__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

‘ P R O M I S E A N D D I S T I N C T I O N ’ : T H E C A M PA I G N ’ S S U C C E S S SPOKESPEOPLE • CAVE DWELLERS • HOME COOKING INTERVENTION • FALL 2008 Tu l a n i a n

hiddenTulane

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID

Office of University Publications 31 McAlister Drive, Drawer 1 New Orleans, LA 70118–5624

T H E M AG A Z I N E O F T U L A N E U N I V E R S I T Y

A brush with autumn. Fall colors mix with less seasonal hues in decorating the workspace of the theater department’s prop room, whose floor has taken on the look of an abstract painting.

Tulanian T H E M AG A Z I N E O F

TULANE UNIVERSITY

FA L L 2 0 0 8


The Power of Bequests Mrs. Mary H. Irvine’s (NC ’25, G ’32) bequest honors her sister-in-law, the renowned Newcomb pottery decorator Sadie Irvine. Her gifts support scholarships for outstanding female students as well as research projects focusing on the craftworks of the Newcomb art faculty between 1940 and 1952.

s

From the Newcomb Archive

Milton Rosenson (B ’44, L ’48) split his bequest to benefit the Law School Library and the A. B. Freeman School of Business.

Jonathan Ching (M ’75) left an unrestricted bequest to the School of Medicine for pressing needs in medical education. He also designated funds to support undergraduate arts and sciences at Tulane.

 ONE OF THE EASIEST WAYS to create or support a project you love is to include Tulane in your estate plan. A bequest can be a specific amount, or all or part of what is left after family needs are met. Simply meet with your attorney to draft, update, or supplement your will. THEN LET US KNOW. We would like to honor you with lifetime membership in the prestigious William Preston Johnston Society. For sample bequest language and more, visit www.plannedgiving.tulane.edu.

Your Gift. Your Way. Office of Planned Gifts • 504-865-5794 • toll free 800-999-0181 Bequests • Gift Annuities • Charitable Trusts • Retirement Plan Gifts • Securities Gifts • Real Estate Gifts • Insurance Gifts


what’s Inside

Tulanian theFeatures 20 Time of Transformation by Ryan Rivet, Carol Schlueter and Maureen King ‘Promise and Distinction: The Campaign for Tulane’—largely a success because of alumni support—changes the university, big time.

26 Balancing Act by Nick Marinello You’ll never forget how to ride a bike, but do you know where bicycles come from and where they are going?

32 Light on Dark by Mary Ann Travis Looking for light on the meaning of life? Philosophers say wisdom lies in the examined life.

38 Good Eatin’ by Fran Simon Change a diet and ameliorate chronic disease. Medical students teach patients basic nutritional principles leading to health.

the Departments 4 President’s Perspective

The economy’s ups and downs

challenge us in new ways.

5 Inside Track

From Outreach Tulane to saving an endangered species of fish, read about the latest news and scholarship.

16 Mixed Media 18 Photo Riff

Take a look at new books and film.

Razzle-dazzle of campaign fireworks brightens the night.

43 The Classes 56 New Orleans

Check out what your classmates are up to. Order out in the court.

57 Associates Honor Roll

Donors are recognized.

Classes, page 43, opens with poet Allen Ginsberg reading to professor Joseph Cohen’s English class in spring 1979.Cohen, who started the Jewish studies program at Tulane, is well and living in New Orleans. He recalls Ginsberg’s talk that day as“witty, polite, restrained, and at times, brilliant.” If you were there, write Tulanian and let us know what you remember.

On the cover: ‘Making groceries’ by bike. Inside front cover: Snow falls on Dec. 11, 2008. It was the earliest snowfall on record in New Orleans—and the first time in four years that snowflakes blanketed the campus. Photos by Paula Burch-Celentano. VOL. 80, NO. 2

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

1


Tulanian

between the Lines

Edito r Mary Ann Travis Featur es Edito r Nick Marinello “Th e Classes” Edito r Fran Simon Staf f Wr iter s Alicia Duplessis Ryan Rivet

Green moves Are you among the millions of Americans riding bikes these days? By some reports, more than a quarter of adults in this country rode a bicycle at least once last year. And, if you’re like most bicyclists, you are riding for the health of your body, the planet, your pocketbook—and for fun.

Ar t Dir ecto r Melinda Viles Un iv er sity Ph o to gr ap h er Paula Burch-Celentano Pr o ductio n Co o r din ato r an d Gr ap h ic Design er Sharon Freeman Gr ap h ic Design er Tracey Bellina

Tulane students have certainly joined the potential transportation revolution, bicycling in droves to class, to shop, to work and to play. Tooling through town on a bicycle, they’ll tell you, emits no noxious fumes. But bumps along the road are inevitable. In “Balancing Act,” Nick Marinello, who bikes to work most days, gives us the history of the bicycle and the saga of bike paths in New Orleans along with the tale of Tulane junior Phil Schapker, student transportation minister, bike-mechanic extraordinaire and juggler on the side. Do you often wonder about big questions such as what is happiness, knowledge, art and reality? Philosophy professors Ronna Burger, Richard Velkley, Bruce Brower, Alison Denham and Oliver Sensen do, too. And, like all good philosophers, in “Light on Dark,” they keep asking

Pr esiden t o f th e Un iv er sity Scott S. Cowen

questions, searching for a way out of Plato’s cave of delusion and shadows. There’s no question that good health is linked to good food. In “Good Eatin’,” Fran Simon

Vice Pr esiden t o f Un iv er sity Co m m un icatio n s Deborah L. Grant (PHTM ’86 )

follows Tulane medical students as they provide practical nutritional advice and make personal

Ex ecutiv e Dir ecto r o f Publicatio n s Carol Schlueter (B ’99)

Distinction: The Campaign for Tulane.” Of the $730 million total raised for the university, alum-

connections with patients in rural Pierre Part, La. Tulane alumni, you can give yourselves a pat on the back for the success of “Promise and

ni donated $316 million. It’s a remarkable achievement because as you are all aware there were bumps—including a devastating hurricane—that could have thrown the fund-raising effort off

Tulanian (USPS 017-145) is a quarterly

course, but didn’t.

magazin e publish ed by th e Tulan e

Tulanian, by the way, is doing its small part to green the planet. The entire magazine will

Offi ce of Un iver sity Publication s.

soon be digitized and available online. We’ll continue to produce the print version, but we plan

Periodical postage at New Orleans, LA 7011 3 and additional mailing offices.

to reduce the number of copies printed. Tulanian will still arrive in most of your mailboxes as

Sen d editor ial cor r espon den ce to:

a gift with paper and ink intact—a tangible reminder of where you received your education and,

Tulanian, 31 McAlister Drive, Drawer

we hope, a tactile, informative delight.

1 , New Or lean s, LA 70118-5624, or e-mail tulanian@tulane.edu. Opinions ex pr essed in Tulanian ar e not necessarily those of Tulane representatives and do not necessarily reflect university policies. Material may

Mary Ann Travis

be r eprinted only with per mission.

Editor, Tulanian

Tulane University is an affir mative action/equal opportunity institution. POSTMASTER: Se n d a d d r e s s changes to Tulanian, 31 McAlister Dr ive, Dr aw er 1 , New Or lean s, LA 70 118-5624. Fall 2008/ Vol . 80, No. 2


back Talk OFFSHORE GUSHERS

DURIEUX DISCOVERED

I thoroughly enjoyed reading the [cover] article in the summer 2008 edition of the Tulanian. As a Shreveport native and longtime resident, I took a special interest in the aspect of your article that addresses the petroleum industry in that part of the state, as well as the pictures of the “gusher” outside Shreveport circa 1907 and the pipeline across Caddo Lake where, for many years, I fished and hunted. I also enjoyed the anecdote about the night watchman at the Shreveport ice plant—my recollection is that it was Independent Ice & Storage, owned by several generations of the Harman family. I realize, of course, that you had to cull lots of material to keep your article short enough to publish in the Tulanian. Still, given your definition of “offshore” and the picture of Caddo Lake reflecting drilling and production facilities, your readership would likely have been interested to learn that the platforms and derricks in the lake itself were the first-ever “offshore” facilities anywhere in the world. From these small, rudimentary Louisiana structures grew the technologically sophisticated behemoths that explore for and produce oil and gas around the globe. Jacques L. Wiener Jr., A&S ’56, L ’61 Circuit Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, 5th Judicial Court New Orleans

I thoroughly enjoyed Earl Retif’s article [summer ’08, Tulanian] on Caroline Durieux. What an interesting woman! I was not familiar with her work at all and I found the art work and the background fascinating. Thank you! Mary Heausler, NC ’81 Leawood, Kan.

JUDICIAL INDEPENDENCE Professor Sherman’s article [summer 2008, Tulanian] on the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Boumediene reflects that our highest court still exercises some level of judicial independence in what has been highly politically charged times. As an attorney practicing federal habeas corpus matters in California, the professor’s article was of great interest and importance to me and my colleagues. He very clearly and succinctly captured the mood of our executive and judicial branches during the past several years. Job well done. Robert A. Nadler, L ’90 Beverly Hills, Calif.

WHO’S WHO? As always, I enjoyed the current issue [summer ’08] of the Tulanian. My only disappointment was that the initiates into Assets in 1947 were not identified. Perhaps in a future issue? Effie Stockton, NC ’51 New Orleans Editor’s note: Photos from the university archives don’t always come with the proper identification of the people in the pictures. So we make our best guess, based on scant information. We count on our readers to help us out. It seems that with the Assets photo, we may even have gotten the name of the organization wrong! (See below.) WOMAN IN DARK DRESS My sister, Beatrice Edith Rault, NC ’49, was president of the Newcomb student body, 1948–49. She is the young woman on the right, dark dress. Somehow I thought that this





was a picture of the newly named members of Alpha Sigma Sigma. Each spring outstanding juniors are elected to membership. Assets was a freshman honorary group (in my day). … My sister was elected to both groups, Assets at the end of the freshman year and Alpha Sigma Sigma at the end of her junior year. She was also the outstanding

student (1909 Prize) at graduation. … Coincidentally, I was also a member of both groups: vice president of the student body and first Newcomb woman to be editorin-chief of the Tulane Hullabaloo. My late sister was Mrs. Richard C. Baldwin. Calista Rault Schneidau, NC ’44 Houston WELL-CONNECTED Kindly accept a hearty thanks from the Pedersens. Your subject matter is always of interest— and your presentations are superb. Eventually we do read the Tulanian from stem to stern—but your features are front and center on our must-read list. Our 30-year associations with Tulane were rewarding. The Tulanian maintains that connection. Ralph Pedersen, A&S ’52 Culver, Ind.



Send letters to: Tulanian, University Publications, Suite 219, 200 Broadway, New Orleans, LA 70118, or send e-mail to: tulanian@tulane.edu. The magazine reserves the right to edit letters for clarity and length, and to eliminate inappropriate language or potentially libelous material. Letters should address subjects related to Tulane University or found in Tulanian magazine.

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

3


president’s Perspective Déjà vu, again The other day I was thinking about the Y2K bug. Ten years ago, it was a potential disaster that was on everyone’s mind. Now, Y2K seems to me almost like a dream, the memory of its urgency diminished by the passing of time and the many challenges that would follow. The very next year we witnessed the 9/11 tragedy, which forever changed our world. In the ensuing years we would mount Tulane’s new strategic plan, launch the “Promise and Distinction” campaign, be forced to close our doors in the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, develop the Renewal Plan that would allow us to reopen our doors, re-launch “Promise and Distinction,” and engage in the critical task of spreading the message that Tulane and New Orleans were again open for business. This August, we welcomed to campus more than 1,500 first-year students, topping prestorm levels for the academic quality of an incoming class. In October we celebrated the successful completion of the “Promise and Distinction” campaign. Yet even as we marked these achievements, another storm that had long been brewing took aim at Wall Street and financial markets around the world. And so here we are, three-and-a-half years from Katrina, a decade away from Y2K and facing a set of challenges that we are only beginning to fully understand. Unlike the wind and water driven by a storm, this economic downturn will impact all of us no matter where we live. I’m sure most of you have already in some way been adversely affected by the economic events of the past few months. Along with your personal concerns, I know many of you have been apprehensive about the welfare of Tulane. Lately I have been asked over and over again how Tulane University will weather this storm. In answering that, I can give encouraging news. First and foremost, you should know that Tulane’s current financial position is solid and continues to rebound from the effects of Katrina at a faster rate than originally anticipated. As I mentioned, the “Promise and Distinction” campaign was an extraordinary success and your contributions to it are an important factor in our current financial stability. External research

P A G E

4

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

funding also remains strong. In addition, student interest and quality are at an all-time high and we expect them to remain so. We also continue to attract highly qualified and committed individuals to our faculty. In all honesty, our endowment was in better shape in July at the close of the “Promise and Distinction” campaign, when we achieved the

targeted amount of $1 billion, than it is today. And as discouraging as that may seem, I can tell you that our financial position would be considerably diminished had we not built up the endowment so impressively. Do I have concerns? Certainly. It’s very likely that fund raising, especially for major gifts, will be challenging in this environment. I’m also concerned that some of our students, especially those who are most in need of financial aid, may have a difficult time financing their education. The best way to deal with a crisis is to begin to defuse it before it happens. As we prepare the fiscal year 2010 budget we will consider a number of precautionary measures to reduce spending and allocate resources judiciously. And we will continue to move forward. Some of you have already asked if there is anything you do to help. Absolutely. Our alumni continue to be the university’s greatest resource. You are the most effective ambassadors we have. With your every achievement you bolster the university’s standing. With every fond memory of Tulane you share, our reputation is enhanced. Together, you comprise an influential constituency. We need you networking and matchmaking for us. If there are people or institutions that Tulane should know about, contact me. I read all my e-mail. We also need you to continue to give to the university. If you’ve never made a gift to Tulane, now would be a good time to start. At a time like this, it’s important that we increase the number of alumni and friends who contribute to the university. That genius purveyor of fractured English, Yogi Berra, famously coined the expression, “It’s like déjà vu, all over again.” If we know anything about life, it’s that it is cyclic in nature, with the ups alternating with the downs. In the spirit of Yogi, I can tell you that as delighted as I was to arrive at Tulane a decade ago, if I had known about half the challenges this presidency would present, I would have been at least twice as delighted to accept it. There’s no better team to pitch for. And now, once again, together, we are called to step up to the plate.


insideTrack

Students haul trash away from Lafayette No. 1 cemeter y. On Sept. 20, nearly 800 Tulane students par ticipated in Outreach Tulane community service, fanning out across New Orleans to pick up debris, paint public schools and propagate coastal marsh grass.

Outreach Tulane First-year students • Care for evacuees • Medical center in N.O. East • ‘Architecture School’ • Teach for America • LBC’s green • Music library unplugged • Dr. Gourmet • Gene studies • Women’s voices • Pop art • Green Wave • Trout saving in Colorado


newsNotes insideTrack First year students on the upswing Three years ago, Tulane sustained more than $650 million in damages and had 70 percent of its uptown campus flooded by Hurricane Katrina. Today, first-year undergraduate student enrollment is soaring. This fall, 1,563 freshmen enrolled in the university, a number that dwarfs the enrollment figure of 882 first-year students for fall 2006 (the first new class after Katrina) as well as the tally for the 2007 first-year class, which numbered 1,324. The number of applications was so great for the fall 2008 class by early January, the Office of Undergraduate Admission had to shut down the online application page and stop receiving applications. An unprecedented 34,000 applications were processed. Tulane administrators credit the increased interest in Tulane to several factors including the universitywide Renewal Plan enacted after Katrina, which made public service a requirement of graduation. Students say they are drawn to the university because of Tulane’s and their own commitment to civic engagement and public service. This year’s first-year class is the most academically accomplished group of students ever to enter Tulane, based on SAT/ACT scores and class rank in high school.

Number of First-Year Undergraduates

2000

1500

1563 1324

1000

882

500

0

2006

2007

2008

Year of Enrollment

P A G E

6 |

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

Dr. Francesco Simeone, left, and surgical resident Dr. Rafael Sierra, right, at the Union Passenger Terminal in New Orleans, wait for returning evacuees who might need medical care after Hurricane Gustav.

Doctors reassure returnees As thousands of New Orleans area residents poured back into Orleans and Jefferson parishes following the evacuation for Hurricane Gustav during the first week of September, Tulane University School of Medicine doctors met them, making sure that returning citizens, especially those who participated in public-assisted evacuation, would have access to medical care. Dr. Ben Sachs, senior vice president and dean of the Tulane School of Medicine, said that the doctors’ efforts reflect the values of the school. “I think our school has a major responsibility to ensure the health and well-being of the people of New Orleans when they return from an evacuation,” Sachs said. Doctors were on hand at the Union Passenger Terminal in downtown New Orleans and at the Palace Theatre in Metairie to perform basic health screenings, write prescription refills and ensure that any patients with special needs received continued care. The Tulane Qatar Katrina Fund mobile medical unit also was deployed to bring care to patients. “For patients who needed to be sheltered because, for example, they might be oxygendependent but not have power at home, we staffed up a special-needs shelter and made

certain they had a place to go,” said Dr. Karen DeSalvo, associate professor of medicine and chief of general internal medicine and geriatrics at the medical school. She also serves as vice dean for community affairs and health policy. “We wanted to make sure that none of the citizens of New Orleans who were coming back and were part of this special-needs population went without medical care.” Those who volunteered say they felt the returning citizens were happy to see them and grateful for the opportunity to address any health concerns. “They were very thankful,” says Dr. Francesco Simeone, associate professor of clinical medicine. “Just our being there with the white coat, telling them ‘welcome back’ and smiling and being available, people were happy to see us there.” Gustav was the first test for first responders since Hurricane Katrina, and the doctors said they were happy to be of service. “The whole intention of why we received the grant for the mobile unit was to provide care to folks in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. It seemed apt that we do the same after Gustav,” says Leah Berger, director of operations for Tulane community health clinics. “Immediately following any sort of emergency event, we want to make sure the people in the city are taken care of.” —Ryan Rivet

ILLUSTRATION BY TRACEY O’DONNELL


insideTrack newsNotes Community health in New Orleans East Reaching out to provide health care in an area where it is desperately needed, Tulane opened a new community health center in eastern New Orleans in late August. Like the Tulane Community Health Center at Covenant House that opened in downtown New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, the new center offers low-cost, high-quality primary care to adults 18 and older. “This clinic is an extension of our plan to see that everyone has access to highquality, affordable primary care in New Orleans,” said Dr. Karen DeSalvo, vice dean

Nguyen said, “A lot of people in this area are not insured, and since this clinic is geared toward people who can’t afford medical care, it’s filling a great need.” Other staff members at the clinic, in addition to Nguyen, are a licensed practical nurse, two medical assistants and two frontdesk personnel. Funding for Tulane’s neighborhood clinic projects comes primarily from two sources—the Qatar Katrina Fund, devoted to helping people affected by Hurricane Katrina, and the federal government. The federal government is committed to expanding and strengthening a network of community clinics in New Orleans, said Gen. Douglas O’Dell, coordinator of federal

A lot of people in this area are not insured, and since this clinic is geared toward people who can’t afford medical care, it’s filling a great need. —Dr. Chuong Nguyen

for community affairs and health policy at the medical school. The center in eastern New Orleans is a partnership between Tulane University School of Medicine and Mary Queen of Vietnam Community Development Corp. DeSalvo said the clinic initially is focusing on primary care for adults, but eventually will add gynecology and obstetrics care. In time, 500 patients a month may go to the clinic. In addition to the two clinics housed in traditional buildings, Tulane also staffs a mobile medical unit that travels to neighborhoods without sufficient healthcare services throughout the metro New Orleans area. Dr. Chuong Nguyen, the physician at the eastern New Orleans clinic, said that the need is great in the neighborhood. There are not enough doctors serving the community, and two hospitals that were in operation before Hurricane Katrina are still closed.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SUNDANCE CHANNEL

support for the recovery and rebuilding of the Gulf Coast region in the Department of Homeland Security. “We’ve provided $100 million to advance this vital mission,” O’Dell said. “This clinic is a testament to what can get done through great partnerships: the determination and resiliency of the Vietnamese American community in New Orleans East, the generosity of the people of Qatar, and the ongoing commitment of Tulane University School of Medicine to expanding primary care across New Orleans.” Nasser Bin Hamad Al-Khalifa, chair of the Qatar Katrina Fund, said, “The launch of the new Community Health Center at New Orleans East is a particularly happy occasion, both because it brings quality health care directly to another Katrina-damaged neighborhood, but also because it demonstrates Tulane’s careful and resourceful management of our gift to reach even beyond the ambitious goals with which we started.”

The Rev. Vien The Nguyen, pastor of Mary Queen of Vietnam Church and one of the clinic’s strongest community advocates, said, “This center is important because a number of my people have not returned yet, especially the elderly, because of the absence of health care. … To see Tulane and the Qatar Fund and others stepping in is a sign of confidence in us, in what we are doing, as well as the acknowledgement and recognition of our needs.” —Arthur Nead

Drama in ‘Architecture School’ Michael Selditch, a producer for the Sundance Channel, had a purpose when he followed with a camera and a microphone Tulane School of Architecture students for a year as they designed and built an URBANbuild house. “I wanted to show what architects do,” said Selditch. URBANbuild is a design and construction program of the Tulane School of Architecture and its City Center. The television documentary “Architecture School,” filmed by Selditch and his crew, shows the passion and hard work of the architecture students and their professors as

Amarit Dulyapaibul works on a model of a house design for URBANbuild. He and other Tulane architecture students star in a documentary series produced by the Sundance Channel.

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

7


newsNotes insideTrack they create—from the drawing pad to the finished building—an affordable house on an empty lot in the Central City neighborhood of New Orleans. It also highlights the concerns of neighbors in a part of town hard hit by blight and crime. Selditch shows the angst in the design studio as the students balance originality and practicality in making their models of three-bedroom, two-bathroom, 1,200square-foot houses. The students compete for the chance to have their design built. They wrestle with the question whether architecture is an art or science. After Adriana Camacho’s design is selected, all the students pitch in to construct the house, relying on each other for heavy lifting, cement pouring and step building. Neighborhood Housing Services of New Orleans partners with URBANbuild to find low-income, first-time homeowners to buy houses built through the program. The house designed by Camacho is the third URBANbuild house to be completed. The six-part “Architecture School” series aired this fall on the Sundance Channel and garnered national media attention, including a positive review in The New York Times and an

A- grade in TIME magazine. The entire program was presented on Oct. 10 in a special showing on the Tulane campus. —Mary Ann Travis

Teach for America enlists new graduates The Scott S. Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives at Tulane has developed a partnership with Teach for America, an organization that places recent college graduates and young professionals in public school teaching positions in urban and rural communities across the nation. Teach for America’s mission is to eliminate educational inequity by building a highly selective corps of new graduates—of all academic majors—to commit to two years of teaching and in the process to become lifelong learners in pursuit of educational excellence and equity. This year, 25 Tulane graduates were selected to serve as full-time teachers with Teach for America. Seven of them signed on to public schools in the Greater New Orleans area, while others were placed in schools in lowincome communities in other states. With the public school system in New

Rachel Kohn ’08 teaches at Arthur Ashe Charter School in New Orleans.

Orleans struggling to rebuild and reform academic programming following Hurricane Katrina, Teach for America has helped to supply instructors. Teach for America is rapidly scaling up its presence in New Orleans through recruiting, selecting, training, placing and providing ongoing support to approximately 250 new teachers each year for the next three years. Shannon Jones, the Cowen Institute’s executive director, said that the institute “has developed a strong partnership with Teach for America because we are all working toward the same goal: providing every child with the opportunity to receive an excellent education.” —Alicia Duplessis

LBC named a top 10 green building The Committee on the Environment of the American Institute of Architects has named Tulane’s Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life a Top Ten Green Project for 2008. Describing the environmental aspects of the project, the institute’s website notes, “Unlike the old university center, which was mechanically cooled year-round, the new building was designed to be passively cooled for five months out of the year. … “Balconies, canopies, shading systems, and courtyards create layered spaces while permitting variable exchanges of air, light, and activities.” Groundbreaking for the LBC was in 2003. Delayed by Hurricane Katrina, the project included 67 percent renovation of the old University Center and 33 percent new construction. The LBC opened in January 2007. The AIA website also notes, “The new university center serves not only as a hub for the campus community, but also as a model of environmentally friendly design for the city.” Vincent James Associates Architects of Minneapolis was the lead architectural group on the project.

P A G E

8

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

TEACH FOR AMERICA PHOTO BY TRICIA TRAVIS


insideTrack news notes New life pumped into swamped books, documents The fat lady has yet to sing for the Music and Media Collection at Tulane University’s Howard-Tilton Memorial Library. Formerly known as the Maxwell Music Library, the collection of more than 80,000 books, music scores and sheet music, vinyl and compact disc recordings sat in floodwater 8 feet high in the library’s basement after Hurricane Katrina. As the murky water drained, mold took hold, a fate compounded by increasing humidity. “At the time, it seemed like a potential total loss,” said Leonard Bertrand, interim head of the Music and Media Collection. “It was scrunched up balls of unrecognizable books.” Fast-forward three years. The first shipments of restored music items—12,000 to date—have made their way to the collection’s new home on the third and fourth floors of the library, taking up residence on rows of empty bookshelves. Shipments of restored books arrive weekly and Bertrand hopes they will recover about 70 percent of their original material during the next two to three years. Over the years, the library staff had put hurricane preparedness plans into action, including packing books as tight as possible on high shelves so they would not absorb water. For the 25 years, the collection had been in the basement, along with government documents, newspapers and microforms, and they had been spared from any flooding, until Katrina, when shelves became top-heavy and fell as water receded, Bertrand said. The shelves held important materials and significant collections of classics, opera and musical theater scores, jazz, vocal teachings, music history, theory and composition and American folk music. Both local and national scholars and students had used the library’s extensive collections regularly. The decision was made to salvage the

contents, Bertrand said. Despite many challenges, “library executives were right on top of the situation” right after the storm. With the Federal Emergency Management Agency willing to cover the cost of salvage and restoration, Belfor, a disaster management company that Tulane had on retainer, began salvaging everything it possibly could. After visiting Belfor’s restoration facility in Texas, Bertrand said he was “blown away by how this work was progressing.” As the material was removed from the library basement, it was put into freezer trucks and transported to Texas, frozen in Katrina water. From there, each step has been painstakingly orchestrated, he said. The books are slowly defrosted using clean running water until the pages are manageable, then specialized tools are used to reshape and flatten each book, squeezing out excess water. Books are opened in chunks, before each page is examined. “Most of the covers were lost, along with identifying marks, bar codes, call numbers and sometimes the first and last pages of each book,” Bertrand said. Eventually, each page is treated with special

chemicals, used to dry them out. Then they are rewet and cleaned. A form of gamma radiation is used to kill fungus and bugs and then the books move on to a dehydration process that should allow each page’s fibers to maintain its original integrity. Once a batch of books has been restored, it is sent to two other companies, one that rebinds the books and another “that recatalogs and reprocesses the materials, reidentifying them with old cataloging records,” Bertrand said. “The music faculty is delighted to see materials coming in and students will be pleasantly surprised when they come in to the library,” said Bertrand, a musician who is grateful for donations from peer institutions, individuals, friends of libraries and insurance settlements. “I have no doubt that Tulane’s collection will reach the prominence that it had before.” —Nina Wolgelenter Nina Wolgelenter graduated in 2004 from Tulane’s University College with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. The Times-Picayune originally published this article.

