loaded with citrus. “We definitely use a ton of citrus in our blends because of its immunity-boosting powers,” Hulver says. She says customers also appreciate blends with citrus for the soluble fiber, which aids in digestion and keeps you full and more satisfied. One of the most popular juices at Ediblend is the Tropical Orange, a pretty blend of orange, carrot, pineapple, apple, ginger, dates and coconut water. Those seeking citrus also will like the Lemon Zinger, a bright yellow blend of lemons, cayenne pepper and agave. Or, try the hydrating signature blend, the 1717, with orange, banana, strawberries, dates and filtered water. Anyone who has tasted Ediblend’s popular Detox Green knows it also has a burst of lemon, which Hulver says is a great detoxifier. TP TulsaPeople.com

35


CHEERS!

W H AT’S COOK ING? The buzz on Tulsa’s tastiest products, restaurants and events BY NATALIE MIKLES

G

lacier has become the chocolatier of choice for Tulsans, with its handcrafted truffles and confections. With its newest iteration — Glacier Bean to Bar — Glacier is now infusing its cocoa know-how with cocktail flair. The Chocolate Espresso Martini ($12) is the flagship tipple, featuring a shot of espresso that is rich and smooth. Chocolate liqueur adds a subtle sweetness, while white chocolate liqueur imparts dainty notes of vanilla. Just a touch of half-and-half creates a pillowy topper for a regal “G” or seasonal design made from ground espresso. The barkeeps at the chocolate bar also are working to incorporate Glacier’s chocolate cherry bomb truffles into a signature cocktail, and they offer a hot toddy that is sure to whisk away the most blustery of moods. In addition to cocktails, Glacier Bean to Bar, 209 E. Archer St., also offers truffles, pastries and coffee beverages starting at 11 a.m., Wednesday-Sunday. — ANGELA EVANS

36

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

R

emember when brunch was a noun? Now brunch is so much more than a meal eaten between early morning and afternoon. Brunch is an activity, a hobby, a highlight in a weekend full of activity. It’s written (sometimes eye-rollingingly so) on T-shirts. But you don’t have to have a #brunchsquad shirt to appreciate this meal that’s become celebrated as the perfect weekend food, the antidote to a hangover and the time to get together with friends without the pressure of dressing up for an 8 p.m. reservation. Brunch is unique in that it covers any number of types of foods. Classic breakfasts, like eggs Benedict and Belgian waffles, are expected on a brunch menu. But it also is common to see sliders, lox, tacos and even dessert masked as a meal on a brunch menu. Part of the fun of brunch is finding new places and trying new menus around town. Lucky for us, there’s no shortage of brunch options in Tulsa. We’ve listed some of our favorites on the next page. But brunch at home also can be fun. A home brunch can be the perfect venue for a birthday party, a shower or any celebration. Here are some of our favorite — and super simple — ideas for a fun brunch at the kitchen table.

BRUNCH TARTLETS Makes 8 tarts

1 package (8 count) big refrigerated biscuits ¼ cup pesto, divided 8 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled 1 cup gruyere cheese, shredded 8 eggs

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 8 mini tart pans with nonstick spray or spread generously with butter. Press one refrigerated biscuit into bottom and up sides of each tart pan. Spread each piece of dough with pesto. Evenly sprinkle with bacon and cheese. Break egg onto cheese in each tart. Place tart pans on a parchment-lined baking sheet for easy handling. Bake 18-22 minutes or until biscuit is golden brown and egg is cooked through. Let cool 5 minutes, then remove tarts from pans. Serve warm.

BANANA BREAD PANCAKES Makes 16 pancakes 2 cups pancake mix 1 ½ cups buttermilk 2 eggs 1 cup mashed ripe bananas (about 2 medium bananas) 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 cup warm maple syrup

In a medium-sized bowl, combine pancake mix, buttermilk, eggs, mashed bananas and cinnamon, stirring with whisk until most lumps disappear. Do not overmix. Heat griddle or nonstick pan on medium heat. Lightly grease or brush with butter. Pour ¼ cup batter to make each pancake. Turn when bubbles form in the middle of pancake. Pancakes are done when bottoms are golden brown. Serve with syrup, sliced bananas and pecans.

PANCAKES: VALERIE WEI-HAAS

A CHOCO-LOT of love

Banana bread pancakes


Acai bowl

BOWLED OV ER

SMOKE’s chicken-fried pork loin

BRUNCH BRIGADE Hungry for brunch? Try one of these to-die-for dishes.

These are like the more mature cousin of a delicious little chicken biscuit served at a fast-food restaurant closed on Sundays. But brunch at Roosevelt’s is served only on Sundays. That’s when you can get these homemade biscuits with fried chicken cutlets, honey butter and fried rosemary. Served with breakfast potatoes. $12. 1551 E. 15TH ST.

MAIN STREET TAVERN’S WAFFLE CRISTO

SMOKE’S CHICKEN-FRIED PORK LOIN The pork loin is soaked in buttermilk making for a tender meat with a crisp-fried coating. It’s served with two eggs, potatoes and sausage gravy. Try a biscuit with bacon jam on the side. $13. 1542 E. 15TH ST.; 201 S. MAIN ST., OWASSO

BISHOP’S: COURTESY TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND MUSEUM; SMOKE: VALERIE WEI-HAAS

ROOSEVELT’S HONEY BUTTER CHICKEN BISCUIT

It’s a Monte Cristo merged with a waffle, and it’s fantastic. Sandwiched in between a Belgian waffle are sliced chicken, ham and Swiss cheese. It’s served with warm maple syrup and a berry compote. $11. 200 S. MAIN ST., BROKEN ARROW; 1325 E. 15TH ST., SUITE 107

The idea of mixing fruits with granola, nuts or vegetables has been popping up all over the country. Fruit bowls or smoothie bowls are popular for a quick breakfast, lunch or post workout meal. A new spot downtown, fROOT Bowls, specializes in these tasty concoctions. Owners Kristi and Mike Tomlinson opened in a small space around the corner from the downtown Tulsa YMCA. Bowls are made to order with no added sugars or preservatives. One of the most popular is the acai bowl ($8), with a blend of bananas, mixed berries and coconut milk with a little granola on top. Other interesting ingredients and toppings to try are blackberries, kiwi slices, dragon fruit, coconut shavings, guava nectar and chia. 6 W. FOURTH ST.

Lost restaurants of Tulsa

Restaurants might come and go in Tulsa, but many have made their mark on our city’s history for their food, service, owners and atmosphere. Here’s one serving of Tulsa’s gastronomic history from the book “Lost Restaurants of Tulsa.”

Bishop’s Restaurant 510 S. MAIN ST.

One of Tulsa’s most famous historic restaurants, Bishop’s, opened in 1930. It was the newest eatery from Bill Bishop and partner Harry Powers, who had run several successful “Kansas City Waffle House” restaurants in the state. It was open 24-hours-a-day and occupied two floors at 510 S. Main St. The lower floor had a large U-shaped coffee bar and a dining room, and the top floor served as an open buffeteria. Customers included oil tycoons like Josh Cosden, William Skelly, J. Paul Getty and Harry Sinclair. Local performers camped out and drank coffee while they waited for the newspapers to hit the sidewalk so they could read the first reviews. Soldiers stationed nearby listed Bishop’s as their mailing address due to their frequent visitation. As Tulsans expanded to the suburbs in the 1960s, business waned and Bishop’s eventually closed … but the memories are still strong more than 50 years later. — RHYS MARTIN TulsaPeople.com

37


CLASSIC.

Style.

Da l l as is a cit y w i t h m a n y s i de s. There’s more to Dallas than a hit TV show. Sure, we all have horses. Most are just under the hood. In reality, Dallas is a city with many sides—unscripted and full of surprises. The one place where heritage meets hospitality. Southern meets modern. And legacy meets luxury. From “Howdy, folks” to “Holy cow,” it’s all just a quick road trip away—hood ornament not required.

Get the most from your getaway at VisitDallas.com.

LOCATION: ROSEWOOD MANSION ON TURTLE CREEK


COME SEE THE Many Sides of Dallas Dallas Blooms at the Arboretum Experience the largest floral festival in the Southwest, with gardens bursting with over 500,000 blossoms, including tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, Japanese cherry trees and more. Plus, bring the kids and enjoy the interactive magic of the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden.

WHEN?

February 23–April 7, 2019

WHERE?

Dallas Arboretum

dallasarboretum.org

St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Festival Dallas’s wildest (and greenest) party is back for its 40th year. Come early for the two-mile parade with more than 90 floats. Then enjoy the postparade concert and the amazing afterparty scene at bars and restaurants all along historic Greenville Avenue.

WHEN?

March 16, 2019

WHERE?

Greenville Avenue

dallasstpatricksparade.com

Margarita Mile Dallas is the official home of the frozen margarita! Now, Dallas’s best and brightest margs are collected in the city’s newest attraction, the Margarita Mile, a one-of-a-kind experience that will keep you and your friends coming back again and again. Think of it as the ultimate margarita bucket list—and the perfect way to discover the diverse flavors of Dallas.

WHEN?

Anytime you’re visiting MargaritaMileDallas.com

WHERE?

Various locations


A suicide note is received from a student virtually every day within Tulsa Public Schools.

One in six Oklahoma children has experienced multiple Adverse Childhood Experiences, or ACEs.

Suicide is the eighth leading cause of death in the state, and the second leading cause for ages 15-34.

Distress in the classroom Oklahoma adolescent suicide rates are outpacing increases nationally. Local agencies and professionals lend their expertise to this tough issue that doesn’t discriminate. BY GAIL BANZET-ELLIS 40

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

ADOLESCENT SUICIDE IS GROWING AT AN ALARMING RATE IN OKLAHOMA.

Suicides among ages 10-24 in the state have increased 41 percent since 2006, compared to a 33 percent increase in the youth suicide rate nationally for the same time period, Oklahoma’s 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicates. It is the eighth leading cause of death in the state, and the second leading cause for ages 15-34, reports the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. According to the Tulsa Mental Health Plan, within Tulsa Public Schools, a suicide note is received from a student virtually every day. Thoughts of suicide affect every aspect of a teenager’s life, from their social interactions to their ability to perform in the classroom. It’s a difficult topic to discuss, but more common than the general public realizes. However, when communication and education are utilized, mental health professionals say suicidal thoughts are treatable, and suicide is preventable.


CONTRIBUTING FACTORS TO SUICIDE

Mental illness, depression and other conditions that can lead to suicide are caused by a combination of factors, but the constant connectivity to smart phone platforms often is blamed. M.J. Clausen, director of Oklahoma City operations for the Mental Health Association of Oklahoma says cyber bullying and a teen’s fear of missing out can contribute to teen suicide rates. “It is 24/7 and unrelenting,” she says. “The growth of social media is something that has significantly changed during the past 8-10 years.” Access to today’s social media platforms is overwhelming and can create a superficial world where teens frequently compare themselves to others. “It doesn’t allow kids a break,” says Dr. Sara Coffey, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. “With anonymous apps, kids can post something derogatory or hurtful to another student without holding themselves accountable.” On the other hand, Coffey says it’s important to remember social media with parental oversight can be beneficial in helping teens connect with peers in a positive way. “We want to make sure that it’s healthy and adaptable to kids rather than harming.” Inside the walls of a classroom, Ebony Johnson, Ed. D., executive director of student and family support services at Tulsa Public Schools, says students vulnerable to suicide sometimes are heightened by an interaction with another student or an adult or an internal conflict that no one else can detect. “When it comes to trauma, we attribute a lot of what the student is going through to something they’ve experienced in their life,” she says. “Whether they’ve witnessed certain things as children or young adults, the behaviors caused by that trauma are exhibited at school.” These Adverse Childhood Experiences, known as ACEs, are mentioned in a 2018 report on the state of Tulsa’s mental health, prepared by the Urban Institute and funded by the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation. Titled “Prevention, Treatment, Recovery: Toward a 10-Year Plan for Improving Mental Health and Wellness in Tulsa,” the document discusses how “ACE rates among Oklahoma’s children are among the worst in the nation.” According to the Urban Institute, one in six Oklahoma children has had multiple ACEs such as “witnessing domestic violence, substance misuse or mental illnesses within a household; having an incarcerated family member; being affected by household separation or divorce; and experiencing various types of abuse or neglect, by the time they are 19.” Johnson and her colleagues at TPS contributed to the Tulsa Mental Health Plan and are optimistic about the laser focus the City of Tulsa and the state of Oklahoma are placing on mental health awareness. “We’re finding that working collectively is where we’re seeing the most benefit,” she says. As a result of the plan’s findings, the Zarrow

Foundation has committed to working with TPS to better understand how to go forward. It’s called Healthy Minds: Enhance Children’s Mental Health System Project. Though inadequate treatment often is due to low funding, Clausen says Oklahoma’s landscape also factors into a high suicide rate. Consistently, for all ages, Tulsa and Oklahoma counties stay below the state suicide rate, according to data from the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse. In 2017, Tulsa County had a rate of 18.1 suicides per 10,000, and Oklahoma County had a rate of 15.5. The state average for 2017 was 19.2. “Although we (the state of Oklahoma) have a nationally recognized telemedicine program, we are spread out, so people are isolated in rural and non-metro areas,” she says. “It’s difficult for people to get the treatment they need.” Mental illness that leads to a suicide attempt does not discriminate. According to Clausen, Oklahoma’s suicide rate has increased by 37 percent since 1999, affecting residents from every walk of life. Children and teens in both public and private school environments are equally susceptible to these health challenges. “It doesn’t matter what background you come from. It happens to all races and classes of people,” says Robin LeBlanc, president of the Oklahoma chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. “Depression and mental health is not selective. It happens to whomever, whenever, however, and it’s nothing to be ashamed of.”

SIGNS SAVE LIVES

Recognizing a child or teen in distress is critical to getting them the help they need as quickly as possible. In a school setting, students dealing with deepseated mental health issues or trauma exhibit behavior much different from those who are anxious or agitated from stress associated with a typical day, such as homework. Johnson says one indicator is when students struggle with adult-student relationships. “They have a hard time with trust, or it’s the opposite and they seek out relationships with adults that can become co-dependent,” she says. Other signals to watch for include a child appearing uncomfortable in a group or lacking the ability to transition to the next activity, especially for those in early childhood development classrooms. “They may become attached to one thing and have a tough time when there’s a substitute teacher because of attachment and abandonment issues,” Johnson says. Students who pace around or walk aimlessly in an agitated or distressed state should raise concern as well as children and teens who are not sociable. Those who are extremely emotional or who display more aggressive behavior than a typical student also might be experiencing emotional distress. “Some students can be pretty pessimistic and not see a lot of hope, depending on their background,” Johnson says. “Other students have had unfortunate sexual encounters, so sometimes they

SUICIDE PREVENTION RESOURCES (Emergency)

NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE suicidepreventionlifeline.org 1-800-273-TALK (8255) COMMUNITY OUTREACH PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY SERVICES (COPES) fcsok.org/services/crisis-services 918-744-4800 CRISIS TEXT LINE crisistextline.org Text: 741741 CALL 9-1-1 (can ask for a CIT officer – Crisis Intervention Team)

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES SUICIDE PREVENTION RESOURCE CENTER sprc.org AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF SUICIDOLOGY suicidology.org AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION afsp.org MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF OKLAHOMA (offers QPR trainings) mhaok.org OKLAHOMA CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION afsp.org/chapter/afsp-oklahoma LAUREATE INSTITUTE FOR BRAIN RESEARCH laureateinstitute.org/ongoing-studies.html OPEN ARMS YOUTH PROJECT, a youth center that supports the LGBT community openarmstulsa.com, 918-838-7104 DENNIS R. NEILL EQUALITY CENTER, TULSA okeq.org THE TREVOR PROJECT, many programs, including a 24/7 helpline for LGBT youth in crisis thetrevorproject.org, 866-488-7386

TulsaPeople.com

41


Amanda Bradley

Dispatching

HELP

Community Outreach Psychiatric Emergency Services (COPES) is a free, confidential crisis line and mobile crisis service available 24/7 to children and adults in suicidal crisis and emotional distress. Calls made to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline as well as the Youth Crisis Mobile Response Line from a 918 area code ring to COPES. Senior Program Director Amanda Bradley says at least three individuals are answering the phones at all times, dispatching calls to mobile teams in the field. “On any given day, we typically have somewhere between three to four mobile teams responding all over Tulsa County,” she says. COPES has the unique ability to quickly triage calls and determine how best to stabilize a situation in the least restrictive environment possible. “We truly walk with them on their darkest day to help them see there is hope,” Bradley says. COPES reports it receives the highest number of kid-related calls for those age 13. Bradley says COPES has a high success rate of helping children and their families avoid a trip to the hospital and identify long-term treatment. In one instance, COPES received a call from a counselor at Newman Middle School in Skiatook. The student, Chyann DeClue, was talking to a girl in India through an app, and the Indian girl said she was getting ready to end her life by taking medications. COPES began advising DeClue on what to say to the girl. At the same time, COPES made calls to India (35 in total) to find local responders. They even spoke with the U.S. Embassy in India to reach the right people who spoke the girl’s Chin dialect. As a result of efforts in Oklahoma, the girl in India did not attempt suicide. She was able to discuss the situation with her family and still communicates with DeClue to this day.

COPES, 918-744-4800 42

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

may act out and try to exert that behavior on others.” Youth affected by a disruptive life at home, previous ACEs or mental illness sometimes react more on impulse because they lack the ability to manage their metacognition, the ongoing thoughts we have with ourselves that help us gain insight into how we learn and create successful ways to overcome things we perceive as a challenge. Amanda Bradley is senior director for Community Outreach Psychiatric Emergency Services (COPES), a program of Tulsa’s Family and Children’s Services. She says children exhibiting mood swings or getting too much or too little sleep are indicators of mental health issues that can coincide with a teen’s rash decision-making behavior. “It’s important to recognize impulsivity because they don’t have the ability to regulate those emotions yet,” she says.