Music librarian Leonard Bertrand, right, looks through one of the library’s restored books with fellow librarian Victoria Blanchard.

PHOTO BY DANIEL ERATH, COURTESY OF THE TIMES-PICAYUNE

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

9


news notes insideTrack Food doctor is in When Dr. Timothy Harlan isn’t seeing patients at Tulane Medical Center in downtown New Orleans or teaching courses at the School of Medicine, he transforms into his alter ego, “Dr. Gourmet.” Under that moniker, Harlan compiles meal plans that he says help with weight loss and encourage healthy eating. Harlan is a former restaurateur who went to college with intentions of continuing his career in the restaurant business. But a family member’s declining health changed his focus to the medical field. However, Harlan’s love for creating meals didn’t dissipate. He transferred his passion for good food into a venture that provides healthy and flavorful menus. “The name (Dr. Gourmet) has been around about 10 years. It was given to me by a creative friend of mine who was a music writer for the New York Times. Since then, the name has stuck,” says Harlan, associate chief

of general internal medicine and geriatrics for outpatient services at Tulane Medical Center and an assistant professor of clinical medicine in the School of Medicine. Barely through his second year of medical school, Harlan joined forces with his brother, a television producer in their home state of Georgia, to create the “Dr. Gourmet” cooking show that aired on a local public television station. Harlan used the show to teach viewers how to create meals that followed the nutritional guidelines he was learning in medical school. “It was perfect,” says Harlan. “I was a chef and training to be a doctor, so it made a lot of sense.” Today, Harlan has a small staff that helps him maintain a Dr. Gourmet website (drgourmet.com) that scores hundreds of thousands of visits. Most visitors to the site subscribe to a daily newsletter containing recipes and ideas for meals. The website also has software that helps

visitors create weekly meal plans complete with printable grocery lists. “That’s a big part of what makes our site different from other Internet diet sites,” says Harlan. “It’s free and we focus on accepted research. Studies show that the Mediterranean-style diet is best for a person trying to lose weight. So that’s what we incorporate into the meals.” The diet is high in vegetables, beans and peas, fruits and whole grains. The main animal proteins are fish and dairy instead of beef and poultry. For people seeking to lose weight and wondering what to eat, Dr. Gourmet offers “Eat This Diet,” a detailed meal plan consisting of recipes calling for healthy, tasty ingredients. The Dr. Gourmet program also is collaborating with the Lance Armstrong Foundation to provide recipes and meal plans to LiveStrong.com, a website that focuses on fitness and wellness. —Alicia Duplessis

health Hope

Studies show that the Mediterranean-style diet is best for a person trying to lose weight. So that’s what we incorporate into the meals. —Dr. Timothy Harlan

Fish is a weighty option, says Dr. Timothy Harlan, aka Dr. Gourmet. Harlan maintains a website, drgourmet.com, offering healthy recipes and meal plans.

P A G E

10 |

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

PHOTO COURTESY OF DR. TIMOTHY HARLAN


insideTrack scholarship

Yiping Chen studies how genes trigger development of teeth, roofs of mouths, jaws, joints and the heart's natural pacemaker.

Gene by gene The genome is a wonder. As the complete set of genes present in a cell or organism, it is the script of life, say scientists. That script fascinates Yiping Chen. He has spent his career studying how genes trigger development—normal and abnormal—of organs and body parts, from the roofs of mouths to natural heart pacemakers, to teeth and jaws and limbs. Chen is chair and professor of cell and molecular biology at Tulane. Chen first came to the university in 1997. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, he left in 2006 to join the faculty at Ohio State University. He returned to Tulane this fall to serve as chair of his department in the School of Science and Engineering and to continue his teaching and research. “I like the collegial and friendly environment at Tulane,” says Chen. “And I feel New Orleans is my home.” In his lab in the Merryl and Sam Israel Jr.

Environmental Sciences Building, Chen leads a team of 11 researchers, including postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, undergraduates and technicians, exploring gene expression and functions. “We mainly focus on craniofacial development,” says Chen. “We work on how genes control tooth formation and how genes control palate formation. And most recently we shifted a little bit to the development of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ).” Genes are expressed, or active, when they give instruction for processes such as the initiation of the growth of teeth. Each gene contains a particular set of instructions, usually coding for a particular protein. As scientists have learned more about the human genome, they’ve discovered the genetic similarity of all living organisms. For example, humans and mice have 99 percent of the same genes, which is why working with mice genes is so productive for a researcher like Chen. As most dentists are well aware, if a tooth is knocked out, it can regrow, if reimplanted.

Chen is taking the regeneration of teeth a step further as he investigates whether mice skin cells can become mice tooth cells, hoping to translate the work to human skin and teeth. “So you don’t have to have your tooth to make a tooth. You can take skin cells— at least that is the hope—to make a tooth regrow,” says Chen. “I’m really excited about that project because imagine if you take a human skin cell and make a tooth or tooth cells.” In his work on the jaw joint—or temporomandibular joint, commonly referred to as TMJ—Chen is studying normal jaw development in order to understand how changes in gene expression lead to abnormal development that results in inflammation and discomfort. The jaw joint connects the lower jaw to the skull. According to Chen, 17 percent of Americans suffer from TMJ disorder. Joints are distinct structures in the body at which two parts of the skeleton fit together, and Chen has expanded his interest in those structures to the elbow and fingers. The elbow joint connects the upper and lower arm, allowing the arm to move just as the finger joints allow the fingers to move and do things like type and pick up tools. Chen is collaborating with Ken Muneoka, Tulane professor of cell and molecular biology, on a joint project in which Muneoka is studying regeneration or regrowth of limbs. Muneoka is looking at whether in the case of amputated limbs, genes can be stimulated to signal the regrowth of a limb. Chen’s part of the limb regeneration project is involved in how genes control the regeneration of a joint in a regenerated limb. Other projects of Chen’s include examining how the natural pacemaker forms in the heart. The natural pacemaker is the part of the heart muscle—the sinoatrial node—that regulates the heartbeat. Chen plans to map genetic progression in the development of the heart pacemaker. —Mary Ann Travis

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

11


scholarship insideTrack Women’s voices in colonial Louisiana The traditional, written history of New Orleans has been based primarily upon stories told by explorers, governmental officials, lawyers and businessmen. Associate professor of history Emily Clark (NC ’76, SW ’84, G ’98) is bucking the commonplace understanding of history by exploring voices that have not before been widely heard. In the process, she is revealing a more complex and multifaceted early American history. Clark has examined a group of French and colonial religious women who established the first convent in Louisiana territory and the community of Ursuline nuns in New Orleans in 1727 and have served the city ever since. Although the civic leaders of colonial Louisiana primarily recruited the first Ursuline missionaries for the purpose of nursing the sick, the feisty women had another mission: they wanted to be educators. They established a school to educate free girls regardless of their social rank and race, and they began a program of Catholic conversion among slaves and Indians. In two books, Masterless Mistresses and Voices From an Early American Convent, Clark pays tribute to the nuns whose work

promoted a novel level of literacy among women in colonial America and eventually led to the development of a large, vibrant AfroCatholic population in New Orleans. “Their catechesis of enslaved women was very successful in the first generation,” Clark says. “Then in the second generation, the men caught up with the women [in Catholic observance]. I postulate that women began to insist on Catholic conversion before marriage. This changed the fabric of the city.”

A fully professed Ursuline nun, 1715. From Voices From an Early Convent.

In Voices From an Early American Convent, Clark provides firsthand accounts of the French missionaries, who braved the threat of

pirates, possible shipwreck and shortage of food and potable water on the long voyage to Louisiana, believing that they would be seeking to convert Native American Indians in the New World. She focuses particularly on Marie Madeleine Hachard, the youngest of the 12 women who founded the New Orleans convent. “Little did they know that they’d be catechizing enslaved women and children, that this would be the spiritual vineyard in which they’d be working, with no previous experience with slaves of African descent,” Clark says. Clark’s books uncover life in early colonial Louisiana from the women’s perspectives as she presents domestic details often overlooked by male writers of the time. Clark is next turning her attention to quadroons—New Orleanians of mixed race. Poring over records of marriages between people of African descent, she is contesting the myth of the “tragic mulatta,” as it has been portrayed in travel writing, literature and art. By scrutinizing historical documents in order to detect patterns that may reveal the real women behind the myth, Clark hopes to give voice to married women of color in antebellum New Orleans. —Fran Simon

overHeard We are all refugees from our own childhood. That notion of us each being a refugee—each having lost—is very central to the novel. If we indulge that too much, if we go into a kind of nostalgia, a longing for the past, it can become a disease. That disease of nostalgia is very potent and dangerous.

—Mohsin Hamid

Moshin Hamid, author of the novel The Reluctant Fundamentalist, spoke to first-year students on Sept. 15 in Dixon Hall.All first-year students were sent a copy of the book—this year’s Tulane Reading Project selection—before they arrived on campus.The Reading Project aims to create a shared intellectual experience for new students at the beginning of their college career.In addition to Hamid’s appearance, faculty members led discussion groups in residence halls as part of the Reading Project. The Reluctant Fundamentalist tells the story of a Pakistani man educated in America.The book deals with post–9/11 issues of mutual suspicion between the Muslim world and the West.

P A G E

12 |

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

ILLUSTRATION FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY


insideTrack scholarship

A LOVE sculpture by Robert Indiana is an iconic pop art image. LOVE was first created in the 1960s.

Revising the 1960s “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was. …”—the 1960s. And like the period eloquently characterized by Charles Dickens, it was a decade so complicated by its polarizing events and attitudes that it presents fresh insights and understanding every time we look back at it. Or at least it should, says Michael Plante, associate professor of art history and holder of the Jessie J. Poesch Professorship. Plante’s “Revising the 1960s” course not only examines the most influential art movements during that grooviest of times, but also how our historical observations and views change over time. “Most art histories are written 20 years out, and then you get a second set that are 40 to 50 years out,” says Plante. “So you have the immediate criticism, then an overview associated with a museum show and then the real histories that involve research.” Historical perspective invariably changes, and that is significant for art produced during the 1960s, a decade in which the sexual

PHOTO COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES

behavior, idealized politics, music, war and domestic conflict provided more than a backdrop to art movements such as pop art and minimalism: the social upheaval became an integral part of the artistic process. This is particularly true, says Plante, for pop art, perhaps the most defining movement of the decade by artists such as Andy Warhol and Robert Indiana.

on Course “A lot of the art of the time was absolutely dependent on mass media and popular culture,” says Plante. “Nothing could be more immediate to the formation of that art’s subject matter than rock ’n’ roll, the Kennedy administration and the development of the birth control pill.” It was a time when traditional barriers were breaking down. “You had people like John-Paul Sartre being interviewed by Playboy,” says Plante, “and then you would have Life magazine covering Jackson Pollock. Low culture was aspiring to high culture and high culture was moving to low culture. Those categories became very sticky and almost irrelevant.” Today’s students are now two generations

removed from the 1960s, and many have confused notions about the decade. “Most things students think what happened in the ’60s actually happened in the ’70s,” says Plante. “They think feminism was really a big issue of the ’60s and it wasn’t. It was definitely post-Summer of Love.” Plante brings the decade back to life through readings and class discussion. Though our historical perspectives may shift over time, Plante says that contemporary criticism does not, so students read a good bit written by critics of the day such as Susan Sontag. “A lot of her firsthand accounts of pop art, of happening art and happenings—which are very theatrical art performances—still matters very much,” he says. While Plante wants students to come away from the class with a better understanding of the decade and the art it produced, he hopes students also leave with a more refined understanding of culture and the terms of culture. “That’s in every class—I don’t care what I’m teaching,” he says. “I want students to question the assumptions they bring to any material—whether it is contemporary or historical—and learn how to think through what historians and critics say about it.” —Nick Marinello

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

13


green wave insideTrack Croatian experience In mid November, the Green Wave volleyball team ranked 13th among 329 NCAA Division I-A programs in the Volleyball Ratings Percentage Index. “I am pleased that our hard work and our scheduling efforts have been paying off,” said Liz Kritza, head volleyball coach. “It is a place that a Conference USA team has not been in a while, and Tulane has never been there as well.” The volleyball team prepared for the season with a spring trip to Croatia to play in a highly competitive international tournament. Croatia has a “serious volleyball environment” that inspired the players, said Kritza. The Green Wave volleyball team already has a pipeline for volleyball talent from Serbia and Croatia. Assistant coach Sinisa Momic is from Zagreb, Croatia, the capital city of the country with miles of Adriatic Sea coastline.

Dave Dickerson is in his fourth year as head coach for the men’s basketball team.

Roundballers ready for action As Tulane men’s and women’s basketball teams launched seasons with tough schedules, coaches of both teams said the players are up for the challenge. The men’s team, which posted 34 victories during the past two years under fourth-year head coach Dave Dickerson, is playing 15 contests in Fogelman Arena this season.

P A G E

14 |

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

Players Sara Radosevic and Luna Rebrovic also are from Zagreb. Ksenija Vlaskovic and Visnja Djurdevi are from Serbia. Radosevic and Rebrovic are seniors and business majors. Vlaskovic is a junior business major and Djurdevi, a freshman. During the trip to her hometown, Radosevic said that she was happy to compete with her Green Wave team in the same gym where she had played for 10 years. She said, “We were always hoping that one day we will go to Croatia but we never really believe it will happen. I am extremely excited that my family can see me play in my Tulane jersey, and so are my friends.” The trip home must have helped. In the fall season, Radosevic, an outside hitter, is turning in stellar performances. She’s playing “like a senior player-ofthe-year candidate,” said Kritza. —Mary Ann Travis

“With two back-to-back winning seasons under our belts, we hope to continue to improve and set our sights on postseason play,” Dickerson said. “As always, great support from our students and fans makes Fogelman Arena one of the best home courts in the country.” Dickerson acknowledges that the Wave will face a hard schedule this year. “This is the most difficult schedule we have played during my tenure at Tulane,” he said. Tulane returns guard Kevin Sims, who Dickerson said is “one of the best guards in this conference,” as well as Robinson Louisme, the team’s third-leading scorer last season. While the Green Wave women’s team was picked in a preseason poll to finish fifth in Conference USA, head coach Lisa Stockton’s players are undaunted. They expect to be contenders for Tulane’s fourth regular-season title and fifth tournament title. Tulane will host the C-USA women’s basketball tournament at Fogelman Arena on March 5–8.

After showing her teammates around her native Croatia, Sara Radosevic is playing volleyball “like a senior player-of-the-year candidate.”

“I think it’s going to be a really competitive conference race this year. I think any number of teams can win it,” Stockton said. The Green Wave women’s basketball team returns three starters and nine letter-winners from last year’s team that went 16-14. The team sports one of the best point guards in the nation in junior Ashley Langford. She led Tulane last season in both assists and scoring, averaging 11.9 points per game to go with her 160 assists in 30 games. —Carol Schlueter

Lisa Stockton, kneeling at far right, head coach of the women’s team, has the all-time record for wins in Conference USA.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAVE BROWNING


Inside Track freret jet Saving the Greenback Cutthroat Trout Brandon Policky knows a lot about fish. He knows a lot about trout to be more specific, and the Greenback Cutthroat Trout to be exact. A senior majoring in ecology and evolutionary biology, Policky learned about this particular endangered species of trout while working during the last three summers for the U.S. Forest Service in the mountains of Colorado. A Colorado native, Policky says he and his family always spent time outdoors, and he has long been interested in biology and fisheries. When it came time to get a summer job, he decided that flipping burgers or working in an office wasn’t for him. “I’ve been working for the U.S. Forest Service for three years as a biological science technician. It basically means I collect data to be processed for research at the forest service,” Policky says. “I worked on a reclamation project for the Greenback Cutthroat Trout, which is the state fish of Colorado. It is an endangered species

and recent genetic analysis has shown that only three populations of this fish remain in the wild.” Policky explains that the Greenback Cutthroat Trout is unique from an evolutionary standpoint. “The Greenback is the product of a single interbasin transfer, over the Continental Divide somewhere between 50,000 and 75,000 years ago,” Policky says. “The glaciers during the last glacial epoch created a lake that spanned over the Continental Divide. As the lake receded, the species on the east side became the Greenback Cutthroat Trout, and the population on the west became the Colorado River Cutthroat Trout. Because of that, it is the only salmonid found on the east side of the Continental Divide. It has a unique evolutionary lineage.” Greenback Cutthroat Trout are threatened by non-native species of fish stocked as a source of food in lakes and streams by miners in the late 19th century. The invasive species quickly drove the native fish higher into the mountains. For the project, Policky rides on horseback into places most people never go, in

By moving individual Greenback Cutthroat Trout downstream to establish new population centers, Brandon Policky is helping to conserve an endangered species of fish in Colorado.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRANDON POLICKY

areas above 11,000 feet in the San Isabel National Forest. “These fish exist in absolutely remote places that no one goes but us,” Policky says. “They’re in a wilderness area that is accessible only by hiking and there are no trails. No one is going in there. Nobody knows we’re there.” Policky carries electro-fishing equipment in a backpack to the remote areas. Using an electric wand, he puts a current with high voltage and low amps into the water of the stream. When the fish sense the current, they involuntarily swim toward it. When they get within a couple of feet of the source, they go into a state called galvanonarcosis and flip over on their backs, making them easy to net out of the water. “It is a very efficient way to catch fish, and when done right it is relatively safe,” Policky says. Catching the fish is the first of several steps that include measuring and weighing them. Policky then loads them onto the horse and descends down the mountain slopes. Downstream, he helps to establish another population of the Greenback. The goal is for the upstream and downstream populations to combine within 50 years. Another aspect of the conservation project involves setting up barriers in the stream so that the invasive species of fish are blocked from preying on the Greenback. Through the project, the range of the habitat of the Greenback Cutthroat Trout has almost tripled from three miles to 11 miles. Policky says his passion for fish has been shaped and honed at Tulane by studying with assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology Michael Blum. Blum runs a fisheries lab on the Tulane uptown campus in which Policky works during the academic year. “I really enjoy this work,” adds Policky. “It’s satisfying to help recover something that is rare and aid in the conservation. I like the fieldwork. That’s the best part of being a biologist, seeing exotic places.” —Ryan Rivet

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

15


mixed Media

ALBUM OF THE DAMNED: SNAPSHOTS FROM THE THIRD REICH By Paul Garson (A&S ’68) Academy Chicago Publishers BIENVILLE’S DILEMMA: A HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF NEW ORLEANS By Richard Campanella, associate director of the Tulane-Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research Center for Louisiana Studies OVERVIEW: After the storm surge of Hurricane Katrina so badly humbled

the flood-protection system of the city of New Orleans, many wondered how a major city could have been founded on such a precarious site. Those who questioned the prudence of rebuilding in so questionable a location, says Richard Campanella, were echoing arguments heard 300 years earlier among French colonials debating where to locate the primary city of Louisiana. In the course of the 68 articles and essays presented in Bienville’s Dilemma, Campanella takes readers from the Ice Age to the present day, weaving into a historical narrative of New Orleans the threads of geology and topography, sociology and demography, politics and policy, and offering an explanation as to how this inevitable city was indeed able to flourish in an improbable location. The title is taken from the high-stakes dilemma faced by a French Canadian explorer named Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, sieur de Bienville, who had few good choices in siting the city “within a fantastical geographical situation.” That dilemma resonates throughout every chapter as Campanella contemplates how humans relate to the physical landscape of their communities. QUOTABLE QUOTE: “Bienville’s proposal [to transport soil to the mouth

of the Mississippi River to elevate a coastal post located there]— Louisiana’s very first coastal restoration plan—foretells the many vast hydrological engineering projects that would render the lower Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico estuary one of the most anthropogenically altered major ecosystem on earth. Themes familiar to the news headlines of southern Louisiana today—coastal erosion, river diversion, sediment transport, land-building, governmental financial commitment—began in the early 1700s.”

P A G E

1 6

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

OVERVIEW: The photograph on the cover of Album of the Damned signals what’s to follow. An infant peering out of a wicker carriage wears a Wehrmacht officer’s cap. The cap probably belongs to the infant’s father or uncle, and the photographer likely couldn’t resist capturing such a cute moment. The reader, however, will likely be chilled by this and many other images in this book that document everyday life in Nazi Germany. Paul Garson compiled some 400 photographs from private collections of old photo albums purchased through online auctions. They include commonplace, often celebratory scenes of couples and families, soldiers relaxing or horsing around, and “respectable” members of the middle class. Through commentary that creates a context for viewing these images, Garson invites us to contemplate how these seemingly ordinary people either perpetrated or stood by and allowed the brutalities of the Third Reich. QUOTABLE QUOTES: “The photographs seen here were taken by anonymous photographers wearing the various uniforms of the Third Reich. Just as the names of the individuals behind the cameras are lost to history, the subjects also remain unidentified. These images, and the indelible effects of the War, will never fade away.”


mixed Media

NATALIE SCOTT: A MAGNIFICENT LIFE

THE BRUSILOV OFFENSIVE

THE NEW ORLEANS TEA PARTY

By John W. Scott Pelican Publishing

By Timothy C. Dowling (G ’99) Indiana University Press

Filmmakers Marline Otte, Tulane associate professor of history, and Laszlo Fulop, University of New Orleans film professor

OVERVIEW: In 1905, Natalie Scott (NC 1909)

OVERVIEW: By most accounts the greatest

entered Newcomb College and immediately embarked on what would be a life of letters, as well as one of great accomplishment. In Natalie Scott: A Magnificent Life, author (and Natalie’s great nephew) John Scott begins his biography of the “literary and cultural dynamo” with a focus on her college days as sub editor of the Jambalaya yearbook and contributor to The Tulane Weekly and Newcomb Arcade. She would go on to become a decorated war zone nurse and translator during World Wars I and II; a journalist, playwright, actress and central figure in the cultural life of the French Quarter; and an adventurer who explored much of Mexico on horseback and in the process established social improvements including a peasant school and a medical cooperative for the people in the small town of Taxco. By incorporating Scott’s letters and original narratives into the biography, the author allows readers to see the world through the eyes of this remarkable woman.

Russian military achievement of World War I, the 1916 strike by Alesksei Brusilov against the forces of the Central Powers along the Eastern Front, was not only astonishing in military terms, but had perhaps even more significant political consequences. Historian Timothy Dowling brings to life the little-known battle that brought the Hapsburg Empire to the brink of a separate peace, while creating conditions for revolution within the Russia Imperial Army.

QUOTABLE QUOTES: “Her train trip to New

York on Sept. 8 began miserably because of the cold weather and the crowds, but the mood soon brightened as they passed two different trainloads of troops. She wrote of the unity and optimism of the soldiers. Poor fellows! They were in awful-looking old daycoaches, but they were a jolly crowd as a whole. One from our train called out to a car on theirs, ‘Hey, you fellows! Goodbye.’ They called back, ‘Where you going, Pinky?’ ‘Home,’ he yelled joyfully.’”

MARGINALIA: Author Timothy Dowling worked

in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow before earning his doctorate from Tulane. QUOTABLE QUOTES: “By autumn the ‘disease’ of

revolution was beginning to infect the front. On the night of 1–2 October 1916, for example, units of the VII Siberian Corps balked when ordered to take up positions for an attack. One week later, two regiments in the Special (Guards) Army forced soldiers from a neighboring unit to halt work on the trenches in their sector, and there were reports of threats against any soldiers who launched an attack. … More than a dozen regiments mutinied in December 1916. ‘Take us and have us shot,’one company telegraphed to the tsar, ‘but we just aren’t going to fight any more.’”

OVERVIEW: Shot between December 2006 and

October 2008, this 74-minute documentary explores the “slow and painful renaissance” of New Orleans in the ongoing aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In the city’s rebuilding, the filmmakers find a microcosm in which familiar themes of citizenship, civil and human rights, and individual versus state responsibility have gained new urgency, and where the communal, the local and the national are inseparably intertwined. Through a series of interviews, The New Orleans Tea Party chronicles the achievements of both the local residents and the millions of volunteers streaming to the region from all over the nation, while exploring the limitations and fragility of a recovery process built upon the shoulders of individuals operating “almost entirely without government support.” MARGINALIA: Shot in high-definition video on

a shoestring budget, the documentary has been screened at film festivals in the United States and Hungary, as well as on the Tulane campus. A trailer of the film is available for viewing at www.theneworleansteaparty.org. QUOTABLE QUOTES: “Why not stick around

and fight? You want to take my house? You want to bulldoze my house? All right, come at it. But I’ll tell you what, I’m going to fight to the death—and it may take it—but I’m going to go down swinging.” —Resident of the Broadmoor neighborhood

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

1 7


photo Riff

P A G E

18

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8


photo Riff

Fireworks light up the sky, dazzling the crowd on the uptown campus at the ‘Promise and Distinction’ end-of-campaign celebration on Oct. 3, 2008.

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

1 9


PA G E

20 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8


At a town hall meeting during homecoming weekend, Tulane President Scott Cowen marks the achievements of the ‘Promise and Distinction’ campaign and celebrates a new era for the university.

by rya n r i v e t

p h oto g r a p h y by pa u l a b u r c h - c e l e n ta n o T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

21


Previous pages: Guests settle into their seats and multiple screens blaze with images moments before the town hall meeting commences. This page, clockwise from top left: Campaign co-chairs Hunter and Cathy Pierson open the meeting by introducing Tulane President Scott Cowen. • Cowen keeps his thumb on the remote control during his presentation. • Inductees into the Paul Tulane Society enjoy front-row seats. Facing page: The campaign celebration dovetails into homecoming weekend festivities at an outdoor reunion party and concert including the Tulane Marching Band.

PA G E

22 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

triding onto stage to a standing ovation, Tulane President Scott Cowen beamed as he expressed his gratitude for both the warm welcome and the generosity that made Tulane’s “Promise and Distinction” fund-raising effort the most successful capital campaign in the history of the state of Louisiana. Cowen addressed the crowd on Friday, Oct. 3, in a town hall meeting that kicked off homecoming weekend and celebrated the campaign. Parents and alumni filled to capacity the Kendall Cram Lecture Hall at the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life. Other audience members watched from overflow locations across campus and from a live feed on the Internet, hearing Cowen outline how the university

accomplished its lofty goals and where Tulane is headed next. “What I want you to understand is that your dollars helped transform this university,” Cowen said. “A transformation that would have never come about without each of you in this audience today. I also wanted to be here today to say ‘thank you.’ Sometimes we move so fast in life, we don’t have the opportunity to reflect on what we’ve accomplished, and to say to one another, ‘you’ve done a great job.’” Cowen touted campaign contributions to the endowment, saying they will allow Tulane to build on its status as a premier research university and improve on an already stellar institution by attracting the best and brightest students and faculty.


“We’ve always had an aspiration at Tulane University to be, truly, one of the most distinguished and unique institutions in America, and that is a neverending path,” Cowen said, adding that Tulane will continue to progress as an outcome of the campaign. With progress, said Cowen, comes the kind of prestige and influence that will enable the university to remain innovative and effect positive change in the community. “It’s not important to just be distinguished,” Cowen said. “I want to make sure that our students, faculty and alumni are going out there and making the world a better place.” Tulane does not exist as an insulated institution, said Cowen, but rather “to serve society in a meaningful way.” The president praised the university’s impact on the larger community by not only producing the “enlightened leaders” of tomorrow but also by assisting in the New Orleans–area recovery from Hurricane Katrina. Cowen expressed gratitude for being part

of Tulane’s “darkest days” following the storm and the subsequent renaissance of the past three years, adding that it had been a privilege to serve both the Tulane community and the city of New Orleans in rebuilding and making a difference. In linking the university’s mission of encouraging public engagement to the growing interest of students in Tulane as reflected in the record number of applications for admission, Cowen exhorted the audience to not underestimate the nation’s youth. “What these young people want to do is they want to make a difference,” Cowen said. “They want to go to a school where they can not only get a great education, but where they can also make a difference.” The record number of applicants allowed the university to be one of the most selective institutions in the country this year, and Cowen predicted an even more discerning admission process in years to come. Cowen applauded those in attendance and watching over the Web for investing in Tulane, thanking them again for their generosity and calling on them to help shoot

for loftier goals down the road. “What do we all aspire to in life when it is all said and done? That is to make a difference. You have made an extraordinary difference. We’ve climbed one peak, but there are higher peaks. I would be proud to climb that next peak with you. There’s not a better group than the Tulanians all over the world.” The meeting ended as it began with a standing ovation for Cowen with everyone in attendance showing an esprit de corps that carried over to the rest of the weekend’s activities. Alumni from around the country gathered on the uptown campus later that evening for a reunion party at the Lavin-Bernick Center’s Qatar Ballroom, followed by fireworks and a concert on the quad by the New Orleans band, the Funky Meters. The town hall meeting was the beginning of a homecoming weekend that also included the Tulane football game against Army, held the following day outdoors at City Park’s Tad Gormley Stadium. Ryan Rivet is a writer in the Office of University Publications.

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

23


By Carol J. Schlueter ueled by the success of “Promise and Distinction: The Campaign for Tulane,” which raised $730.6 million, Tulane University is at a “transformative” moment in its history, said President Scott Cowen. “We are poised to further elevate our place among the most distinguished and distinctive universities in the nation in terms of education, research and community-service programs,” Cowen said. “This is a transformative time for our university, our city and state.” A key factor in surpassing the $700 million campaign goal was the strong support of Tulane alumni, who donated nearly half of the funds, according to former Board of Tulane chair Cathy Pierson, who, along with her husband, Hunter, chaired the campaign. “I am very excited to say that of the more than $730 million we raised, $316 million of that was raised by our alumni. This shows the dedication and commitment of this group to the mission of Tulane,” Pierson said. As the university celebrated the fund-raising victory on Oct. 3, alumni and supporters gathered for events at the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life, a highly visible symbol of the campaign’s success. The renovated and expanded student center was made possible

PA G E

24 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

by substantial gifts from alumna and Board of Tulane member Carol Bernick and the Bernick and Lavin family. The family also donated funds to create the Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives. “The campaign was always less about the dollar amount and more about the impact of what those dollars meant to the university,” said Luann Dozier, vice president for institutional development. Some 50 individuals and organizations were inducted on Oct. 3 into the Paul Tulane Society, which honors those who have donated $1 million or more to the university. Dozier added that membership in the society is Tulane’s highest honor and “recognizes the many donors at this level who ensured our success.” The following are among the achievements of the “Promise and Distinction” campaign: • A total of $93.5 million of the raised funds was dedicated to improving student housing; the Lavin-Bernick Center and Greer Field at Turchin Stadium; and a new addition to the A. B. Freeman School of Business. • Through fund raising, the Tulane endowment reached the $1.1 billion mark on June 30, 2008. (See President Cowen’s column on page 4.)

• More than $297 million of the campaign’s total was earmarked to support chairs, professorships, scholarships, fellowships, research, scholarly travel, internships, athletics and libraries. Through new support generated by the campaign, the number of endowed chairs and professorships grew from 153 to 331. • More than $238 million was raised for educational and research programs, while $101 million was raised in unrestricted support, providing funding for salaries, programs and operations. • The campaign gifts included donations from the Carnegie Corp. and the Parents Council to support the Center for Public Service; a gift from Dr. Jim Doty to support medical scholarships and establish an endowed chair in medicine; a bequest from the estate of Lallage Feazel Wall that led to numerous new academic projects; funding from the Qatar Katrina Foundation for scholarships, neighborhood health clinics and mobile medical units; and donation of the former Murphy Exploration Building in downtown New Orleans for use by the School of Medicine. Carol Schlueter is executive director of the Office of University Publications.


By Maureen King

The ‘Promise and Distinction’ campaign has sparked positive change at the university that will impact Tulane for years to come. Facing page, left to right: The Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life lies at the heart of the uptown campus. • The 15-story Murphy Exploration Building expands the Tulane Medical School’s downtown campus. This page, top to bottom: Students, ultimately, are the big winners of the campaign, benefiting from enhanced scholarship opportunities and academic programs led by distinguished faculty members. • The Wall Residential College is changing how students live and learn on campus. • Mobile medical units, a gift from the country of Qatar and staffed by physicians such as Dr. Chukwunmnso Dennar, deliver health care to New Orleans neighborhoods.

he Ellis Mintz Memorial Scholarship Endowed Fund is an example of the dozens of scholarship funds endowed during the “Promise and Distinction” campaign. Elaine L. Mintz (B ’47) established the scholarship in the School of Science and Engineering in the name of her husband, Ellis, a well-known and beloved figure, who, she says, “never met a stranger.” Ellis Mintz (B ’46) was an old-school merchant who loved his work and his community. He followed in the footsteps of his father, Morris, when he became chief executive officer of Hurwitz-Mintz Furniture Co. on Royal Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans in 1946. Ellis retired from the business in 1999 and died in 2006. The Mintz family has deep ties with Tulane. Ellis’ brothers, Saul (A ’53) and Albert (B ’48, L ’51), are both alumni, and Elaine grew up in the neighborhood near Tulane’s uptown campus. Ellis was an avid fan and supporter of Green Wave athletics. Ellis and Elaine’s son, Mitchell, and his wife, Christie, made contributions to the fund, and their daughter, Cheryl (MBA ’04, L ’07), has contributed as well. The scholarship, Elaine says, is a fitting tribute to Ellis because along with his keen business sense, he had an appreciation for innovation and believed that science education is crucial to the nation’s future economic security. The current recipient of the Mintz Scholarship is a Louisiana native, Lindsey Titus, a senior majoring in ecology and evolutionary biology. Donations to the Ellis Mintz Memorial Scholarship Endowed Fund may be sent to the attention of Luann Dozier, vice president of development, Tulane University, Office of Development, P.O. Box 61075, New Orleans, LA 70161-9986. For more information, call 504-865-5794.

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

25


PA G E

26 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8


Albert Einstein once noted that life is like riding a bicycle— to maintain your balance you must keep moving. In New Orleans, swerving to miss the potholes also helps.

b y N ic k M a r in

e ll o

p h o to g r a p h y b

y P a u la B u r c h

-C e le n ta n o

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

27


A bike is gears and grease, cables and cal- Maximum Exposure

The fact that Campanella can feel a pulse when he checks is encouraging, given New Orleans is the only major American city to have ever flatlined for any period of time. And while he says a day that does not begin and end on his bike isn’t complete, he is willing to admit there are drawbacks to spending so much time in two-wheel transit. “Sudden, torrential downpours can turn you into a drowned rat. Flat tires can stop you cold. Opening car doors are potentially deadly. Motorists honk you out of ‘their’ way, pigeons poop on you. …” If Campanella seems largely cheerful in his assessment of the downside of his daily commute, it may be because the transplanted New

ipers, spokes and rim, fork and frame, chain A bike is rattles and bumps, sunburns and and crank and cogs, and if ever an assembled sweat, afternoon soakings and drive-by splashthing has rivaled man’ s best friend for being es. It helps to focus on the positive. a faithful companion, it is the bicycle taking “I love cycling because it’s one of those you to the end of the trail or on your daily rare win-win-win situations in life,” says bicycommute. cle commuter Rich Campanella, a research It is an alliance nurtured within the laws of professor and associate director of the physics. Contacting the ground at only two Tulane-Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental points, a bicycle is a statically unstable Research. “It’s great exercise, it’s enjoyable, it object. At rest, a bike is an ungainly and reduces traffic congestion, reduces dependawkward thing that invariably will fall to one ency on foreign oil, reduces greenhouse gas side. To stabilize a bike you can do one of emissions, extends the life of your car, frees three things: deploy the kickstand, lean the up parking space, and improves urban living bike against something, or… by putting ‘eyes on the street.’” ... you can ride it. A bicycle is designed to be balanced when in motion. The faster you go, the better the bike is at re-finding its center of gravity. When it begins to lean, you turn into the lean and inertia pulls you both back upright—until the bike begins to lean in the opposite direction, which in turn must be corrected with a slight tilt of the handlebars. And on it goes, bike and rider paradoxically propelled into stability by falling from one side to another, over and over again. In New Orleans, a town that regularly misplaces its center of gravity, bicycles have played a role in stabilizing community life. Before Hurricane Katrina, it was estimated that more than 27 percent of the A wrought-iron fence in the Garden District lends its support to a well-weathered bicycle. city’s households did not own an automobile and the number of residents Campanella has made the 14-mile round-trip Yorker is under the sway of the town’s charms. commuting to work by bike was three times commute from his home in Bywater to his “New Orleans lags behind other large Amerthe national average. After Katrina, the numuptown campus office for six years now. A ican cities in terms of serious, planned networks bers are anybody’s guess, but anecdotally geographer by training, Campanella researches of bike paths and lanes,” he begins, but adds, there seem to be more bikes on the city’s and maps the historical lay of the land in the “however, it makes up for this deficit with an streets than ever before. New Orleans region, a pursuit that has proabundance of pedestrian-scale neighborhoods For all its narrow, ragged streets and moduced four critically acclaimed books [see with a vast inventory of interesting architecture torists who seem oblivious to any vehicle with Mixed Media department]—and has kept him and beautiful foliage.” less than four wheels, New Orleans also enjoys on the saddle of his bike. For any further assessment of the worthigenerally benevolent weather, a griddle-flat “For someone like me who studies and ness of the city’s streets, Campanella directs topography and a tight street grid—all of which writes about the geography of New Orleans, you to his colleague, Liz Davey, environare ideal for biking. It’s the kind of duality that cycling maximizes my exposure to the city and mental coordinator for Tulane’s Office of the city seems expert in achieving and one that helps me keep my finger on the city’s pulse,” he Environmental Affairs and among the city’s requires the cycling community to keep pedalsays. “I see new things, new details and new most active proponents of creating safe and ing to remain upright. angles of the city every day.” viable bike routes.

PA G E

28 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8


“We are a big bicycling town in that we have a lot of people who don’t have cars,” says Davey. “If you look at the commuting numbers on the 2000 census—which are really the only good numbers we have—we were higher than most metropolitan areas in the country.” Over the last decade, Davey’s day job has been to turn Tulane into a greener, more environmentally sustainable institution. As president of the Metropolitan Bicycle Coalition, however, she emphasizes the nonenvironmental benefits of cycling because they are more tangible to the community. “There is a recognition that part of the growing obesity problem is the decline in physical activity, and cycling can play a role in that. As

Runners and cyclists share the road in Audubon Park.

for quality of life, in New Orleans it’s a nobrainer to pay attention to the bicycling infrastructure because cycling is such a wonderful way to see the city and appreciate the beauty of the neighborhoods.” In 2003, the MBC was formed to voice the concerns of cyclists and lobby for bike-friendly measures to be included in the city’s transportation master plan. The following year, the coalition was able to persuade the city of New Orleans to set aside $4 million from a capital improvements bond to create marked bicycle lanes on a network of streets throughout New Orleans. The bond was approved by voters, but Katrina hit before any work began.

“After the storm I thought all that work was just gone,” says Davey. “I thought no one would be interested in bicycling and bike improvements. And then people who were involved in neighborhood planning spoke up and said they wanted walkable, bikeable neighborhoods.” In Gentilly, for instance, residents have sent letters to the city, asking that bike improvements be included in ongoing post-Katrina street-repair programs. “One neighborhood resident told me that they want to attract young people to Gentilly, and they consider a bikeable neighborhood to be important,” says Davey. The federally funded South Louisiana Submerged Road Program is sponsoring the rehabilitation of approximately 60 miles of roadway in the city. The area’s Regional Planning Commission has been active in seeing that bicycle lanes and disability-accessible sidewalk ramps are incorporated into the repairs. According to Dan Jatres, TC ’05, director of education and outreach for the RPC, his agency is attempting to access some of the bond money to incorporate stripes and signage for bike lanes on some of the rehabilitated roads. In the early part of the decade, Jatres was one of a small group of Tulane students whose work in the environmental affairs office will likely have a lasting impact on the quality of cycling in New Orleans. In 2002, when the RPC came to the environmental affairs office looking for Tulane students to help gather information for a bicycling and pedestrian plan for the metropolitan area, Davey tapped Jatres and three other students. Three years later, the Tulane students’ survey results and recommendations informed the RPC’s master plan, released in the form of a 242-page document incorporating crash data, an overview of existing conditions, demographics of pedestrians and cyclers, an overview of the condition of the existing infrastructure, a summary of state bicycle laws (and recommendation for new ones) and an assessment of the existing bicycle routes. The same group of students also put together a guide to create a bicycle safety education program at universities and colleges, a motorist’s guide to sharing the road with bicycles, and a bicycle map to help cyclists better navigate the city’s highly variable roads.

(The last project benefited from Campanella’s cartography skills.) With the effects of Katrina beginning to loom less large, it’s time to muster these resources and move forward, says Davey. “We are at a really important moment,” she says. “We have the experience, the plan, educational programming and a lot of the funding in place. And now we just need the courage to get it done.”

An interesting mix A bicycle is an economic choice, a social statement, a symbol of status, a convenience, and a necessity. … “We have a really interesting mix of people who ride bikes here,” says Jatres, noting a cycling-rich demographic that includes those who can’t afford to own a car, as well as those who live and work in densely packed neighborhoods like the Fauboug Marigny and the French Quarter where automobile parking is at a premium, college students who arrive without cars, and the swelling ranks of environmentally conscious young professionals in town to support the city’s rebuilding. As a freshman at Tulane, Jatres got to know the city’s streets firsthand, often riding his bike down Carrollton Avenue to City Park and Lake Pontchartrain. It’s farther afield than most first-years are willing to venture, and in places the ride can be downright hazardous to your health. As the person now in charge of the RPC’s efforts to make the region safer for cyclists and pedestrians, Jatres shares the sensibilities of both an old-fashioned social activist and a modern-day policy wonk. Inasmuch, he assesses the city’s progress toward being cyclingfriendly with a kind of optimistic indignation. “New Orleans has a higher percentage of people riding bikes than most cities,” says Jatres. “If we are this far along in terms of people choosing to ride bikes, think of the difference it would make if the city made a concerted effort to improve infrastructure and enforcement.” While his office is available to supply technical assistance in terms of safety assessments and best-practices to city and parish agencies working on rehabilitating the city’s infrastructure, Jatres is primarily working on educational programs, including those that instruct both

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

29


scarcity of horses and citizens and law enforcement officials on the food to fuel them the rules and regulations applicable to cycling, brought on by an ontrain fleet drivers how to proceed safely round going famine, Drais bicyclists and pedestrians, and teach cyclists de-signed and built the how to maintain their bikes and choose the velocipide, a prototype best routes. for the bicycle that he An obstacle he encounters is that many peounveiled in 1817 as an ple erroneously believe they have sufficient alternative to horseknowledge of the dos and don’ts of cycling. For drawn traffic. instance, there is a commonly held belief among many cycists that it is safer to ride If Drais had hoped against the flow of traffic. It’s not only unsafe, to solve the transportasays Jatres, but it is illegal. tion problems of the Jatres recalls a conversation on the subject day, those hopes were with a woman who insisted that it was more derailed by the rutted important to her to see what was coming at and gnarly streets plaguher, a conversation that ended with her asserting most cities. Riders ing that she would continue to ride against who were forced to traffic “because I’ve been in seven accidents navigate their way along and I’m still OK.” city sidewalks became Jatres has his work cut out for him. A bike a menace to pedestrimay be an efficient, environmentally sustainable ans, causing the invenmethod of transportation, but it is also a birthtion to be banned in at day present, a hand-me-down from an older least four countries. brother, a reward for good grades—all of which Nevertheless, the connect to the inner child of every rider. free-spirited partner“People tend to think of bicycles as toys,” ship between man and A cyclist manuevers the narrow streets of the French Quarter, while another ignores the the directional markings of a designated bike lane says Liz Davey. machine has endured along St. Claude Avenue. The lane opened in spring 2008, and … And as Jatres notes, law enforcement nearly 200 years of officials are often no better than the general public … will offer protection to those who use it properly, says Dan Jatres, an advocate for bicycle and pedestrian safety. when it comes to applying traffic laws to cycling. “Unfortunately,” he says, “the general law enforcement culture is that it is not real police work.” All of which suggests the need for education. “Ultimately, a bike lane is not going to protect you from a car,” says Jatres. “It’s just a stripe.”

Loose affiliations Hats off to Karl Drais, who was born into European aristocracy in the late 18th century, but grew up to be a fervent democrat and an inventor with a populist bent. Responding to the

PA G E

30 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8


sidewalk riding (still not legal), recreational touring, mail delivering, Olympic training, circus clowning, Tour de Francing, street policing and even battlefield fighting. “When I’m on my bicycle I feel like John Henry, the steel-driving man,” quips Phil Schapker, who says he hasn’t driven a car in three years. Schapker, a junior at Tulane majoring in anthropology, is among the next generation of Tulane students that Davey has plugged into the local cycling community. With Davey’s encouragement and support, Schapker and Patrick Townsend, a junior in the business school, are spending Sunday afternoons on campus offering free instruction on bike repair to anyone who rolls by. Members of the campus Juggling Club, of which Schapker is president, can usually be counted on to be hanging out, often providing entertainment. Schapker, who learned how to handle a headset wrench in a bike shop in his hometown of Kansas City, says the primary reason that bikes grow rusty from disuse is that their owners don’t know how to make simple repairs like fixing brakes or changing tires. “I genuinely enjoy teaching people about bikes and knowing that bikes on campus overall are a little bit safer every Sunday,” says Schapker. “It’s also been cool to watch my friends get to the point where they can start teaching other people.” The idea for the bike shop originally came out of a “think tank” organized by the campus Green Club, he says. “I knew some people and they were like, ‘Hey Phil, you know about bikes. Can you be the bike shop guy?’”

Receiving a small stipend from the Office of Environmental Affairs, Schapker and Townsend have operated the increasingly popular outdoor bike clinic along McAlister Drive. Next semester, the shop will be housed in its own permanent on-campus facility, thanks to Schapker’s Phil Schapker, who began an on-campus clinic to teach others how to fix adroit if somewhat their own bikes, is building common ground among cyclists, jugglers, subversive maneuver- gardeners, political activists and anyone else who wants to change the world. ing through the bureauhe knows there are more important things for cracy of student government. Tulane graduates to be doing. With no clear indication of “who was in That’s what happens, perhaps, when things charge of operating the bike shop,” Schapker get reduced down to a sane and sustainable says he decided to annex it for the Juggling size, when “good pay” is enough, and every Club. “We wrote into our constitution that the step forward is valued. minister of transportation is responsible for operating the bike shop. So it is officially in Last spring, the city opened its first bike our constitution, and Undergraduate Student lane—a three-mile, white-striped route along St. Government takes constitutions very seriously.” Claude Avenue through an area of the Lower This fall the Juggling Club petitioned for and Ninth Ward that is still rebuilding after the storm. received from the USG funding to build a bike “It’s a street that had become busy but shed. The club also received money to start a had schools along it,” says Davey. “It’s really community garden—under the direction of its part of a neighborhood. Adding a bike lane minister of agriculture—but that’s another story. and slowing down traffic a little bit helps Schapker says his ultimate goal is training bring back that neighborhood feeling. It’s part professional bike mechanics. “I could train of making it a friendlier street for the people people for an actual trade—a job you could do who live on it.” right out of college that has healthcare benefits, good pay, and everything.” Nick Marinello is the features editor of And the cool thing is that he says this with no Tulanian and a senior editor in the Office of hint of irony, no wink or smile suggesting that Publications

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

31


For two millennia, philosophers have sought to illuminate the shadows lurking in the unexamined life.

PA G E

32 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8


T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

33


Plato!s Cave. It’s a classic story told

and re-told by philosophers. People are chained prisoners in a cave, mesmerized by images projected onto a wall. The images represent the beliefs, the opinions, the conditioning with which everyone grows up. “We don’t know that they aren’t reality because that’s all we’ve seen,” says Ronna Burger, professor and chair of philosophy. But every cave has an opening and there is the possibility of a turnaround. The prisoners — all of us—can realize that the images on the wall are merely shadows cast by objects and not the objects themselves. We can turn around to the light. “Unreflective, poorly grounded, small-minded attitudes” enslave us, keeping us glued to the flickering images as if watching some sort of theater or film, says Richard Velkley, the Celia Scott Weatherhead Professor of Philosophy. But careful, disciplined thought can liberate us from our shackles, say philosophers. We can be free from the human dilemma of being caught in our own delusions. It’s a matter of thinking—and what we think and how we think matters.

PA G E

34 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

Time, love and being human

The Tulane philosophy department is thriving. With 100 undergraduate majors and more than 20 full-time graduate students, it has created a niche in higher education for the study of political philosophy. It is an environment in which current issues such as stem-cell research, cloning, environmental concerns, neuroscience findings and the ethics of torture and preemptive military strikes provide plenty of food for thought. And yet, the issues that provoked profound thought from the ancient Greeks more than 2,500 years ago also are still relevant today. Scientific advancements may have pushed the boundaries of philosophical thought, but the fundamental mysteries of life remain. The work of the earliest philosophers “is still alive,” says Burger, who points to Greek philosophy and the Bible as the two roots of Western civilization, and uses the Greek philosophers as tools for understanding the Bible. For Velkley, “Philosophy is a search for the most fundamental principles in various areas of human life and human inquiry.” Philosophers formulate questions about science, morality, happiness, politics, history, religion, justice, individual autonomy, culture, art and language.

There is “an inexhaustible character to questions,” says Velkley, who has written books about 18th-century Continental philosophers Immanuel Kant and Jean-Jacques Rousseau— Freedom and the End of Reason: On the Moral Foundation of Kant’s Critical Philosophy and Being After Rousseau: Philosophy and Culture In Question. In its contemplation of life’s conundrums, Rousseau’s work was influential to philosophical thought extending into the 20th century, says Velkley, who holds among his chief interests phenomenology, a distinctly 20th-century concept relating to consciousness as experienced from a subjective point of view. That modern sensibility can be found in the work of Rousseau, who, according to Velkley, generally characterizes human beings as good but also “distracted, dispersed, or as we often say, alienated by our existence as social and political beings.” And there is something awful about that. According to Velkley, a basic feature of our human experience as understood by Rousseau, is that “we live in time in terms of anticipating a possible future. … And we seek to realize certain aims among possible aims.” This restlessness, says Velkley, “is connected with everything that alienates us.” It disperses our powers, fragments us and gets in the way of living harmoniously or holistically in a unified way. For Rousseau, literature and music have an important role in teaching us ways to address this alienation, says Velkley. “He tries to direct us toward being more sincere, authentic, true to our sense of ourselves.”


The good, the true, the beautiful

When Alison Denham, associate professor of philosophy, wrote a lengthy book on ethics and aesthetics—Metaphor and Moral Experience: An Essay in the Psychology of Value—she wanted to explore, among other things, why literary metaphors so often seem to capture the moral essence of a situation in ways that literal descriptions do not. Now she’s taking the insights she’s gained about what makes a good metaphor in literature—when a metaphor is alive instead of dead, when it is profound and rich and able to speak to generation after generation—and applying the same criteria of worthiness to conceptual art. A good metaphor is original and sparks the imagination naturally and easily. “A good metaphor ought to draw our attention to some aspect of its topic that we might not otherwise have noticed,” says Denham. “We already have some fairly widely recognized criteria for identifying quality metaphors, and I propose that very similar criteria ought to be used in the evaluation of conceptual art.” It’s a disciplined way to “weed out the wheat from the chaff,” says Denham, and to find out if an artist is “pulling your leg or just trying to make a sale, or has genuine and worthwhile aesthetic aims.” A theme pervading Denham’s work is the interplay between passion and reason, or emotion and cognition. But why “do” philosophy at all? What is the point? “The attraction of philosophy for philosophers is not unlike the attraction of beautifully worked-through mathematical theorems for mathematicians,” she says. Asking philosophers why they philosophize about what is the good, what is the true, what is the beautiful—the basic concerns of philosophy since the days of the ancient Greeks—is like asking, “What’s the point of dancing for the dancer?” says Denham. To value philosophy, says Denham, “you have to value the life of the mind in itself, seeing how far thought can carry you, how deeply you can understand those aspects of human experience that you value, that you love, how clearly you can work out answers to the questions that puzzle you. Perhaps not complete answers, perhaps not final answers, but that is

all right; what matters is that you value the questions and give them the attention they deserve.” Denham, who studied violin and viola before finding her métier in philosophy, sees both music and philosophy as “noninstrumentally valuable. They are just good ways to live. “It’s good to live with music in your life. And it’s good to live thinking clearly and deeply about things that are interesting and important, rather than living and thinking shallowly and in a muddled manner about things that are ultimately insignificant.”

Thinking critically

Bruce Brower, associate professor of philosophy, says, “Philosophers are in the business of teaching people how to reason and how to be rational.” Philosophers learn “to think rationally and critically about things,” he says. As an analytical philosopher, Brower says that being moderately skeptical—of everything—is critical. It can, however, be taken to the extreme. “There are kinds of skepticism that say I can’t even announce my skepticism, I can only take a skeptical attitude because to say that I don’t know is to say that I know something.” Brower is working on a book on the nature of knowledge, arguing that knowledge is “a social contract between agents.” Western thought is grounded in the idea that “mature, moral agents recognize the solid foundations—and also questionable foundations—of many different positions,” says Brower. The moral agents—all of us—then aren’t willing to impose just one position on others. Hence, we respect liberty and so on. The result for Brower, personally: “I tend to actually be much more willing to listen to all sides of moral claims.” Brower finds it amazing when 20-year-old students think they know everything and have decided that theirs is the right way to view the world. “My desire,” says Brower, “is to teach them alternative positions—not to directly criticize their own positions but just to get them to see the value of other positions.” A great thing about philosophy, says Brower, is that there’s a philosophy of everything, and underlying the exploration of each area is “the question of whether the world is anything like the way we might initially take it to be.”