ASKING THE TOUGH QUESTION

As a licensed mental health professional, Bradley oversees COPES, a 24/7 free mobile crisis program serving Oklahomans in psychiatric crisis. She routinely dispatches with a COPES unit and has experience communicating with teens in distress. “The first thing to do is recognize how brave they are to be reaching out for help and (to explain) that you want to be there to help them,” Bradley says. Many families are unaware of the struggles their children or adolescents face, so it is crucial to assure them that help is available to initiate and navigate those difficult conversations. Once a COPES team determines the risk of the individual in crisis, decisions are made to deploy immediately to the location or call emergency services — whatever is needed to stabilize the situation as quickly as possible. In October 2018, Bradley says 221 children in crisis sought the assistance of COPES. Approximately 40 percent of the calls COPES receives are suicidal. “We have the ability to have conversations not only with the individual in crisis but also another member of the family,” she says. When children and young adults express signs of emotional distress not typical of behavior for their age, a teacher, coach, counselor, parent or friend must ask the tough question: Are you having suicidal thoughts? “With adolescents, it’s so important to take every threat or statement or warning sign seriously,” Clausen says. “It is very difficult even as a mental health professional, but we always just want to ask it straight out and allow the person time to say yes or no. Then, you go from there (in terms of getting that individual the help they need).” Bradley at COPES says it is critical to pose the question in a way that is accepting of what the teenager is feeling so that they trust you to share their thoughts. “You don’t want to overreact or underreact to the information they’re giving you,” she says. “Be open to just listening and thinking about their feelings and what actions they’ve taken.” Besides COPES, many other hotlines are

available to call or text for immediate action and resources. Dialing 9-1-1 also is an option, along with taking the person in crisis to an emergency room. On school grounds, Johnson says every school leader at TPS is given protocols and safety plans for students who run from the classroom or off school grounds when they’ve experienced a traumatic issue. The district also offers deescalation strategies and training, prioritizing the safety of not only the student in distress, but the other students in the classroom. “At the district level, teachers can request a behavior interventionist if they are concerned about a student’s extreme behavior,” she says. “We reach out back to the teacher with immediate support.” TPS administrators can become aware of a student in distress through a number of sources: a teacher, classmate, parent or the student themself. Upper elementary and high school students having suicidal ideations or experiencing other emotions such as panic attacks can meet with one of the TPS licensed social workers on-site. School counselors and leaders are trained on how to handle the situation and provide resources, including calling COPES. In a large school district like TPS, Johnson says administrators understand the importance of additional resources to: 1) determine how to directly support students in crisis situations through a tracking system, 2) support teachers and staff members working directly with students and 3) make sure the family of a student in crisis is involved every step of the way and referred to mental health agencies and other wraparound support services. The district currently is consulting with mental health professionals and specialists across all age ranges for trauma-informed practices. TPS also is exploring training programs that support the mental wellbeing of teachers. Johnson says a teacher care line has been established at TPS for novice instructors who seek support for professional learning, support for troubling classroom behavior and mental health referrals for the teacher themself. TPS also is working with CASEL — Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning — thanks to a Wallace Foundation grant, to develop social and emotional learning opportunities. Once urgent needs are met and a child or teen is no longer in immediate danger, treatment or therapy are viable options to help him or her improve their mental health long term. Coffey says medication certainly plays a role, but therapy is the first and foremost recommendation. “Studies show therapy combined with medication, more specifically for adolescents, can be helpful,” she says. “It’s really important there’s a therapeutic component in treating kids’ depression and suicidal tendencies.” Mental health professionals are available, but not every school site has dedicated, embedded mental health staff. The district works with several outside mental health agencies to address student needs.


In October 2018, 221 children in crisis sought the assistance of COPES.

Oklahoma’s suicide rate has increased by 37 percent since 1999, affecting residents from every walk of life.

In Oklahoma, suicides among 10- to 24-year-olds have increased 41 percent since 2006.

TRAINING AND PREVENTION

In addition to the hotlines and response teams called in emergencies, the general public is encouraged to take advantage of free training programs available statewide that help people talk to their friends, relatives, coworkers and others in times of crisis. The Mental Health Association of Oklahoma offers suicide prevention training, free of charge, focused on three actions: Question, Persuade and Refer. “QPR is similar to CPR in terms of training people in the community,” Clausen says. “It’s about educating people to ask the question directly while busting the myths surrounding suicide.” Training also involves understanding how to be mindful and respectful of others when talking about suicide or reporting suicide to the media. A separate training for media professionals is available. “It can be tempting when we lose celebrities to death by suicide to sensationalize it a little and cover details around the method used, but that’s been shown to increase the risk of more deaths by suicide,” Clausen says. The phenomenon is called suicide contagion, and is usually higher among adolescents than adults. Other key components of suicide prevention in

teens include monitoring their behavior on social media and the internet as well as the elimination of accessible lethal means such as firearms and medications — both prescription and over-the-counter. “If a family member has a concern of depression or suicide, guns should be away from the child, out of the home and locked up,” says OSU’s Coffey. Local health organizations are dedicated to reducing Oklahoma’s adolescent suicide rate, but much more work lies ahead. Addressing suicide on a unified national or international level will highlight the need for further research and resources. The Laureate Institute for Brain Research currently is conducting multiple studies related to anxiety and depression in local residents, currently enrolling ages 13-15 and 18-55. A 10-year study is already underway for ages 10-12. LIBR’s mission is to discover causes of and cures for mood, anxiety and other neuropsychiatric disorders, so there will always be new studies focusing on anxiety and depression. The studies adapt and evolve as more is learned to help narrow down either pathophysiology of the disorders or work toward treatments and cures. LIBR is currently enrolling subjects that are experiencing any anxiety and/or depressive symptoms (medicated or unmedicated, formal diagnosis or not) as well as

subjects with no history of psychiatric symptoms. “While each individual study has its own specific aims and goals, the general goal of all of our work is to bring to bear a multidisciplinary research program aimed at illuminating the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders,” says Florence Breslin, adolescent manager of clinical assessment and testing at LIBR. “(We work) to develop novel therapeutics, cures and preventions to improve the well-being of persons who suffer from or are at risk for neuropsychiatric illness and to foster collaboration among scientists, clinicians and institutions engaged in research that enhances wellness and alleviates suffering from mental illness.” Mental health professionals agree that with education and treatment, suicide is preventable. The stigma it carries is slowly disappearing as people learn to talk about the topic. The idea that mentioning suicide to someone will cause suicidal thoughts is a myth. Coffey says people must recognize that mental illness is not attributable to a moral failing or bad parenting. “We know that mental illness is really a brain disease just like asthma is a lung disease,” she says. “If you see something, say something. If we’re not talking about it, then we’re not able to address it in a way that is going to be most therapeutic.” TP TulsaPeople.com

43


Tuition, financial aid, registration dates — there are plenty of things to consider when selecting your child’s school. Whether you are new to the school of parenting or an undergrad, we’re here to help you make enrollment decisions. Here is a list of private school information for the upcoming academic year. COMPILED BY KIRSTEN DOMINGUEZ AND MADELINE EWING

SCHOOL

YEAR FOUNDED

GRADE LEVELS

UNIFORMS

FINANCIAL AID

STUDENTTEACHER RATIO

TUITION (ANNUAL, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED)

SCHOOL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIATION

ENROLLMENT

BEFOREAND AFTERSCHOOL CARE

REGISTRATION/TESTING DATES

Catholic

412

Yes

Registration: February; testing: summer

ALL SAINTS CATHOLIC SCHOOL 299 S. Ninth St., Broken Arrow 918-251-3000 allsaintsba.com

1957

Pre-K-8th

Yes

Yes

20-1

1 student: $4,722 (Catholic parishioner) or $5,391 (nonparishioner); 2 students: $8,831 (Catholic parishioner) or $10,177 (non-parishioner); 3 students: $12,417 (Catholic parishioner) or $14,434 (non-parishioner); 4 students $14,387 (Catholic parishioner) or $17,079 (non-parishioner)

AUGUSTINE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 6310 E. 30th St. | 918-832-4600 acatulsa.org

1997

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes

12-1

$6,350, kinder-prep; $6,325, K-5th; $6,750, 6th; $6,975, 7th-8th; $7,775, 9th-12th

Christian

199

Yes

New students apply in March; August enrollment deadline; admission stops when classes are full.

BISHOP KELLEY HIGH SCHOOL 3905 S. Hudson Ave. 918-627-3390 | bishopkelley.org

1960

9th-12th

Yes

Yes

12-1

$9,125, Catholics supporting a parish; $11,425, all others

Catholic, Lasallian

925

No

If accepted, enrollment contracts are due March 1.

CASCIA HALL PREPARATORY SCHOOL 2520 S. Yorktown Ave. 918-746-2600 (Upper School); 918-746-2616 (Middle School) casciahall.com

1926

6th-12th

Yes

Yes

9-1

$14,900 plus a one-time $50 matriculation fee

Catholic, Augustinian

550

After-school study hall

Call 918-746-2604 for tour, testing and application information.

CHRISTIAN MONTESSORI ACADEMY 3702 S. 90th E. Ave. 918-628-6524 montessorilearning.org

N/A

Preschool-8th

No

No

10-1

Ages 3-6: $520 per month, 5 half days; $520 per month, 3 full days; $620 per month, 5 full days. Ages 6-12: $620 per month. Ages 12-15: $660 per month.

Montessori

84

Yes

Call 918-628-6524 to schedule a tour and receive an admission application.

CROSSOVER PREPARATORY ACADEMY 940 E. 36th St. N. (mailing address); 2027 N. Cincinnati Ave. (physical address) 918-986-7499 | crossoverprep.org

2017

7th-9th (with 2019-20 school year)

Yes

Yes

15-1

$7,900

Christian

58

After-school extracurricular activities

Application deadline: April 1

HAPPY HANDS EDUCATION CENTER 8801 S. Garnett Road, Broken Arrow 918-893-4800 happyhands.org

1994

Age infant-6 for children who are deaf, hard of hearing or have communication disorders

No

Yes

4-1, infants; 5-1, all others

Sliding-scale

Christian

66

Yes

Ongoing

HOLLAND HALL 5666 E. 81st St. 918-481-1111 hollandhall.org

1922

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes

9-1

$7,200: early pre-K and pre-K 3 days; $10,200: early pre-K and pre-K 5 days; $12,500: jr. K; $14,850: K; $16,050: 1st-3rd; $18,000: 4th-5th; $18,800: 6th-8th; $20,300: 9th-12th

Episcopal

942

Yes

Feb. 10, March 10, April 7: Middle and upper school test dates

HOLY FAMILY CATHEDRAL SCHOOL 820 S. Boulder Ave. | 918-582-0422 holyfamilycathedralschool.com

1899

Preschool-8th

Yes

Yes

12-1

$4,120, Catholic; $5,150, nonCatholic. Multiple child discounts.

Catholic

185

Yes

Registration begins in February, continues until classes are full.

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 400 N. Aspen Ave., Broken Arrow 918-251-5422 | ilcanews.org

2001

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes

12-1

$6,642, K-8th; $7,670, 9th-12th

Lutheran

300

Yes

Registration: Feb. 1. Testing by appointment.

KIDS IN MOTION ACADEMY 1700 N. Redbud Place, Broken Arrow 918-258-5437 | kidsinmotionacademy.com

2008

Age 2-3rd grade

Yes

Yes

8-1, preschool; 15-1, K-3rd

Available upon request.

Christian

130

Yes

Registration: February

LEGACY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 1201 N. Elm Place, Broken Arrow 918-286-6794 | legacyba.org

2007

K-6th

Yes

Yes

8-1 to 16-1

Approximately $6,000

Christian

35

Yes

Begins March 1

12-1, pre-K; 14-1, K; 18-1, 1st-4th; 20-1, 5th-6th

$5,852: pre-K, first and second student (5 days); $5,721: pre-K, third student (5 days); $3,512: pre-K, first-third student (3 days); $2,340: pre-K, first-third student (2 days); $6,828: K, first student; $6,437: K, second student; $5,721: K, third student; $5,005: K, fourth student; $7,152: 1st-6th, first student; $6,437: 1st-6th, second student; $5,721: 1st-6th, third student; $5,005: 1st-6th, fourth student; $7,475: 1st-8th, first student; $6,727: 1st-8th, second student; $5,978: 1st-8th, third student; $5,223: 1st-8th, fourth student; $7,799: 9th-12th, first student; $7,019: 9th12th, second student; $6,239: 9th-12th, third student; $5,459: 9th-12th, fourth student

Christian

944

Yes

Registration: Feb. 1

LINCOLN CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 1003 N. 129th E. Ave. | 918-234-8150 lincolnchristianschool.com

44

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

1997

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes


SCHOOL

YEAR FOUNDED

GRADE LEVELS

UNIFORMS

FINANCIAL AID

STUDENTTEACHER RATIO

TUITION (ANNUAL, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED)

SCHOOL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIATION

ENROLLMENT

BEFOREAND AFTERSCHOOL CARE

REGISTRATION/TESTING DATES

THE LITTLE LIGHT HOUSE 5120 E. 36th St. | 918-664-6746 littlelighthouse.org

1972

Birth-age 6

No

No

12-3

Tuition-free

Christian, for children with special needs

96

No

Ongoing

Parishioner: $5,450, 1 child; $8,875, 2 children; $12,025, 3 children; $14,650, 4 or more children. Non-parishioner: $6,900 per child. Early Childhood Development Center rates vary.

Catholic

500

Yes

Registration begins in February. School tours by appointment.

MARQUETTE SCHOOL 1519 S. Quincy Ave. 918-584-4631 marquetteschool.org

1918

Pre-K-8th

Yes

Yes

12-1, pre-K; 22-1, K-8th

METRO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 6363 S. Trenton Ave. | 918-745-9868 metroca.com

1983

P3-12th

Yes

Yes

20-1

$6,535-$10,740

Christian

900

After-school care

Open house: 2-4 p.m., Feb. 10. Open house Thursdays begin at 8:30 a.m.

MINGO VALLEY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 8304 S. 107th E. Ave. | 918-294-0404 mingovalley.org

1976

K4-12th

Yes

Yes

10-1

$6,925, K4-5th; $7,850, 6th-8th; $8,455, 9th-12th

Christian

303

Yes

Registration: Ongoing. School tours by appointment.

MISS HELEN’S PRIVATE SCHOOL 4849 S. Mingo Road | 918-622-2327 misshelens.com

1954

Pre-K-5th

Yes

No

10-1, preschool; 15-1, K-5th

$8,700, pre-K; $8,600, K; $8,500, elementary

N/A

150

Yes

Ongoing

MIZEL JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL 2021 E. 71st St. | 918-494-0953 mizelschool.org

1975

Preschool-5th

Yes

Yes

8-1

$8,225

Jewish

46

After-care enrichment program

Ongoing

MONTE CASSINO SCHOOL 2206 S. Lewis Ave. | 918-742-3364 montecassino.org

1926

Pre-K3-8th

Yes

Yes

15-1, elementary and middle; 10-1, ECLC

$6,400, 3-day early childhood; $9,600, 5-day early childhood; $10,950, K-4th; $11,150, 5-8th

Catholic

750

After-school care

Wednesday open houses: 8:30 a.m., middle school; 9:30 a.m., ECLC; 11:30 a.m., elementary school. Tours available on ongoing basis. Call Brooke Jones at 918-746-4238 to RSVP or to schedule a tour.

PEACE ACADEMY 4620 S. Irvington Ave. | 918-627-1040 patulsa.org

1990

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes

15-1

$5,500, pre-K; $5,200, K-12th

Islamic

209

After-school care

Registration: April-August

PRIMROSE SCHOOL 10185 S. 85th E. Ave. | 918-364-0021 primroseschools.com/schools/south-tulsa

1982

Infants-Pre-K

Pre-K only

No

9-1

$1,212 per month

N/A

175

After-care offered

Ongoing

REGENT PREPARATORY SCHOOL OF OKLAHOMA 8621 S. Memorial Drive | 918-663-1002 rpsok.org

2000

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes

14-1

$3,150-$4,040, 4-5-year-olds; $4,040, 5-6-year-olds; $8,390, 1st-6th; $8,990, 7th-8th; $10,150, 9th-12th

Christian

510

No

Registration: November. Testing: January.

Yes

Registration begins Dec. 1. Preschool applicants complete a 30-minute developmental screening. K-12th grade applicants complete an academic screening. Times vary. Screening appointments are made in the online application.

REJOICE CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS

10701 N. 129th E. Ave., Owasso (preschool/ elementary); 13407 E. 106th St. N., Owasso, (middle and high schools) 918-272-7235 (preschool/elementary); 918-516-0050 (middle/high) rejoiceschool.com

RIVERFIELD COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 2433 W. 61st St. | 918-446-3553 riverfield.org

SAINT CATHERINE CATHOLIC SCHOOL 2515 W. 46th St. 918-446-9756 saintcatherineschool.org

1992

1984

1927

Preschool-12th

Infants-12th

Pre-K-8th

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

$2,430, preschool 2 days; $3,690, 14-1 (average preschool 3 days; $5,490, preschool class size of 16 full time; $6,100, K-5th; $6,520, 6thstudents) 8th; $6,980, 9th-12th

Christian

1,046

4-1 to 15-1 based on age

$520-$1,565/month, infants-5year-olds; $10,680-$11,745 K-3rd; $11,235-$12,375, 4th-5th; $11,600$12,870, 6th-8th; $13,240-$14,535, 9th-12th

Nonsectarian, Reggio-inspired

625

Yes

K-12th registration: SeptemberFebruary. Prospective preschool students can submit application at any time. Enrollment for the upcoming school year is typically offered by mid-May.

9-1

Practicing Catholic: $4,355, 1 child; $7,312, 2 children; $10,003, 3 children; $13,417, 4 or more children. Non-practicing/non-Catholic: $5,388, 1 child; $9,986, 2 children; $14,635, 3 children; $19,613, 4 or more children

Catholic

124

Yes

Ongoing

SAINT PIUS X SCHOOL 1717 S. 75th E. Ave. 918-627-5367 spxtulsa.org

1957

Preschool-8th

Yes

Yes

15-1

$6,600, parishioner; $5,066, K-8 (1 child); $8,486, K-8 (2 children); $10,278: K-8 (3 or more children)

Catholic

375

Yes

Re-enrollment is in February; registration is ongoing. New students can enroll anytime. Testing (only for students entering kindergarten) is Feb. 2.

SAINTS PETER AND PAUL SCHOOL 1436 N. 67th E. Ave. | 918-836-2165 peterandpaultulsa.org

1951

Pre-K-8th

Yes

Yes

10-1, pre-K and K; 18-1, 1st-5th; 10-1, 6th-8th

$4,000, first child; $3,500, second child; $3,000, third child; $2,500, fourth child

Catholic

200

Yes

Registration begins in January

$5,450, K-8 parishioner; $6,805, K-8 nonparishioner

Roman Catholic

325

After-school care

As needed.

$5,520, pre-K3 and pre-K4; $5,160, K-5th

Christian

70

After-school care

Enrollment in February. Evaluation after enrollment

SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY 1365 E. 49th Place 918-749-9361 schoolofsaintmary.com

1954

Pre-K-8th

Yes

Yes

15-1, K-2nd; all other grade levels have a maximum of 30 students with smaller classes for math and language arts.

SOLID FOUNDATION PREPARATORY ACADEMY 4025 N. Hartford Ave. | 918-794-7800 sfpaeagles.com

2004

Pre-K-5th

Yes

No

12-1

46

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019


BRING YOUR

CREATIVITY.

With so many exciting degree programs like Theatre or Digital Media in the School of Visual and Performing Arts, TCC can open new doors to a great career and future. Bring your ambition — and explore all the choices available at TCC.

Digital Media

Find degree programs or learn more at

TulsaCC.edu

Theatre


SCHOOL

YEAR FOUNDED

GRADE LEVELS

UNIFORMS

FINANCIAL AID

STUDENTTEACHER RATIO

TUITION (ANNUAL, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED)

SCHOOL OF THOUGHT OR AFFILIATION

ENROLLMENT

BEFOREAND AFTERSCHOOL CARE

REGISTRATION/TESTING DATES

SUMMIT CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 200 E. Broadway Ave., Broken Arrow 918-251-1997 | sca-eagles.com

1987

K-12th

Yes

Yes

14-1

$5,770, K; $6,270, 1st-6th; $6,760, 7th-8th; $7,170, 9th-12th

Christian

440

Yes

Registration: February-August

THE SAN MIGUEL SCHOOL OF TULSA 2444 E. Admiral Blvd. | 918-728-7337 sanmigueltulsa.org

2004

6th-8th

Yes

Not tuitionbased.

12-1

$100 per month

Lasallian

72

Extended school day

Registration: February-August

TOWN AND COUNTRY SCHOOL 8906 E. 34th St. 918-296-3113 tandcschool.org

1961

1st-12th

Dress code.

Yes

6-1

$12,760, 1st-3rd; $13,280, 4th-6th; $13,770, 7th-8th; $14,300, 9th-12th

Improving the lives of students with learning disabilities by nurturing academic, social and personal growth.

187

Yes

Ongoing

TULSA ADVENTIST ACADEMY 900 S. New Haven Ave. | 918-834-1107 tulsaacademy.org

1916

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes

15-1

$5,200, pre-K-4th; $5,510, 5th-8th; $6,970, 9th-12th

Christian

107

After-school care

Pre-enrollment in March. Testing by appointment.

Montessori

220

Yes

Ongoing

UNDERCROFT MONTESSORI SCHOOL 3745 S. Hudson Ave. | 918-622-2890 undercroft.org

1964

Age 3-8th grade

No

Yes

11-1

$6,625, primary half day; $9,925, primary full day (with or without nap); $10,470, lower elementary; $10,935, upper elementary; $11,365, middle school

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA 326 S. College Ave. 918-631-5060 utulsa.edu/uschool

1982

Age 3-8th grade

No

Yes

5-1

$10,210, early primary, primary 1, 2 and 3, and early childhood; $10,435, intermediate 1 and 2 and older intermediate 5, 6, 7 and 8

Gifted

225

Yes

Ongoing

VICTORY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 7700 S. Lewis Ave. | 918-491-7720 vcstulsa.org

1979

K3-12th

Yes

Yes

15-1

$6,120, K3-K5; $6,855, 1st-4th; $7,255, 5th-6th; $7,400, 7th-8th; $7,605, 9th-12th

Christian

940

Yes

Ongoing

WRIGHT CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 11391 E. Admiral Place | 918-438-0922 wrightchristianacademy.com

1989

Pre-K-12th

Yes

Yes

10-1

$5,510, pre-K; $5,435, K-5th; $5,785, 6th; $6,150, 7th-8th; $6,615, 9th-12th

Christian

250

Yes

Enrollment is ongoing; tours by appointment.

ENROLL NOW Now is the time to secure your child’s spot at Rejoice Christian Schools for the 2019 - 2020 academic year. Scholarships are available.

Excellence in Education, Strength in Character.

Contact us today for more information at: Email: admissions@rejoiceschool.com 918-272-7235 (Preschool / Elementary) 918-516-0050 (Middle / High School)

Rejoice Christian Schools admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin or disability in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

48

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019


2520 SOUTH YORK TOWN AVENUE, TULSA • 918.746.2604 • CASCIAHALL.COM

Cascia Hall Preparatory School C

ascia Hall has a storied history — a legacy of achievement, excellence and honor spanning more than 90 years of graduates who have gone on to make indelible marks in the world. Our tradition is alive and dynamic as today’s students excel in rigorous academic programs, the arts, sciences and athletics. Cascia’s Augustinian values of “Truth, Unity, and Love” instill in each student the habits of mind and strength of character to achieve lifelong success. The school’s curriculum, technology and methods continue to ready today’s students for tomorrow’s opportunities. Students prepare for an outstanding future at Cascia Hall.

For more than 90 years, Cascia Hall has been preparing young women and men for college and for life by focusing on the Augustinian values of Truth, Unity, and Love.

YEAR FOUNDED: 1926 ENROLLMENT: 549 STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO: 9-to-1 GRADES: 6th-12th grade

AREAS OF ACADEMIC DISTINCTION Students in grades 6-8 have opportunities to earn high school credit in math, science and world language. Students in grades 9-12 can earn college credit in the extensive Advanced Placement program.

TulsaPeople.com

49


5666 EAST 81ST STREET, TULSA • 918.481.1111 • HOLL ANDHALL.ORG

Holland Hall

I

t can be challenging to find the right school for a child who’s becoming someone new every day. As Tulsa’s only Pre-K through Grade 12 independent Episcopal school, Holland Hall strives to offer all a child needs for all they’re becoming. The school’s intentionally small-scale approach means each child’s teachers truly know who they are and where their strengths and passions lie. An ambitious curriculum and extraordinary extracurriculars widen horizons, uncover hidden talents, and awaken unexpected interests. “Students find it all at Holland Hall,” says Director of Enrollment Management Justin Butler. Holland Hall’s commitment to excellence can be seen across many metrics. Holland Hall has average scores of 1366 on the SAT and 27 on the ACT, the highest in Oklahoma compared to other 4-year high schools. Additionally, 100 percent of graduates attend a 4-year college, and 90 percent of graduates receive a significant college scholarship.

YEAR FOUNDED: 1922 ENROLLMENT: 987 STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO: 9-to-1 GRADES: Early Pre-K–12th grade

Holland Hall students have opportunities beyond the classroom, too. The Upper School offers 62 different art courses, 18 individual and team sports, and more than 30 clubs. A Holland Hall education may be more affordable than expected. Pre-K tuition is up to $3,000 less per year than other comparable local programs, and 31 percent of all students receive some form of tuition assistance. “We believe that the best way to learn what makes Holland Hall different is to visit our 162-acre campus and see for yourself,” says Butler. In addition to private tours, the school offers an open house every other week on “Welcome Wednesdays.” To learn more, visit www.hollandhall.org/open-house or email justin.butler@ hollandhall.org.

AREAS OF ACADEMIC DISTINCTION Our Holland Hall is the only Cum Laude Society School in Tulsa. Colleges see having a Cum Laude Society chapter as a critical mark of academic excellence.


Join us for the 59th Annual Holland Hall Book Fair!

(918) 481-1111 • hollandhall.org

Saturday, February 23, 2019 8:00 am– 3:00 pm Holland Hall Primary School Gym (5666 East 81st Street, Tulsa, OK 74137) Open to the Public • Tickets $1, 18 and Under Free • No RSVP Required For the past 59 years, Holland Hall has hosted the state’s largest used book sale. This traditional annual community event is open to the public, providing access to discount-priced, gently-used, quality adult and children’s books, toys, games, movies, music, educational resources, and more. Learn more at www.hollandhall.org/bookfair.

Tulsa’s PreK through Grade 12 Independent Episcopal School


2206 SOUTH LEWIS AVENUE, TULSA • 918 -742- 366 4 • MONTECASSINO.ORG

Monte Cassino School

S

ince 1926, Monte Cassino has been committed to academic excellence while educating the whole student. This Catholic Benedictine school, which serves grades PreK3 – grade 8, offers small class sizes, a 13-to-1 student-to-teacher ratio and dedicated faculty — allowing Monte Cassino to provide a comprehensive educational experience. The school excels in the traditional subjects of reading, writing, math and the sciences, but students must also take music, art, Spanish, French or Latin, plus physical education. Students are encouraged to take risks, explore and push themselves during the learning process. The Monte Cassino educational experience is complemented by a robust co-curricular program of more than 25 activities such as robotics, rocketry club, coding club, drone club, chess club, Makerspace, musical theater, Academic Bowl and more. Because experiential learning is important, the school offers

unique, learning-based field trips, service days and project work. The Monte Cassino athletics department offers 11 sports, ongoing development clinics and holds several state championship titles in basketball and volleyball. Monte Cassino’s commitment to Catholic religious instruction focuses on eight universal Benedictine values: Love of Learning, Seek God, Prayer, Community, Simplicity and Balance, Hospitality, Service and Stewardship. These values enable students of all faith traditions to build life skills and grow in their own spirituality while serving the community around them. Monte Cassino provides this rigorous, challenging and focused curriculum to help develop well-rounded and morally grounded students who emerge prepared for high school and life beyond. Come see what it means to “Be A Saint” — Contact Brooke Jones at 918-746-4238 to schedule a tour.

AREAS OF ACADEMIC DISTINCTION YEAR FOUNDED: 1926 ENROLLMENT: 750 STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO: 13-to-1 GRADES: Pre-K3-8th grade

Monte Cassino School is accredited by the Oklahoma State Department of Education and North Central Association AdvancED. Monte Cassino School is an accredited member of the National Catholic Education Association (NCEA) and Diocese of Tulsa Catholic Schools.


Monte Cassino School

2206 South Lewis

Tulsa, OK 74114

918-746-4238

www.montecassino.org


6363 SOUTH TRENTON AVENUE • 918.745.9868 • METROCA.COM

Metro Christian Academy “W

e like to say around here that you can tell a lot about something by its name,” says Keith Currivean, Ph.D., Headmaster at Metro Christian Academy. “Metro is where we are, Academy is what we are, and Christian is who and how and why we are.” Located on a 60-acre campus at 63rd and Trenton Avenue, Metro Christian Academy is an independent Christian school, serving students age 3 through high school. Metro students enjoy small class sizes with a student-teacher ratio of 18-to-one. The academic curriculum is designed to prepare students to thrive in college. Students also have the opportunity to participate in competitive athletics including 11 varsity sports. Fine arts classes include everything from Studio Art to Drama to Band and Choir while Leadership and Missions classes teach students to lead and serve others. At the heart of Metro is a sense of community. Students, parents, faculty, and staff all work together to educate and nurture students to reach their full potential. “We work to develop this culture in which everyone knows who you are,” says Adam Taylor, Athletic Director. “You are somebody here. You are someone important.” You’re invited to explore the Metro website at metroca.com where you can find more details on curriculum, activities and more.

YEAR FOUNDED: 1983

AREAS OF ACADEMIC DISTINCTION

ENROLLMENT: 900

High school scholars are challenged through enrollment in on-level or honors courses, any of the 14 advanced placement classes offered or by earning college credit through concurrent enrollment classes offered through Colorado Christian University.

GRADES: P3-12th grade

STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO: 18-to-1

It is a huge joy when that light bulb finally clicks. There’s almost nothing better than seeing a young student get better because of their own work and their own commitment. George Toumayan Teacher

GET TO KNOW METRO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Hear our students, teachers, and parents tell you what Metro means to them in their own words. Go to visitmetro.com to see our #mymetro video.

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT METRO?

Come to our OPEN HOUSE | Sunday, February 10, 2019 | 2pm - 4pm Sign up for a THURSDAY TOUR | Thursdays at 8:15am Register at visitmetro.com or call 918.745.9868 ext. 164 54

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

Metro Christian Academy 6363 S. Trenton Ave., Tulsa, OK


24 33 WEST 61ST STREET, TULSA • 918.4 46.3553 • RIVERFIELD.ORG

Riverfield Country Day School R

iverfield is a nonsectarian school providing quality innovative education for children 8 weeks old through 12th grade. Founded in 1984, Riverfield is dedicated to academic excellence and college preparation, while remaining true to our family-oriented atmosphere and whole-student approach to education and learning. Riverfield provides a student-centered approach to education with a program of authentic, experiential learning in which individuality is valued and the needs of the whole student are honored. Small class sizes, along with the collaborative nature of our classrooms, provide the opportunity for students to cultivate leadership, interpersonal skills, and the confidence needed for success today and tomorrow. Personalized programming and flexible scheduling offer Middle and Upper School students the opportunity to develop talents and explore interests. Riverfield is home to the state’s first and most comprehensive school rock band program, with more than a dozen bands comprised of 4th-12th grade students. Through participation in the OSSAA, the school has achieved success in athletics, academics, and arts. Riverfield is accredited through the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS), the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), and the Oklahoma Private School Accreditation Commission. YEAR FOUNDED: 1984 ENROLLMENT: 625 STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO: 4-to-1 to 16-to-1 (based on age/ grade level) GRADES: Infants-12th grade

AREAS OF ACADEMIC DISTINCTION Located on a 120-acre campus, Riverfield’s students experience the barnyard, hiking trails, gardens and athletic fields as an extension of the academic excellence found in the classroom.

TODAY Tomorrow engineers

innovators

collaborators

thinkers designers

environmentalists performers

creators

advocates artists musicians readers philanthropists athletes

writers difference-makers

explorers

communicators

individualists

problem-solvers

scientists

mathematicians

investigators

leaders researchers riverfielD.Org 918.446.3553

TulsaPeople.com

55


SPONSORED EDITORIAL

Protecting Your Financial Future Financial advisor is here for you, not the commission.

small school University School

BIG RESULTS

Our mission at University School: Challenge gifted students with a dynamic curriculum in a nurturing academic environment.

University School, located on the campus of The University of Tulsa, is for Pre-K - Eighth Grade students. Our nationally-acclaimed program has been helping students achieve high academic success since 1982.

Call or email us for a tour. Tour dates are Feb. 6, March 6 and April 3.

918-631-5060 • uschool.utulsa.edu

Educating Gifted Students Since 1982 The University of Tulsa is an EEO/AA institution.

56

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

Kevin King always knew he would work for himself. His dad was a small business owner so he always knew he would be an entrepreneur. He started other businesses, but The Legacy Financial Group is where he found his passion. “Our team of financial advisors helps clients navigate the pitfalls and hurdles of investing, which change often,” Says King, “It’s too complex to go it alone.” Clients appreciate that The Legacy Financial Group keeps them focused on the future. They manage retirement accounts, save money for college for kids, plan for taxes and estate planning. Advisory HQ lists this award-winning firm as one of the best financial advisors in Oklahoma and number one in Tulsa. “We are a fee only wealth advisory firm that is paid for our expert advice. No commissions, no external influence and no conflicts of interest. We sit on the same side of the table as the client,” King added. King practices what he preaches about getting advice from others. As a member of the Entrepreneurs Organization of Tulsa, he works with other businesses owner to work through the everyday challenges of working for yourself. It’s a skill that has served his well at The Legacy Financial Group. “A high number of our clients are business owners so I can understand their challenges and thought process,” said King. The biggest mistake he sees people make when planning for their future is not having a household budget. With many marriages listing it as a top reason for arguments, he is surprised that people won’t take the time to create a workable personal financial plan.

www.legacyadvisor.net 918-665-0826 Entrepreneurs’ Organization of Tulsa Member Profile eotulsa.org


HEY TULSA,

IT’S TIME TO VOTE FOR THE 2019 A-LIST!

Tell us who’s on your A-LIST and you could win a $500 DINING PACKAGE!

Dining package includes: Justin Thompson Restaurant Group, Polo Grill, McGill’s, In the Raw, Duet, SMOKE and more!

HEAD TO TOE

DINE LOCAL

FUN FOR ALL

SERVICES

SHOP LOCAL

Just visit TulsaPeople.com Feb. 15 - March 15 and let us know who should be on the 2019 A-LIST!

• 1603 S. Boulder Ave. • 918-585-9924 75% of the ballot must be completed in order to register for the prize. Only one ballot per email address may be submitted; must be 18 or older.


We are having the time of our lives at

WOODLAND TERRACE

Grady Nichols Jazz Night

BURGUNDY PLACE Swing into the New Year at our

Sweetheart Dance

Featuring a Demonstration by The Oklahoma Swing Syndicate

February 19th • 6 pm

February 28th • 7 - 9 pm

Light refreshments will be served. Space is limited. RSVPs are required.

Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Space is limited. RSVPs are required.

RSVP to 918.994.1325

918.994.1325

71st & Mingo, Tulsa seniorstar.com/woodlandterrace

918.602.4665

RSVP to 918.602.4665

88th & Lewis, Tulsa seniorstar.com/burgundyplace

We Offer


SPONSORED EDITORIAL SECTION

TulsaPeople celebrates legacy businesses that have made their mark in Tulsa for 25 or more years. These locally owned institutions provide a vital economic foundation for our city and are known for their overall excellence, which creates loyal customers, business success and longevity. Enjoy learning about 18 valued businesses who succeed by keeping Tulsans coming back year after year.

Arrow Exterminators Celebrity Attractions Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson, LLP Eurocraft Final Touch Cleaning First State Investment Advisors

ARROW EXTERMINATORS Founded in 1952, Arrow Exterminators is Oklahoma’s oldest pest control company. With the motto “Aimin’ To Please!” Arrow has grown into a statewide entity with offices in Broken Arrow and in Oklahoma City. Arrow Exterminators handles nearly any nuisance, including termites, bed bugs, ants, mosquitos, moles, snakes, bees, mice, fleas, ticks, bats and more. Recently, the company added lawn and landscape management to their list of expertise. “My Papa, J.W. ‘Bud’ Fulps, started this company one house and one business at a time and spent many years in professional training,” says Farrah Fulps, Bud’s granddaughter and Arrow’s

Gable Gotwals Houchin Electric Indian Health Care Resource Center JD Young Moore Funeral Homes and Fitzgerald Funeral Service Oklahoma Central Credit Union

Oklahoma Methodist Manor Saint Simeon’s Episcopal Home T.D. Williamson, Inc. Triad Eye Institute Tulsa Garden Center Ziegler’s Art & Frame

801 S. Main St., Broken Arrow 918-258-9669 7701 Broadway Extension, Suite A-6, Oklahoma City 405-912-4337 nomorebugs.com business development and marketing manager. “We don’t believe in tricks and gimmicks and there really are no secrets. We work hard to get the job done right, the first time, which is why we can guarantee our services.” Some of Tulsa’s greatest cultural treasures — including Philbrook Museum of Art, Gilcrease Museum, the Tulsa City-County Library system and Tulsa Garden Center — put their trust in Arrow Exterminators. “Oklahomans should trust the company that has been around the longest, is still family owned and operated, and is still part of the Main Street Broken Arrow charm, in the same place where it originally started back in 1952,” Fulps says.

L to R: Farrah Fulps, Business Development; Brad Lee, Pest Control Manager; Linda Johnson, Office Manager; Roger Graham, General Manager, ACE. Not pictured: Lea Fulps, Owner; Eli Fulps, Bed Bug Thermal Engineer; Cody Pearson, Fleet Operations

TulsaPeople.com

59


From left to right, front row: Kay Payton, Kristin Dotson, Drew Payton; second row: Libby First, Erica Ludwig, Maddie Dyer, Angie Ball; third row: Alison Waddell, Allyson Davis, Sarah Brown, Melinda Summar, Laura Payton, Shane Stroud; last row: Josh Payton, Randy Cole, Melissa Jack, Greg Dean.

CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS In 1983, Larry Payton started Celebrity Attractions with his wife Kay in the spare bedroom of their house in Tulsa. Today, Kay and the couple’s son Drew serve on the board, and Kristin Dotson, who has worked with the Paytons for 24 years, is CEO. “We believe in strong, loyal relationships - within our industry, with our patrons and with our committed staff,” said Dotson. “We understand the tastes and sensibilities of our region – we are Tulsans serving Tulsans.” In addition to presenting nationally touring Broadway seasons in four states, Celebrity Attractions invests in shows on Broadway and on the road, sits on boards of the major Broadway industry organizations, votes for the Tony® Awards and has strong relationships with agents, producers and other presenters. Celebrity Attractions nurtures these relationships to secure the best shows at the most affordable prices for Tulsa audiences. The company’s calling card is high-quality live entertainment and

7506 East 91st Street Tulsa, OK 74133 918.477.7469 celebrityattractions.com

concierge-style customer service. After 35 years, Celebrity Attractions has built Tulsa into one of the most high-profile Broadway markets on the road today. New York producers have taken notice. Tulsa continues to have one of the most successful Broadway Seasons in the country, especially this year with a record number of subscribers supporting the 35th Anniversary Season. On average the yearly impact on the Tulsa economy is over $40 million – but the impact on the quality of life for Tulsa’s citizens and visitors is immeasurable. With hard work and trusted relationships with the Tulsa PAC, corporate sponsors and the media, Celebrity Attractions is hoping to bring the Best of Broadway to Tulsa for another 35 years and more!


Ryan Phillips, Hjorny Skaftason and Johann Skaftason

EUROCRAFT GRANITE & MARBLE From its founding in 1976 as a general masonry company, Eurocraft has brought old-world craftsmanship and cutting-edge technology to the homeowners and businesses of the Tulsa area. Owner Johann Skaftason became especially passionate bout natural stone in 1992 and specialized in granite and marble countertops. Today, Eurocraft continues to lead the way in the design, fabrication, and installation of natural stone without losing sight of the innovation that sets it apart. The company founder’s daughter, Hjorny Skaftason and husband Ryan Phillips, are proudly working to carry-on Eurocraft’s legacy by expanding its stone selection and fabrication capabilities. “We have the technology to create custom architectural stone such as columns, arches and trim, and ornamental stonework,” Skaftason said, “and that combined with Johann’s experience and passion for innovation and our fresh perspective are allowing th copany to build on its foundation in old-world craftsmanship.”

16052 S. Broadway, Glenpool 918-322-5500 2626 E. 15th Street, Tulsa 918-938-6914 eurocraftgranite.com In addition to traditional applications of stone—including countertops, intrior and exterior stone walls, cut-to-size flooring, and fireplaces— Eurocraft creates custom stone finishes, statues, monuments, fountains, inlays, corels, and balusters. “If you can draw it up, our machines can make it,” says Johann. Eurocraft’s state-of-the-art machinery can even create custom stone furniture, some of which is featured at the company’s new showroom at 2626 East 15th Street in Tulsa. “The people of Tulsa warmly welcomed by dad and mother, Anna, when they emigrated from Iceland in 1976,” says Hjorny. “My parents have taught their children to love the city with its beautiful trees and big philanthropic heart.” Hjorny and Ryan hope to continue Johann Skaftason’s legacy of filling Tulsa’s homes and businesses with exquisite stone that elevates not only function and beauty, but will endure.


Chelsea Hanoch, Lindsay Henderson, Sandra Mullins, Madi Ambrose, Jackie Vu, Brooke Taylor

FINAL TOUCH COMMERCIAL CLEANING Your workplace environment inf luences employees’ productivity, performance and well-being. No matter the industry, maintaining a clean workplace helps keep staff members safe, healthy and efficient. The “Queen of Clean” and owner of Final Touch Cleaning, Sandra Mullins, knows this all too well. Final Touch was founded 33 years ago with a high standard of white glove service and now has over 200

10404 E. 55th Pl., Suite C 918.663.1919 finaltouchcleaning.com

employees who clean more than 7 million square feet daily in the greater Tulsa area. “Our clients and employees are our family,” said Mullins. “We are honored to have served hundreds of companies in the Tulsa area for over 33 years. We live to give and have been blessed and privileged to be able to partner with many Tulsa nonprofits and give to those in need.”


Sid Shupack with Matthew Redmond, CFA

FIRST STATE INVESTMENT ADVISORS First State Investment Advisors was founded in 1971 to provide Tulsans with a personalized, value-oriented approach to portfolio management. “Our firm has engaged in ‘The Gold Chip’ philosophy of investing since our beginning,” says Sidney Shupack, founder. “We believe in investing primarily in high-quality, large-cap stocks that can reduce worry for clients in the chaotic, up-and-down financial environment.” Shupack began developing the Gold Chip standard in 1958, and Matt Redmond, CFA has helped to advance and refine the standard since 2015. Gold Chip companies must meet the following criteria: long-term industry growth, market leadership, widespread recognition, outstanding management, investment grade credit, large capitalization and a dividend payout ratio of at least 20 percent. Redmond notes there are three compelling reasons to invest in large cap stocks. First, the companies have greater stability, often being the top businesses in their industries. Second, during a downturn, they are typically a

8801 S. Yale Ave., Suite 410 918.492.1466 FirstState-OK.com

safer investment. Third, large-cap stocks pay dividends that create another source of income for investors. The minimum target timeframe of investment in a Gold Chip stock is three to five years with a target annual rate of return of 8 percent. Investments are only made when potential reward is at least twice the potential risk. As of December 31, 2018, First State managed nearly $45 million for individuals, pension plans and retirement accounts. Shupack currently serves as president and chairman of the board. Matt Redmond, CFA serves as vice president and is responsible for developing the company’s investment models and research. Paul Mitchell, who joined the company in 1979, is chief financial officer and board treasurer. “We follow a set of strict guidelines in order to build a formidable portfolio,” says Shupack. “We use our proprietary analytic approach to understand how a company’s past and current performance may indicate their future potential.”


GABLEGOTWALS

100 West Fifth Street, Suite 1100 Tulsa, OK 74103 918-595-4800 gablelaw.com

GableGotwals is a full-service law firm of approximately 100 lawyers representing a diversified client base across the nation. Though rooted firmly in Oklahoma since 1944, the company’s connections and reach are global. Every day, Fortune 500 corporations, privately owned companies, entrepreneurs, foundations and individuals entrust the lawyers at GableGotwals with the stewardship and strategic management of their legal challenges. GableGotwals is well known for its high-quality legal services provided by highly experienced lawyers who have been recognized by Chambers USA, Best Lawyers in America, Oklahoma Super Lawyers and a number of federal, state and county bar associations. Oil and gas, banking, bankruptcy, securities and finance, construction, real estate, mergers and acquisitions, intellectual property, tax, employment law and Indian and gaming are some of the many fields of expertise offered by the firm.

“GableGotwals places significant importance on our ability to attract and retain talented lawyers,” says John Dale, CEO. “Our goal is to provide a work environment that supports our employees’ personal and professional goals. We strive to provide an atmosphere where lawyers can begin, grow and thrive throughout their legal career.” According to Dale, the firm’s success can be attributed to hard work, dedication to client service, an atmosphere of integrity and respect, as well as a positive and supportive culture. “This attitude carries over into all the firm’s client relationships,” says Dale. GableGotwals is committed to giving back to the Tulsa community. The firm’s lawyers and staff members volunteer time and resources to various civic organizations, often reaching top leadership positions. GableGotwals believes that everyone should have access to legal representation — which is why the firm takes pro bono cases each year.


HOUCHIN ELECTRIC

9134 East 46th Street Tulsa, OK 74145 918.663.1818 houchinelectric.com

Since 1974, John Houchin has steadily built his electrical contracting business into one of Tulsa’s largest and most respected service companies. Today, Houchin Electric employs a team of over 44 employees to providing services to a wide variety of businesses from area refineries, bulkproduct handling plants, manufacturing companies, small businesses and residential homes from the company’s 5,000 square foot facility at 9134 East 46th Street. “We are unique in that our business ranges from doing work for residential customers to complex control and power wiring for automatic process control systems for a commercial customer,”says Houchin. “The common thread is the level of trust we’ve established with our customers. They know our certified and licensed electricians are true professionals who are able to efficiently repair any electrical problem or answer any emergency.”

John Houchin, a 1965 graduate of Nathan Hale High School, is a Tulsa success story. Over the past 42 years, he has built the company on a foundation of high-quality workmanship and professionalism, and being cutting-edge. Houchin utilizes advanced tools, equipment and technology to stand-apart. The company’s thermograph technology allows for a predictive maintenance that engages scheduled shutdown instead of expensive unscheduled downtime. Houchin Electric is regularly honored as a top electrical service company with awards from TulsaPeople (A-LIST), Oklahoma Magazine (BEST OF THE BEST) the Tulsa World (BEST IN THE WORLD), as well as Angie’s List and the Better Business Bureau. “We are proud of our history in Tulsa,” says Houchin. “People know they can trust a company that’s been in business since 1974.”


INDIAN HEALTH CARE RESOURCE CENTER OF TULSA, INC. In 1978, Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa, Inc. (IHCRC) was incorporated as an Oklahoma non-profit organization. Since then, more than 250,000 people have walked through its doors. IHCRC provides comprehensive health, wellness and behavioral health services to Tulsa-area Native Americans. All services are offered in a single building for ease of care, access to services and integration. A variety of special programs and events are also available to enhance well-being and reconnect the community to their culture. “Some of our earliest patients have grandchildren, great grandchildren, and even great-great grandchildren who are now receiving care at IHCRC,” says CEO Carmelita Skeeter, who has been with the organization since its founding. IHCRC started with one part-time physician. Today, the staff number almost 150, with 9 full-time medical providers.

550 S. Peoria Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 918-588-1900 ihcrc.org

IHCRC is the only culturally sensitive Native American clinic in the Tulsa metro area. All services are free to any individual with a CDIB or tribal membership card. The organization is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit with a community Board and is not tribally affiliated. Individuals from more than 135 tribes were served last year. More than 11,000 individuals receive care on annual basis. Another 4,000 to 5,000 participate in cultural events and family activities. IHCRC continues to add services and programs to promote an approach to care that strengthens physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellness within the Indian community. “Our organization has thrived for so long by maintaining focus on one thing and doing it well,” says Skeeter. “IHCRC is very clear about being a comprehensive health and behavioral health care facility.”


Patty Stuart, manager of JD Young’s Purified Water Division, and CEO Bob Stuart, Jr.

JD YOUNG

116 West Third Street Tulsa, OK 74103 (918) 582-9955 jdyoung.com

“It’s hard for us to believe that nearly 70 years have passed since Joe Young first opened the doors of JD Young in Tulsa,” says Bob Stuart, CEO, and co-owner with Doug Stuart, Patty Stuart, and Deni Stuart. “Who could have known over 60 years later that his vision of serving Oklahoma’s business community would still be alive and thriving as it is today.” Today, JD Young succeeds by adapting and evolving with the times, and staying on top of the ever-changing document management industry and needs of clients. “Companies all over the state contact us for direction and ideas on how to be more efficient in their workflow practices,” says Stuart. “We are skilled at offering the best products and services to our customers, and backing-up our sales with excellent maintenance by our highly-skilled service teams.” JD Young’s mission is to help businesses better manage the flow of infor-

mation and data through a more efficient usage of hardware systems, software solutions and advanced IT technology. “Specifically, we are skilled in providing information-handling processes that increase performance and reduce the cost of input, output and management,” noted Stuart. “It’s all about creating a document strategy for a business to identify how the company is managing its paper files. The strategy is a needed step toward managing documents more efficiently as a means of increasing profitability.” The Stuart family realizes establishing and maintaining strong relationships with clients is the key to JD Young’s sustained success over six decades. “Our company’s guiding light from day one has been doing the right thing for customers…our business partners,” Stuart notes. “We count our blessings every day that we have a strong and growing base of customers and excellent employees to serve them.”


Jeff Tutt, LaFonda Ehlers, Koby Creason, John Wilson, Chris Penn, Lynne Moore, Terry Hamm, Joseph Moore.

MOORE FUNERAL HOMES AND FITZGERALD FUNERAL SERVICE When James Herbert Moore opened his funeral home in 1932, he had no idea his company would later become the largest funeral provider in Oklahoma. More than 80 years later, Moore has grown with Tulsa, both in the number of locations — six in total — and in the scope of services available to families. What have not changed are Moore’s core values — as well as the family at the helm. “Our mission is to provide excellent care to the deceased and their families and to help create tributes that remember, honor and celebrate the lives of those very special people,” says Joseph P. Moore, owner, and grandson of the company’s founder. “We give our families the highest level of personal and professional care during one of the most difficult times of their lives.” Unique services offered include an on-site crematory, to ensure that all aspects of cremation are performed properly and with dignity. Additionally,

2570 S. Harvard Ave. Tulsa, OK 74114 918.744.1202 moorefuneral.com

Moore offers special veterans’ services and an extensive aftercare program — including online resources and weekly grief support groups. Moore’s pre-planning services lock in today’s prices and provide peace of mind. All of these offerings plus a commitment to service have resulted in excellent reviews on family satisfaction surveys. Moore Funeral Homes and Fitzgerald Funeral Service’s motto is to provide extraordinary service at a fair and affordable price. Additionally, Moore/ Fitzgerald maintains a strong community involvement, both individually and corporately. The company takes special pride in its 40 full-time, dedicated and professional staff members, many of whom have been with Moore/ Fitzgerald for more than 10 years and have experience working with families of all faiths. “Our families have come to know that we’ll be here when they need us,” says Moore.


Steve Dickie (standing left) has served as CEO of Oklahoma Methodist Manor since 2004. Susie Butterworth (seated right) is the incoming President of the Board. Sharon Earley (seated left) is Treasurer and Stan Teter (standing right) is the Secretary.

OKLAHOMA METHODIST MANOR The legacy of Oklahoma Methodist Manor began in 1956 when the first person moved in. OMM’s promise since then has been to serve everyone in the spirit of Christ. Today, OMM serves more than 400 people every year with an array of options including residential living, assisted living, rehabilitative therapy and long-term nursing care. Growth and change are constant. After the residences in Crestwood and the Spann Wellness Center opened in 2012, planning began on the current redevelopment. The new 40-residence Assisted Living building will be finished in August 2019. Then, work will begin immediately on two Memory Care Assisted Living Households that will serve 24 people living with mid-stage dementia. The vision includes a new Community Life Center that will promote social, emotional and intellectual wellness.

4130 E. 31st St., Suite C Tulsa, OK 74135 918-574-2590 ommtulsa.org

“Our Members dream of living in a community where, although individual needs change, relationships continue,” says Steve Dickie, who has served as CEO since 2004. “Our goal is to provide a place that promotes enjoyment of life and community living in surroundings that can accommodate a person’s health changes.” OMM leadership believes aging should include opportunities to develop new relationships, share wisdom and experience new expressions of purpose and meaning. “Aging does not have to be an ongoing sequence of loss and decline,” says incoming Board President Susie Butterworth. “We are committed to promoting whole-person wellness in the lives of every member of the community.”


SAINT SIMEON’S

3701 Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard 918-425-3583 saintsimeons.org

Nestled on 50 secluded acres just north of downtown Tulsa, Saint Simeon’s has been exceeding expectations in senior living since 1960. The mission of the community is “to be the preferred home for men and women of all faiths who wish to live their later years in an environment with dignity, individuality and the highest level of independence.” “Saint Simeon’s, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma, is a respected Senior Living community that welcomes people of all faiths,” said CEO Tammy Schafer. “As a not-for-profit organization, accountability in the form of excellent care has been the vanguard throughout Saint Simeon’s history.” There are many options for Senior Care in the Tulsa area. What makes Saint Simeon’s different is the people. From the moment you arrive at Saint Simeon’s you witness the caring spirit and rich legacy of the community.

CEO Tammy Schafer

Whether it’s special dinner parties in the Bistro or swim classes in the Wellness Center, all of our residents receive personalized service. We are honored to care not only for our residents but their family members as well. “We strive to live up to our slogan of ‘Minutes from downtown, Miles from Ordinary’ every single day,” added Schafer. Saint Simeon’s offers services that are unique to Tulsa. We are one of only four communities in the entire state that can offer Skilled Memory Care services. Our varied levels of care provide multiple options for residents. When a health challenge occurs with a resident we are able to handle the increased needs of the person without them having to move to another community. You are invited to learn more about vibrant Senior Living in Tulsa at Saint Simeon’s by calling Donna at 918-425-3583.


Karen Neal and Michelle Shrum

T.D. WILLIAMSON

6120 S. Yale Ave. #1700 Tulsa, OK 74136 918-447-5000 tdwilliamson.com

The world counts on pipelines as an energy lifeline. Through ever-changing times, pipeliners must responsibly transport product and keep it in the pipe, and for nearly 100 years, T.D. Williamson (TDW) has helped owners and operators around the world do just that. From global headquarters in Tulsa and solutions centers worldwide, TDW has provided some of the industry’s most highly regarded technologies, which optimize performance and enable safe, efficient and environmentally sound operations. T.D. Williamson, Sr. founded The Petroleum Electric Company, the forerunner of T.D. Williamson, Inc., in Tulsa in 1920. The company was renamed in 1942. Today, Bob McGrew (Tulsa) is CEO and President, while third- and fourth-generation Williamson family members remain actively involved on the board of directors and in daily operations. Richard “Dick” Williamson (Tulsa) is Chairman Emeritus and Steve Williamson (Oakville, Ontario) is Chairman of the Board. Innovation has been part of the TDW story since the start. During WWII,

the company developed and built the first large diameter scrapers used to clean the War Emergency Pipeline’s Big Inch and Little Big Inch pipelines. More recent advances include technology that improves pipeline inspection and increases the reliability of results. TDW also has a significant history of service to the communities where its team members live and work. This tradition began with T.D. Williamson Sr. and his wife, Edna Mae, and has been carried on by subsequent generations. In Tulsa, local causes supported include the Salvation Army, United Way, Habitat for Humanity, Junior Achievement and STEM programs like FIRST Lego League. TDW’s passion is for pipelines, but its focus is on people — employees, customers and the public alike. Long-term relationships show that the company constantly searches for better, safer ways to operate a pipeline and to extend its life. This makes customers more profitable while also making communities safer.


Ryan P. Conley, DO Mary Anne Ahluwalia, DO

TRIAD EYE INSTITUTE Triad Eye Institute is eastern Oklahoma’s most comprehensive referral center for specialty and surgical eye care. The team members and physicians value each and every patient, working to ensure that questions are answered and expectations are exceeded. Triad Eye Institute works closely with optometrists from across the region, co-managing patient cases and optimizing the continuum of care. In 1996, Triad Eye Institute was the first provider in Tulsa to offer LASIK, and in 2012, Triad Eye surgeon Dr. Ryan P. Conley performed Oklahoma’s first laser-assisted cataract removal procedure using the revolutionary LenSx® laser system. Dr. Ryan P. Conley leads the Triad Eye Institute team. A native of Pryor, Conley is a board certified ophthalmologist and fellowship trained cornea specialist. He is committed to continuing Triad Eye’s legacy of excellence and dedication to technology. “Ever-evolving technology in the field of ophthalmology has greatly

6140 S. Memorial Dr. Tulsa, OK 73144 918-252-2020 TriadEye.com impacted the ability of Triad Eye Institute’s team of surgeons to improve the quality of life for patients,” says Conley. “These technological advancements have brought advanced eye care to every community we serve.” Triad Eye Institute has grown from a single location in Tulsa in 1986 to a comprehensive network of clinics and surgery centers in Tulsa, Muskogee, Grove and McAlester. Triad Eye Institute is proud to deliver world-class specialty and surgical eye car to the residents of eastern Oklahoma. The staff at Triad is especially proud to make access to advanced eye care easier for those who live in rural communities. “Often, these patients will forego care due to their inability to travel long distance,” says Conley. “We work constantly to change that.” Triad Eye Institute is a supporter of the Owasso-based Folds of Honor Foundation. Portions of proceeds from LASIK procedures are donated to the Foundation’s scholarship fund.