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

35


Unknowingness

Ronna Burger

Richard Velkley

Oliver Sensen

Alison Denham

Bruce Brower

PA G E

36 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

What makes philosophy “puzzling and interesting over time,” says assistant professor Oliver Sensen, “is that maybe these questions are in a way too difficult for human beings to answer.” Sensen is writing a book on human dignity, particularly what it means in the work of Immanuel Kant. Dignity is considered a human value tied up with reason and free will. When he was a boy, Sensen wanted to be the wise man, the teacher of the action hero he’d seen in karate movies. He went into philosophy expecting to find concrete answers. Instead he found more questions. Questions such as what is mind and what is the soul may be, Sensen discovered, “way out of our reach.” You can use light to look at things, explains Sensen, but you can’t examine light by illuminating it. “Similarly, it might be that our consciousness, our mind, our soul is something that does the looking, through which we can look at things. But you can’t turn it upon itself and lighten the light itself and get an insight into what lighted it.” Kant is “big on this view that in principle there are things we cannot know,” says Sensen. Human beings may have the capacity to learn how to build airplanes and bridges, but then, says Sensen, “there are other things, like God, freedom and immortality, which we don’t really have knowledge of. We can have faith and belief and those things, and we might have other access, but we don’t really have knowledge.” For instance, it is impossible to with any certainty prove or disprove the existence of God. For 2,500 years, the smartest people in the world have asked questions about soul and freedom and God and morality, “and there’s no agreement,” says Sensen. “Kant’s point was then, well, maybe there’s in principle a problem with our knowing these things. In principle, human beings cannot answer these questions.”


A way out of the Cave

Socrates, the ancient philosopher who walked the streets of Athens engaging others about the meaning of life and the nature of things, never recorded his thoughts in writing because he said philosophy should be a dialogue, not permanently fixed or codified. “The only thing I know is what I don’t know,” Socrates famously said. For his provocative positions and role as a gadfly in Athenian society, Socrates was condemned to death and executed, providing a cautionary tale for future philosophers. Plato, who came after Socrates in the pantheon of ancient Greek philosophers, “discovered how to write philosophy in a way that captures Socratic flowing, freethinking, nondogmatic philosophy,” says Ronna Burger. Plato wrote dramas, she explains. “He never wrote anything in his own name. That was a work of genius.” Letting characters in a drama speak and not attaching one’s own name to anything they say is “a kind of self-protection,” Burger adds. Plato learned that heedfulness from the trial of Socrates. “Society and philosophy are always going to be in some conflict,” notes Burger. “Society is always more dogmatic.” But the form of writing motivated by that concern turns out to have an important philosophical consequence: it requires the reader’s active engagement in thinking by means of interpretation.

Burger has spent nearly 40 years studying the writings of Plato and Aristotle, the next great Greek philosopher. Plato and Aristotle often are considered opposites. According to the standard view, says Burger, “Aristotle starts from the ground up and Plato starts from the heavens.” And Aristotle’s writing of treatises looks very different from Plato’s writing of dialogues. But Burger thinks Aristotle’s work comes to life by discovering in it the Platonic form of thinking and writing. Both Plato and Aristotle insert Socrates as a character in their writings, and the title of Burger’s latest book—Aristotle’s Dialogue With Socrates: On the Nicomachean Ethics—reflects the ongoing dialectical relationship among the philosophers. “My Aristotle is not the mainstream Aristotle,” says Burger, speaking of her reading of the Ethics—what she considers one of the most influential books in the philosophic tradition. The conclusion of the work is especially controversial. “There’s a contest,” says Burger. “Aristotle has set things up on the surface that there are two ways of life competing: the political or public life and the theoretical or contemplative life.” According to most scholars, Aristotle straightforwardly declares that the best life is the theoretical life—presented as a life devoted to the solitary activity of contemplation—in contrast with the political life, which is found less worthy. This understanding, Burger notes, “has been taken as tradition for more than 2,000

years, for all of Western civilization, practically.” But here’s Burger’s move. “I want to say, no. Aristotle writes and thinks just like a Platonic thinker.” Burger’s Aristotle writes with irony and very carefully. “Plus, he’s funny,” she says. The opposition Aristotle sets up between the solitary life of contemplation and the political life leaves out the activity of philosophy as Socrates practiced it. “Let’s call it political philosophy,” says Burger. But that is precisely what Aristotle is engaged in himself in the Ethics. The opposition presented in the speeches of the work is ironically undercut by the missing deed of the work. Aristotle’s project in the Ethics, says Burger, is neither contemplation of the universe nor political action. “He’s doing an examination of opinion. He’s leading you in certain ways to knowledge of ignorance in the sense that you reflect on your values. You see where your limits are, where the contradictions are. You understand much more, even if you don’t know the answer.” Aristotle is showing you a way out of Plato’s Cave, a way to turn away from the shadows flickering on the cave walls to turn toward the light of the opening and see reality. In Socrates’ Apology, Plato’s version of the speech given by Socrates during his trial, the accused refuses to comply with his accusers. “Socrates tells them, ‘I’m not going to give into you people and do what you want,’” says Burger. “‘You want me to be quiet. I’m not going to do that because I believe the unexamined life is not worth living.’” What that line means, Burger suggests, is that the philosophic life is “the fulfillment of our human potential.” That’s the turnaround in the cave. Mary Ann Travis is editor of Tulanian and a senior editor in the Office of Publications.

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

37


PA G E

38 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8


Good Eatin’ The folks in Pierre Part, La., have always eaten well, but now they are learning to eat good, too.

By Fran Simon

A

s Highway 70 meanders south from Baton Rouge, La., the road winds through fields of sugar cane. Next comes a low bridge crossing a bayou crowded with fishing boats. You’re entering Pierre Part, a dot on the Louisiana map with no other towns surrounding it. It’s a place whose street names hint at a closeness of community—Family Street, Brothers Court, Mam and Pap Drive. Neat houses line streets that go by first names—Agnes, Paul, Ben, James, Mary Ann—or names of families who have lived here for generations—Gaudet, Verret, Landry, Breaux and Theriot. To the 3,000 or so people who live here, this is home, but some say the renowned Cajun homestyle cooking of Pierre Part might kill you. The residents enjoy a diet rich in fish, but also high in simple or refined carbohydrates

Photos by Paula Burch-Celentano

and fat, while low in fiber and green vegetables. The people of Pierre Part eat an abundance of red meat, white bread, rice, potatoes and rich gravies. Rampant obesity, diabetes, hypertension and other illnesses are the fallout of this town’s embodiment of joie de vivre. Slowly, however, the unhealthy dietary habits handed down from generation to generation may be changing as residents become more informed about nutrition. As shoppers stroll through the town’s one grocery store, they are guided by signs illustrated with stop lights that “glow” green, signaling grocery items with nutritional value. The goal of this labeling system is to get shoppers to consider selecting as many greenlight products as possible. Near the dairy case, there’s a table with a display of breakfast cereals containing high levels of dietary fiber.

“Would you like to try this one?” asks a young woman of a passing shopper. “It’s really yummy.” France Fung holds out a box of caramel-flavored Fiber One cereal. The gray-haired shopper stoops over her shopping cart, squinting at the box as she studies it dubiously. She smiles at the young woman because she knows who she is. Fung, a Tulane medical student, has been in town for several weeks and has already gotten to know many residents of Pierre Part. Earlier that morning, Fung made a presentation to the parents of preschoolers gathered at the local school. As children squirmed in their mothers’ laps, Fung discussed healthy snack options. The presentation was part of the school’s program to educate youngsters to eat right and stay fit. Each month, the school features a different theme, such as “Eat a

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

39


above: Signs give the green light to healthy grocery items. below: A kid’s take on JumpStart’s “Eat A Rainbow” initiative. Rainbow,” which urged youngsters to eat vegetables of all different colors. Fung’s efforts are her contribution to JumpStart Pierre Part, a program designed and launched last year by a team of six Tulane medical students in collaboration with two local doctors to encourage people to eat healthier foods. Each student on the team spent six weeks (sequentially) in Pierre Part during the course of the year as they fulfilled the required family medicine rotation for third-year medical students. As if to emphasize the connection of family to medicine, Fung is completing the community-project requirement of the family medical clerkship by helping implement a plan that her sister, Claire, helped create the previous year as a medical student in the same rotation.

A tailored plan

At the heart of the family medicine clerkship is the relationship forged between medical school students and the preceptors in whose practice the students are placed. For students in rural settings such as Pierre Part, the potential to truly experience “community” is unique. Dr. Sherlyn Bell-Larrison and her husband,

PA G E

40 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

Dr. Jim Larrison, have been Pierre Part’s doctors for 10 years. Raised in farming communities, the two operated a farm together in northern Louisiana before deciding in their mid-30s to change to a more stable career and go to medical school. After receiving their medical degrees from Louisiana State University and serving as Air Force physicians, they searched for a rural community in which to practice. They chose the town of Pierre Part, which had no doctor at the time, and established the Larrison Family Health Center. On a busy day in their onestory, beige brick building on Highway 70, the doctors each see 30 to 40 patients. Like most physicians, Bell and Larrison routinely counsel their diabetic patients to follow the food plan recommended by the American Diabetes Association. But Bell soon found that her patients would agree to follow the diet, but then return to their families’ customary eating habits. Bell concluded that the ADA guidelines were not working for the citizens of Pierre Part and set out to develop a plan tailored to the community. Every day, eat a serving of beans, she now tells her patients. That alone will boost fiber


In her six weeks working with a small clinic, medical student france Fung became part of the Pierre Part community. clockwise from top: Dr. Jim Larrison observes Fung with a difficult patient; Fung delivers the message for healthy eating habits at a school meeting and in a office visit with dr. Sheryln Bell-Larrison in attendance.

in the diet and reduce sugar levels. Substitute turkey sausage for pork sausage when you make gumbo. Serve your gumbo on top of brown rice instead of white rice. When you sit down to dinner, fill half your plate with vegetables, one-quarter with beans and less than one-quarter with lean meat. Through focusing on a high-fiber diet Bell began to see changes resulting in weight control, better diabetes control and improved health. Many patients now control diabetes with dietary changes alone. Wanting to spread her message about leading a healthy lifestyle to more people in the community, Bell began talking to people at the local school. But she had more ideas than she had time or energy to implement. When she became a preceptor in Tulane’s family medicine clerkship, the medical students she trained became interested in helping Bell with an initiative that would inspire and support a culture of community health and wellness. “Dr. Bell believes that nutritional counseling merits her time and effort because it is the key to disease prevention, while many other physicians spend zero time on dietary counseling,” says France Fung. “She approaches policymakers, community members and

school administration with the same perseverance and persistence with which she counsels her patients.” JumpStart Pierre Part has become an ongoing partnership between Tulane and the local school, businesses, government and families. JumpStart team members have collaborated with the school’s dietitian and cafeteria staff to incorporate into school menus healthier ingredients such as low-fat milk, whole-wheat products and more fruits and vegetables. The school has a vegetable garden where students learn how to grow produce they then eat. The Parent-Teacher Organization sponsors “Healthy Households” sessions. Pierre Part’s library now holds monthly nutrition seminars. Jumpstart has helped organize a 5K run/walk and health, and has contributed healthy choices at the town’s annual food fest. The Tulane medical students

maintain a JumpStart website and support the Bayou Journal, the local newspaper, by publishing articles on nutrition, fitness and JumpStart events. Each Tulane medical student participating in a family medicine clerkship in Pierre Part takes on an aspect of the JumpStart project to fulfill a curriculum requirement while advancing the community endeavor. For example, France Fung developed a Pierre Part cookbook that includes modifications of favorite local recipes by lowering fat, increasing fiber and eliminating empty calories. Future plans for JumpStart including bringing Smart Bodies, a childhood obesity prevention program coordinated by the Louisiana AgCenter, to the school. Plans also call for working with Meals on Wheels to adjust its menus to provide healthier meals for homebound and elderly people in the community.

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

41


Clinics providing family care to residents of rural and small-town America are becoming all too rare. By tracking the body mass indices of the children in the community, food purchasing patterns and sales trends at the grocery store, students in the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, in partnership with the Louisiana Public Health Institute, also are monitoring JumpStart to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. They are performing qualitative analyses of cultural and behavioral change as they assess modifications in knowledge, attitude and practice in the community.

Not just about illness

The lifestyle changes taking place in Pierre Part exemplify what family medicine is all about, says Dr. Rick Streiffer, professor and chair of the Tulane Department of Family and Community Medicine. “Family medicine has, from the beginning, embraced prevention and the social sciences,” says Streiffer. “People want a personal physician they can get to know and work with. Health is not just about illness; it’s also about problems of living and moving ‘upstream’ to help people adopt healthier lives.” Early in his career, Streiffer practiced family medicine in rural Mississippi and “frontier” Colorado. From those experiences and his time in Louisiana he has seen the growing need for primary care physicians outside of urban areas. The need is especially acute in rural Louisiana, where more than 90 percent of the state is designated as a primary care shortage area. “Rural areas are desperate for physicians as

PA G E

42 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

so many of their doctors are slowing down and retiring, but not being replaced,” says Streiffer. Studies show that rural populations are older, sicker and poorer than urban populations, hence rural populations are likely to be heavy users of medical services—which is

Rural education rotations have value to students with all types of careers in their future, says Dr. Richard Streiffer. not a good situation when physician shortages abound and prevention is often pushed to the back burner. In Louisiana, as few as six of the nearly 400 medical students who graduated from the state’s three medical schools in 2008 are projected to enter rural primary care practices in Louisiana. In an attempt to slow this trend, the Department of Family and Community Medicine established the Tulane University Rural Medical Education Program in 2004. The program recruits and trains medical students from rural areas who intend to return to practice in rural communities in Louisiana and the Gulf South.

Streiffer’s department currently has about 130 Louisiana preceptors, of whom 30 percent are located in rural areas. About a fifth of the family medicine clerkship placements for medical students are in rural communities. To further support rural communities’ health needs, this year Dr. Benjamin Sachs, dean of the medical school, established the Rural Outreach Initiative. An aim of the initiative is for communities to be active in identifying and nurturing their own future physicians. Sachs “jump started” the effort, says Streiffer, by creating two full-tuition medical school scholarships each year for students from rural Louisiana who make a commitment to return to rural Louisiana to practice primary care. This is a critical step, Streiffer says, because medical students from urban areas rarely become “converts” to primary care practice in rural communities. “To produce rural physicians, you must attract students into medical school from rural areas who want to return to primary care practice there.” The high cost of medical education is a major obstacle for rural doctors, especially for those headed for the relatively low-income level of primary care physicians. Rural educational rotations have value to students with all types of careers in their future, says Streiffer. Many of the skills the medical school students learn in rural settings help them become better doctors, whatever specialties or locales they pursue. He says they experience “relationship-based medicine”—a style of medical care in which doctor and patient are partners. “You can’t become a partner until you really know your partner. That’s why understanding who they are, where they live, the community they’re a part of, and being able to relate to that, is vital,” Streiffer says. “A person is not separate from their environment, their community, their family. A person is who they are because of their culture, beliefs and values. All of that is relevant to the delivery of health care.” And readily apparent in rural communities like Pierre Part. Fran Simon is managing editor in the Office of University Publications and editor of“The Classes”section of Tulanian.


theClasses

Literary icon Poet Allen Ginsberg speaks to Newcomb English professor Joseph Cohen’s class in spring 1979. Ginsberg gave the first public reading of “Howl,” his rhythmic, hallucinogenic rant and major work of the Beat Generation literary movement, in 1955 at a San Francisco poetry reading.

PHOTO BY MATT ANDERSON


classNotes theClasses

Emeritus reception 1 Celebrating 50 or more years since graduation at the emeritus reception on Oct. 2, 2008, are (left to right) Joseph Cangelosi (A&S ’48), Calvin Pflug (A&S ’43) and Carolyn Pflug (NC ’58, G ’62).

2 Alvin Gottschall (E ’43) and Mary Fran Gottschall

1

both wear pearls—his strand denotes an alumnus who graduated more than 50 years ago.

3 Joyce Sabatier (NC ’37, SW ’43) and Joseph Sabatier (M ’38) socialize on the porch of No. 2 Audubon Place, the home of Tulane President Scott Cowen.

Newcomb awards 4 Carol Lavin Bernick (NC ’74) receives this year’s

2

Outstanding Alumna Award from the Newcomb Alumnae Association. She is executive chair of the $1.4 billion global Alberto-Culver Co.

3 5

Catherine Hagaman Edwards (NC ’72), left, chair of the awards committee, and Carter Dudley Flemming (NC ’70), center, president of the Newcomb Alumnae Association, present the 2008 Young Alumna Award to Erica Trani (NC ’06, G ’07), right.

5

Newcomb luncheons 6 The Newcomb Class of 1948 celebrates a 60th

6

reunion at a luncheon at Commander’s Palace Restaurant on Oct. 2, 2008, in conjunction with homecoming. Left to right are Marie Louise Socola Crane (NC ’48), Mary Marsh Willis (NC ’48) and Cynthia Cooke Roth (NC ’48).

4

7 8

7

Also celebrating with the Newcomb Class of 1948 are (left to right) Dot Post Davis (SW ’48, PHTM ’89), Beedee Nolan (NC ’48) and Sally Foster (NC ’48).

8

Rebecca Ray Roniger (NC ’73) and Danielle Dutrey Newlin (NC ’73) celebrate their Newcomb Class of 1973 35th reunion at a luncheon on Oct. 4, 2008, at Ralph’s on the Park.

9 Celebrating the Newcomb Class of 1943 65th reunion on Oct. 4, 2008, at Ralph’s on the Park are (left to right) Elise Cambon Walther (NC ’43), Janet Seidenbach Phillips (NC ’43), Hilda Ziifle Jung (NC ’43), LaVerne Morris Welch (NC ’43), Phyllis Ecker t Huhner (NC ’43) and Joy Clay Plauche (NC ’43).

9

PA G E

44 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

PHOTOS 1–3 BY SALLY ASHER, PHOTOS 4–9 BY JESSICA BACHMAN


theClasses classNotes

10 Medical honors 10 Receiving honors at the Tulane Medical Alumni Study Club and luncheon hosted by the dean of the School of Medicine at the Murphy Building on Oct. 4, 2008, are John F. Moffett (A&S ’58, M ’61), left, who received the Distinguished Service Award, and L. Maximilian Buja (M ’67, G ’68), who received the Outstanding Alumnus Award.

10-year reunion 11 Having a reunion at the Class of 1998 tent before the homecoming football game at Tad Gormley Stadium are (left to right) Mike Niemtzow (B ’98), Nick Loeb (B ’98), Alex Hernandez (TC ’98, B ’03), Brett Henderson (B ’98), Mark McCourt (UC ’98), Chris Defelice (UC ’98) and Rob Tessaro (UC ’98).

11 Glad to see you again! 12 Sharon Kozlowski Bourgeois (NC ’69), left, and Martha McCarty Kimmerling (NC ’63) greet each other on Oct. 3, 2008, at the Wave ’08 all-alumni party, the signature event leading into homecoming weekend.

13

Celebrating their 25th reunion at the all-alumni party in the Lavin-Bernick Center on the uptown campus are, left to right, Lisette Jimenez Getzler (E '83), Michele Carey Egan (NC '83), Tara Burke Feenane (NC '83) and Laurette Galano (NC '83).

14

Reuniting at the all-alumni party are, from left to right, Richard Blum (E ’78, B ’85), Edward Breland (E ’78), Glen Dinwiddie (E ’78), Karl Kesser (E ’78), Carlton Dufrechou (E ’78, ’93), Glenn Richoux (E ’78, ’81), Mike Joseph (E ’78) and Gary Vogt (E ’78).

13

12

14 15 16

Kentucky crawfish 15 At a crawfish boil in Louisville, Ky., on May 17, 2008, are (left to right, back) Trey Beam, Jay Gumbeaux, Walker Fair (B ’05), Jessica Fink Fair (B ’05) and (left to right, front) Fairfax Fullerton Fair (NC ’79), William Beam (A&S ’80), Monette Beam and Sarah Jernigan (NC ’94, PHTM ’97).

Hometown parties 16 Mark Oswald (A&S ’76) welcomes Liz McCoy, left, and Maddy Knaver, both Tulane students whose hometown is Marietta, Ga., at a hometown party hosted by Oswald and his wife, Nancy, at Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Atlanta on Aug. 14, 2008. The Oswalds, co-owners of restaurants in several cities, have been hosting hometown parties for incoming Tulane students for nine years.

PHOTO 10 BY PAT GARIN, PHOTOS 12–14 BY TRACIE MORRIS SCHAEFER

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

45


classNotes theClasses

JONNIE HORN MCLEOD (NC ’45, M ’49) a pediatrician in Charlotte, N.C., received the 2008 E. Harvey Estes, MD, Physician Community Service Award from the North Carolina Medical Society on Oct. 18, 2008. The award recognized McLeod’s exemplary service to her community and to the state. “For more than 45 years, Dr. McLeod has been a tireless volunteer in civic causes in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County and North Carolina,” the letter of nomination stated. “From sex education to drug treatment to AIDS prevention to assistance to impaired physicians, her common thread has been her commitment to helping people live more productive, happier lives.” McLeod established a program that has become known as the McLeod Addictive Disease Center, the largest comprehensive addictive disease treatment center in the state. In 1971, she helped to found the Charlotte Drug Education Center, with the help of the Junior League of Charlotte. The program became known as Substance Abuse Prevention Services, a private, nonprofit agency that has trained personnel to deliver prevention programs in 21 states. She also served as chair of the Governor’s Council on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse, the Governor’s Interagency Team on Drug Abuse, the Governor’s Interagency Team on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Among Youth, and the North Carolina Drug Commission.

’45

’60

JACK KUSHNER (A&S ’60) was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the International Biographical Centre of Cambridge, England, on Aug. 29, 2008, in recognition of his outstanding achievement in the field of neurosurgery and emerging medical technology. As it was the third anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, in receiving the honor at St. Catherine’s College of Oxford University, Kushner spoke about the recovery of Tulane University after the storm. JAMES H. LAROSE (A&S ’60, M ’63) received the Ira L. Myers Service Award from the

PA G E

46 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

Medical Association of the State of Alabama for lifetime service to the medical profession. Larose helped found the American College of Nuclear Physicians and chaired the organization’s House of Delegates in 1985–87. He has published nine medical textbook chapters and more than 40 papers in the formal medical literature. Active in his community, he has chaired the board of Seton Haven Retirement Home, commanded the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Sons of Confederate Veterans, and chaired the Menewa District of the Boy Scouts of America since 1999. CARL B. CLEMENTS (A&S ’65) retired from the University of Alabama. He was a founding member of the psychology-law graduate program and also served as director of clinical training (1983–92) and department chair (1992–97). He testified as an expert witness in numerous prison and mental health class action suits and is the author of some 100 articles, chapters and reviews. Clements also served for five years on the Alabama Board of Examiners in Psychology. As an emeritus professor he continues to supervise students and remains active in research and consulting. His wife, PATRICIA TUCCILLO CLEMENTS (NC ’67), retired from DCH Regional Medical Center in Tuscaloosa, Ala., where she was a staff nurse and founding director of the diabetes center.

’65

’66

HARRY ESKEW (G ’66), professor emeritus of New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, has been honored with a volume of contributions by his former students and others, Hymnology in the Service of the Church: Essays in Honor of Harry Eskew (St. Louis: Morning Star Music, 2008).

HAL KANTOR (B ’67) is featured in a new edition of the book The Rainmaking Machine, published by Thomson Reuters. Kantor is included in the chapter “Building a Practice Around a Passion.” Kantor also represented his firm recently at the Florida Law

’67

Review’s senior banquet to present the first annual Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor and Reed Law Review Book Award. The firm is central Florida’s largest.

’69

JOHN C. FAVALORA (G ’69) received the Lumen Christi award from the Catholic Educators Guild in Miami. Favalora, who is archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Miami, was recognized for his long-standing commitment to and vision for education. JOE FORRESTER (A&S ’69) has joined the global law firm of Edwards Angell Palmer and Dodge in the firm’s New York office as counsel in the public finance department. Forrester’s legal practice focuses primarily on novel tax issues within public finance transactions. He has public finance experience as a lawyer and an investment banker and has previously served as bond counsel, special tax counsel, underwriter’s counsel and corporate counsel. Forrester previously was a managing director in the municipal securities group of UBS Securities. He resides in Summit, N.J. KATIE BYRNE SPECK (NC ’69) became a published author in 2007, after years as an active member of the Kansas City Junior League and a court-appointed advocate for abused children. Her first book for young children, Maybelle in the Soup, inspired by a character her grandmother invented, is about an epicurean cockroach. It has earned critical acclaim and is nominated for three 2009 Readers’ Choice Awards. Her newest book, released in August 2008, is Maybelle Goes to Tea. Both books are published by Henry Holt and Co. Speck is married to the man she met at Tulane, Allen Speck, and has a daughter living in Los Angeles. GERALD F. JOSEPH JR. (M ’71) was elected presidentelect of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He is a senior consultant in gynecology at Ochsner Health Center in Covington, La.

’71


theClasses classNotes

SHIRLEY N. SPARKS (G ’71) is co-author of The Art and Practice of Home Visiting: Early Intervention for Children With Special Needs and Their Families (Paul H. Brookes, 2008). Sparks, a speech-language pathologist, has many years of experience as a home visitor while teaching at Santa Clara University in California. She lives in Cupertino, Calif., with her husband, Richard Greif.

’76

TIM MESCON (A&S ’76) was named president at Columbus State University in Columbus, Ga. For the past 18 years he has been dean and Dinos Eminent Scholar at the Coles College of Business at Kennesaw State University. John Dane, right, sails with son-in-law Austin Perry.

KENNETH G. NIX (M ’77) is internal medicine program director, associate dean of the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, and vice chair of the Department of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla. He was named a Mayo Distinguished Educator in 2001. His son, David, is a Fulbright fellow at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, studying the origins and trajectory of contemporary Japanese sustainable architecture. His daughter, Elizabeth, is a veterinarian in Atlanta.