TULSA GARDEN CENTER The Tulsa Garden Club and the Tulsa Council of Federated Garden Clubs incorporated the Tulsa Garden Center in 1950 as a nonprofit organization. In 1954, the purchase of the Center’s current home, the Snedden mansion, from W.G. Skelly was completed. Today, the 100-year-old Mansion at Woodward Park is owned by the City of Tulsa and is managed by Tulsa Garden Center Inc. The Tulsa Garden Center’s mission is to provide a variety of horticultural and environmental education opportunities for the community and to serve as the horticultural headquarters for the area. It fulfills this role by offering lectures, classes, training and plant shows throughout the year. Annual fundraisers like SpringFest at Woodward Park, a gardening market and festival, and The Tasting at Woodward Park, an upscale garden party event, support the organization. Additionally, over 20 affiliated organizations like the Audubon Society, Sierra Club, Tulsa Rose Society and Tulsa Garden Club call the Center home.

2435 S. Peoria Ave. 918-576-5155 tulsagardencenter.org

Visitors can enjoy the architecture and collection of historical photographs displayed throughout the mansion, which depict the home as it was during the Snedden days. Most of the rooms still retain the craftsmanship and charm of the original home. The public can rent the facility for receptions, parties, weddings and other events. That income helps maintain the building and provides public educational opportunities. In 2006, the addition of The Linnaeus Teaching Garden brought a new form of education to the Center. Often called a best-kept secret, the 1.55acre Linnaeus Teaching Garden is staffed by more than 300 volunteers. It has a greenhouse, indoor classroom, a koi pond and much more. The Garden also functions as an outdoor classroom for the Linnaeus Gardeners program, which brings in a new class of volunteers every year. Other programs include Story Time, Tai Chi classes, Little Green Thumbs, Let’s Talk Gardening and book discussions in the Tulsa Garden Center library.


Charlie, the store’s greeter with (left to right) Trent Morrow, Tim Ziegler, Alan Morrow and Danny Ziegler.

ZIEGLER’S ART & FRAME The popular store rooted in the Kendall Whitter neighborhood offers hundreds of styles of custom and ready-made frames. “We specialize in specialty framing and can do it all from custom-designed mats and frames to creating shadow boxes and frames for needlework,” says Alan Morrow, company president. “We also stretch and re-stretch painted canvases on the proper bars for display, and can custom cut any mat to create multiopenings, oval, arch, spandrel and cathedral shapes. A customer’s artwork is in good care with our helpful and knowledgeable staff. ” The store is also a supply source for artists with major brands of oils, acrylics, watercolor, couache, inks, markers and pens. “We take pride in

6 North Lewis Avenue 918.584.2217 zieglerart.com

offering graphic and illustration supplies plus all the ancillary products to enable one to pursue artistic endeavors,” said Morrow. Ziegler’s is known for offering one of the city’s largest collections of Tulsa art. Customers are frequently “amazed” to find iconic photos and prints from Tulsa’s past to the latest images reflecting our growing and ever-changing city. “We also are proud to feature the works of local and regional artists that we believe are representative of the ‘Tulsa spirit,’” noted Morrow. The store is a member of the “Keep It Local” movement that encourages Tulsans to shop and support locally-owned stores.


DOERNER, SAUNDERS, DANIEL & ANDERSON, LLP The history of Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson spans more than 120 years of serving Oklahomans in complex legal matters. The firm’s founding lawyers were leaders who actively shaped the region in the early 1900s. DSDA has represented large and small clients, many for decades, helping them grow, survive economic hardships and thrive regardless of where their business interests take them. “Our history plays an important role, evident in our depth of experience and the get-it-done attitude that each lawyer brings to the table,” says Tom Q. Ferguson,

OKLAHOMA CENTRAL CREDIT UNION When Oklahoma Central Credit Union was founded in 1941, credit union employees couldn’t bank where they worked. Oklahoma Central was founded to provide the credit union experience to credit union employees. We began serving those with the highest expectation of what credit union service should be. This commitment to understanding our community and striving to meet those expectations continues today. Since our early days with just 27 charter members, Oklahoma Central has grown with the principle that informed financial decisions contributed to a better life. A mortgage isn’t merely a loan, but secures a place to call home. A student loan doesn’t just cover

Williams Center Tower II 2 W. Second St., Suite 700 Tulsa, OK 74103 918-582-1211 dsda.com

managing partner. Today, with nearly 50 attorneys practicing in three cities, DSDA is one of the oldest law firms in Oklahoma. In 1975, DSDA was one of the first law firms in Oklahoma to have a female partner. DSDA is the only law firm in Oklahoma selected as a member of Meritas®, a respected global alliance of law firms recognized for their expertise. DSDA gives clients access to a variety of full-service legal resources. The firm continues to grow to meet the challenges of changing laws, technologies and business cycles.

Seated (left to right): Sam Daniel and Bill Anderson Standing (left to right): Mike Linscott, Bill Riggs, Linda Martin and Tom Ferguson

10 Branches Tulsa, Broken Arrow, Catoosa, Owasso 918-664-6000 oklahomacentral.creditunion tuition and books, but opens doors to a different kind of future. From someone opening their first account learning how to complete a deposit slip, to a long-time member preparing for their retirement, Oklahoma Central employees are there to provide the support and education needed to progress confidently. The creation of the Oklahoma Central Foundation is part of our continued commitment to the ideals we were founded on. Everything we do is meant to encourage purpose – empowering people to lead full and successful lives. Over the years the technology changes, our branches move and evolve, and our membership grows. But our mission to improve lives remains. TulsaPeople.com

75


BE TRUE TO YOUR HEART. 99

$

for three screenings that could save your life.

CAROTID DISEASE 15 MINUTES

This simple ultrasound test helps detect plaque in arteries that can cause a stroke. ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

Year round, the Heart Hospital at Saint Francis offers a series of three cardiovascular screening ultrasound tests at a reduced cost. These quick, easy and painless tests can help you identify potential risks for heart disease and other vascular conditions. It’s a way to help keep you informed about your heart health. For more information or to schedule your appointment, please call the Heart Hospital at Saint Francis at 918-494-6900.

15 MINUTES

Using ultrasound, this test checks for enlargement of the aorta within the abdomen, which could suggest a risk for rupture. PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE 15 MINUTES

This condition of the arteries in the legs is related to an increased risk of heart attack or stroke. This test will record blood pressure in both legs to evaluate blood circulation.

ADDITIONAL SCREENING OPTION Ask about our $99 cardiac calcium screening, which measures the calcified plaque in the arteries that supply blood to the heart. This non-invasive CT scan takes about 15 minutes and helps calculate your risk of a heart attack.

6161 South Yale Avenue | Tulsa, Oklahoma | saintfrancis.com/hearthospital SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL | THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | WARREN CLINIC | HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH | LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL MUSKOGEE | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL VINITA | SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW | SAINT FRANCIS CANCER CENTER | SAINT FRANCIS HOME CARE COMPANIES | SAINT FRANCIS GLENPOOL


HALL OF

FAME For the past eight years, TulsaPeople readers have named their favorite local companies to be on the A-List. The A-List Hall of Fame recognizes all the winners that have been named to the list for ďŹ ve or more years. Each business is listed under the overall category it was recognized in, such as Dine Local, Shop Local, Head to Toe, Service and Fun for All. Advertisers are featured with a business description. These businesses, restaurants, service providers, destinations and local sites are the best in Tulsa. Congratulations to those named to the Hall of Fame. Look for the 2019 A-List ballot on TulsaPeople.com beginning Feb. 15. IN ORANGE = ON LIST ALL EIGHT YEARS

TulsaPeople.com

77


FUN FOR ALL

LOVETTS GALLERY lovettsgallery.com

108 CONTEMPORARY 108contemporary.org

MAYO HOTEL themayohotel.com

TULSA AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM tulsamuseum.org

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA utulsa.edu The University of Tulsa is an accepting and inclusive community of more than 4,000 engaged learners who actively sculpt their own learning and development.

AHHA ahhatulsa.org

MOHAWK PARK tulsaparks.org

TULSA BALLET tulsaballet.org

WATERWORKS ART CENTER waterworksartcenter.com

AMBASSADOR HOTEL ambassadortulsa.com The Ambassador Hotel and The Chalkboard have been setting the standard of excellence in Tulsa for decades with its luxury appeal and historic elegance.

OKLAHOMA AQUARIUM okaquarium.org

TULSA CHILDREN'S MUSEUM DISCOVERY LAB discoverylab.org

WOODWARD PARK tulsagardencenter.org

BOK CENTER bokcenter.com BRADY THEATER bradytheater.com CAIN'S BALLROOM cainsballroom.com CHERRY STREET facebook.com/cherrysttulsa COLOR RUN C/O RIVERPARKS AUTHORITY thecolorrun.com/locations/tulsa DRESSER MANSION dressermansion.com GILCREASE MUSEUM gilcrease.org GUTHRIE GREEN guthriegreen.com HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO hardrockcasinotulsa.com Hard Rock Tulsa has your favorite electronic and table games, award-winning hotel and restaurants, amenities and the best live entertainment at The Joint: Tulsa and the new Track 5. HARWELDEN MANSION harweldenmansion.com HUNTER PARK tulsaparks.org LAFORTUNE PARK parks.tulsacounty.org LIVING ARTS OF TULSA livingarts.org 78

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

M.A. DORAN GALLERY madorangallery.com

OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER nba.com/thunder

THE JOINT-HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO hardrockcasinotulsa.com/ the-joint-tulsa

TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE tulsacc.edu

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY — TULSA tulsa.okstate.edu

TULSA DRILLERS tulsadrillers.com

OKTOBERFEST tulsaoktoberfest.org

TULSA GLASSBLOWING SCHOOL tulsaglassblowing.org

OSAGE CASINO osagecasino.com Osage Casino is downtown Tulsa’s newest entertainment destination featuring gaming, a luxury hotel and pool, in-house brewery and Skyline Event Center.

TULSA INTERNATIONAL MAYFEST tulsamayfest.org

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER woodyguthriecenter.org

DINE LOCAL ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q albertgs.com

DALESANDRO’S ITALIAN CUISINE dalesandros.com DILLY DINER dillydiner.com DESI WOK desiwok.net EL GUAPO’S CANTINA elguaposcantina.com EL RIO VERDE 918-592-2555 EL TEQUILA MEXICAN KITCHEN eltequilatulsa.com ELOTE CAFE AND CATERING elotetulsa.com FAT GUY’S BURGER BAR fatguysburgers.com FIRST WATCH firstwatch.com

TULSA OILERS tulsaoilers.com

ANDOLINI’S PIZZERIA andopizza.com

FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE AND WINE BAR flemingssteakhouse.com

TULSA OPERA tulsaopera.com

ANTOINETTE BAKING CO. antoinettebakingco.com

FUJI SUSHI fujitulsa.com

BILLY SIMS BARBECUE billysimsbbq.com

GOLDIE’S PATIO GRILL goldies.com

PINOT'S PALETTE pinotspalette.com Pinot’s Palette is an upscale paint-and-sip studio, where no experience is needed! Sip cocktails and listen to great music! Paint. Drink. Have fun.

TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER tulsapac.com Tulsa Performing Arts Center is home to more than 500 events each year including ballet, opera, symphony, Broadway, drama and comedy. Come home to the arts!

BLUE MOON BAKERY AND CAFE bluemoontulsa.com

HIDEAWAY PIZZA hideawaypizza.com

BODEAN RESTAURANT bodean.net

IN THE RAW SUSHI intherawsushi.com

POLO GRILL pologrill.com

TULSA RUN tulsarun.com

BONEFISH GRILL bonefishgrill.com

INDIA PALACE theindiapalacetulsa.com

PURPLE GLAZE STUDIO purpleglazestudio.com

TULSA STATE FAIR tulsastatefair.com

BROOKSIDE BY DAY brooksidebyday.com

JAMES E. MCNELLIE’S PUBLIC HOUSE mcnellies.com

RIVER PARKS riverparks.org

TULSA SYMPHONY tulsasymphony.org

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT riverspirittulsa.com

TULSA TECH tulsatech.edu

ROUTE 66 MARATHON route66marathon.com

TULSA TOUGH tulsatough.com

SUSAN G. KOMEN RACE FOR THE CURE komentulsa.org

TULSA ZOO tulsazoo.org Inspiring passion for animals in every guest, every day.

PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART philbrook.org

BURN CO BARBEQUE burnbbq.com CHARLESTON’S RESTAURANT charlestons.com CHUY’S chuys.com DAILY GRILL dailygrill.com

JASON’S DELI jasonsdeli.com JUNIPER RESTAURANT junipertulsa.com KEO ASIAN CUISINE keorestaurant.com KILKENNY’S IRISH PUB tulsairishpub.com LAFFA MEDI-EASTERN RESTAURANT AND BAR laffatulsa.com


Providing spirits to Tulsa since the end of Prohibition in 1959. Come enjoy our selection and talk to our in-house experts.

3324 E 31st St #A 918-747-1171

Over 150 years of combined experience.

HALL OF

FAME Thank You For Honoring Us With Your Patronage.


THE BROOK RESTAURANT AND BAR brookrestaurant.com

LAMBRUSCO’Z DELI lambruscoz.com

P.F. CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO pfchangs.com

LANNA THAI lannathaitulsa.com

PANERA BREAD panerabread.com

LONE WOLF BANH MI lonewolftulsa.com

PEI WEI ASIAN DINER peiwei.com

LOS CABOS MEXICAN GRILL AND CANTINA loscabosok.com

PRHYME DOWNTOWN STEAKHOUSE prhymetulsa.com

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO tiamotulsa.com

LUDGER’S BAVARIAN CAKERY ludgersbavariancakery.com

QUEENIE’S CAFE AND BAKERY queeniesoftulsa.com

VILLA RAVENNA villaravenna.com

LUDGER’S CATERING ludgerscatering.com Ludger’s Catering is the place to call for all of your wedding, corporate and private event needs. From drop-off to full service.

R BAR AND GRILL rbartulsa.com

VINTAGE WINE BAR winebartulsa.com

RED LOBSTER redlobster.com

WARREN DUCK CLUB doubletree3.hilton.com/en/ hotels/oklahoma/doubletree-by-hilton-hotel-tulsawarren-place-TULSYDT/dining/ index.html

MAHOGANY PRIME STEAKHOUSE mahoganyprimesteakhouse.com MAZZIO’S ITALIAN EATERY mazzios.com Since 1961, Mazzio’s Italian Eatery has been locally owned and operated by the Selby family. Made-from-scratch dough with real meats and cheeses, and of course, the family-secret sauce.

RI LE’S VIETNAMESE 918-496-2126 Ri Le Restaurant introduced the flavorful and healthful style of Vietnamese cooking to Tulsa in 1981. The specialties are raved about for their freshness, taste and presentation. Join Ri Le (pronounced Ree Lay) and his wife, Thao, and family members at their multiple award-winning restaurant.

MERRITT’S BAKERY merrittsbakery.com

RIBCRIB ribcrib.com In 1992, Bret Chandler opened the first RibCrib and started serving up righteous ribs. Twenty-seven years later, we’re still here and smokin’ the good stuff.

MI COCINA micocinarestaurants.com

RON’S HAMBURGERS AND CHILI ronsburgersandchili.com

MONDO’S RISTORANTE ITALIANO mondositalian.com

MCGILL’S dinemcgills.com

MR. NICE GUYS mrniceguystulsa.com OKLAHOMA JOE’S BAR-B-CUE okjoes.com OLIVE GARDEN olivegarden.com

WHITE RIVER FISH MARKET AND RESTAURANT whiteriverfishmarket.com WHOLE FOODS MARKET wholefoodsmarket.com WILD FORK wildfork.com YOKOZUNA yokozunasushi.com ZOËS KITCHEN zoeskitchen.com

BLACK OPTICAL blackoptical.com

HOME DEPOT homedepot.com

BROOKSIDE brooksidetheplacetobe.com

IDA RED idaredgeneralstore.com

BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS brucegweber.com

ISRAEL DIAMOND SUPPLY israeldiamond.com

CHELSEA GALLERY facebook.com/ chelseagallery.tulsa DILLARD’S dillards.com DOG DISH thedogdish.com Dog Dish has been Tulsa’s award-winning pet store for dogs and cats (and the owners who love them) since 2002. The store, located at Utica Square, specializes in premium food and baked treats, beds, toys, collars, apparel and more. Pets welcome…of course! DR. ROBERT H. ZOELLNER AND ASSOCIATES drzoellner.com DSW-DESIGNER SHOE WAREHOUSE dsw.com EMPIRE OPTICAL empireoptical.com

SAVASTANO’S PIZZERIA savastanospizzeria.com

SHOP LOCAL

SAVOY RESTAURANT eatsavoy.com

ABERSONS abersonstyle.com

GAP gap.com

SENOR TEQUILA MEXICAN GRILL AND CANTINA senortequilaok.com

ANDREW’S LIGHTING shop.andrewslighting.com

GARBE’S LIGHTING AND HOME ACCESSORIES garbes.com

STONEHORSE CAFE AND MARKET stonehorsecafe.com TED’S CAFE ESCONDIDO tedscafe.com

OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE outback.com

TEXAS ROADHOUSE texasroadhouse.com

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

THE TAVERN taverntulsa.com

HOBBY LOBBY hobbylobby.com

FLEET FEET SPORTS fleetfeettulsa.com

OSAKA STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI BAR osaka-steakhouse.net

80

THE CHALKBOARD chalkboardtulsa.com

BICYCLES OF TULSA bicyclesoftulsa.com

B AND B LIQUOR WAREHOUSE bbliquortulsa.com BAKER POOLS bakerpoolsok.com BEST BUY bestbuy.com

FLEMING’S COMFORT FOOTWEAR flemingsshoes.com

GRANT’S FRAMES grantsframestulsa.com HAHN APPLIANCE WAREHOUSE hahnappliance.com HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR hicksbrunson.com

J. DAVID JEWELRY jdavidjewelry.com J. SPENCER JEWELRY AND GIFTS shopjspencer.com J.COLE SHOES jcoleshoes.com JENKS MAIN STREET facebook.com/jenksdowntown JOHNSON FLOOR AND HOME/CARPET ONE johnsonfloorandhome.com JOS. A. BANK josbank.com KATHLEEN’S KIDS kathleenskids.com LOWE’S lowes.com MARGO’S GIFT SHOP themargoshop.com THE MARKET themarkettulsa.com MARY MURRAY’S FLOWERS marymurraysflowers.com Mary Murray’s Flowers has been a Tulsa institution for nearly a half century. The company and store provide customers the finest in high-quality, fresh bouquets and floral arrangements designed with care and style. Same day delivery is offered in the Tulsa area and service is available nationwide. MATHIS BROTHERS FURNITURE mathisbrothers.com METRO APPLIANCES AND MORE metroappliancesandmore.com MICHAELS michaels.com


MILL CREEK CARPET AND TILE millcreekcarpet.com MOODY’S JEWELRY moodysjewelry.com Since 1944, Moody’s Jewelry has been the Tulsa area’s trusted family-owned jewelry store. Today, the award-winning retailer serves the metro area with seven convenient stores: Harvard at 12th, Lewis at 71st, Sheridan at 51st, 68th at Memorial, Kenosha at 145th, 71st at Highway 169, and Utica Square.

RIVER CITY TRADING POST rivercitytp.com RCTP is located at 301 E. Main St., Jenks. Home to 300-plus vendors who house a mixture of antiques, vintage and collectibles. SLOPPY DOG WASH sloppydogwash.com SOUTHERN AGRICULTURE southernagriculture.com SPEXTON FINE JEWELRY spextonfinejewelry.com

MRS. DEHAVEN’S FLOWER SHOP mrsdehavens.com

SPROUTS FARMERS MARKET sprouts.com

OLD VILLAGE WINE AND SPIRITS 918-712-2115

SR HUGHES srhughes.com

ON A WHIM shopatonawhim.com

STEMS tulsaflorist.net

PARKHILL’S WAREHOUSE LIQUORS AND WINE parkhillsliquor.com

TED AND DEBBIE’S FLOWER GARDEN tedanddebbiesflowers.com

PERFECT TOUCH perfecttouchgiftstore.com

TERMINIX PEST CONTROL SERVICES terminix.com

PETCO petco.com PETSMART petsmart.com PHAT TIRE BIKE SHOP phattirebikeshop.com POSH poshtulsa.com RANCH ACRES WINE AND SPIRITS ranchacreswine.com Opened just after the end of state Prohibition in 1959, Ranch Acres Wine and Spirits is an institution in Tulsa. The centrally located store is known for its broad selections of wines, beers and spirits and its friendly and knowledgeable staff…plus Truman, “the shop dog.” REASOR’S reasors.com RETRO DEN retrodentulsa.com

82

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

THE LOLLY GARDEN lollygarden.com THE SNOW GOOSE uticasquare.com/shops/ the-snow-goose TOM’S BICYCLES tomsbicycles.com TONI’S FLOWERS AND GIFTS tonisflowersgifts.com TRAVERS MAHAN traversmahanapparel.com Discover the art and craft of fine menswear at Travers Mahan, a family-owned business offering distinctive and timeless, yet modern, apparel with uncompromising service and expertise.

TULSA HILLS SHOPPING CENTER shoptulsahills.com TULSA HILLS WINE CELLAR tulsahillswinecellar.com UTICA SQUARE uticasquare.com WOODLAND HILLS MALL simon.com/mall/ woodland-hills-mall ZIEGLER ART AND FRAME zieglerart.com Locally owned store on the corner of Admiral and Lewis offers custom framing, original and fine art, home accessories, art supplies and art classes.

SERVICE

BARRON AND HART barronandhart.com

HOURGLASS COLLISION REPAIR hourglasscollision.com

BLUE HAVEN POOLS bluehaven.com

INVERNESS VILLAGE invernessvillage.com

CAMP BOW WOW campbowwow.com/tulsa

DOGVILLE DAYCARE AND BOARDING dogville-daycare.com At Dogville and Kitty City, pets are family members. Staff members are on site 24 hours a day. Come take a tour!

KARROLL MARTIN PAINT AND BODY SHOP martinpaintandbody.com Karoll Martin Paint and Body is a full-service repair facility, founded in Tulsa in 1972. The multiple award-winning company proudly operates by standing behind two values: quality and honesty. The Martin family and KM’s employees are dedicated to providing outstanding service to all customers.

DOLPHIN POOL AND SUPPLY dolphinpoolstulsa.com

LAMODE CLEANERS lamodecleaners.com

FIESTA POOLS AND SPAS fiestapoolsandspas.com

MAIDPRO TULSA maidpro.com/tulsa MaidPro is proud to make homes shine and offer Tulsans more time! We are bonded, insured and award-winning professionals.

CLEAN FREAKS OF TULSA cleanfreaks.info

A-1 AUTO BODY a1autobodyrepair.com

FOUR STAR IMPORT AUTOMOTIVE fourstartulsa.com

AIR ASSURANCE airassurance.com

FOX CLEANERS foxcleaners.com

AIRCO SERVICE aircoservice.com

GH2 ARCHITECTS gh2.com

ARROW EXTERMINATORS nomorebugs.com Arrow Exterminators has been serving Oklahoma since 1952. With offices in Tulsa and OKC. You can count on their highly trained staff to take care of any termite or pest control need.

HAMMOND ANIMAL HOSPITAL hammondanimalhospital.com

ARVEST BANK arvest.com Arvest Bank provides a wide range of banking services in more than 135 communities across four states, with extended weekday banking hours at many locations. ATLANTIS POOLS AND SPAS atlantispoolsandspasinc.com

T-TOWN BICYCLES t-townbicycles.com

BANCFIRST bancfirst.bank

TULSA FLEA MARKET tulsafleamarket.net

BANK OF OKLAHOMA bankofoklahoma.com

HARP SERVICES getharp.com HILLCREST HEALTHCARE SYSTEM hillcrest.com HOUCHIN ELECTRIC CO. houchinelectric.com Since 1974, Houchin Electric has been one of Tulsa’s largest and most respected service companies. The award-winning company provides homeowners and business owners with a team of licensed electricians to assess, diagnose and repair any electrical need, including emergency response.

MERRY MAIDS merrymaids.com/locations/ok/ greater-tulsa-metro MIDFIRST BANK midfirst.com MOLLY MAID mollymaid.com MONTEREAU montereau.net MOTHER NATURE’S PEST AND LAWN mothernaturesinc.com MULLIN INC. mullininc.com OKLAHOMA CENTRAL CREDIT UNION oklahomacentral.creditunion Oklahoma Central has helped Oklahomans meet their financial goals, solve problems and turn opportunities into accomplishments since 1941.


HALL OF

FAME

EXCEPTIONAL Senior Living: Minutes from downtown, Miles from ordinary Nestled on 50 secluded acres just outside downtown, Saint Simeon’s has been exceeding expectations in senior care and living since 1960. Residents love the state-of-the-art wellness center, therapeutic indoor pool and enjoying time with friends. Their families enjoy the park-like grounds, feeding the peacocks and watching the grandkids on the playground. But the real difference is our outstanding care. With Saint Simeon’s, families have peace of mind. Come see for yourself. Call Donna at 918-425-3583 for your free tour today.

Saint Simeon’s is a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma

saintsimeons.org


OKLAHOMA METHODIST MANOR ommtulsa.org Oklahoma Methodist Manor offers residential living with options ranging from 5602,700 square feet. Dining, housekeeping and urgent response is included. POOCHES poochestulsa.com Dog daycare, boarding, grooming and training. Serving Tulsa for 13-plus years. RCB BANK rcbbank.com RED CROWN CREDIT UNION redcrown.org Red Crown Credit Union is a local not-for-profit financial institution that provides financial needs to the communities they enjoy giving back to. RENOVATIONS BY HELMS renovationsbyhelms.com From design to final clean-up, Renovations by Helms has offered its customers a systematic approach to the remodeling and building process for over 34 years. ROTO-ROOTER PLUMBING AND WATER CLEANUP rotorooter.com Proud to be family owned and operated, Roto-Rooter takes care of our customers with honest and prompt service at a fair price.

SAINT SIMEON’S saintsimeons.org Saint Simeon’s Episcopal Home has been serving the senior population in the Tulsa area since 1960. This award-winning senior living community, offers a wide variety of services ranging from independent cottages to memory care for persons of all faiths.

WOODLAND WEST ANIMAL HOSPITAL woodlandwestanimalhospital.com Woodland West Animal Hospital is dedicated to providing the highest level of veterinary medicine along with friendly, compassionate service.

SIMMONS HOMES simmonshomes.com

ZOELLNER EXTERMINATING zoellnerexterminating.com

SOUTHWOOD LANDSCAPE AND GARDEN CENTER southwoodgardencenter.com SPIFFY’S CLEANERS spiffyscleaners.com THERMAL WINDOWS INC. thermalwindows.com TULSA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION tulsafederalcu.org TTCU FEDERAL CREDIT UNION ttcu.com VCA ANIMAL HOSPITALS vcahospitals.com VIDEO REVOLUTION videorevolution.com W DESIGN wdesignsite.com WILLIAMS PLUMBING AND DRAIN williamsplumbing.com

Thank you! FOR VOTING US TO THE “A-LIST HALL OF FAME” arvest.com Member FDIC 84

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

YALE CLEANERS yalecleaners.com

IHLOFF SALON AND DAY SPA ihloffspa.com

SKY FITNESS AND WELLBEING sky-fit.com

IIDENTITY SALON iidentitysalon.com

ST. JOHN HEALTH SYSTEM stjohnhealthsystem.com Ascension’s St. John Health System operates seven hospitals and more than 90 health care clinics across the region. St. John provides more than $75 million in community benefit and care of persons living in poverty each year.

JARA HERRON DAY SPA, MED SPA AND SALON jaraherronsalon.com LIFE TIME FITNESS lifetime.life

HEAD TO TOE BOOTCAMP TULSA bootcamptulsa.com CENTER FOR PLASTIC SURGERY cpstulsa.com CLARY SAGE SALON AND SPA clarysagesalon.com EMERGE MEDICAL AND WELL SPA emergemedicaldayspa.com Leaders in medical aesthetics, wellness and day spa services in northeast Oklahoma for more than 10 years. Thank you, Tulsa! HARREL EYECARE harreleyecare.com Founded by Dr. Monte Harrel in 2000, Harrel Eyecare is dedicated to providing the highest quality of patient care at each of its four convenient locations.

PERFECT SMILE TULSA perfectsmiletulsa.com PLASTIC SURGERY CENTER OF TULSA pscoftulsa.com Dr. Greg Ratliff, the Plastic Surgery Center of Tulsa, and Inject, an Aesthetics Bar — Quality cosmetic and med spa care. Exceptional service. For more than 27 years.

ST. JOHN SIEGFRIED HEALTH CLUB stjohnhealthsystem.com/ health-club

PURE BARRE purebarre.com

TRIAD EYE INSTITUTE triadeye.com Triad Eye Institute is eastern Oklahoma’s leading provider of specialty and surgical eye care, performing iLASIK vision correction, laser-assisted cataract removal, oculoplastic surgery and much more.

RAJ M. PATEL, D.D.S. rajpateldds.com

TULSA DERMATOLOGY CLINIC tulsadermatology.com

SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM saintfrancis.com Saint Francis Health System is a Catholic, not-for-profit ministry which is wholly owned and operated in Tulsa, whose mission is to extend the presence and healing ministry of Christ.

TULSA FITNESS SYSTEMS tulsafitnesssystems.com

SALT YOGA saltyogatulsa.com SKIN CARE INSTITUTE skincareinstitute.net

TULSA SURGICAL ARTS tulsasurgicalarts.com WEIGHT WATCHERS weightwatchers.com YMCA OF GREATER TULSA ymcatulsa.org YOGA ROOM theyogaroomtulsa.com ZOELLNER CHIROPRACTIC zoellnerchiropractic.com

Our Tails are

Wagging! We want to thank all of HALL OF our amazing customers FAME who have entrusted the care of their beloved dogs to us. We promise to continue to grow to meet your needs and, most importantly, to keep the tails wagging!

poochestulsa.com 5331 E 41st St 918-398-6459 /poochestulsa


THANK YOU FOR VOTING US TULSA PEOPLE’S A-LIST! We are proud to continue being Tulsa’s top spot for a good time. I-44 Exit 240 | 800.760.6700 | HARDROCKCASINOTULSA.COM

Know your limits. Gambling problem? Call 800.522.4700.


HALL OF

FAME 1778 UTICA SQUARE • 918-624-2600 OPEN MON-SAT, 10-6

86

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019


Order Online! VISIT RIBCRIB.COM

TulsaPeople.com

87


PHOTO: DOUG SUMMERS

we’re calling a toast for making the a list hall of fame Here’s to you, Tulsa! Thank you for your continued love and support! AmbassadorTulsa.com ChalkboardTulsa.com

25THANNIVERSARY! THANKS TULSA FOR VOTING US INTO THE

A-LIST HALL OF FAME!

Thank You!

To All Our Customers And Vendors For Helping Us Make The Grade!

TULSAPAC.COM | 918.596.7111 3 0 1 E A S T M A I N S T R E E T, J E N K S O K L A H O M A

88

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019


Is This the Year You Make a Change? We have 2 tremendous options for cosmetic change in 1 convenient location, under the direction of 1 outstanding board-certified plastic surgeon! Dr. Greg Ratliff, a board-certified plastic surgeon, and his team at Plastic Surgery Center of Tulsa and Inject, an Aesthetics Bar, have the resources for all your cosmetic services! From fillers to facelifts, we have everything you need! And we have the expertise to ensure a tremendous outcome! • Breast Augmentation and Other Breast Procedures

• miraDry

• RF Microneedling

• Body Contouring

• BOTOX and other Injectables

• IPL

• Mommy Makeovers

• Fillers

• Facial Procedures

• HydraFacial MD

• ZO Skin Health and SkinMedica products

• Laser Hair Removal

HALL OF

PLASTIC SURGERY CENTER OF TULSA

FAME

CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION!

WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM

918-779-1448

WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM

SINCE 1935

HALL OF

FAME

Trusted to get you out of jams for over 75 years. Master Plumbing Contractor #1446 WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM

918-779-1448

WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM

WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM

Voted Tulsa’s Best

WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM 918-779-1448

WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM 918-779-1448 WWW.ROTOROOTEROK.COM

918.712.0888 • pscoftulsa.com • 2107 East 15th Street, Tulsa OK 74104

TulsaPeople.com

89


VOTED BEST PET BOARDING & PET GROOMING

HALL OF

FOR 5 YEARS !

FAME

All Suite Boarding. No Cages. Comfort care available for special needs dogs.

Groomer on site.

ay care

D

Owned and managed by a retired veterinarian.

rdi & Boa

ES T D 2012

ng

Boarding price includes daycare, use of dog’s own food and medications.

9525 E 47 th Pl / Tulsa, OK 74145 / (918) 949- 6070

www.dogville-daycare.com

Be sure to check out our cat only area next door to Dogville Daycare!

www.kittycitytulsa.com HALL OF

STAFF ON SITE 24 HRS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK @ BOTH LOCATIONS

FAME

Complete Remodeling. Thank you for recognizing us in the Auto Body & Repair category of the A-LIST. At Karoll Martin Paint & Body, we take great pride in being an independent repair facility because we pay close attention to every detail without exception. It means our clients receive quality repair with no insurance company directing the process, timeframe or overall outcome.

HALL OF

FAME

We also take pride in our ability to keep up with the ever-changing automotive technology and repair procedures in our industry. It requires a great deal of experience—we have been in business over 40 years in Tulsa—and attention-to-detail to make us stand-out in our business category. Thank you for recognizing the Karoll Martin difference.

9718 E 58TH ST • 918-250-5332 • WWW.MARTINPAINTANDBODY.COM 90

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

R E N O V A T I O N S B Y H ELM S

918-369-5545 A-List Winner FAME 5 years in a row! From Design to Final Clean-Up HALL OF

www.renovationsbyhelms.com


THANK YOU! We Value & Appreciate The Honors & Recognition…

HALL OF

FAME A+

“Since 1974, we have proven our company’s unmatched skill in the field of electrical service. Our team of certified and licensed electricians are skilled to perform preventative maintenance or diagnostics, upgrades and repairs…of any project size. Please call on us.”

— John Houchin

PROFESSIONAL HOME CLEANING

9134 East 46th Street (918) 663-1818 houchinelectric.com

$75 OFF YOUR 1ST, 3RD, & 5TH CLEAN 918.270.2800 | maidpro.com/tulsa

HALL OF

FAME

PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF TULSA PEOPLE’S A-LIST HALL OF FAME

1628 S MAIN ST, TULSA, OK 74119 (918) 744-9988 WWW.LUDGERSCATERING.COM SALES@LUDGERSCATERING.COM

Emerge Medical & Well Spa is the leader in medical aesthetics, wellness and day spa services and has been serving Tulsa since 2007. Services include: Botox, Fillers, Laser Treatments, Hormone Replacement Therapy, Facials, Massages, Weight Loss Therapy, Lash Extensions and more! 918.392.8606 • 9124 S Sheridan Rd • emergemedicaldayspa.com TulsaPeople.com

91


Open and caring 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Find yourself in

today!

7am - 8pm, 10am - 6pm on holidays 9360 S. Union Ave., Tulsa • 918.299.1208

HALL OF

FAME

woodlandwestanimalhospital.com

op e n 9 a m - 5 p m · 363 days a year ∙ t ul sa zoo.org

HALL OF

FAME

T UL S A P E OP L E .C OM GI V E AWAY S Visit TulsaPeople.com to register for a $200 Travers Mahan gift certificate.

WINNER

WITH APPRECIATION! WITH APPRECIATION!!!

Update the Spring wardrobe with high quality apparel for any occasion from Travers Mahan!

It has been myour joyjoy toserving live in Tulsa for the past It has been award-winning 43 years—I love much—and to Vietnamese food inTulsa Tulsavery for the past 32 years. serve award-winning Vietnamese food at our Thank you. restaurant for the past 38 years. Thank You!

4932 E 91st St 918-496-2126 92

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

• R E GIS T E R B Y F E BR U A R Y 2 8 •


HALL OF

FAME Thank you!

918 745 9962 harreleyecare.com

4 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

HALL OF

FAME FROM A TULSA GET R E A DY FOR GR E AT

© 2018 Mazzio’s LLC

TulsaPeople.com

93


T R AV E L + H O M E + T R E N D S

Love in B L O O M Vessels as beautiful as these simply beg to be filled with flowers. BY KENDALL BARROW

Pictured clockwise from top left: tall white ceramic vase, $29.99, and yucca bowl, $54.99, both from Cohlmia’s; small and large crystal bud vases, $44 and $65, respectively, and ceramic faux marble vase, $30, all from Thayer Furniture; gold-banded vase, $24.99, and gold oval diamond patterned vase, $29.99, both from Cohlmia’s. COHLMIA’S: 1502 S. CINCINNATI PLACE THAYER FURNITURE: 3309 S. HARVARD AVE., SUITE E

TulsaPeople.com

95


STOREFRONT Jeremy Buller

The Ascent candle is the store’s best-seller. This signature scent was created just for Ascent by the Nest on Cherry Street. It smells like coming into the lodge after a long day skiing. It’s sold exclusively at Ascent. $25.

The Osprey Daypack will get you through any type of day trip or weekend hiking trip. Comfortable and ventilated, but tough enough to carry your gear. $65.

Patagonia’s Nano Puff jacket is warm, wind-resistant and light as a feather. This is the essential, environmentally friendly outdoor jacket. $199.

Colorado in Oklahoma

Alite camping chairs are durable, easy to pack and most importantly, ultralightweight. Use one for a camping trip, or in the backyard around a campfire. $99-$135.