’77

’78

MARCO GIARDINO (G ’78, ’85) is a chief scientist, chief technologist and historic preservation officer with NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. His commendations include special service awards, administrator’s special recognition, group achievement award, performance awards and outstanding performance awards. His main professional interest is conducting archaeological research with remote sensing images taken from NASA sensors. Giardino lives in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and he has three children, Michael, Luca and Annie. KARL KESSER (E ’78) participated in a climb to Kala Pattar, Nepal, near the Mt. Everest base station in March and April, reaching an elevation of more than 18,000 feet. Kesser

PHOTO BY FRIED ELLIOT

JOHN DANE III Sailing into history The minute JOHN DANE III (E ’72, ’75) realized he made the 2008 Summer Olympic Sailing Team, he let it sink in. After 40 years of trying, he would become the oldest member of the team to join a small fraternity of about 6,000 living United States Olympians. Then, the New Orleans native did what he has done most of his life: he set his sights higher. “Once I won the right to represent the United States, I raised the goal to come home with a medal,” said Dane, 58, president and chief executive officer of luxury boat maker Trinity Yachts in Gulfport, Miss. Why not? Most of the American teams that had defeated Dane’s crews in qualifying for the Olympics went on to win the gold medal. Armed with 20 years of climate history in Qingdao, China, about 350 miles east of Beijing, Dane and son-in-law Austin Perry, 30, designed a boat made for light air. Initially, the research paid off as the duo led the field after the first three races. But the weather changed and so did the pair’s fortune. After 10 races, they finished one point out of making the medal round. Still, Dane recognizes his accomplishment. “Being the oldest member of the Olympic Team was special,” he said, noting that even President George W. Bush facetiously asked about a slot on the nation’s cycling team. Dane credits the time he spent on the uptown campus working on his degrees in the engineering school for success in all aspects of his life, saying he learned “a certain thought process—it is never gray. The way to think (like an engineer) has certainly helped me in running a business and competitions.” In October, Dane was elected to the U.S. Sailing Board of Directors to serve a three-year term. It is unlikely there will be another Dane, according to Gary Jobson, an ESPN commentator and author who has tracked Dane’s rise. “I think this is a rare case,” Jobson said. —David Leiva

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

47


classNotes theClasses

works as program manager of projects for J. Ray McDermott Middle East, based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Kesser says his next challenge is climbing Mt. Kilamanjaro in Tanzania, which he hopes to accomplish in February. BENSON T. MASSEY (E ’79) was elected president of the Dysphagia Research Society, a multidisciplinary group dedicated to clinical and basic research for patients with swallowing disorders. As president, he has selected New Orleans as the site for the March 2009 meeting of the society. Massey is professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterolgy and Hepatology at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He is listed in Best Doctors in America.

’79

ROBERT LESLIE PALMER (A&S ’79) received the Access to Justice Award from the Public Justice Foundation at the organization’s annual gala in Philadelphia on July 15, 2008. Palmer and his Alabama Legal Reform Foundation fought to change Alabama’s statute of limitations on toxic tort complaints —a limit that required victims to file a complaint within two years of their last exposure to an offending chemical. In two editorials, the New York Times urged justice for Jack Cline, one of Palmer’s clients, who sued the makers and suppliers of benzene. Cline had acute myelogenous leukemia, which is linked to benzene exposure, but his case was thrown out of court because he was not diagnosed with the disease until after the two-year statute of limitations had expired. Palmer challenged a 1979 Alabama Supreme Court ruling that had upheld the two-year statute of limitations and overturned the 30-year-old ruling. MOREY RAISKIN (A&S ’79, L ’82) is named in The Best Lawyers in America 2009. Raiskin has headed the labor and employment law practice at Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor and Reed, since 1990. He lives with his wife, Maribeth, and 17-year-old son, Evan, in Orlando, Fla. His oldest son, Marshall, is a junior at William and Mary College.

PA G E

48 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

’80

IAN THOMPSON (M ’80) has been appointed chair of the genito-urinary committee and the urologic cancer outreach program of the Southwest Oncology Group. Thompson is professor and chair of urology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. For 20 years, he has been a part of the Southwest Oncology Group, leading a prostate cancer chemo-prevention study to reduce cancer risk in men.

’82

ALAN BRACKETT (A&S ’82, L ’84) was elected as international vice president of Delta Tau Delta. The two-year position is the second-highest post on the fraternity’s 11-man Arch Chapter, its international board of directors. Brackett is a principal in the New Orleans law firm Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand and Brackett. Delta Tau Delta is a valuesdriven fraternity founded in 1858, with 119 chapters and expansion colonies across the United States and Canada and an undergraduate membership of 6,000 men and more than 110,000 living alumni members.

’83

FRED BURNS (A&S ’83) has opened the Law Office of Fred Burns in Dallas for the practice of criminal defense, after more than 20 years with the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office. Burns is a board-certified criminal lawyer. STEPHEN D’ESPOSITO (A&S ’83) was appointed president of RESOLVE, a nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 1, 2008. The organization was founded more than 30 years ago to promote collaborative resolution of public issues, with a focus on the environment and natural resources. At RESOLVE, D’Esposito is launching the EARTH SOLUTIONS Center designed to catalyze, incubate and reward solutions to urgent environmental challenges. D’Esposito served as president of EARTHWORKS for over a decade and was previously with Greenpeace USA and Greenpeace International in a number of positions including head of the

executive committee at Greenpeace International in Amsterdam. TOM MARSHELLA (B ’83) was promoted to group managing director of corporate finance-Americas for Moody’s Investors Service in March 2008. He heads credit ratings for corporations throughout the Americas. LARRY ROMANS (G ’83), head of government information and media services at Vanderbilt University Libraries, is the 2008 recipient of the James Bennett Childs Award given by the American Library Association Government Documents Round Table. This annual award is a tribute to an individual who has made a lifetime and significant contribution to the field of government documents librarianship. Romans also was elected to the executive board of the 65,000-member organization. Romans worked in the government documents department at the Howard Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane before joining the staff at Vanderbilt. DREW BURNSIDE (L ’84) has joined the New Orleans office of Coats Rose in the labor and employment law and litigation sections. Burnside brings more than 20 years of experience in employment law and litigation. He works with employers on drug testing, non-competition agreements, trade secrets, and handbooks, and defends claims of discrimination, defamation, invasion of privacy, wrongful discharge and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

’84

’85

EMILE “JAY” BRINKMANN (B ’85) is vice president of research and economics for the Mortgage Bankers Association, where his responsibilities include economic forecasting, mortgage industry analysis, benchmarking of industry profitability and providing support for legislative and regulatory initiatives.

’86

PAUL FRIEDRICHS (A&S ’86) was named a distinguished graduate of the National War


theClasses classNotes

College and was also awarded the National Defense University President’s Writing Award in June 2008. In August, he became the new commander of the Air Force-Veterans Administration Hospital in Anchorage, Alaska, a 110-bed facility that cares for Veterans Administration, Coast Guard, Army and Air Force personnel from bases throughout Alaska. He, his wife, Rita, and their sons, Christopher and Matthew, are slowly adapting to the large amounts of snow and absence of crawfish, Friedrichs writes. HEATHER D. MCARN (NC ’86) joined Jenner and Block as special counsel in the firm’s New York office in August 2008. McArn, an experienced bankruptcy lawyer, completed a clerkship for Judge Arthur J. Gonzalez in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York. From 2004 to 2006, she was a court advocate for victims of domestic violence in Birmingham, Ala.

’87

KENNETH FORD (G ’87) was named chair of the NASA Advisory Council, which provides advice to the NASA administrator on program and policy matters related to the U.S. space program. Ford has been a member of the advisory council since June 2007, serving on the exploration committee. He is founder and director of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, a statewide not-forprofit research institute of the state university system of Florida. In 1997, NASA asked Ford to develop and direct its new Center of Excellence in Information Technology at NASA’s Ames Research Center. He received the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal in 1999. Ford received the 2008 Robert S. Englemore Memorial Award for his work in artificial intelligence. PAUL HILBERT (A&S ’87) was approved for active staff privileges by the Andrews Institute Credentialing Committee. The Andrews Institute in Gulf Breeze, Fla., is an orthopaedics and sports medicine practice under the leadership of orthopaedic surgeon James Andrews, who completed an

orthopaedics residency at Tulane in 1972. Hilbert’s podiatric medical and surgical practice consists of offices in Navarre, Gulf Breeze and Milton, Fla. Hilbert and his wife live in Gulf Breeze.

’88

CAROLYN GILLMAN (NC ’88) is founder and director of No Matter What!, an educational nonprofit committed to excellent education for all children, through which she hopes to bring awareness to the importance of supporting students and teachers in postKatrina New Orleans. Gillman has worked with children and families in high poverty areas in New Orleans, Boston, Oregon, North Carolina, Miami and Wisconsin for the past 20 years. On Oct. 6, 2008, she embarked on a 12-month, educational tour called Katrina’s Children No Matter What!, traveling crosscounty to visit universities, conferences, schools, bookstores and theaters, in conjunction with the documentary film, Katrina’s Children. The tour includes presentations of the film followed by panel discussions on the current status of children in New Orleans and the far-reaching educational implications of the aftermath of disaster. Learn more about the tour at: www.no-matter-what.org. Gillman holds a PhD in culture, curriculum and change from the University of North CarolinaChapel Hill and a master’s degree in early childhood education from Lesley University. She has served on the faculty of Washington State University and Lesley University. Her research expertise has been applied to the evaluation of The A+ (Arts in Education) Model for the Kenan Institute and the School Readiness Study with the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute in North Carolina. JEAN MARIE LIVAUDAIS (NC ’88) announces the arrival of her daughter, Laura Alyce, born on June 6, 2007. REGINA BENJAMIN (B ’90), who practices family medicine in rural Alabama, is one of this year’s recipients of a MacArthur

’90

Foundation “genius grant.” Benjamin founded the Bayou La Batre Rural Health Clinic to serve the rural fishing community. She lost the clinic in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The clinic was rebuilt by volunteers but the clinic was destroyed again by fire. Each MacArthur Foundation fellow receives a $500,000 grant, with no strings attached, over five years. Benjamin said the money will help rebuild her health clinic, which serves 4,400 patients. Grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation are designed to reward exceptional creativity, the promise of future accomplishment and the recipient’s potential to use the fellowship to underwrite such work. Benjamin was profiled in Tulanian in the spring 2001 issue. STEPHEN NELSON (M ’90, PHTM ’90) led a group of doctors to Ecuador for a medical mission Sept. 10–27, 2008. Nelson is currently an active duty lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force stationed at Keesler Air Force Base. While in Ecuador, the team of 15 providers saw more than 4,800 patients, dispensed more than 10,000 prescriptions and provided medical care to populations in need. Nelson is an assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at Tulane working part-time as a pediatric neurologist and serving on staff in the pediatric emergency department. ADAM TIKTIN (B ’90) was named vice president of investments for Marcus and Millichap Real Estate Investment Services, the nation’s largest real estate investment services firm. Tiktin specializes in retail, office and industrial investment sales. HEATHER HENRIKSEN (NC ’92) was appointed director of the new Office of Sustainability at Harvard University. Harvard received the highest ranking in a college sustainability report card that graded 300 U.S. colleges and universities. For more information go to www.greenreportcard.org.

’92

JESSICA HEW (L ’92) serves as treasurer for the Orange County, Fla., Bar Association, as

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

49


classNotes theClasses treasurer of the bar association’s foundation and on the board of trustees for the Legal Aid Society for 2008–09. MEGAN HEIZER WELFARE (NC ’93) relocated to a suburb of Charlotte, N.C., when her husband, Chuck Welfare, accepted a position with Goodrich Corp. Megan Welfare retired from her job as a CPA/auditor at Ernst and Young in 2005 to be a stay-athome mom to 3-year-old triplets, James, Camille and Meredith, and Elise, 2. In her spare time, she enjoys photography and scrapbooking.

’93

Andrew Friedman, right, executive vice president of baseball operations for the Tampa Bay Rays, talks strategy with the team’s manager, Joe Maddon.

ANDREW FRIEDMAN Baseball genius Until only a few months ago, when one thought of Major League Baseball’s elite teams, the Tampa Bay Rays probably was not the first team to come to mind. In fact, before this year, the team had never posted a winning record in its 10-year history. But that was then and this is now, and right now the Rays are coming off an improbable season that took them from worst to almost first, with a run at the World Series in October. Much of the credit for the Rays’ reversal of fortune has gone to ANDREW FRIEDMAN (B ’99), executive vice president of baseball operations and general manager. Friedman was named executive of the year by The Sporting News after his club posted the second-best record in baseball. Friedman took over the GM job with Tampa Bay in 2005. He overhauled the team by finding young talent through the draft and making trades to strengthen his lineup. Some of his moves were considered gambles by the sports press, but they paid big dividends this season. The total budget for the team was $43 million—29th out of 30 teams in the major leagues. Teams in the Rays’ division such as the New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox routinely spend well upwards of $100 million a year. The only major league team with a smaller starting budget was the Florida Marlins, and they were not around for the postseason. Friedman was an outfielder for the Green Wave baseball team until his career was cut short by injury. After graduation from Tulane, he worked as a financial analyst on Wall Street, until he got the call to the big leagues. The “Miracle” Rays were unable to cap the 2008 season with a World Series championship, winning only one game in the series while their opponent, the Philadelphia Phillies, won four games in the best of seven series. But there’s always next year. —Ryan Rivet

PA G E

50 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

’94

DAVID E. MORRIS (B ’94) was chosen for “40 Under 40 Dynamic Achievers” by the Network Journal, a magazine for black professionals and small businesses. He is founder and managing partner of Oracle Capital Partners, a private-equity firm that provides investment funds to companies owned and controlled by minorities. CAROLE TOEBE (PHTM ’94) serves as a faculty member and chair of the biological sciences department at City College of San Francisco. JEFF CRYSTAL (E ’96) is chief operating officer of Voltaic Systems, a company that sells mobile solar-powered generators to charge hand-held electronic devices, where he is responsible for sales and marketing, web development and order fulfillment for the United States and Europe. Voltaic Systems’ solar-powered laptop bag was listed on Popular Mechanics’ list of top 10 green products. For more information, go to voltaicsystems.com.

’96

HOWARD JEFFRIES (M ’96, PHTM ’96) was appointed medical director for the continuous performance improvement program at Seattle Children’s Hospital, where he is working with a team to increase physician engagement with the program, educate

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


theClasses classNotes physicians on continuous performance improvement principles and direct clinical practice projects. Jeffries, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, is an attending physician in the cardiac intensive care unit at the hospital, and he has served as director of quality improvement for the pediatric and cardiac intensive care units since joining the faculty in 2004. RYAN DAVIS (TC ’96) is president-elect of the Young Lawyers Section of the Orange County, Fla., Bar Association for 2008–09. REBECCA BLACK (NC ’97) and Francis Kelly were married in Marin County, Calif., on July 26, 2008. EDEN GOLDRING (NC ’97) was a bridesmaid and LANE GREENE (TC ’97) took about 1,000 photos, according to the bride. Black is the new director of creative writing at Santa Clara University.

’97

JOHN WATERMAN (B ’97) helped produce a film, Boston Girls, which was screened at the Boston Film Festival. Waterman is president of Odd Man Out Productions. DONNA PEARSON BEAL (PHTM ’98) received the Judith R. Miller Award for contributions to the profession and to the section from the Public Health Education and Health Promotion Section of the American Public Health Association. Beal and her husband, Randy, announce the birth of Wyatt Edward on Aug. 12, 2008, in Santa Barbara, Calif. The baby joins a sister, Paige.

’98

TONY FRISSORE (TC ’98) announces the release of his debut album, “The Übermix.” For more information, go to: http://cdbaby. com/cd/tfrissore or listen to tracks at www. betarecords.com/tony.frissore. TIMOTHY J. SMITH (TC ’98) has accepted a position as assistant professor in the anthropology department at Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C.

DAVID ZARIN (B ’98) and JILL COHEN ZARIN (NC ’04) announce the birth of Micah Harry on May 14, 2008, in New York. IAN C. BARRAS (E ’99, ’02) is an associate in the New Orleans office of the law firm of Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman and Areaux, where he practices intellectual property law. In July, Barras became a registered patent attorney, so he can practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

’99

EMILY GRIFFITH (NC ’99) graduated with honors from the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine with the degree of doctor of osteopathic medicine on May 31, 2008. Griffith is planning to enter residency training in orthopaedic surgery at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Consortium in Philadelphia. KRISTOPHER KEST (TC ’99) is serving on the board of directors of the Young Lawyers Section of the Orange County, Fla., Bar Association for 2008–10.

’00

MARK BRYANT (B ’00) was appointed vice president for the external tank program at Lockheed Martin, providing leadership to the external tank program including design, production, delivery and flight for the space shuttle program. AMBER CASSELL (E ’00) married Austin Hood on Sept. 27, 2008, in Lake Tahoe, Nev. In attendance were RUPAL PATEL (E ’99), MARIA ELENA GOMEZ-MEJIA (NC ’00) and CATHARINE THOMSON (NC ’99). Amber Hood is employed by SAIC as a human factors engineer and Austin Hood is a captain on active duty in the Air Force. The couple resides in Yorktown, Va.

ANNIE T. CHRISTOFF (NC ’00) joined Bass, Berry and Sims in the litigation practice of the firm’s Memphis, Tenn., law office. Christoff graduated in May 2007 from the Georgetown University Law Center. She was managing

editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. Christoff served as a judicial clerk in the western district of Tennessee. After graduation from Tulane, she spent four years as a high school teacher in Memphis, Tenn. FELIPE CORREA (A ’00) announces that his architectural practice of Somatic Collaborative, in association with Leven Betts Architects, was awarded third prize in the Magok Waterfront International Competition in Seoul, Korea, in June. DOUGLAS MEFFERT (E ’88, B ’99), the Eugenie Schwartz Professor for River and Coastal Studies at Tulane University and a principal in Meffert + Etheridge Environmental Projects, served as the environmental consultant for the project. NANCY STRASFELD (B ’01) married Jack Gold in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 26, 2008. MEGAN BERNSTEIN (NC ’02), MADELINE LOWENSTEIN (NC ’02) and SHERI GOLDBERG (NC ’03) were bridesmaids. MAGGIE WEINBERG (NC ’02), ASHLEY SCHARF (NC ’01) and STEVE SCHARF (TC ’92) were in attendance.

’01

ELLEN JEFFERY BLUE (G ’02) received a Lilly Faculty Fellowship for her sabbatical project, “In Case of Katrina: Reinventing the United Methodist Church in Post-Katrina Louisiana.” Blue is the Mouzon Biggs Jr. Associate Professor of the History of Christianity and United Methodist Studies at Phillips Theological Seminary in Tulsa, Okla. She will spend a year completing research in New Orleans and has been named a visiting scholar at the Newcomb College Center for Research on Women at Tulane for 2008–09.

’02

EMMA BEESONTATE BOULWARE (NC ’02) has started a website, www.Do-GoodGuide. com, to help people integrate small acts of charity and kindness into their everyday lives. Boulware lives in Tampa, Fla. NICOLE PAIGE FATICA (B ’02) of Greenwich, Conn., married Robert Arthur Stansell III of Cohasset, Mass., on July 19, 2008, in

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

51


classNotes theClasses Greenwich. Fatica is the investor relations officer at Primus Guaranty in New York. She is pursuing an MBA at New York University. Stansell is a design architect with Perkins + Will in New York. He also works independently on bar and restaurant design, most recently completing GalleryBar and Ella in lower Manhattan. The couple honeymooned in the Philippine Islands and resides in Manhattan. WANDA SIGUR (B ’02) was appointed vice president and deputy of engineering for Space Systems Company of Lockheed Martin, where she assists with personnel management and development, processes development and deployment, engineering tools and training, and product technical validation for operational excellence. JOHN GREIFZU JR. (TC ’03) and CHRISTINA “TINA” TAYLOR (B ’02) were married in Indianapolis on Oct. 11, 2008. CHRISTOPHER VIESON (TC ’03), MICHAEL WILLIAMS (B ’05) and DAVID WILLIAMSON (B ’03) were groomsmen. BARBARA TAYLOR AITKEN (NC ’98) was matron of honor and ERIN RILEY VILLASEÑOR (E ’03), CYNTHIA KURIAKOSE (B ’03) and ERIKA JORDAN (E ’03) were bridesmaids. ERIC AITKEN (E ’99) was a reader. Those in attendance included MICHAEL BELGRAIER (TC ’03), RICHARD BORN (TC ’04), GREG DILLON (TC ’02), COOKIE DUPONT (NC ’05), BRENT KRAEGER (TC ’02), LINDSEY KUCHARSKI (NC ’03), SARAH MONTGOMERY (NC ’05), ERICA OTTEN (B ’03), JOSEPH QUICK (TC ’04), MARY SCHMID (NC ’05), CRAIG SETLOW (B ’04), JULIE SONKIN (B ’05), ANDRES VILLASEÑOR (TC ’03), KEVIN WALSH (B ’04), ADRIENNE WHITE WALSH (NC ’05), and PAUL WALSH (TC ’04). The couple resides in New York, where Greifzu is a litigation associate with the law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison, and Taylor is a management associate with American International Group.

’03

MEGAN STACK (NC ’03) has been named director of the Family Assistance and Community Employment Services Department at Catholic Charities of Tennessee.

PA G E

52 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

JARED CONGIARDO (E ’04) is an aerospace technologist with NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. He lives in Metairie, La.

’04

CHRISTOPHER MEYER (TC ’04) is one of 14 White House Fellows for 2008–09 appointed by President George W. Bush. Meyer is a health policy fellow at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. After graduation from Tulane, Meyer became a Teach for America Corps member in New Orleans, where he taught high school social studies and coached basketball. Meyer was selected as a school principal for Teach for America’s summer institute. He has served as a policy coordinator for Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, and has volunteered and interned at the White House, in Congress and in the Office of the Mayor of New York City. Meyer is the youngest person to be elected as a Louisiana delegate to the Republican National Convention, where in 2004 he spoke about education reform. He received his master’s degree in public policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government where he was a public service fellow and teaching assistant. Owner of a small business in his hometown, Shreveport, La., Meyer says he and his wife, Alice, are committed to working to strengthen Louisiana. J O N F E R R I S (G ’05) is president of Seattle-based MyGlobalStaff.com, a firm that provides business outsourcing solutions for small and medium-sized businesses in the United States, Europe and Australia. Ferris is a certified outsourcing provider. The company opened a new office in Washington, D.C., this fall 2008.

’05

MEGHAN HOLAHAN RODDY (L ’05) and her husband, Troy, welcomed their second child, Heldner Paul, on July 26, 2008. Heldner joins his sister, Irene, 3. After the birth, the family relocated to Warrenton, Va., where Troy Roddy is the head of the middle school at Wakefield School. Meghan Roddy is staying

home and will resume practicing law after taking the Virginia bar exam. BEN TRAHAN (UC ’05) and his wife, KRISTINE KARRIGAN TRAHAN (NC ’94), announce the birth of Sara Kristine on July 31, 2008. The Trahans live and work in Dallas. DAVID FOBES (TC ’06), who is studying for his PhD in physics at Tulane, was one of a group of graduate research students who attended the 58th Annual Lindau Meeting of Nobel Laureates and Students in Lindau, Germany, June 29–July 4, 2008. During the meeting, Nobel laureates in chemistry, physics and medicine or physiology lectured on topics of their choice and participated in small-group discussions with the students. Fobes was among 14 American students at the event who were sponsored by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, a university consortium of 99 major research institutions.

’06

VALERIE FONTENOT (’07) received an Albert Schweitzer Fellowship to help provide health education focusing on responsible sexual behavior for adolescents in the greater New Orleans area. Fontenot is working on a master’s degree in health policy and systems management at the Louisiana State University School of Public Health.

’07

WENXIN LI (B ’07) won a 2007 Elijah Watt Sells Award as one of 10 candidates who earned the highest cumulative scores on the four sections of the CPA exam, announced the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. In 2007, there were more than 76,000 examinees. Li is employed by Energy Future Holdings in Dallas. LENA D. GIANGROSSO (L ’08) joined the firm of Provosty and Gankendorff in New Orleans as an associate, focusing her practice primarily in the fields of insurance defense, environmental law, corporate law, commercial litigation, toxic tort litigation, maritime law and intellectual property.

’08


deaths theClasses

MICHAEL P. SMITH (A&S ’68) of New Orleans on Sept. 26, 2008 A photographer who for three decades captured vivid pictures of jazz funerals, Mardi Gras Indian ceremonies, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, and New Orleans’ music scene, Smith had a trove of more than 500,000 images. He was a staff photographer for the Jazz Archive at Tulane University in the 1960s and his work is housed in permanent collections internationally. He received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and a lifetime achievement award from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. A founder of Tipitina’s music club, Smith lived his philosophy: “Follow the music.”

Marjorie Isaacs Kullman (NC ’31) of New Orleans on Sept. 12, 2008. Sally Reed Atkins (NC ’32, G ’34) of Santa Barbara, Calif., on July 9, 2008. Lise Wehrmann Wells (NC ’35) of New Orleans on Aug. 25, 2008. Barbara Bouden (NC ’36, UC ’71) of New Orleans on Feb. 24, 2007. Camille D’Ingianni Oms (NC ’36) of Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 22, 2008. Adele Bodker Salter (NC ’36) of Hammond, La., on Sept. 16, 2008. Fernando C. Mendigutia (L ’37) of Miami on May 26, 2008. Jane Haas Vincent (NC ’37) of Lafayette, La., on July 24, 2008.

PA G E

54 |

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

Marvin A. Cohen (A&S ’38) of Cincinnati on July 21, 2008. John K. Dixon (E ’38) of Fort Worth, Texas, on July 17, 2008. Thomas C. Earl (E ’38) of Fort Myers, Fla., on Aug. 23, 2008. Lewis C. Parrish (A&S ’39) of New Orleans on Aug. 25, 2008. Margaret Follett RePass (NC ’39) of New Orleans on Sept. 6, 2008. Bernard Kaufman Jr. (M ’40) of San Francisco on July 9, 2008. Charlotte Carter Smith (NC ’40) of New Orleans on Sept. 19, 2008. Annette Lisitzky Brown (NC ’41) of Blacksburg, Va., on July 4, 2008. James F. Gladney Jr. (M ’41) of

2 0 0 8

Homer, La., on Aug. 24, 2008. Elva Gaille Marks (UC ’41) of New Orleans on Sept. 4, 2008. Algie Hill Neill (A&S ’41) of Montgomery, Ala., on May 29, 2008. Barbara Harrison Tete (NC ’41) of Lake Charles, La., on July 22, 2007. Beth Jarman Sumner-Wiggins (SW ’41) of Jacksonville, Fla., on July 29, 2008. John S. Burwell (E ’43) of New Orleans on Sept. 20, 2008. Yvonne Anderson Champagne (NC ’43) of Lafayette, La., on June 11, 2008. George B. Elliott Jr. (B ’43) of Louisville, Ky., on Sept. 18, 2008. Henry C. Foss (L ’43) of Hilton Head, S.C., on July 26, 2008. Nathan F. Troum (A&S ’43, M ’45) of San Diego on Feb. 15, 2008. Audrey Flautt Westphal (NC ’43) of New Orleans on Aug. 20, 2008. Joseph J. Creely (UC ’44, A&S ’48) of New Orleans on Oct. 11, 2008. Wendell B. Holmes (M ’44) of McComb, Miss., on July 8, 2008. Willie H. Morgan (E ’44) of New Orleans on July 28, 2008. Shelton P. Berry (B ’46) of Lubbock, Texas, on Sept. 3, 2008. Jordan Brown (L ’46) of St. Louis on Aug. 29, 2008. William T. Bourke (A&S ’47, G ’49, ’52) of Southampton, N.Y., on Dec. 2, 2007. Richard H. Havener (A&S ’47) of Sarasota, Fla., on Sept. 1, 2008. Richard L. Page (B ’47) of Asheville, N.C., on April 12, 2007. Percy S. Richard Jr. (B ’47) of Baton Rouge, La., on Sept. 29, 2008. Alfred A. Watters Jr. (A&S ’47) of Raleigh, N.C., on Sept. 25, 2008. William Glazier (M ’48) of Boxford, Mass., on Feb. 19, 2007. Joseph A. Conino (B ’50) of New Orleans on Oct. 10, 2008. Melvin A. Laurent (B ’50) of Greenville, S.C., on June 20, 2008.

Edmund P. Pixberg Jr. (A&S ’50) of Metairie, La., on Aug. 22, 2008. John N. Stewart III (A&S ’50) of New Orleans on July 10, 2008. Jeraldine Wooley Still (SW ’50) of Columbia, S.C., on Sept. 23, 2008. Joseph L. Akerman (M ’51) of Apopka, Fla., on Oct. 29, 2008. Patrick Bryer (E ’51) of New Orleans on Sept. 15, 2008. Thomas C. W. Ellis III (L ’51) of New Orleans on July 28, 2008. Goodman O. Emanuel (B ’51) of River Ridge, La., on July 26, 2008. Arturo N. Munoz-Mellowes (E ’51) on Sept. 26, 2007. Wilbur D. Starr (A ’51) of Lafayette, La., on July 9, 2008. LeRoy C. Antrobus (M ’52) of Gainsville, Ga., on Dec. 9, 2007. Luis G. Alvarez-Aponte (L ’52) of Algiers, La., on Sept. 29, 2008. Leslie R. Hess (B ’52, ’55) of Lafayette, La., on Sept. 20, 2008. Mary Sue Hart Lowry (M ’52) of Austin, Texas, on July 25, 2007. Chester A. Stokely (B ’53) of Granger, Ind., on Oct. 26, 2007. JoAnn Ansley Woliver (NC ’53) of San Antonio on June 8, 2008. Avery L. Cook (M ’54) of Lake Charles, La., on Aug. 22, 2008. Les Crane (A&S ’55) of Greenbrae, Calif., on July 13, 2008. Henry C. Ivy Jr. (B ’55) of Green Valley, Ariz., on July 2, 2008. Betty Morphy Oliveira (M ’56) of New Orleans on Aug. 24, 2008. H. Philip Radecker Sr. (UC ’56) of Metairie, La., on Aug. 10, 2008. Sandra Fichtner Shapiro (G ’56) of Glenville, N.Y., on Aug. 1, 2008. John T. Butler (M ’57) of Fort Myers, Fla., on Aug. 23, 2008. Carl F. Dahlberg Jr. (E ’58) of Fairfax, Va., on Aug. 12, 2008. Gwen Munch Welch (NC ’58) of Houston on Oct. 7, 2008. Albert W. Auld (M ’59) of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on March 26, 2008.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL DeMOCKER


theClasses deaths Barbara Murphy Brooks (SW ’59) of Washington, D.C., on Nov. 8, 2007. Adelaide Sleeper McCormick (SW ’59) of Chesapeake, Va., on Jan. 14, 2007. John F. Naughton (A&S ’59, B ’61) of Washington, D.C., on July 14, 2008. Lewis W. Willis (PHTM ’59) of Jacksonville, Fla., on May 8, 2008. John J. Ahearn (G ’60) of New Orleans on July 26, 2008. Asa J. La Grow Jr. (B ’60, ’61) of New York on July 30, 2008. Hellen Sadler Rash (A&S ’60) of Biloxi, Miss., on Aug. 2, 2008. Richard J. White (UC ’60) of New Orleans on July 14, 2008. Benny J. Edwards (B ’61) of Covington, La., on Aug. 23, 2008. Frederick A. McCaughan (E ’61) of Stanley, Va., on Aug. 3, 2008. John H. Ellis Jr. (G ’62) of Bethlehem, Pa., on July 29, 2008. Gregory S. Hoffman (A&S ’62) of Pittsford, N.Y., on April 2, 2008. John W. Ormond (L ’62) of New Orleans on Aug. 14, 2008. Ruth Delony Sewell (NC ’62) of Decatur, Ala., on July 3, 2008. Wallace F. Veaudry (G ’62) of Columbus, Ga., on July 19, 2008. Jessie Collura Becnel (SW ’63) of New Orleans on July 24, 2008. Thelma Carbo Buquoi (UC ’63) of New Orleans on July 24, 2008. Hans Grohmann (UC ’63) of Tampa, Fla., on Sept. 13, 2008. John R. Peters Jr. (L ’63) of Edgard, La., on Oct. 6, 2008. C. Richard Bath (G ’64, ’70) of El Paso, Texas, on Aug. 5, 2008. Ellen Conmy Cornwell (NC ’64) of Tempe, Ariz., on June 11, 2008. Jeffrey D. Steele (A&S ’64) of Coral Gables, Fla., on Aug. 10, 2008. William M. Katz Sr. (B ’65) of Metairie, La., on June 28, 2008. Henry T. Landry Jr. (UC ’65) of Prarieville, La., on June 30, 2008. David S. Shughart Jr. (A&S ’65) of

Flagstaff, Ariz., on Sept. 8, 2008. Beth Bagby Sunflower (NC ’65) of Santa Rosa, Calif., on June 30, 2008. Joe E. Walker (G ’65) of Lafayette, La., on Sept. 11, 2008. Patricia Rollins Whitty (NC ’65) of New York on July 15, 2008. Roy H. Hughes (PHTM ’66) of West Palm Beach, Fla., on May 4, 2007. Howard C. Kliesch (E ’67) of Nipomo, Calif., on Aug. 7, 2008. John W. Perry Jr. (B ’67) of Gulfport, Miss., on Oct. 31, 2007. Augusta M. Polchow (NC ’67, G ’70) of Opelousas, La., on Sept. 5, 2008. Peter D. Thacher (A&S ’67, B ’72) of Raleigh, N.C., on June 21, 2008. Lawrence J. Merrigan (A&S ’68) of New Orleans on July 31, 2008. Richard L. Oden (G ’68) of Minneapolis on Aug. 14, 2008. Jon L. Stuntz (A&S ’68, G ’71) of Scotland on June 1, 2008. Marie Christine Ballay-Boyer (L ’69) of Algiers, La., on Sept. 13, 2008. Mitchell P. Urbanski (A&S ’69) of Flint, Mich., on Sept. 19, 2008. C. Tricon Sehrt (A&S ’70) of New Orleans on July 6, 2008. John H. Downs (A&S ’71) of Watertown, N.Y., on July 16, 2007. Suzanne Loup Comarda (SW ’72) of Baton Rouge, La., on Aug. 11, 2008. C. Donald Kratovil (PHTM ’73) of Club, Texas, on June 8, 2008. Ivonne del Por tillo Lightfoot (NC ’73) of New Orleans on Aug. 20, 2008. Augustus H. Denis Jr. (B ’74) of New Orleans on Aug. 3, 2008. Thomas G. Kambur (A&S ’74) of Mandeville, La., on Aug. 6, 2008. Fleur E. Johnson-Muller (NC ’74) of Mullica Hill, N.J., on Aug. 2, 2008. Eugenia A. Craighead (NC ’75, G ’77) of New Orleans on July 2, 2008. Ivan S. Livingston (A&S ’75) of Statesboro, Ga., on July 19, 2008. Nicholas Digirolamo (UC ’76) of

PHOTO PROVIDED BY RUDOLPH MATAS LIBRARY

JOSEPH T. “TOM” HAMRICK (PHTM ’62) of Houston on Aug. 8, 2008 An emeritus professor in the School of Medicine and the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Hamrick served in several capacities during his 40year career at Tulane, including founding chair of the community medicine program. He also founded and directed Tulane’s MD/MPH joint degree program, the first program of its kind in the nation, and served as the acting dean of the public health school. During a sabbatical from Tulane, Hamrick served as director of the New Orleans City Health Department and as assistant secretary of the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals.

Norco, La., on Sept. 13, 2008. Leslie Andelman Grodin (NC ’78) of Cleveland of April 21, 2008. Antoni J. Przygocki (G ’79) of Hampton, Va., on June 12, 2007. Craig G. Colomes (A&S ’84) of New Orleans on Sept. 27, 2008. Allan R. Lundell (G ’85 ’87) of Lancaster, Ohio, on July 7, 2008. Ray B. White (B ’86) of Rusk, Texas, on Jan. 13, 2008. Aaron F. Marcus (L ’87) of New Orleans on July 19, 2008. John A. Brady Jr. (B ’88) of Larose, La., on Aug. 13, 2008. Deborah A. Blanchard (SW ’90) of Hammond, La., on Aug. 2, 2008.

Sheryl Ellis Davenport (UC ’91) of Picayune, Miss., on July 9, 2008. Susan Barker Adamo (SW ’94) of Seattle on Sept. 24, 2008. Charles S. Riecke (L ’96) of Chicago on Sept. 5, 2008. Peter W. Dangerfield (G ’03) of New Orleans on Sept. 29, 2008.

Correction Gordon L. Blundell Jr. (A&S ’76, M ’80) was incorrectly listed in “Deaths” in the summer 2008 Tulanian. He lives in Mandeville, La.

T U L A N I A N

FA L L

2 0 0 8

|

PA G E

55


n meiw xeOrleans d Media Law and order By Nick Marinello Fashioned from granite, the brooding art deco fortress that is the Orleans Parish criminal district court building presides over the corner of Tulane and Broad without a care in the world, oblivious to the messy affairs of the people inside it. Here, law and order is not nearly as smart, sexy and certain as it is on TV, where even the most complex cases have hard, crisp edges, and every story, happy or sad, resolves in a way that at least makes sense. At Tulane and Broad, making sense is an option. If societies organize themselves around laws so that they can function in an orderly way, then one fallout of crime is disorder and confusion, and once the genie of misrule is out of the bottle it can be difficult to stuff him back in and mete out justice in the addled wake of transgression. It’s serious stuff, but you wouldn’t know it by listening to the lively chatter going on in the jury pool room that’s located on the ground floor of the criminal court building. It’s 8:30 a.m. and the room is already crackling with energy, as if each of the 200 summoned jurors has arrived determined to contribute his or her own spark. The camaraderie is a thoroughly New Orleanian byproduct of the city’s otherwise much-maligned jury-pool system that requires summoned citizens to appear two days a week for an entire month. That’s a lot of time to spend away from your job, family, television set, whatever. It’s also a lot of time to spend with a group of people with whom you wouldn’t otherwise come into contact—a sampling of the city’s diverse demographic that is not unlike certain stretches of the St. Charles parade route on Carnival Day. The spirited chatter from the 60 or 70 independent conversations belies the common interest everyone holds in the progress of a wall-mounted digital readout that ticks down

P A G E

56 |

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

the number of cases left on today’s docket. No one’s eyes stray from it for long. If all the cases resolve without the need of a jury, then everyone gets to leave before noon. No such luck today, however. One of the judges upstairs has called for a jury, and a couple dozen folks from the pool are summoned to his court, where they are picked over by both the prosecutors and the courtappointed public defender. The 19-year-old defendant, wearing a T-shirt and a couple of diamond earrings, warily watches the process, stealing looks at the jurors’ faces. Here

today on charges of distributing a couple of rocks of cocaine, the young man is perhaps calculating who will be chosen for his jury, or maybe he’s simply seeing bits and pieces of himself reflected in eyes that are working overtime to project impartiality. Meanwhile, attorneys whittle the group down to a 12-person panel, which is then sent out of the courtroom to wait for the trial to begin. This is serious stuff, what with having the burden of a person’s fate and all, but, again, you wouldn’t know it from the lively banter around the table inside the jury room. The trial is scheduled after lunch and the judge has ordered out from Five Happiness. It’s surprising how a group of strangers from widely different backgrounds and walks of life can behave as if they are old friends at a high

school reunion when sharing Chinese food, talking about the Saints and laughing at each other’s lame jokes. There aren’t many things taking place at Tulane and Broad that could be labeled “uplifting” or “heartening,” but this convivial moment built around a solid lunch and a sprinkling of good will is one. More sober moments occur after the trial, when the group returns to the jury room to pore over the evidence, which is largely circumstantial and based solely on the observations and assertions of the arresting officers. There are no eyewitnesses or surveillance tapes to talk about, and eventually the conversation, to the chagrin of some, boils down to whether or not the testimony of the arresting officers is entirely credible. No one accuses the police of any wrongdoing, nor does anyone reference that the officers are white and the defendant is black, but something is shifting in the dynamic of the group. The elephant of race has pulled up a seat, and the deliberation begins to break sharply along his ragged back. In the end, despite much arguing and cajoling and some shifting of individual positions, the group is eventually obliged to send word to the judge that it is divided and unable to reach a verdict. Some of the jurors later engage in private grumbling. Those who want a conviction believe justice has been subverted by an unreasonable distrust of the judicial system. Maybe, but to be just, shouldn’t a system be fashioned to endure both the abiding faith and the skepticism of those who come before it? More than 2,300 years ago Aristotle posited that a society is better served by the rule of law than by that of any individual. At some point, however, at Tulane and Broad and a thousand other intersections, the authority of that rule flows into the hands of individuals, all of whom arrive at the table as honest—if splintered—reflections of that society. Nick Marinello is features editor for Tulanian.

ILLUSTRATION: MARK ANDRESEN


Tulane University Associates

THE

TULANE ASSOCIATES



2008 Donor Honor Roll Dear Tulane Alumni, Students, Parents, Faculty, Staff and Friends:

Dear Tulane Alumni, Students, Parents, Faculty, Staff and Friends:

Looking back over the last year, I feel a strong sense of pride for the continued dedication of our alumni, parents and friends. You were front and center when it came to reaching our goals for “Promise and Distinction: The Campaign for Tulane.” And our extraordinary alumni led that effort, raising $316 million of the record-setting total of more than $730 million. This philanthropy speaks volumes about your commitment to the mission of Tulane.

Thank you so much! Tulane has met many milestones thanks to your incredible support, not the least of which is the astounding success of “Promise and Distinction: The Campaign for Tulane.” Over the last few years we have witnessed a dramatic increase in financial support for Tulane, which has been tremendously beneficial to making the university stand out as one of the nation’s premier research institutions. I am grateful for your strong commitment.

It is your thoughtful support that has helped us to respond so quickly and effectively to our students’ needs. Because of your gifts, Tulane has been able to expand and enhance both educational and research programs. And the Tulane endowment reached the $1.1 billion mark for the first time in our history — only 76 universities in the country have endowments that large. These endowment dollars support chairs, professorships, scholarships, fellowships and much more. In fact, our endowed chairs and professorships alone grew from 153 to 331 during the campaign period.

The Associates program recognizes the gifts of $1,500 and above that constitute the vast percentage of all giving to the university. It is no exaggeration to say that Associates are the lifeblood of the university. At this level, your contributions provide a tremendous boost to the university and set a wonderful example. In addition to helping pay for student financial aid, computer and laboratory equipment, library materials, faculty salaries, student services, and other baseline needs, your unrestricted giving is making it possible for the university to grow and transform like it never has before. As the chair of the Associates Board of Directors, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for all you have done for Tulane.

The capital dollars raised in our campaign provided for improvements to student housing in addition to a few spectacular landmarks such as the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life, Greer Field at Turchin Stadium and a new addition to the A. B. Freeman School of Business. The university’s role in the community is stronger than ever, thanks to new funds that created the Center for Public Service and the Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives, in addition to our project to improve housing in our city through the School of Architecture’s URBANbuild program and our grassroots efforts in establishing neighborhood health centers through the School of Medicine. Please know that all of you have my deepest appreciation for your gifts and loyalty that are strengthening the future of Tulane. We are counting on your unwavering dedication and your partnership as we continue on the path to fulfill our mission as one of the most distinguished and distinctive universities in the nation in terms of education, research and community-service programs.

Of course, all gifts, no matter the amount or designation, have an impact. I am so very proud that so many Tulanians came through for the university to build on our long-standing and well-deserved reputation for academic excellence, to establish Tulane in its rightful place among the top research universities in the nation, and to bring pioneering innovations to our outstanding undergraduate and professional programs. Thank you for your loyalty and your generosity. Sincerely, Mark Tipton (A&S ’78) Chair, Associates Board of Directors

Sincerely,

Scott S. Cowen President

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

5 7


Tulane University Associates The following donor list includes new gifts and pledges and pledge payments received in fiscal year 2008.

Mr. & Mrs. Lodwrick M. Cook Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Darden € Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Darden $1,000,000+ Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Devlin Anonymous Donors Collins C. Diboll Private Foundation Jeffrey A. Altman Foundation ¥ The Discovery Fund Carnegie Corp. of New York Mrs. Dora Bonquois Ellis* Mr. Michael A. Corasaniti & ExxonMobil Foundation ¥ £ Ms. Valerie A. Zondorak FedEx Corp. The Devlin Foundation € Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund ¥ £ § Dr. & Mrs. James R. Doty § Mr. & Mrs. David C. Friezo Feil Family Foundation The Frost Foundation Ltd. Ella West Freeman Foundation ¥ Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation § Goldring Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Avram A. Glazer The James Family Foundation § Peter D. & Carol Goldman Lawrence Family Foundation ¥ Foundation Louisiana Board of Regents ¥ £ Mr. & Mrs. Matthew B. Gorson Georges Lurcy Charitable & The Greater New Orleans Educational Trust Foundation ¥ £ § The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation The Greer Family Foundation The Murphy Foundation Hancock Bank ¥ Murphy Oil USA £ The Irving Harris Foundation § Edward G. Schlieder Educational Mr. & Mrs. Douglas J. Hertz ¥ Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Hinckley £ Dr. & Mrs. Howard M. Sheridan § Humana § Mrs. Bertie Deming Smith § Joseph M. Humphries, MD* The People of Qatar § IBM Corp. ¥ The Vesper Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence J. Israel* The Weatherhead Foundation Jaeger Foundation Woldenberg Foundation Jewish Endowment Foundation £ § Mr. & Mrs. E. Richard Yulman Eugenie & Joseph Jones Family Ms. Kate J. Yulman Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey N. Karp $500,000–999,999 Ms. Martha McCarty Kimmerling Anonymous Donors Mr. & Mrs. Sandor Korein The Children’s Health Fund § Kuehn Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Paul H. Flower Mr. & Mrs. James M. Lapeyre Jr. ¥ £ Mr. & Mrs. Scott G. Heape € Mr. & Mrs. Albert N. Lechter ¥ J.D. & C.T. MacArthur Foundation Mrs. Mary M. Lemann § Meredith Mallory Jr., MD § Mr. Albert R. Lepage ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Marshall € Mr. & Mrs. Alan M. Leventhal £ Dr. Penny Morrill Lydian Asset Management, LP Mr. & Mrs. Rick S. Rees ¥ Mr. & Mrs. William E. Mayer Laurie Klayman Schloss & McCune Charitable Foundation Lawrence M.V.D. Schloss Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. McKeever Wisner Trust Fund The McKnight Foundation £ Zemurray Foundation Mr. Robert B. Menschel Dr. & Mrs. John F. Moffett ¥ § $100,000–499,999 Mozel Charitable Trust Anonymous Donors The Nathan Cummings Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Ackerman £ The Perkin Fund J. Aron Charitable Foundation Mr. A. Lane Plauché* Mrs. Merryl I. Aron The Posse Foundation Mr. Charles L. Atwood ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Richardson K. Powell Carole B. & Kenneth J. Mr. & Mrs. James J. Reiss Jr. ¥ Boudreaux Foundation ¥ Mr. Christopher B. Robb The Booth-Bricker Fund Mr. Kenneth R. Sadowsky The Gladys Brooks Foundation Dr. Louise H. Saik & Mr. Burk-Kleinpeter Clifton J. Saik ¥ Amon G. Carter Foundation § The Satterwhite Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. D. Bruce Christian Mr. Martin F. Schmidt GIFTS RECEIVED JULY 1, 2007–JUNE 30, 2008

P A G E

5 8

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

Mr. David A. Sislen ¥ The Smerge Family Foundation § Dr. & Mrs. John L. Smith § Soref-Breslauer Texas Foundation Mrs. Gladys Davidson St. Martin* Drs. Mai & Willie Suhr § Mr. Paul B. Sussdorf* Dr. & Mrs. J. Dudley Talbot § Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Tudor III £ United Way of Miami-Dade Kendall Vick Public Law Foundation £ Vital Projects Fund The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Ambassador & Mrs. John G. Weinmann £ § Suzanne R. Weiss & Stephen H. Weiss* Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation § Whitney National Bank of New Orleans ¥ Dr. & Mrs. J. Richard Williams § M. B. & Edna Zale Foundation $50,000–99,999 Anonymous Donors Mrs. Solange Abdulnour & Mr. Nazih Nakhoul § The Almar Foundation § Baptist Community Ministries £ § Mr. & Mrs. J. David Barksdale Mr. & Mrs. Emile J. Bayle ¥ Berberian Ranches § Mr. & Mrs. Edwin J. Blair Mr. & Mrs. Barry Brucker § Mr. Robert L. Bunnen Jr. Mrs. Carla Dodd Burgess* Edward L. Burke, MD § CA, Inc. Cancer Crusaders § Centocor § CIAPA The Coypu Foundation Cystic Fibrosis Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Ray Day Jr. Mr. Kenneth P. de Got & Christine E. Blackwell, MD Ms. Jo Ann De Martini Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Felson Mr. & Mrs. James B. Francis Jr. Freeport-McMoRan Foundation ¥ £ The Greater Kansas City Community Foundation The Hon. Jennifer Sneed & Mr. Frederick R. Heebe Louisiana Cancer Research Center § The Marcus Foundation ¥ Dr. & Mrs. K. David McMurrain Merck & Co. §

Microsoft Corp. ¥ Ms. Dorothy Lamb & Eugene J. Miller Jr., PhD Motorola Foundation Charles Stewart Mott Foundation £ Mr. & Mrs. David M. Mussafer OppenheimerFunds Legacy Program Ms. Ruth Paddison* Mr. & Mrs. Gray S. Parker Dr. & Mrs. Charles Pinkoson § The Max & Betty Ratner Family Foundation William Rosenberg Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. John T. Rossi Charles Schwab & Co. ¥ § T & C Schwartz Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Albert H. Small Jr. Mr. Raymond G. Smerge § Mr. & Mrs. Paul Robert Spellman Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Staed £ Mr. & Mrs. Matthew J. Ungarino United Negro College Fund § Unity for the Homeless § Dr. & Mrs. J.E. Watkins Trust Fund § Dr. & Mrs. Ted Chau-po Wei § Mrs. Carol B. Wise Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Wolfberg Mr. & Mrs. Bob F. Wright £ $25,000–49,999 Anonymous Donors AGL Resources Private Foundation ¥ American Greetings Corp. American Psychiatric Assoc. § AmeriCares Primary Healthcare Grant Program § Mr. & Mrs. William J. Atkins ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Gerald S. Berenson § Mr. & Mrs. Sean M. Berkowitz Mr. & Mrs. Jack R. Berquist Mr. Allan Bissinger Mr. Philip W. Bohne*§ Ms. Cheryl A. Verlander & Mr. Charles N. Bracht Brandon Charitable Cayman Trust Dr. & Mrs. Malcolm M. Brown § Mr. & Mrs. Richard G. Buckingham The Burkenroad-Selber Foundation ¥ Business Council of New Orleans & River Region Capital One Services Dr. & Mrs. David M. Carlton § Mr. Walter Carroll Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Albert John Cass III Chielpegian Law Offices § Jonathan Y. C. Ching, MD* Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana £ Covance §


Tulane University Associates Covance Periapproval Services § Scott & Marjorie Cowen Mr. & Mrs. Bernard J. Panetta II § Ernest G. DeBakey Charitable Foundation § Deer Creek Foundation £ Mr. & Mrs. Steven L. Dehmlow Mr. Robert S. Devins Robert & Michelle Diener Foundation Eason-Weinmann Foundation £ § Mr. & Mrs. R. V. Edwards Jr. Ms. Adele A. Eisler* The Jeffrey & Donna Eskind Family Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. H. Mortimer Favrot Jr. Ms. Ann C. Fishman Evan Frankel Foundation £ Friedman Foundation € £ Mrs. Anita P. Georges Mr. Constantine D. Georges Mr. & Mrs. Craig S. Glick Mrs. Alexandra Pomeroy Goehring Scott Goldman, MD § Leonard & Jerry Greenbaum Family Foundation ¥ Mrs. JoAnn Flom Greenberg § Mr. & Mrs. Arthur M. Greshemer Jr. Joy M. & James Grodnick Charitable Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Joseph D. Guillory Jr. § Ms. Sarah E. Harte Ray Hester Chapter € Mr. Robert C. Hills* Mr. & Mrs. Scott G. Intagliata Mr. John A. Isakson Mr. & Mrs. Marvin L. Jacobs £ Jewish Community Federation of the Greater East Bay Mrs. Doris O’Quinn Johns* Jones, Walker, Waechter, Poitevent, Carrere & Denegre ¥ £ Mr. Gladstone N. Jones III £ Yvette & Rick Jones Mr. & Mrs. Jory B. Katlin Mr. & Mrs. Richard R. Kilgust Mr. & Mrs. John E. Koerner III Dr. Christopher M. Kramer £ Mr. Daniel R. Kramer £ Dr. & Mrs. J. Monroe Laborde § Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. Laufer Mr. Alan W. Lawrence Mr. & Mrs. John F. LeBlanc € Ellen & Alan Levin Family Foundation Mrs. John R. Luke The Lupin Foundation Dr. Mary Lupo & Mr. Robert Smith Lupo § Mr. & Mrs. Wilson K. Magee Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Augustine Meaher III Middle J Foundation Mignon Faget-Assembly, Ltd.