ASCENT TARGETS THE OUTDOORSY CROWD WITH ITS APPAREL AND GOODS. BY KIM BROWN

J

eremy Buller has always been an avid skier. complements the other nearby shops and customHe has many memories, starting at 5 years ers’ interests. Buller does his best to understand what cusold, of hitting the slopes in Colorado on yearly trips with his family. tomers need for outdoor apparel, whether they’re going on a ski trip, camping or on vacation. In fact, he speaks so familiarly about Colorado that it’s easy to mistake him for a native. That’s one “Our high-end customer service is what we of the reasons why his outdoor apparel and goods hope really stands out,” he says. “So, we take the time to get to know what exactly they need, how store, Ascent, feels so authentic. long they’ll be there. We can really help them “I had a recent customer say when he walked make their trip the best possible experience.” in that it felt like Main Street in Breckenridge,” Buller says. “You can find the same brands here Many of Ascent’s products can’t be found elseand have that same feeling. We wanted to bring where in Oklahoma. “We’ve really tried to that niche to Tulsa.” capture that vibe of ColBuller bought the store orado, and we think we in 2016 from the previhave,” he says. “I’ve always ous owner when it was on Ascent Cherry Street. The move to loved the atmosphere of the 3514 S. PEORIA AVE. | 918-557-3447 Center One on Brookside ski shops, and it has been FACEBOOK.COM/ASCENTTULSA a great way to bring that was a good fit for the business, he says, because it home to Tulsa.” TP 96

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

Darn Tough socks carry a “no-questions” lifetime warranty. Buller says runners love these socks for their fit, comfort and durability. $22, regular; $16.50, runners’ socks.

Patagonia duffel bags start at $119. These bags are perfect for any type of travel, are lightweight, waterproof and are made in an array of bright colors.


“All you need is love. But a little chocolate doesn’t hurt now and then.” CHARLES SCHULZ

NEW LOCATION

3541 S. Harvard Ave, Tulsa, OK 74135 918-712-8785 |

❖ ORGANIC INGREDIENTS ❖ H A N D M A D E PA S T R I E S

www.TraversMahanApparel.com South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100

T–F 6:30 am -2pm SA 7:30 am -12pm

610 W. Main, Jenks 918-528-6544

esperancebakery.com

Tulsa’s newest Independent Senior Living Community offers a fulfilling, maintenance-free lifestyle. Conveniently located, the community features: • Restaurant-Style Dining • Wellness Center • Outdoor Salt Water Pool • And So Much More! Call (918) 205-4370 to learn more about Cedarhurst and to schedule a personal tour! “I feel as if I am home. I have my own private space yet I am apart of a large family. There is life, laughter, listening and there is sharing.” - Dorris M.

Glenpool Conference Center • February 21, 2019 To reserve your Sponsorship or Tickets, please contact Debbie Davis by calling 918-749-5255 or email Debbie@muddy-paws.org Pets Helping People is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization Fed ID #80-0407977

7345 S. 99th E. Avenue • Tulsa, OK 74133 • CedarhurstWoodlandHills.com TulsaPeople.com

97


BEYOND CITY LIMITS

Bentonville

SHORT TRIP, BIG REWARDS BY RHYS MARTIN

SPRINGDALE

AQ CHICKEN HOUSE 1207 N. Thompson St. Springdale has a great downtown for shopping. It’s also home to this eatery, which has served northwest Arkansas since 1947. In addition to its pan-fried chicken, it’s known for homemade spaghetti and southern-style catfish.

WEST SILOAM SPRINGS NATURAL FALLS STATE PARK HIGHWAY 412 WEST Near the Oklahoma/Arkansas border on Highway 412, this state park features a 77-foot waterfall that spills into a small valley, creating one of Oklahoma’s most scenic spots. $5 per vehicle to enter.

CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, 600 Museum Way The museum’s collection spans five centuries of American works. The grounds are nice for a walk in any season and provide an artistic surprise: a Frank Lloyd Wright house. It was originally built circa 1956 in New Jersey and was acquired by the museum in 2013. It was painstakingly reconstructed and is available for tours. 21C MUSEUM HOTEL, 200 N.E. A St. This respite features a wide variety of experiences that give visitors a taste of Arkansas — from the modern interior and eccentric exhibits to the finely crafted cuisine served in the Hive, the hotel’s in-house restaurant. WALTON’S 5&10 AND THE WALMART MUSEUM, 105 N. Main St. This downtown site is where Sam Walton opened his original five-and-dime store that would eventually become Walmart. The museum doesn’t take long to tour, and it gives an insightful look into the early days of the business empire that Sam and his brother, Bud Walton, built.

ROGERS WAR EAGLE MILL 11045 War Eagle Road It’s a picturesque red gristmill on War Eagle Creek in Benton County, Arkansas. As you cross the historic iron bridge to the mill, you might see the water wheel turning. The current mill is actually the fourth one built; the first three were lost to flood and fire, including a strategic burning during the Civil War. Today the mill still uses the power of the river to grind grain into flour. It offers a wide variety of natural goods, and the restaurant serves a great home-cooked meal. SUSIE Q MALT SHOP 612 N. Second St. If you’re in the area after Valentine’s Day, check and see if this family-owned roadside stand has reopened for the season. It has been around since the 1960s and is known for its pork tenderloin sandwich. If you’re looking for a place to share a malt with your sweetheart, this is a good spot. 98

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

WAR EAGLE MILL: RHYS MARTIN; CRYSTAL BRIDGES: NANCY NOLAN PHOTOGRAPHY; MAP: GEORGIA BROOKS

You can pack a lot into the shortest month of the year. February is a great time to take a weekend road trip as crowds are generally thinner at popular spots. If you have a free day or two, a short drive to northwest Arkansas has a lot to enjoy.


LISTEN UP! RACQUET AND HEALTH SPA • Services and products • Massage

OUR VALENTINE’S DAY GIFT TO YOU…

30% OFF

TULSA TALKS

is TulsaPeople’s podcast on Tulsa’s community and culture. Subscribe for FREE on Apple Podcasts, Google Play or Spotify! Episodes are released the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month.

1335 E. 11th St. Suite E., Tulsa, OK 74120 located on historic Route 66 jenkinsandcotulsa

Expires 3/15/19 3030 E. 91ST ST. 918-298-9500 R AH91.COM

NOW THROUGH APRIL 2019

Leonard Bernstein at 100: A collaborative exhibition between Tulsa’s Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art and the Woody Guthrie Center. Visit both museums to experience the full exhibit.

Leonard Bernstein at 100 was curated by the GRAMMY Museum in collaboration with The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and the Bernstein Family. Presented in cooperation with the Bernstein Family, The Leonard Bernstein Office, Inc., Brandeis University, and the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.

317 S Trenton Ave, Suite B • adorndesignstulsa.com HOM E + GI F T S + HO L I DAY F U N TulsaPeople.com

99


HEALTH

Adult immunizations Immunizations aren’t just for kids. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends several immunizations for adults. Dr. Brent Beasley, medical director of internal medicine at the Schusterman Clinic at OU Physicians-Tulsa, and Dr. Rhonda Casey, professor of pediatrics at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences and associate dean of global health, tell us why.

BY SARA PLUMMER Human papillomavirus vaccine

Influenza vaccine

Tdap vaccine

Zoster vaccine

Shingles.

What does it protect against?

Human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus strain known to cause cervical cancer.

The influenza, or flu.

Pneumococcal pneumonia.

“It’s import to note that Tdap is three different vaccinations combined into one: tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough,” Beasley says.

Who should get it?

Females from 9-26 years old and males from 9-22 or 26 years old, based on their doctor’s recommendation.

Everyone 6 months of age and older.

People 65 and older. Those under 65 with certain highrisk conditions can get the vaccines at a younger age.

Children get a series of Tdaps during childhood and then a final dose as an adult.

People over the age of 60.

It’s a series of three doses over a six-month period.

Once a year, usually in fall or winter. Pediatric patients may need two doses one month apart.

The CDC recommends receiving the Prevnar® vaccine first and then the Pneumovax® a year later.

Adults should get a booster every 10 years. If an adult was not vaccinated with Tdap as a child, they should receive it as an adult.

Two doses, six months apart.

“It’s very important to get this vaccine before you are exposed,” Casey says. “Cervical cancer kills a lot of women every year. Men can also get cancer from it, and they could be a carrier. There’s really no reason not to protect your child or yourself.”

“Many people die every year from the flu,” Casey says. “Most people can become very, very ill for up to two weeks. You can become dehydrated and run a high fever.”

“Like the flu, the very young and the very old are susceptible to dying from pneumococcal disease. In fact, often pneumonia is preceded by the flu,” Beasley says. “Pneumococcal pneumonia is one of the deadliest pneumonias. It accounts for 30 percent of all adult pneumonia cases.”

“Tetanus gets in cuts and causes a paralyzing illness. Diphtheria grows in the back of throats and can cause suffocation and death,” Beasley says. “Pediatric offices do very well at getting these vaccinations done by and large, and we rarely hear of any of these diseases anymore.”

“Ninety-nine percent of people worldwide have been exposed to the chicken pox virus, even if they don’t remember having an outbreak,” Beasley says. “Shingles is a reactivation of the chicken pox virus that hides in the nerves of the spine until a person’s immune system becomes weakened, usually when they are older. Then it breaks out along the skin nerves, causing painful ulcers.”

“If you get this vaccine before you’re exposed to HPV, you’re protected,” Casey says.

The CDC surveys which type of flu is coming to the U.S., then makes a prediction and formats the vaccine to those strains estimated to have the biggest impact. “Some years they hit it better than others,” Casey says. “You can still get the flu from strains that aren’t covered by the vaccine. It definitely gives you more protection than if you don’t get it at all.”

For the most part yes, unless a patient has an immune deficiency.

“The new vaccine is more than 90 percent effective at preventing shingles,” Beasley says. “Even after four years, it maintains its protection, but some will still get shingles.” TP

How often?

Why is it important?

Will getting immunized mean I never get sick?

Where do I get vaccinated? 100

Pneumovax® and Prevnar®

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

“People may still get pneumonia, but it protects against the worst common strains,” Beasley says.

All vaccinations can be administered at the Tulsa Health Department or your doctor’s office. Several area pharmacies also carry Tdap, influenza, Zoster, Pneumovax® and Prevnar® vaccines.


Tulsa Retina Consultants is proud to welcome Kyle T. Piwonka, D.O. Tulsa Retina Consultants would like to welcome Kyle T. Piwonka, D.O. Dr. Piwonka is a board certified, and fellowship-trained surgeon. He received his medical degree from Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2009, followed by a residency in Ophthalmology at Michigan State University. He has a Fellowship in Vitreoretinal surgery from Valley Retina Institute, P.A., Texas. To schedule your appointment call:

(918) 949-4577

Tulsa Retina Consultants a proud member of US Retina

www.retinatulsa.com

2424 E. 21st Street, Suite 200 | Tulsa, OK 74114

Are you experiencing vision loss that cannot be corrected with surgery, contacts or glasses? We can help patients of all ages, so call us today. Ask your doctor for a referral. Paid for by Medicare and most 3rd party insurance. Tulsa Low Vision Center 5986 South Yale Avenue Tulsa, OK 74135

(855) 811-9699 NVOklahoma.org TulsaPeople.com

101


Elizabeth Walker

HOME

Formerly Puttin’ on the Dog THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2019 COX BUSINESS CENTER 100 Civic Center, Tulsa Complimentary valet parking at the Houston entrance

6:00 P.M. Complimentary Cocktail Reception Auction Preview • Dinner • Live Auction Musical Entertainment by Double Treble

For more information call (918) 664-9000 or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE OF THE PARTY ®

The Hale Family Foundation The Herman Kaiser Foundation

Clean sweep

O

rganization is one of the top New Year resolutions. However, only around 8 percent of people stay committed to their goal throughout the year, and 80 percent fail just within the first month, according to

Forbes. As we transition to February, Elizabeth Walker, owner of local company Nook and Cranny Homekeeping, gives a few easy tips to stay on top of your resolution to keep your place in tiptop condition.

1. 2. 

Speak to our Care experts today.

918.591.2525 AberdeenMC.com 102

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

3.

4.

Don’t be one of the 92 percent giving up on their resolutions. The year is still young. — MADELINE EWING

GREG BOLLINGER

Know the signs of Dementia

Clear the clutter. Get rid of those items in the house that nobody has touched, looked at or used within 30 days. This includes clothes, shoes and mail. For toys, if they have been left out or neglected for longer than two days, toss or donate them. Have a dish routine. The kryptonite to a clean kitchen are those dirty dishes that pile up in the sink. Set up a rotation in which each capable member of the household will be responsible for the dishes on specific days of the week. Leave soapy water in the sink and let the dirty dishes soak until the responsible party loads them in the washer. Keep a shoe rack by the door. When people walk in, whether it be your own family or guests, they will know where their shoes belong. This prevents shoes being left around the house and tracking in dirt. Have a basket of silly or fun socks by the door to encourage visitors to remove their shoes. Monetize your time. Time is money or, in some cases, an experience. The entire weekend you spent cleaning your house might be accomplished by a professional cleaning crew within several hours.


Did you know

that for many people the first symptom of heart disease is a

heart attack? Scan T C c a i d Car

le Availab

for

499

*

ed offer

e limit l one-tim

*Specia

half the ss than or This is le cket expense f . o ce -p n f a r -o u t s u o s with in patient

Oklahoma Heart Institute offers a cardiac CT angiogram scan performed with the region’s only 128 multi-slice, ultrafast scanner that is more than 95% sensitive in detecting heart disease with low radiation exposure.

What is a Cardiac CT Scan?

A cardiac CT scan is a painless imaging test that provides many detailed pictures of your heart and arteries in just seconds. This means easy and early detection of heart disease.

Who should have a Cardiac CT Scan?

Anyone 40 years or older with symptoms concerning for heart disease or risk factors such as: • Diabetes • Smoking history • High blood pressure • Family history • High cholesterol of heart disease

Call 918.592.0999 by February 28th to schedule your appointment.

918.592.0999

1120 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa

OklahomaHeart.com


MUSINGS

I

t’s still cold and flu season, so wash your hands. Although, I’ve just read a book that makes catching a cold or the flu seem like child’s play. Even the norovirus infection, the stomach bug so generous with vomiting and diarrhea, seems mild compared to everything else we can catch from microbes — bacteria and viruses — transmitted by hands, food and public surfaces. Sharing a popcorn bowl? Having ice cubes or a lemon slice in your drink? Enjoying chips and dip? Using a hand dryer in a public bathroom? Sharing bites or a sip? Whoa. Here come germs by the trillion, most transmitted by hands. And they’re bringing e. coli, meningitis, rubella, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), chicken pox, tuberculosis, cold sores, staph infections as well as the common cold. The book “Did You Just Eat That?” scared the bejupiter out of me. It’s an entertaining book by two scientists — Paul Dawson of Clemson University and Brian Sheldon of North Carolina State University — complete with charts, graphs, formulas, scientific words as long as your finger and pages of citations and documentations. After reading this, I’m surprised any of us who have ever taken a bite of food or ventured out in public is left standing.

Eating out? The bacteria listeria monocytogenes, salmonella and other germs can live on laminated plastic menus up to 72 hours. Only six hours on paper menus. On the rocks? Lemon in your drink? Almost 20 percent of the bacteria on hands can be transferred to ice cubes and 66.2 percent by a contaminated ice scoop. E. coli was more prominent on lemons at room temperature compared to those that had been refrigerated. Sharing bites or taking a sip of a friend’s drink? Don’t. If hands are a major source of crosscontamination, oral bacteria can be even worse. The scientists list five infectious diseases transferred through oral saliva, including pneumonic plague. Pass the popcorn, please. On second thought, forget it. Hands diving into a box of popcorn at a movie or a bowl of nuts in a pub are the same hands that have touched doorknobs, handles, arm rests and furniture from day cares, gyms, work places and restaurants and have picked up — pre104

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

WASH YOUR HANDS! AGAIN! BY CONNIE CRONLEY

pare yourself, because this is gross — sweat, mucus, fecal matter and more. These two food scientists love statistics, and they concluded that each person reaches into a bag of popcorn 12 times, increasing the bacteria transfer twelvefold. Just as we have staggered to our feet from this news, they tell us, “Bacteria can survive on common public surfaces for weeks to months, making nearly all public places reservoirs for bacteria.” Quick, get out the hand sanitizer. The joke is on you. They tested four brands of ethanol-based hand sanitizers and found that those with lower alcohol content were no more effective than tap water in killing bacteria. A brand with only 62 percent ethanol was not effective at all in eliminating e. coli. They did agree, somewhat grudgingly, that hand sanitizers reduced the number of stomach ailments, grade-school absences and university dorm illnesses.

Go wash your hands! Not so fast. Depends on where you’re washing them. In a public place with a hot-air hand dryer? Let’s think this over. Every flush of the toilet spews bioaerosols (sometimes connected with excretion and sewage) into the room, and then the hand dryers blow the bacteria around — some as far as 6 feet. One study found electric hand dryers increase bacteria on hands fivefold while paper towels decrease it by 42 percent. Forget going out, let’s just have the birthday party at home. Just try not to think that when we blow out the birthday candles, we spread up to 37,000 bacteria on the cake. This is a good book for students and scientists who want to repeat the experiments themselves, for germophobes who are already jumpy and for those of us who are reassured that only one in six of us come down with a food-borne illness every year. I think the book is meant to scare us. And to remind us to wash our hands. TP


QA &

From Tulsa Professionals

For information about participating in Q&A, please contact adservices@langdonpublishing.com.

FAMILY LAW During my marriage, I signed a deed conveying the house I already owned to both of us as joint tenants with rights of survivorship. If we get a divorce, can I get the house back? Property acquired prior to marriage is the property of the spouse who brought it into the marriage, unless the spouse made a gift of the property to the non-owning spouse. If the owning spouse can prove that the deed was signed for a purpose such as estate planning, then the house will be considered separate property and not subject to division by the Court.

Bryan J. Nowlin, Shareholder Hall Estill Attorneys at Law 320 S. Boston Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74103 918-594-0602 • www.hallestill.com

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

BEAUTY & WEIGHT MANAGEMENT What treatments are available to help me get rid of extra tummy fat before summer? Coolsculpting® is an FDA-cleared procedure that safely and effectively freezes away unwanted fat on multiple areas of the body with no surgery or downtime. Because it is completely non-surgical, patients can typically return to normal activities immediately. Make health a part of your lifestyle before summer arrives by combining Coolsculpting® with one of our Weight Loss Programs to ensure a fast and positive outcome by. To schedule a complementary Coolsculptingâ consultation, call 918-872-9999. Malissa Spacek and Dr. James Campbell BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place • Broken Arrow, OK 74012 918-872-9999 • www.baweightspa.com

GENERAL DENTISTRY My front teeth have several fillings, which have discolored over time. Which would be better for me: veneers or full crowns? Veneers are best because less of the tooth structure would need to be removed. If performed properly, this will not weaken tooth structure or increase the chance of causing the tooth pulp to die. Veneers can be made using porcelain, which is the most life-like of available materials. They can also be made of stronger materials, like E-max or Feldspathic.