Mississippi State Department of Health & CDC The A. S. Mitchell Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Norman A. Nadel New Orleans Lighthouse for the Blind The New York Community Trust § J. K. Newsom Sr., MD § Ms. Jeanne C. Olivier The William J. & Dorothy K. O’Neill Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. Martin D. Payson Phelps Dunbar, LLP £ The Rechler Family Foundation £ Mr. Jerome J. Reso Jr. £ Mickey Retif Foundation Miss Mary A. Riess Mr. J. Taylor Rooks* The Roos Charitable Lead Trust § San Antonio Area Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Richard K. Schmidt The Aaron or Peggy Selber Foundation ¥ The Stempler Family Foundation Ms. Andrea J. Pennisi & Mr. Paul W. Stephenson ¥ Mr. Ravi Suria ¥ Dr. Danielle Sweeney & Mr. Kevin Sweeney § Mr. & Mrs. Wilmer J. Thomas Jr. £ The Times-Picayune Mrs. Thelma D. Toole* Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program ¥ Mrs. Elizabeth F. Walters Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey D. White Wilemal Fund § Mr. John J. Witmeyer III € Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Young € Sergei S. Zlinkoff Fund for Medical Education

Tommy Meehan (E ’83) and Riptide

Hon. Herbert J. Baumann Jr. & Dr. Shelly P. Baumann § Dr. & Mrs. Bernard Villars Baus Mr. & Mrs. John D. Becker € Dr. & Mrs. Robert O. Begtrup § Mrs. Sophia W. Bender £ Mr. & Mrs. Edward B. Benjamin Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Darryl D. Berger £ Dr. & Mrs. John V. Bernard Mr. & Mrs. James J. Bertrand € The Bertuzzi Family Foundation Mrs. Jeanelle Beskin § Sydney & Walda Besthoff Foundation Biesecker Foundation Bike & Build Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Birdoff £ Dr. & Mrs. Robert C. Blankenship § $10,000–24,999 Mr. & Mrs. James A. Boone ¥ Anonymous Donors Mr. & Mrs. Robert Boudreau € Mr. & Mrs. Herschel L. Abbott Jr. £ § John F. Bricker, LLC Dr. & Mrs. A. Richard Adrouny § W. L. Lyons Brown Jr. Dr. Justus Baird & Dr. Salpi Charitable Foundation ¥ Adrouny § Dr. & Mrs. Robert W. Brown § Allergan Pharmaceuticals § Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Bruno £ Mr. Jeffrey A. Altman ¥ Mr. & Mrs. William Burk III American Refugee Committee Mrs. Dorothy Lambert Calkins* International § Mr. & Mrs. Craig D. Campbell Sr. Mr. Sean P. Aron ¥ Canal Barge Co. £ Atwood Foundation Dr. Robert J. Card & Dr. & Mrs. Kristopher N. Atzeff § Ms. Karol Ann Kreymer § Mr. & Mrs. Grant A. Bagan The P & C Carroll Foundation Virginia Baker Charitable Lead Trust Chadwick Family Barnes & Noble College Booksellers Foundation, LLC ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Lewis Barnum III Mr. Alec Y. Chang £ Mr. Brent Barriere & Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Collat Ms. Judy Barrasso £ Mr. Richard C. Colton Jr. Mr. & Mrs. William R. Battey Communities Foundation of Texas

Community Foundation for Southwest Washington Dr. & Mrs. William J. Cone Connecticut General Life Insurance § Mr. & Mrs. Jason L. Cook ¥ Covenant House § Crane Fund for Widows & Children Mr. & Mrs. Clive S. Cummis The Dallas Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Dauterive Jr. Mrs. Carla M. Dehmlow Dr. J. Carter Denton & Dr. Ann Rose Denton § Miriam & Arthur Diamond Charitable Trust Ms. Ethel L. Eaton Mr. & Mrs. Randall M. Ebner £ The Eichold Family Dean Baker Ellithorpe, MD § Drs. Kristin & N. Robert Elson § The Steven & Laurie Eskind Family Foundation § Philip J. Fagan Jr., MD § Drs. Kathleen & Henry Faulkner Drs. Deborah & Doug Fein § The Hon. Jacques L. Wiener Jr. & Sandra M. Feingerts, Esq. £ Fenner-French Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Ludovico Feoli Dr. & Mrs. Brian G. Firth § Mr. & Mrs. Bruce D. Frank Dr. Irwin Frankel Mr. & Mrs. James G. Frankel Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Freeman Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Ronald French Mr. Reuben I. Friedman £ Mr. & Mrs. James M. Garner £ Mr. Mark P. Gauchet €

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

5 9


Tulane University Associates Mr. & Mrs. Paul F. Gibbons Ms. Hilary Ginsberg-Feshbach & Mr. Joseph A. Feshbach Mr. & Mrs. Robert Gipson Dr. & Mrs. Robert S. Gold § Mr. & Mrs. Stephen L. Golden Goldman, Sachs & Co. Ms. Mary L. Goldman § Mr. & Mrs. Raymond P. Gordon Mr. Joseph A. Gowan* GPOA Foundation Mr. & Mrs. John T. Gray II Mr. & Mrs. Mark A. Greenhill Mr. James C. Groves Marian & Mark Gutowski § Mr. & Mrs. David J. Harris £ Dr. & Mrs. Everette S. Havard § Ms. Adrea D. Heebe & Mr. Dominick A. Russo Jr. € Mrs. Edna Schlegel Heft* The Helts Foundation § Hertz Family Foundation € Adele Hieshima-Inouye, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Hoagland The Horowitz Family Foundation Houston Jewish Community Foundation Hummer Family Trust Dr. & Mrs. Monte E. Ikemire § The Henry M. Jackson Foundation £ Dr. & Mrs. Delmas A. Jackson § Dr. & Mrs. Kenneth L. Janson § The J.E.M.F. Foundation Jewish Federation of Nashville & Middle Tennessee

John Snow Dr. Miriam E. John & Mr. William G. Wilson Mr. Alex Kaufman Keller Family Foundation Seong Y. Kim, MD & Mrs. Kyung S. Hwang § Ms. Dorothy Jung King Mr. & Mrs. Stuart R. Klabin Ulla Ule, MD & James D. Knoepp, MD § Rouzbeh K. Kordestani, MD § Jenny & Bob Kottler ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Colman R. Kraff Mr. & Mrs. Mark Krouse Mr. Frederick S. Kullman* Ms. Merrilee W. Kullman £ Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence E. Kurzius Dr. Samir N. Ghadiali & Dr. Stephanie M. Kute Laitram, LLC Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Lartigue Jr. Lassen Family Foundation € Mr. & Mrs. Sidney W. Lassen € Ms. Kate S. Lavelle Mr. & Mrs. Alan B. Levan Ms. Carol S. Levin Dr. & Mrs. Julius L. Levy § Mr. & Mrs. Walter M. Levy Mr. & Mrs. William G. Lewin Dr. & Mrs. George N. Lewis § Mrs. Judy C. Licht & Mr. Jerry Della Femina Mr. Martin F. Roper & Ms. Susan L. Littlefield

The Tulane Associates Program is excited to welcome Ozgur Karaosmanoglu as incoming chair of the Associates Board of Directors. As a student, Ozgur was involved in several organizations including the Zeta Psi fraternity, the Jambalaya, the Hullabaloo, ASB, and others. As an alumnus and board member, Ozgur hosts an annual Stewardship Luncheon in his hometown of Washington D.C. to recognize Associates in the area and is a vocal advocate for Tulane. “My years at Tulane were a very important part of my life, and I want to help the university. My education and experiences at school helped me get to where I am. That’s one of the reasons I give back to the school. The better the university becomes, the more valuable my degrees get.” —Ozgur Karaosmanoglu (A&S ’84, MBA ’87) Ozgur lives in Bethesda, Md., with his wife, Lori Geraci Karaosmanoglu (NC ’87, G ’89), and their three children.

P A G E

6 0

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

Mr. & Mrs. David J. Lonner Louisiana Assoc. of Health Plans § Louisiana Medical Mutual Insurance Co. § Barbara Lukash, MD & Ben Z. Cohen, MD § Dr. & Mrs. Howard I. Maibach § Mr. & Mrs. Anthony E. Mann Marine Insurance Seminars £ Dr. & Mrs. Clifford G. Martin § Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Martin Jr. € Mr. & Mrs. John L. Martinez § Mayer Electric Supply Co. Mr. & Mrs. Jay H. McDowell Mr. & Mrs. Paul H. McDowell Dr. & Mrs. James W. McFarland ¥ The William G. McGowan Charitable Fund ¥ Gustaf Westfeldt McIlhenny Family Foundation McIntosh Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. Gerald D. McInvale § Mrs. Margaret Werlein McLean* Mrs. Rachel S. McPherson & Mr. William P. McMullan Hilary Anne Wilder, EdD & Michael J. Merritt, PhD Mr. & Mrs. Conrad Meyer IV £ Mr. & Mrs. Michael D. Meyer Dr. & Mrs. D. James Miller Monroe Fund Dr. & Mrs. Gary C. Morchower § Mr. & Mrs. James R. Morton Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Moses Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence B. Nadel National Oilwell Varco, LP National Philanthropic Trust Mr. & Mrs. Brick Nelson Mr. James E. Nix Norman Foundation Dr. & Mrs. William G. Odom Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, PC Mark & Nancy Oswald Ms. Margaret C. Overton* Mrs. Margaret P. Sullivan-Pace & Paul D. Pace, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Parkinson £ Brian & Leigh Pence Ms. Vijay Sree Venkatraman & Mr. Subash B. Pereira ¥ Ms. Frances Petrocelli & Charles B. Wilson, MD § Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of Amer Fdn § Mrs. Irene S. Phelps Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Pierpont Jr. Jack A. Pines, MD § Mr. William S. Piper IV § Mr. Bernie J. Pistillo Jr. £ Pitney Bowes € Diane & Andy Plauché €

Mr. & Mrs. M. Cleland Powell III § Pricewaterhouse Coopers Foundation ¥ The Prior Family Trust Mr. & Mrs. Bruce H. Rabinovitz Mr. & Mrs. David Rabinowitz £ Usha Ramadhyani, MD & Warren R. Bourgeois III, MD § The Rapides Foundation Mrs. Kristine Hummer Rasmussen & Mr. Steven R. Rasmussen The Stanley W. Ray Jr. Philanthropic & Civic Trust £ Mr. & Mrs. Randolph C. Read Mr. & Mrs. Edmund E. Redd The Hon. Ernest V. Richards IV & Mrs. Jo Ann Richards £ Mrs. Anne Gillette Richardson* Dr. Catherine Ridgway & Mr. Eli Ridgway Mr. & Mrs. George A. Rizzo Jr. ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Edwin R. Rodriguez Jr. Roomers The Adam R. Rose Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Alan H. Rosenbloum Mr. & Mrs. Perry J. Roussel Jr. £ Mrs. Antoinette D. Rumely ¥ Dr. & Mrs. A. John Rush Ryan Family Foundation Santa Fe Community Foundation Mr. & Mrs. A. Lester Sarpy £ Sarracenia Foundation ¥ Mr. Scott C. Satterwhite & Ms. Patricia L. Stern ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Felix H. Savoie € Scandurro & Layrisson, LLC € Chester B. Scrignar, MD* Dr. & Mrs. Melvin L. Selzer § Hyslop Shannon Foundation Shapell Industries € Shell Oil Co. Foundation ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Christopher C. Silliman § Mr. & Mrs. Ralfe O. P. Silverman Jr. ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Edward M. Simmons Siragusa Foundation Mr. Benjamin A. Sislen Mr. Matthew M. Sislen Mr. & Mrs. I. William Sizeler Mr. & Mrs. Scott T. Slatten € G. J. Walker Smith, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Christopher R. Smith Mr. & Mrs. David G. Sparks Ms. Jennifer A. Sperling ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Scott M. Sperling ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Jack B. St. Clair € Thomas F. Staley Foundation Steele Energy, LLC Mrs. Elise Levy Steiner Mr. & Mrs. Peter Sterling Jr. Mr. & Mrs. David C. Stokes Mr. & Mrs. George B. Sundby ¥


Tulane University Associates Chris Suellentrop & Jen Raymer Suellentrop George A. & Jamie H. Swan III Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America § Patrick F. Taylor Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Dean E. Taylor Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Thurnher The Tianaderrah Foundation Tidewater Mark & Diana Tipton € Total American Services Elizabeth L. Todd, PhD & Mr. William H. Wilcox Simon & Mary Tonkin Toulouse Gourmet, LLC € Tulane Admiralty Institute £ Tulane Assoc. of Business Alumni ¥ Union Pacific Corp. United Healthcare Insurance Co. § Dr. & Mrs. John D. Uphold Mr. & Mrs. St. Denis J. Villere ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Wall € Mr. Ronald Warner & Ms. Nehama Jacobs € Dr. & Mrs. Victor J. Weinstein Mr. & Mrs. Donald P. Weiss £ Mr. William H. West § Wilmington Trust Drs. Linda & Paul Wilson Yancey Brothers Co. Mrs. Candace D. Young Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence L. Zarrilli

Ms. Patti Harp & Michael A. Bernstein, PhD Mrs. Angela Gibson Berry & Mr. Timothy P. Berry Bisso Towboat Co. € Dr. & Mrs. John R. Black § Mr. & Mrs. Ronald L. Book £ The Bookout Family Foundation Mr. James F. Booth £ Dr. & Mrs. Bruce P. Bordlee § Mr. Roy O. Brady Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Ralph O. Brennan Mr. & Mrs. T. Peter Breslin Jr. Bridgestone/Firestone Trust Fund Mr. Henry J. Bryer Jr.* Ms. Sally A. Corning & Mr. Edison C. Buchanan Mrs. Leonora T. Burger Mr. & Mrs. Jim A. Burke ¥ Cahn Family Foundation Mr. John A. Carmichael € Mr. Kevin A. Carroll Dr. & Mrs. Philips J. Carter § Mrs. Kathrin S. Cashdollar* Ms. Renee M. Castagnola Catalina Marketing Charitable Foundation Mr. Winslow J. Chadwick Jr. ¥ Chevron Chemical Co. Mr. & Mrs. Homer Chisholm Carolyn M. Clawson, MD § Mr. John L. Cleveland Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Carmel J. Cohen Jacques & Emy Cohenca $5,000–9,999 Foundation £ Anonymous Donors Mr. & Mrs. John W. Colbert £ Mr. & Mrs. H. Mark Adams £ Mr. & Mrs. Ugo A. Colella £ AHB Foundation € Community Foundation of Dr. & Mrs. N. Erick Albert Greater Jackson § Mr. & Mrs. Gerard C. Alexander £ Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell C. Compeaux Dr. Althea & Mr. Alton Alexis Mr. & Mrs. Brian J. Cooney ¥ Mr. John C. Allen Jr. § Corporate Realty Alliance Bernstein Holding LP Marjorie F. Cowan Family Mr. & Mrs. William J. Amon € Foundation Mr. George T. Anagnost £ Mr. Arthur A. Crais Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Paul N. Arnold Mr. John A. Crowley Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Arsenault Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Cudd III Atri Cure § Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Cummings Jr. AT&T Foundation Ms. Martha E. Custard Mr. & Mrs. Christopher E. Austin Mr. Leonard A. Davis £ § Mr. & Mrs. Ted Baer ¥ Mr. Robert P. Dean Jr. Mr. Bryan W. Bailey € Deloitte Foundation ¥ BAR/BRI £ Mr. & Mrs. Claiborne P. Deming £ Barriere Construction Co. LLC ¥ Mrs. Rosemary G. Deutsch £ Baton Rouge Area Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Justin R. Dinerman Mr. & Mrs. Scott J. Bender Marilyn McFarland Dorsen, PhD* Mr. & Mrs. Jack C. Benjamin Sr. £ Dow Chemical Co. Foundation Dr. Kenneth J. Bennett & G. Bryan Dutt, CFA ¥ Dr. Renee Bennett § Dr. & Mrs. John J. Eick § Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Berger § Ms. Kelly A. Eisenman Berkshire Taconic Community Dr. & Mrs. Robert Elliott Foundation Entergy

Billy R. Eubanks, MD § Dr. & Mrs. Michael B. Farnell The Hon. Martin L. C. Feldman £ Ferrate Treatment Technologies, LLC Mr. Jerry E. Finger & Mrs. Nanette B. Finger ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Geddes B. Flagg Jr. § Dr. & Mrs. Harold L. Flatt § Foley Marketing Mrs. Philip I. Forbes* Foundation for the Carolinas Mr. Francis L. Fraenkel ¥ Ms. Shari Frank ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Jerry W. Freeman Sr. § Ms. Michele M. Gale £ J & W Gambino Bakeries € Mr. & Mrs. W. Gerald Gaudet GE Foundation Mr. John Geiser III Georgia Power Co. Ann & Gordon Getty Foundation Henry W. Giles Jr., MD € The Joel & Bernice Gordon Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. William M. Gottwald § Mr. & Mrs. John J. Graham Mr. Albert G. Greenberg Mr. & Mrs. Eben Hardie III Mr. J. Brady Harris Jr. Dr. & Mrs. C. Bryce Hartley Mrs. Shirley K. Haspel Ms. Ellen M. Hauck & Mr. Markham H. Smith ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Gerald M. Haydel Mr. & Mrs. David M. Heikkinen ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Michael D. Heine ¥ Dr. & Mrs. John P. Hess § Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Hill Mr. & Mrs. William H. Hines £

Mr. Patrick J. Hojlo Mrs. Sally Baker Hopkins ¥ Fred & Charlotte Hubbell Foundation Gina & J. B. Huck Ironman Capital Management, LLC ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Walter S. Isaacson Mr. & Mrs. Jay Jacobs Mr. & Mrs. Richard James Mr. Bill Jennings & Mrs. Shelby Jennings € Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago Joe H. Smith Co. Johnson Charitable Gift Fund § Mr. & Mrs. Hans A. B. Jonassen Mr. & Mrs. Charlton Jones Mr. & Mrs. Alvin E. Jones § Rick & Gina Jones € Steve & Laura McBurnett Jones Mr. & Mrs. Mark R. Joseph Mr. A. Louis Jung III € Kahn Education Foundation Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation § Dr. & Mrs. Howard N. Kandell § Mr. & Mrs. Jay M. Kaplan Mr. & Mrs. Barry D. Kaufman Mr. Jerry Kelly William R. Kennedy III, MD Mr. & Mrs. Hugh M. Kiefer Margaret Strange Klapper, MD* Mr. & Mrs. Stuart A. Kramer Dr. Hugh W. Long III & Ms. Susan L. Krinsky £ Ms. Terri Lacy & Mr. James V. Baird Mrs. Debra E. Lozier & Dr. David H. Ledbetter Mr. & Mrs. Wayne J. Lee £

Mac Hancock III (L ’72), St. Paul Bourgeois IV (A&S ’69, L ’72), Rick Powell (A ’77) and Bill Beam Jr. (A&S ’80)

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

6 1


Tulane University Associates Mr. & Mrs. Marc D. Lefkowitz Mr. & Mrs. Scott B. Levine Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Levy III Mr. Robert A. Levy € Mr. Robert M. Levy Mr. & Mrs. Floyd W. Lewis Dr. & Mrs. David S. Light § Mrs. Linda Tuero Lindsley Liskow & Lewis £ Mr. & Mrs. Michael R. Littenberg £ The Hon. & Mrs. F. A. Little Jr. £ Mrs. Teresa A. Loughlin & Mr. Brent R. Finley Mr. Stephen L. Williamson & Ms. Lynn Luker £ Mr. Alfred G. Lyons Mr. & Mrs. Emon A. Mahony Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey W. Mankoff Mr. & Mrs. Everard W. Marks III Drs. A. & Edward Martinek Mr. & Mrs. Eric J. Mayer £ Dr. & Mrs. William W. McCall Jr. McDermott International ¥ Mrs. Karen Veillon McGlasson Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. McHale Jr. Mr. Douglas M. McKeige £ Dr. & Mrs. Williams C. McQuinn § Mr. & Mrs. David B. Melius Sr. Dr. Robin H. Meltzer & Mr. Roger Meltzer Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Mestayer £ Mr. & Mrs. Salvadore Miletello § Mr. & Mrs. Sam S. Miller £ Mr. & Mrs. Barry M. Miller Mr. & Mrs. Albert Mintz £ Mr. & Mrs. Morris F. Mintz Morgan Keegan & Co. € § Mr. & Mrs. Michael I. Mossman Motiva Enterprises LLC Mr. & Mrs. William D. Mounger Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation § The NASDAQ Stock Market ¥ NCH Corp. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation Nextstep Accommodation, LLC Mr. & Mrs. James R. Nieset £ North American Syringe Exchange Network § Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Mr. & Mrs. Colvin G. Norwood Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Ernest L. O’ Bannon £ Mr. & Mrs. William C. O’Malley ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Orihel ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Richard W. Parkinson § Mr. & Mrs. Matthew A. Pemberton Mr. & Mrs. Donald J. Peters Jr. The Pfizer Foundation Pincus Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Henry C. Pitot III § Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Platek

Dr. & Mrs. Lester N. Ploss § Mr. & Mrs. John B. Postell € Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Powell Probe Resources § The Procter & Gamble Fund Dr. & Mrs. Elias R. Quintos § Ms. Laura T. Rabinovitz Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Rapier € Dr. & Mrs. James E. Rasmussen Mr. Robert L. Redfearn Sr. £ Dr. Fredric Regenstein & Ms. Caroline Sullivan § Dr. & Mrs. S. Norman Reich Mr. Robert M. Perkowitz & Ms. Elisabeth A. Renstrom Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Rhodes River Parish Disposal € Dr. & Mrs. Raoul P. Rodriguez Mr. Michael Y. Roos Mr. Milton I. Rosenson* I. Rothlein Foundation Mr. Alan G. Rottman Carl B. Roundtree, MD & Associates § Roussel & Clement £ Mrs. Jillandra C. Rovaris Mr. & Mrs. Peter D. Russin Mr. & Mrs. Robert N. Ryan Jr. Sachs Family Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Salloum £ Ms. Cynthia E. Samuel & Mr. John E. Brockhoeft £ Sue Ann & Christopher Sarpy £ Savoie’s Alligator Farm, LLC € Mr. Paul E. Wood & Ms. Sallie Scanlan Mr. & Mrs. Sam P. Scelfo Jr. € Mr. & Mrs. Terry E. Schnuck Dr. & Mrs. Tim Schrader § Mrs. Renate Schubert Mr. & Mrs. Mark L. Schwartz Mr. & Mrs. David A. Seay € Mr. John E. Shackelford ¥ Karen & Leopold Sher £ Dr. Elizabeth M. Short & Michael A. Friedman, MD Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Siegel Dr. & Mrs. Stuart J. Simon Slatten LLC J. Marvin Smith III, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Kent H. Smith € Mrs. Miriam Veith Smith* Mr. & Mrs. Harry Spellman Mr. & Mrs. H. Leighton Steward Mrs. Leilani Tamura Stritter & Dr. Edward P. Stritter Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Swanson Dr. Jeffrey M. Tamburin & Dr. Laura M. Tamburin € Sam A. Threefoot, MD § Mr. & Mrs. John M. Trani ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Gregory J. Trapp Ms. Judith J. Trotta £

P A G E

2 0 0 8

6 2

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

Mrs. Saba Tseggai Tulane Tax Institute £ Jeffrey L. Turner, Esq. Mrs. Lowell Simmons Ukrop & Mr. R. Scott Ukrop United BioSource Corp. § Valero Energy Corp. £ Mr. Michael Valliant Ms. Daisy Meriwether VanDenburgh Mr. & Mrs. J. Michael Veron £ Mrs. Lyn B. Vizzi § Mr. & Mrs. M. Franz Vogt Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey A. Volk Mr. Eugene D. Von Rosenberg Mr. & Mrs. Robbert W. Vorhoff ¥ Vulcan Materials Co. Mr. & Mrs. Edward C. Waller Dr. & Mrs. J. William Watts III Melinda M. & Steven Wertheim Charitable Foundation Mr. & Mrs. James E. Wesner £ Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. White Ms. Andrea S. Will Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Will John C. Williams Architects, LLC Mr. George H. Wilson Jr. ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Carey E. Winder § Dr. & Mrs. Paul R. Winder € Mr. Kenneth A. Windheim Wink Companies, LLC Mary Freeman Wisdom Foundation Mr. & Mrs. John M. Woods £ Woodward Design & Build Mrs. Ellen Harrell Best Yancey* Dr. & Mrs. John M. Yarborough Zadeck Family Foundation ¥ A. Hays Zieman & Christine B. Zieman Charitable Trust § $2,500–4,999 Anonymous Donors Mr. & Mrs. David C. Abruzzi Dr. & Mrs. Stephen G. Abshire § Accenture Foundation Adobe Systems £ Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Adolph € Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Agular € Al Petrie Investor & Media Relations LLC ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Allshouse Mr. & Mrs. Jack M. Alltmont £ American Express Foundation Amgen PAC Mr. & Mrs. John L. Ammerman Mr. & Mrs. David F. Andignac Sr. J. Aron & Co. Arts Council of New Orleans Associated Office Systems Dr. & Mrs. Stuart F. Ball Bank of America Foundation Mr. & Mrs. J. Luis Banos Jr. Ms. Stephanie Martin Barczyk

Dr. & Mrs. Robert C. Barker Jr. § Mr. & Mrs. Jim S. Barnett Mr. & Mrs. Bradford S. Barr Mr. & Mrs. Cameron B. Barr € Mr. & Mrs. Steven O. Barrios Baton Rouge Orthopaedic Clinic, LLC € Dr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Bavaria BCP Engineers & Consultants Theo B. Bean Foundation Aimee Favrot Bell Family Fund Mr. Norton W. Bell § Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. Beltz € Mr. & Mrs. Stacey M. Berger ¥ Ms. Marian Mayer Berkett £ Mr. Stephen M. Berman ¥ Mr. & Mrs. David J. Berteau Mr. & Mrs. David B. Berzon Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan H. Besler ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Dennis S. Blum The Boeing Co. Mr. Benjamin D. Bohlmann & Ms. Ellen Kanner Mr. & Mrs. Harold L. Bohn Mr. & Mrs. Wallace E. Boston Jr. ¥ Bourgeois, Bennett, LLC § Gwynn Akin Bowers, PhD § Dr. & Mrs. James F. Boyd § Mr. William R. Boyer € Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Bracci Mr. Lex Breckinridge & Mrs. Zonnie Breckinridge £ Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Brennan Jr. Mr. & Mrs. David E. Breslin Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Brocato Sr., FAIA Dr. & Mrs. Paul W. Brock Jr. The Hon. Jerry A. Brown & Mrs. Florence Brown £ Dr. Ken Brown Jr. & Dr. Jil Brown Hamilton Barksdale Brown Charitable Trust Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Bruno £ Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Buesinger Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Buettner £ Mr. & Mrs. Allan R. Bundy Dr. & Mrs. John G. Bush § Mr. Steven L. “Caesar” Cahall Ms. Veronica K. Callaghan Callan Associates ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Samuel M. Camp Mr. David L. Campbell £ The Capitol Group, LLC € Mr. & Mrs. J. Brian Carberry ¥ Dr. & Ms. William F. Carroll Jr. The James & Nancy Casty Charitable Foundation Mr. Anthony J. Cerasaro Cynthia Cherrey, PhD Mr. & Mrs. William K. Christovich £ Mr. & Mrs. George M. Cleland III £ Mr. & Mrs. Miles P. Clements £