Gene McCormick D.D.S. SAFE/COMFORT Dentist 6281 E. 120th Ct. Suite #400 • Tulsa, OK 74137 918-740-0454 • www.drmccormickdds.com info@safecomfortdentist.com

VETERINARIAN

Should I maximize my HSA or my 401k contribution?

How should I take care of my pet’s teeth?

Health Savings Account (HSA) contributions are contingent on enrolling in a health plan with a minimum $1,350-per-person deductible. HSA contributions are pre-tax and are not subject to Medicare/Social Security taxes or age 70.5 required minimum distributions. Distributions used for qualifying healthcare expenses are tax-free. HSA contribution limits are $3,500 for individuals and $7,000 for families in 2019. Those 55 and older have a $1,000 catch-up. Individuals will benefit from maximizing their HSA contribution, but without knowing the individual’s 401k options, it’s difficult to compare. Maximizing both would be beneficial — if it’s financially feasible.

As a puppy or kitten it is ideal to teach them to have their teeth brushed with pet safe toothpaste. We recommend brushing daily. There are many treats and chews that can help with dental disease, but make sure that they are approved by your veterinarian. Chews that are too hard, such as antlers and real bones, may break your pet’s teeth. Many pets require regular dental cleanings from your veterinarian. Every pet is different as to how often this needs to be performed.

J. Harvie Roe, CFP, President

Dr. Erin Reed

AmeriTrust Investment Advisors, Inc. 4506 S. Harvard Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74135 918-610-8080 • hroe@amerad.com

15th Street Veterinary Group 6231 E. 15th St. • Tulsa, OK 74112 918-835-2336 • www.15thstreetvet.com TulsaPeople.com

105


CHARITABLE EVENTS SUPPORTED BY

Mar ch 2 , 2019 | Cox Business Center T U R N U P T H E S U P P O R T AT R E D R I B B O N G A L A . O R G EVENT CO-CHAIRS DRS. SAR AH-ANNE & JOHN SCHUMANN

106

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019


How do you describe a commercial cleaning company that has been in business for 33 years in 1 word?

Blessed. Here’s to the next 33 years!

T H E T I TA N OF T H E I N DU S T RY

JENKS | 918.299.2300 • 110 E. A St. BROKEN ARROW | 918.893.6992 2422 W. New Orleans St. OWASSO | 918.376.4600 9455 N. Owasso Expy WWW.TITANTITLEOK .COM

R E S I DE N T I A L C L O S I N G • C OM M E RC I A L C L O S I N G • R E F I NA N C E • 10 31 E XC H A N G E TulsaPeople.com

107


S W E E T H E A R T S & M AV E R I C K S 2 0 1 9 P H OTO G R A P H Y BY L E S L I E H OY T P H OTO G R A P H Y

William Albers

Gianna Allen

Costa Anagnost

Elliott Andrew

Izaac Ashlock

Haley Baber

Brooke Bayles

Henry Berry

Lauren Bingham

Avery Blubaugh

Griffin Boedeker

Katelyn Bollenbach

Audrey Buford

Taggart Butler

Peyton Carter

Allison Casey

Jillian Christner

Darian Curry

Avery Darby

Abby Darden

Alexander DesBarres

Luke Earls

Chandler Eby

Ellie English

Sloan Eshelman

Olivia Flegler

Alexandria Frie

Katherine Galbraith

Paige Gancarczyk

Molly Gilmartin

John Greene

Sally Greer

Joseph Hall

Lily Hardin

Seth Hardy

Ellie Herndon

Sydney Hoose

Jenna Jencks

Sophie Jones

Carter Kendrick

Presenting Sponsor

Signature Sponsors

Heart Ball Chairs, Cynthia and Jeff Thetge Open Your Heart Chair, Tina Parkhill

Sponsors

River Spirit Casino • BMW of Tulsa Route 66 Chevrolet • Luxa

Media Sponsors


Gracie LaFortune

Joci Lake

Olivia Leake

Amie Lehman

Sadie Lollar

Chris Lower

Naomi Malloy

Caleb McCullough

Emma McNeese

Meghan Means

Rebecca Ogilvie

Julia Parkhill

Grace Peterson

Michael Phillips, Jr.

Parrish Pipestem

Katherine Ragland

Sloane Raley

Tate Raley

Anna Riley

Lillie Roberts

Ruby Robison

Malia Ryan

Madison Shaffer

Macy Shaw

Catherine Siegfried

Emma Smith

Nick Sorensen

Madeline Spillars

John Mark Steichen

Ethan Stubblefield

Presley Sullivan

Saige Summerlin

Abby Taylor

Anna Tharakan

Seth Thetge

Buck Todd

Trace Van Pelt

Olivia Warner

Trevor Wheeler

Isabella White

Jameson White

Ryan Williamson

Jonathan Wilson

For almost 50 years, the Tulsa Heart Ball has been raising funds to ensure AHA research and community efforts continue to save lives. Sweethearts and Mavericks are area high school sophomores who volunteer with the American Heart Association supporting that work. They are presented at the Heart Ball to spotlight their accomplishments. To join a future class, visit Tulsaheartball.heart.org or call 918.877.8364. #tulsaheartball


McGraw Realtors

LUXURY PROPERT Y GROUP

TIM HAYES

918-231-5637

thayes@mcgrawok.com

SHERRI SANDERS

918-724-5008

ssanders@mcgrawok.com

A T M C G R AW R E A L T O R S

Call any of the Luxury Property Group Realtors about one of these homes, or any property that you have an interest in. We will provide you with superior personal service with the highest integrity.

GORDON SHELTON

DIANA PATTERSON

918-697-2742

918-629-3717

gshelton@mcgrawok.com

dpatterson@mcgrawok.com

Beautiful designed 4 BR, 3.5 BA custom home offers 4,425 s.f., 1.1 acres with 485 ft of shoreline situated on a point overlooking Grand at its finest, exquisite taste in finishes including reclaimed wood throughout, hand carved fireplace mantel by Bill Snow, 700 s.f. of incredible covered outdoor living with fireplace, and more! $1,700,000

SEQUOYAH HILL II 11523 S Oswego Avenue - Jenks Exquisite former Parade home. Superior craftsmanship & the finest appointments through-out. Master & Guest Suites down. 2 beds up with Gameroom & Theatre room. Extensive moldings, Granite Kitchen with Comm Appliances, Private lot with pool, waterfall, spa, kitchen and Cabana. $1,500,000

FOREST HILLS 1840 E 27th Street - An exquisite home in Forest Hills built in 1992. Features include formal living and dining rooms, kitchen combined with family room, game room, and study. Master bedroom w/ en-suite luxury bathroom on first floor, 3 bedrooms upstairs with 2 bathrooms. 4,904 square feet.$1,399,000

ONE ACRE MIDTOWN 4303 S Lewis Ave - One Level Contemporary on one acre in Mid-town! Study, Formal Dining, Game/Media Room, Mud-room and Prep-kitchen. Great room opens to chef’s kitchen & nook. Master with spa bath. 3 additional En-suite bedrooms. Hardwoods. Oversized 3 Car. Fabulous modern finishes throughout. $1,350,000

FRENCH FARM HOUSE ON SOUTH GRAND LAKE

EAGLES ROOST WATERVIEW Seaside at Grand Lake with wrap around covered porch on 2 lots in gated neighborhood. This 4 BR, 4.5 bath comes lavishly furnished, large game room, office with wonderful views of Grand, open living space, screened-in porch, two 34’ boat slips and all the amenities that Eagles Roost has to offer. $950,000 LEGENDS 9322 E 110th Street, Bixby Beautiful 5 bedroom home in Legends. Formal dining, spiral staircase wrought iron, large kitchen opens to family room. Covered patio, walk in closets, breakfast nook, 80 bottle wine storage, study. 2 bds down. 3 car garage. $499,000

PARRAMORE 1567 E 35th Street, Tulsa Brookside newer construction with Master down and granite/stainless kitchen. Covered outdoor patio looks to beautifully landscaped yard with mature trees. 2 bedrooms up with gameroom. Safe room in garage. $515,000

BALMORAL RESUB MUZINGO HILL 2527 E 66th Place, Tulsa Relax on the covered patio facing Southern Hills golf course. Open floor plan w/ master + 2nd bedroom on the first floor & a guest suite w/ kitchenette on 2nd level. Walk out attic. $475,000

E N J OY T H E LU X U RY L I F E ST Y L E YOU D E SI R E 110

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019


McGraw Realtors

Chris Noel 918-740-2103

cnoel@mcgrawok.com

The Reserve at Stonebrooke 627 W 80th Street - Spectacular custom estate in gated Stonebrooke Reserve. Covered outdoor living overlooks greenbelt and two ponds. Office & theater down, game room & terrace up. Endless amenities. Split 4 car garage, 2 outdoor fireplaces, an absolute MUST SEE!!! 5/4.3/4 6207 Sq. Ft. $1,219,000

Rivers Edge 6609 E 133rd Street S., Bixby - INCREDIBLE FIND! Endless details & breathtaking designer finishes. Luxury high end appliances, office down, theater & game room up, kitchen has massive island w/ built in nook. Gated, Bixby Schools. High efficiency HVAC, smart home wired. 5/4.1/3 5668 Sq. Ft. $599,000 !

on

in

om

C

So g

Bren-Rose 2124 E. 32nd Pl, Tulsa - SPECTACULAR REMODEL. Beautifully designed remodel in highly desirable Bren-Rose addition in Rivers Edge midtown. Stunning, newly designed kitchen, nook, and outdoor 1011 W 87th Street S., Tulsa - FAMILIES, MUST SEE. Award living. Entire home updated with new paint, tile, beautifully winning builder brings million dollar vision to Winchester Park, refinished original wood flooring and trim. New designer fixtures office, theater, butler’s pantry -Home meticulously detailed with and hardware. A truly remarkable balance of new transitional styling family friendly upgrades. Media & playroom up w/built-in kids study. meeting the elegant charm we love from midtown Tulsa. 4/4/2 3478 4/3.2/3 4214 Sq. Ft. $499,000 Sq. Ft. Call for Pricing

Complimentary Staging Serices! www.LuxeRealestateTulsa.com

TulsaPeople.com

111


McGraw Realtors

Spring is here! Sales are going through the roof! Call me today for all of your real estate needs!

BethR engel

7919 S Braden Avenue Fantastic, classy home in elegant gated Holland Lakes. Everything new paint inside & out, ceramic floors, wood floors, granite throughout. Huge master with spa bath. New whirlpool. Caterer’s kitchen, outdoor living with new awnings. $575,000

918-284-97 7 7

brengel@mcgrawok.com

Real Estate, Real Results!

918.808.4780

mkeys@mcgrawok.com 1640 E 31st Street Great Midtown location, Jack Arnold design; 3 bed, 3.5 baths; bonus room could be 4th bedroom. Open living, dining, kitchen w/vaulted ceiling & contemporary fireplace; game room up. 4 car garage w/extra storage. Large patio with water feature. $725,000

1017 E 21st Street Masterful design & modern luxury in Midtown! Immaculate home with beautiful backyard and pool. Newer kitchen opens to family room with two-sided fireplace. Spectacular master suite with walk-in closet, separate shower & whirlpool tub. Truly one of a kind. $539,000

NG

I ND

PE

212 E 21st Street Beautiful home in desirable Maple Ridge, close to Gathering Place and city trails; Gorgeous new kitchen opens to dining and living; separate TV/ Family room with FP; Great backyard with pool and patio; Circle Drive. $489,000 112

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

109 E 22nd Street Beautiful condo w/1st floor master, 2 living areas & 2 large bedrooms up, private courtyard, 2 car attached garage. Close to Gathering Place, steps from Tulsa trails. New: roof, paint outside, master carpet. $375,000

9410 S 74th East Ave Gated Ashton Hollow in Jenks Schools: dry stack stone & brick ext., wood floors & high ceilings. 4 bed, master suite on 1st floor w/patio; Stainless kitchen w/granite opens to large family room w/FP; study, game room & media room; safe room. $375,000


McGraw Realtors

Scott Coffman

918-640-1073 - scoffman@mcgrawok.com 13418 S 65th E Place | $414,900

Stunning former Parade of Homes model and custom home. Backs to wooded area. 5 bedrooms or 4 bedrooms with office. Bedroom or game room up with full bath. Hardwoods, granite, huge kitchen with galley sink, stainless steel appliances & breakfast bar.

W ! NE ICE PR

2943 E 56th Place | $337,500

Stunning one level home with 3 bedrooms plus study. 2 or 3 living rooms. Very open floor plan. In ground diving pool. Vaulted ceiling. Gorgeous landscaping. Beautiful large master suite. 2 car rear entry garage. Large living room with vaulted ceiling. Sprinkler system.

1402 E 33rd St | $435,000

5507 S Norfolk Ave. | $129,999

Great corner lot on .33 acres in midtown. Plenty of mature trees. 3 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms. Remodel, add on or build a new home. Walk to Brookside.

Charming bungalow close to Riverside and The Gathering Place. 2 bed, 2 living. Beautiful Hardwoods, Open kitchen with island, inside utility, covered front porch, all appliances included. Large back yard. Lots of Midtown charm!

Mobile: 918.850.2207 Mobile: 918.850.2207 ajacobs@mcgrawok.com ajacobs@mcgrawok.com Allison Allison jacobs jacobs 41054105 S. Rockford ave. tulsa, ok 74105 S. Rockford ave. tulsa, ok 74105

allisonjacobs.com mcgrawrealtors.com mcgrawrealtors.com

BR

3112 E 88th St, gated Wellington South neighborhood. Stately home with 6 large bedrooms. Master wing with study & large closets. Spacious living areas, media room, game room, office. Half acre, circle drive, incredible pool. $1,150,000 56826 S. 560 Road, Rose, Ranch home w/ new pool. Shop w/ live in quarters & full bath. Large yard w/ pipe fence, long driveway and automatic gates. Add’l land available up to 80 total acres.10 acres TBD by survey, approx lot in pictures. Owner/agent. $475,000

O

S OK

ID

E!

1426 E 37th Place, Clean & move in ready! Brookside, newer construction. Jay Rambo Cabinets. Granite. 2 beds up, 2 beds down. Master Bath retreat! Outdoor Fireplace. Transitional to Modern Flair. $675,000 10625 S Irvington Ave, 5 beds, gameroom, 4 car garage w/ storage space & storm shelter. Repainted + new carpet, spacious kitchen & 3 living areas, formal dining room + breakfast nook. Office & master bed downstairs. Large backyard. $599,000 1339 E 21st Street, Across the street from Woodward Park! Close to Gathering Place. Charming home in the heart of midtown. 3 bed, 2 full bath. Updated wiring, plumbings, bathrooms, kitchen. $285,000

TulsaPeople.com

113


McGraw Realtors 3116 S. Atlanta | $597,500

Custom Built home is located near 31st and Lewis. Spacious formals with lots of natural light. Familyroom has fireplace and wetbar. Kitchen with double ovens and breakfast nook overlooking the pool. Master suite on first floor with hardwood floors has sitting area and large bath. Upstairs features 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. The outdoor space has beautiful pergola and outdoor cooking space. Call for your personal showing.

Gated area in South Tulsa is a beautiful listing that was custom built by the current owner. Open formals having hardwood floors and vaulted ceilings. Butlers pantry with storage and sink. Kitchen has been updated with new appliances and granite. Master suite located on 1st floor. Office with French doors and hardwoods. 2 additional bedrooms. Sunroom. Beautiful 11619 S Hudson Place | $435,000 grounds.

Gated Esplanade condo is a rare C-Unit ready for your personal touches. Open floorplan overlooks private front patio. Double kitchen islands. 2 bedrooms. 2 full bathrooms.

Custom built by the Developer of Garden Park. Open formal living and dining having vaulted and beamed ceiling plus fireplace. Spacious kitchen with cherry cabinets, island and double ovens. Master suite has sitting area & full bath. 2nd bedroom/ private bathroom.

2453 E. 73rd | $215,000

2132 E 60th Street | $195,000

Bovasso & Beal Team Sharna Bovasso

(918) 605-2995 | sbovasso@mcgrawok.com

Dee Ann Beal

(918) 688-5467 | dbeal@mcgrawok.com

PR

NG

I

AZ AM

R PE

!

TY

O

6825 E 105th Street Custom home on almost 2 acres w/exquisite craftsmanship & woodwork. Remodeled w/new wood & travertine floors. New granite, center island & SS appl in Chef’s kitchen. Breathtaking great room w/floor to ceiling windows. Master suite w/spa-like bath. Park-like yard w/pool. 4 car garage! $775,000

E!

SID

ST

MU

N EI

SE

3939 S. Troost Ave Gorgeous single level updated home! Dream kitchen w/high end appl, marble counters, lg island & Jay Rambo cabinets. 2 living-perfect for entertaining. Master w/beautiful en suite bath. Spacious office/3rd living/4th bedroom. Walk to Gathering Place & Brookside! $439,000 114

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

Private Gated Estate on 26 Acres - Broken Arrow 5412 E Princeton Street, Impeccably maintained private gated Estate on 26+ acres. Attention to every detail. Breathtaking grounds with manicured gardens. All bedrooms with private baths. 2 masters down. Pool & spa. 15 car heat/cool garage. 4 attached/11 detached. Outbuildings/ Paddocks. $3,850,000


People donate to Goodwill®.

Donations are sold People donate to Goodwill®.

at local stores.

Donations are sold at local stores.

Someone buys & shows off their find!

People build their skills and find employment, with help from Goodwill.

Sales support Someone buys & Goodwill’s shows off their finds! mission services. Sales support Goodwill’s mission of providing job training to people in their community.

People build their skills and find employment, with help from Goodwill.

Learn moreLearn at:howgoodwilltulsa.org at: www.goodwilltulsa.org


TULSA TIME WARP

END OF THE RAIL BY PATRICK MCNICHOLAS

T

ulsa Street Railway pioneered the trolley system in 1906 in Tulsa, fi rst operating before the roads were completed. Service started on Main Street and later expanded to Th ird Street. TSR was at the peak of its service in 1923. It accommodated hundreds of passengers throughout Tulsa, along 21 miles of rails. But only three years later, TSR would take its final ride. With the rise of affordable automobiles like the Model T and an abundance of local petroleum, the choice was simple for most. After roads were built and paved, street cars became unprofitable, and many railway companies entered the bus market to try to stay afloat. After 20 years of service, the city removed the rails. A street scene at Th ird and Main from this time shows the work in progress. TP

116

TulsaPeople FEBRUARY 2019

PATRICK MCNICHOLAS; HISTORICAL PHOTO: COURTESY BERYL FORD COLLECTION/ROTARY CLUB OF TULSA, TULSA CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY AND TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

East Third Street looking west between Main Street and Boulder Avenue. Only three buildings from the image remain today: the Federal Building, the Wright Building and the Castle Building, all located beyond Boulder Avenue.


Bassett Home Furnishings – Tulsa Presidents’ Day Sale • Introduction to Bassett Modern

We do Windows!

10137 East 71st Street • 918.254.6618 bassettfurniture.com • bassettwindowdesigns.com


Profile for TulsaPeople

TulsaPeople February 2019  

TulsaPeople February 2019