Tulane University Associates The Cobb Family Foundation Elisabeth J. Cohen, MD & Robert I. Grossman, MD Mr. & Mrs. Stanley J. Cohn € Mrs. Dorothy Jurisich Coleman £ Mr. James J. Coleman* Dr. & Mrs. John A. Coleman Jr. Bettie & Robert Coley Mr. Ernest C. Colquette Commtech Industries The Community Foundation of Gaston County § Mr. Dennis P. Connors Mr. Jim S. Cook Dr. & Mrs. Richard L. Corales Mr. & Mrs. Robert Joseph Cousin Mr. & Mrs. Gerald N. Craig £ Crasto Glass & Mirror Co. € Ms. Lisa E. Cristal & Mr. Bruce Cybul Mr. Bradley D. Crown Mr. & Mrs. Martin R. Crowson ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Shannon Curley Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Curran Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Currence £ Mr. & Mrs. Guy C. Curry € Dr. & Mrs. W. Andrew Daniel III § Ms. Blythe Danner Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Danysh The Hon. & Mrs. Oliver S. Delery Sr. € Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Delgado Jr. Adrienne Colella, PhD & Angelo S. DeNisi, PhD ¥ Dr. Diane J. Deveines & Mr. Edward P. Ryan § Mrs. Judith W. Devins Mr. James L. Dewar III Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Dickson Paul A. Distler, PhD Ms. Luann D. Dozier Dubow Family Foundation Mr. Victor A. Dubuclet III £ Mr. William G. Duck £ Mr. Robert J. Duhon Jr. Mr. Brooke H. Duncan Dr. & Mrs. John Lionel Dupre Ms. Candice Frembling Dykhuizen £ Mrs. Stacey E. Earley Edwaldan Foundation § Dr. & Mrs. Paul Richard Eisenberg Mr. & Mrs. Alan J. Eisenman Mr. E. Warren Eisner € Ms. Patricia L. Truscelli & Mr. Emmit N. Ellis IV Dr. & Mrs. David C. Epstein Ernst & Young LLP ¥ Mr. Billy Farr* Mr. Rene V. Faucheux Mr. William W. Featheringill € Federal National Mortgage Assoc. Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey P. Feingold ¥ Fidelity Foundation

Dr. & Mrs. Scott Fisher Mr. & Mrs. Louis Y. Fishman £ Mr. & Mrs. Michael M. Fleishman £ Mr. Walter C. Flower III Mr. George W. Forrest Mr. & Mrs. Ian S. Forrester £ Betsy & Richard Fox Mr. & Mrs. Richard R. Frapart ¥ French Embassy in the United States of America Matthew S. French, MD € Harry C. Frye Jr., MD Mr. & Mrs. John William Galeener Jr. Dr. Amy L. Gardner & Mr. David Mc Anulty Mr. & Mrs. William R. Gardner € Ms. Michele M. Garvin Ms. Ellen I. Geheeb £ Dr. & Mrs. Charles G. Glaser £ Gordon & Kathy Weil Global Impact Mr. & Mrs. Alan N. Gnutti ¥ The Arnold P. Gold Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Goldstein Mr. & Mrs. Michael T. Goodman Mr. & Mrs. Joel C. Gordon Mr. & Mrs. Minos T. Gordy Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Gregorio Mr. & Mrs. Gyl A. Grinberg Mr. & Mrs. Ronald L. Groves £ Charles & Madelon Gryll Mr. & Mrs. Tom I. Guggolz The Gumbo Foundation Mrs. Mary Nelson Guthrie Mr. & Mrs. George B. Hall Jr. Ms. Rita H. Hankins Mr. & Mrs. Harry S. Hardin III £ Hargrove Oil Co., LLC € Harral Foundation € Dr. Geoffrey B. Hartwig & Dr. Marcia J. Hartwig Mr. & Mrs. Jack Harvard £ Mr. & Mrs. Theo H. Harvey Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Brad A. Hastings HDR Engineering £ Mr. Kevin Hebert € Dr. & Mrs. Alfred Y. K. Hew € Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Hodge ¥ Mrs. Debra Ann Hoffman & Mr. Wiley H. Sharp III Mr. Michael H. Hogg ¥ £ Mr. & Mrs. Bernard S. Holloway ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Pierre E. Holloway Dr. & Mrs. Roch B. Hontas € Mr. & Mrs. Harry L. Hopkins £ Richard William Houk, MD § Houston Endowment Mr. & Mrs. Steven J. Hubbell Mr. & Mrs. Bert L. Huebner A. Whitfield Huguley IV € Mr. & Mrs. Daniel P. Hurley €

ING Foundation International Sports Properties Mr. & Mrs. Barry G. Jacobs Dr. & Mrs. Warren M. Jacobs § Ms. Susannah L. Jeffers £ Mrs. James R. Jeter § Dr. & Mrs. James R. Jeter § Jewish Community Board of Akron Mr. Erik F. Johnsen Mr. & Mrs. Frank E. Johnson € Rick Jones Tulane Baseball Camp Mr. & Mrs. Jesse H. Jones II Mr. & Mrs. William N. Kammer Mr. & Mrs. Ozgur Karaosmanoglu ¥ Dr. Jerome P. Keating & Dr. Mary U. Keating § Mr. & Mrs. Harry B. Kelleher Jr. W. K. Kellogg Foundation § Dr. & Mrs. Eamon M. Kelly € Mr. & Mrs. David A. Kerstein £ Mr. & Mrs. John C. Kilpatrick £ Mr. & Mrs. Walter Klenz ¥ Sally T. Knight, PhD Mr. & Mrs. Herman S. Kohlmeyer Jr. Mr. Marc S. Komisarow & Ms. Brenda L. Mooney Ms. Mindy Kornberg Dr. & Mrs. William E. Kramer Ms. Kerry A. Krisher ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. Krotzer Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Jack Kushner Mr. Dan A. Kusnetz £ Mr. & Mrs. Gary L. Laborde € Mr. George A. Laird & Ms. Yvette A. Hebert € Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation £ Mr. & Mrs. H. Merritt Lane III Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Lane III £ Mr. & Mrs. G. Charles Lapeyre ¥ Ms. Judith B. Lapinsohn Mr. & Mrs. Demian S. Larson Irving H. LaValle, DBA* Mr. James P. Lazar £ Ms. Alison Lazarus & Clifford M. Gevirtz, MD § Mr. & Mrs. James J. Lee Sandra McMahan Lenehan, MD Dr. Philip G. Leone Jr. & Dr. Cheryl Leone § Dr. Shelley L. Wallock & Mr. David Lerman Kenneth D. Lessans, MD § Edward & Jami Levy Foundation Mr. Donald I. Levy € Mr. Oscar Z. Levy Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Arthur E. Lewis § Mr. Warren G. Lichtenstein Dr. & Mrs. Zelig H. Lieberman Mr. & Mrs. John M. Lie-Nielsen Ms. Phebe Lin ¥

Mr. & Mrs. Ward P. Lindenmayer Mr. & Mrs. Joshua R. Lipman Lockheed Martin Corp. Loeb Family Foundation Louisiana Independent College Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Fred H. Lowe Jr. € Mr. Jason R. Ludeke ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Martin A. MacDiarmid Jr. Mr. John W. Maher Richard G. Mallinson, PhD Dr. & Mrs. Frank J. Malta § Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Manard III £ Mr. Steve Manuel € Willard L. Marmelzat Foundation § Ms. Carla M. Martin £ Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Martin Mr. & Mrs. Andrew B. Martinez Mr. Joseph Maselli Sr. Mr. & Mrs. John M. McCollam Dr. & Mrs. Stephen M. McCollam § Mr. & Mrs. James L. McCulloch £ Dr. & Mrs. William Y. McDaniel Mr. & Mrs. Terry McGinnis Mr. & Mrs. David L. McKissock Jr. Mrs. Kathy McLean-Murphy Mr. Robert P. McLeod £ Mr. & Mrs. L. Richards McMillan II £ Mr. & Mrs. Tommy P. Meehan Mr. & Mrs. Eduardo Melendreras Mercy Corps ¥ Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Paul V. Messina ¥ Dale & Hillary Miller Mr. & Mrs. R. King Milling Sr. Mr. Ronald E. Mills € Mintz-Easthope Foundation £ Mr. H. Dixon Montague The Moody’s Foundation Morgan Stanley Mr. & Mrs. Wiley L. Mossy Jr. Mike & Nancy Moyle Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Murphy Larry L. Murray € Dr. Drusilla L. Burns & Dr. Herb H. Nelson Dr. Lee T. Nesbitt Jr. € New Orleans BioInnovation Center ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Newhall § Mr. E. Tyler Nichols Jr., CPA, MBA ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Ronald L. Nichols § Dr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Niesen § Northrop Grumman Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Charles L. O’Brien III Mr. & Mrs. Lewis G. Odom Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Alan L. Offner € Dr. & Mrs. Benjamin B. Okel § ORX Resources Overture to the Cultural Season Oxford Fund Ozark, Perron & Nelson, PA

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

6 3


Tulane University Associates Mr. William R. Smith Dr. Lesley Snelling & Mr. John Bober Mr. & Mrs. Geoffrey P. Snodgrass ¥ Mr. A. J. Sofio Jr. Ms. Muriel Dussom Somers Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell I. Sonkin Mr. & Mrs. Bernard C. Sontag Jr. St. Charles Printing € Dr. & Mrs. Eugene C. St. Martin § Dr. & Mrs. William P. Stallworth § Mr. & Mrs. William H. Stanton Ms. Laura A. Starks & Mr. Joseph E. Dannenmaier Steeg Family Foundation £ Dr. & Mrs. John L. Steigner € Mr. & Mrs. Sidney B. Steiner € Mr. & Mrs. Frank B. Stewart Jr. Stokes Bros. & Co. Mr. Jerry Streva Rich Schmidt (E ’66, ’67), Susan Goldstein (NC ’78) Mr. Stephen E. Nichols & and Robert Goldstein (A&S ’77) Mrs. Gloria G. Stricklin Mr. & Mrs. Walter B. Stuart IV £ Mr. & Mrs. Clark J. Pager Dr. Judith Rodin & SUEZ Energy Resources NA The Hon. & Mrs. Joseph D. Painter Mr. Paul R. Verkuil £ Dr. & Mrs. Scott K. Sullivan € Mrs. Jean M. Palmer Dr. & Mrs. Ricardo Jose Rodriguez Mr. & Mrs. Howard Bruce Sutter Mr. & Mrs. Stephen M. Parish Ms. Sonja Bilger Romanowski Dr. Szabolcs Szentpetery Dr. Mark Pakulo & Mr. & Mrs. Barry Rosenberg & Mrs. Victoria Szentpetery Dr. Marie Deruyter § Dr. Allan R. Katz & T. Rowe Price Associates € Mr. & Mrs. Scott S. Partridge £ Dr. Patti J. Ross § Dr. & Mrs. Robert M. Tafel § Mr. & Mrs. Curtis A. Pellerin Dr. & Mrs. Martin P. Rothberg Mr. Jeffrey P. Taft Mr. David B. Penn & Mr. Michael D. Rubenstein £ Mr. Steve S. Taliancich Ms. Dara E. Davis David & Betty Sacks Foundation § Ms. Susan G. Talley & Mr. Billups P. Percy £ Mr. Douglas L. Saidenberg ¥ Mr. James C. Gulotta Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. David G. Perlis Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Saidenberg ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Sean Terry Mr. & Mrs. Shepard F. Perrin III Mr. Lester S. Sanders Mr. & Mrs. John W. Theriot € Dr. Nancy Perron & Dr. & Mrs. Richard M. Saroyan § Reverend LaVerne Thomas III Mr. André Perron Mr. & Mrs. D. Ryan Sartor Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Gregory C. Thomas £ Mr. Albert B. Petrie Jr. ¥ Schifter Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Thomas € Mr. & Mrs. Nathaniel P. Phillips Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Bennett G. Schmidt Dr. & Mrs. Henry K. Threefoot § Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Pickering Mrs. Elise Wheless Schmidt Ms. Charlotte B. Travieso Mr. & Mrs. Rubin M. Piha Mr. & Mrs. Joe B. Schmidt Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Dalton L. Truax Jr. € Mahlon P. Poche Jr., MD § Mr. & Mrs. Ben R. Schneider Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Victor W. H. Tsang § Mary E. Peters & Robert W. The Scholarship Foundation Tulane Greenbackers Booster Club Polchow Foundation § Self Foundation £ Mr. & Mrs. John W. Turner Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. Polchow § Mrs. Karen Landsberg Seltzer Mr. & Mrs. George S. Turpie III Dr. & Mrs. Jack W. Pou Dr. & Mrs. George P. Sessions Dr. Richard J. Tuttle PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Dr. Marlene J. Severson & UBS Financial Services ¥ Psychists Inc. Mr. David M. Cooley § Dr. Stephen Uman & Mr. & Mrs. David B. Quinn Mrs. Maude Saunders Sharp Dr. Gwen Uman § Mr. Donald F. McKee & Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Shatz Unicco Ms. M. Elizabeth Rader ¥ Shields Mott Lund LLP £ United Parcel Service of America Rambusch Decorating Co. Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd N. Shields £ URS Mr. & Mrs. James L. Rice III £ Mr. Elliot M. Siegel Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Van Dusen Mr. & Mrs. Paul Richard Jr. Norman J. Silber £ The Hon. Sarah S. Vance & Mrs. Midge T. Richardson Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Silverberg Mr. R. Patrick Vance £ Mr. & Mrs. Arnold Richer € Mr. & Mrs. Howard M. Singer Mrs. Patricia A. Ventura Dr. & Mrs. James M. Riser Mr. & Mrs. Alan Sklar Mr. & Mrs. Raymond B. The Ritz-Carlton New Orleans Mrs. Linda Sklar Ventura Sr. € Mr. Andre J. Robert € Mr. & Mrs. Stephen E. Slattery Verges Rome Architects, APAC Reverend Joseph L. Roberts III Mr. Catchings B. Smith ¥ Ms. D. Jean Veta & Robinson Lumber Co. ¥ Mary E. Smith, PhD* Ms. Mary Ann Dutton £ P A G E

6 4

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

Dr. Rae R. Victor Dr. & Mrs. Paul Vitenas § Mrs. Allison Piper Wall & Mr. John A. Wall ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Robert R. Walther Dr. & Mrs. Gerald I. Wasserwald Mr. & Mrs. Philip B. Watson Jr. Mr. Wells T. Watson £ Mr. & Mrs. Richard Henry Weaver Sarah V. Webb, MD § Weil-Bohn Foundation Mr. & Mrs. William R. Weinberg £ Mr. & Mrs. William A. Weiss Mr. & Mrs. Martin Wells ¥ Westbank Electric Dr. & Mrs. Joe S. Wheeler § Mr. Virgil M. Wheeler III Dr. & Mrs. Cornelius G. Whitley § The Hon. Thomas C. Wicker Jr. & Mrs. Jane Wicker € Wiegand Management Trust Dr. & Mrs. Randall S. Winn Dr. & Mrs. Herbert B. Wren § Dr. & Mrs. James J. Yang § Dr. Kirsten Young & Mr. Linton Young § Mr. & Mrs. Alan A. Zaunbrecher Ms. Jane F. Zimmerman Mr. & Mrs. William H. Zimmermann $1,500–2,499 Anonymous Donors Mr. & Mrs. Donald R. Abaunza £ Academy of the Sacred Heart § Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Acomb Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Albergotti £ Mr. & Mrs. Jerald L. Album € Mr. Samuel T. Alcus III € Mr. Lawrence J. Aldrich All South Consulting Engineers, LLC Dr. & Mrs. Robert G. Allen § Dr. Tupper L. Allen & Mr. William T. Allen Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Almeida ¥ Altenklingen Foundation Mr. Jeffrey P. Altman £ Mr. & Mrs. Cary J. Amann Dr. & Mrs. David R. Anderson § Mr. & Mrs. Alvin L. Andrews € Mr. Samuel R. Arden £ Dr. & Mrs. Keith E. Argenbright § Mrs. Katsuko Arimura Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Arogeti Mr. & Mrs. Peter A. Aron Mr. & Mrs. John C. Arthurs € Mr. & Mrs. Harold A. Asher € AstraZeneca Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Autenreith ¥ Aventis Pharmaceuticals Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. Bagot Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz £


Tulane University Associates Mr. & Mrs. F. MacNaughton Ball Jr. Mr. Michael E. Ballotti Ms. Diane Humphreys-Barlow & Dr. Jack M. Barlow Dr. & Mrs. Robert V. Barnett Mr. & Mrs. William M. Barnett Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth S. Baron Mr. & Mrs. Gregory E. Barr Professor & Mrs. Paul L. Barron £ Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Basile Jr. € Dr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Beck § Mr. Nelson J. Becker Mr. & Mrs. Rudolf B. Becker III Dr. & Mrs. Herbert S. Bell § BellSouth Corp. Mrs. Jennifer Hanley-Benjamin & Mr. Jack C. Benjamin Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Gary L. Benton £ Dr. & Mrs. Neil R. Bercow Dr. John F. Berglund & Dr. Mary C. F. Berglund Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey D. Bergman £ The Berman Charitable Trust ¥ Mr. John A. Bernard £ The Bernd Group Mr. & Mrs. David A. Bernd Dr. & Mrs. Oscar L. Berry § Dr. & Mrs. James L. Beskin Mr. & Mrs. James M. Besselman Sr. Mr. & Mrs. David A. Beyer Mr. Scott R. Bickford £ Joseph O. Billig, MD Dr. David M. Black & Dr. Kathryn B. Black § Dr. & Mrs. William H. Blahd § Gene T. Blakely, MD Mr. & Mrs. Hershel M. Bloom Ms. Sari W. Blum The Lawrence & Marianne Bogan Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Boh € Mrs. Connie Claverie Bohn* Mr. John A. Bolles & Ms. Elizabeth K. Clann £ Dr. & Mrs. Roger A. Bonomo § Mr. Sam Corenswet & Ms. Jane Bories Karen R. Borman, MD § Mr. Chris Boudreaux € Mr. & Mrs. J. William Boyar £ BP Amoco Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Danny Brasseaux Mr. Darryl B. Braunstein Dr. & Mrs. Frederick W. Brazda Dr. Patrick C. Breaux & Dr. Melissa G. Brammer § Mr. & Mrs. Lee M. Bressler € Dr. & Mrs. Charles W. Brice Jr. § Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Britt Mr. & Mrs. Steven J. Brodie Mark J. Brodkey, MD Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin W. Bronston ¥

Mrs. Ersilia Brown & Mr. Bradley M. Braun ¥ Mr. & Mrs. H. William Brown Jr. Brown’s Dairy € Bruno’s € Mr. Thomas C. Brutting & Mr. Ed York Jr. Mr. Kenneth E. Bubes Mr. & Mrs. John G. Buchanan Mrs. Alejandra Buekens Mr. Joe Bullard € Buquet Distributing Co. ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Floyd A. Buras Jr. € Dr. Vincent D. Burke & Ms. Corito S. Tolentino § Burkedale Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Wade W. Burnside Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Bush Mr. & Mrs. J. Randolph Butts Jr. € Dr. & Mrs. Robert B. Bux § Cadieux Martin Foundation § Dr. Mary & Mr. Robert Cadieux § Mr. Hugh F. Caffery The Cajun Co. € Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Calderwood Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Cali € Mr. Paul A. Callais* Capital One Bank ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Albert Caproni Jr. Careers USA ¥ The Leo J. & Celia Carlin Fund Bryant & Kelly Carroll € Mr. L. Wick Cary € Mr. Robert R. Casey £ Mr. Lawrence J. Cassanova § Mrs. Anita L. C. Cassilly Ms. Alicia M. Castilla & Mr. Mark E. Zelek Central Alabama Community Foundation Central Louisiana Community Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth K. Chadwick Dr. & Mrs. Robert O. Chadwick § Mr. & Mrs. Black Chaffe III ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Henry G. Chambers § Mr. & Mrs. Alan J. Chamorro Mr. & Mrs. William E. Chapman II Mr. J. Storey Charbonnet € Mr. Frank Martin & Ms. Kathleen K. Charvet £ Mr. & Mrs. Roy C. Cheatwood £ Children & Adolescent Clinic § Mr. & Mrs. Walter W. Christy € Mr. & Mrs. A. Knox Clark Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Kevin Clark £ Mr. & Mrs. Charles H. Clawson Jr. Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton Mr. & Mrs. Ralph D. Clements Dr. & Mrs. Philip J. Closmann Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Coffey Jr. ¥

Mr. Bryant B. Cohen Ms. Marcia S. Cohn Dr. David Cole & Dr. Karen Cole Mr. & Mrs. David A. Combe £ Ms. Jennifer A. Comeaux € Ms. Melissa A. Comeaux € Community Foundation of North Central Washington § The Community Foundation of South Alabama Frederic W. Cook & Co. £ Cynthia Maiko Cook Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth S. Cook Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Copper Dr. & Mrs. Robert J. Corcoran § Mr. & Mrs. Russell M. Cornelius ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Coughlin Crane Co. Mrs. Joy Kleck Crews Mr. & Mrs. L. Morgan Cross Mr. & Mrs. Steven G. Crump, DDS Mr. Leon K. Curenton Mr. Sean A. Curran The Hon. Nestor L. Currault Jr. & Mrs. Dorothy Currault Ms. Karen J. Curtin Dr. Andrew J. Czulewicz & Dr. Ann Lovitt § Dallas Jewish Community Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Fernand J. Dastugue The Hon. W. Eugene Davis & Mrs. Celia Davis £ Mr. & Mrs. Robert K. Dawson Dean Foods Co. € Dr. & Mrs. Perry C. DeBardeleben § Debevoise & Plimpton, LLP £ Ms. Elizabeth B. Delery & Mr. Harry B. Towe € Deloitte & Touche LLP Mr. & Mrs. George Denegre Jr. Mr. Jack B. Denur § Mr. Charles E. DeWitt Jr. & Ms. Janet L. Sanders € Ms. Beth Rudin DeWoody Mr. Dave J. Dickerson € Mr. Henry A. Dinh Ms. Jeri K. D’Lugin Mr. Michael B. Donelan Dr. & Mrs. William G. Donnellan Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Andrew F. Dora Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. John M. Duck Mr. & Mrs. David L. Ducote ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Wayne C. Ducote ¥ Mr. Edward Fritz Duhé Jr. € Mr. & Mrs. Samuel R. Dunbar Dr. James W. Dye & Ms. Dorothy Coleman Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Dyer DynMcDermott Petroleum Operations Co. East Tennessee Foundation Ms. Carol Eastin

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory M. Eaton £ Richard Eckerd Foundation Mr. John H. Ecuyer Edison International Thomas R. Edwards € Ernest L. & Cindy Edwards £ Dr. & Mrs. Bernard H. Eichold II Ms. Tracy L. Eisenman Eli Lilly & Co. Dr. Gary S. Hirsch & Dr. Karen Elkind-Hirsch § Mr. & Mrs. Lucas T. Elliot £ Ms. Linda Elson Entech & Associates € Epstein Family Foundation Ernst & Young Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Goodman B. Espy III Mr. Joseph A. Ettinger £ Dr. & Mrs. Hayden O. Evans § Gerald P. Falletta, MD Mr. & Mrs. Troy G. Falterman, CPA Ms. Mercedes O’Connor Fast Mr. & Mrs. R. William Faulk Jr. ¥ Mr. William N. Faulkner Sybil M. & D. Blair Favrot Family Fund The Featheringill Foundation € Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Feehan Mr. & Mrs. Glenn P. Felton £ Mr. Bruce P. Fierst Ms. Jane E. Armstrong & Mr. Kevin J. Finan € Financial Analysts of New Orleans ¥ Frank J. Fischer III, MD § Dr. & Mrs. James B. Fishback Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Fisher Jr. £ Dr. & Mrs. William P. Fitch § Mr. Joseph W. Fleece III Mr. & Mrs. N. Scott Fletcher £ Nancy C. Flowers, MD & Leo G. Horan, MD Mr. & Mrs. Michael Fobes Robert M. Foley & Associates € Mr. & Mrs. Stephen J. Foley € Mr. & Mrs. Donald F. Fontes Professor & Mrs. Robert Force £ Mr. & Mrs. Marshall H. Ford Dr. & Mrs. Julian B. Foreman § Mr. & Mrs. William R. Forrester Jr. £ Mr. Matthew G. Forte € Fowler, Rodriguez £ Mr. Robert G. Freeland Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey D. Friedman Mr. & Mrs. David A. Friedman Mr. & Mrs. Wynne P. Friedrichs € Dr. & Mrs. Norman De Witt Fry § F.S.I. Development € Mr. & Mrs. William J. Furnish Jr. Dr. & Mrs. William D. Futch Mrs. Jane P. Gage Dr. & Mrs. Larry Gandle § Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Gay Jr. €

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

6 5


Tulane University Associates Mr. & Mrs. Bruce H. Gaynes Mr. & Mrs. Peter John Genz Mr. & Mrs. Edward N. George £ Mr. & Mrs. Hans J. Germann £ Ms. H. Susan Gerone & Mr. Blair G. Brown Mr. & Mrs. M. H. Gertler £ Dr. & Mrs. White E. Gibson III § Mr. Adam Leonard Gidwitz § Mr. John David Gidwitz § Ms. Patricia Lewy Gidwitz § Mr. Zackary Willard Gidwitz § Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Giraud III Mr. & Mrs. S. Derby Gisclair ¥ € GlobalSantaFe Mr. & Mrs. Milton J. Godail Sr. € Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. Godfrey Mr. & Mrs. George W. Godwin Jr. Dr. & Mrs. James M. Goff Dr. & Mrs. Paul M. Goldfarb Mr. Michael F. Goldstein Mr. & Mrs. Moylan F. Gomila Jr. ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Luis C. Gonzalez III Mr. & Mrs. John B. Gooch Jr. £ Mrs. Carol B. Good Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLP £ Dr. & Mrs. William E. Gotthold § Greater Miami Jewish Federation Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Green £ Mr. & Mrs. Matthew H. Greenbaum £ Andrew & Ellen Greenspan Foundation Dr. Michael C. Grieb & Dr. Joy E. Cohen § Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey F. Griffin Robert T. Grissom, MD Dr. & Mrs. Harvey M. Grossman Dr. & Mrs. Frank R. Groves Gulf South Finance, LLC Mr. & Mrs. James O. Gundlach Mr. & Mrs. Ronald C. Guzman € Haberman Family Foundation Hainkel Campaign Fund € Mr. & Mrs. Andrew W. Hammond £ Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey J. Hand € Henry T. Harbin, MD & Ms. Brian Gamble § Mr. Ford T. Hardy Jr. § Mr. & Mrs. W. Russell Harp Mr. & Mrs. Robert V. M. Harrison Mr. & Mrs. William Charles Hartranft Dr. & Mrs. Robert C. Hassinger € Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm D. Hawk Mr. & Mrs. John J. Hawkshead Jr. ¥ Mr. Lester J. Haydel Jr. € Dr. & Mrs. Jerome L. Heard § Mr. Robert T. Heffernan Mr. & Mrs. James C. Hendricks ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Edward R. Henkin Ms. Nell A. Hennessy & Mr. Frank A. Daspit

Mr. Richard F. Henry Ms. Robin Walton Hensley Mr. & Mrs. Kazimierz J. Herchold £ Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Herman ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Herold £ Robert L. Hewitt, MD € Mrs. Pauline Edwards Higgins & Mr. Nathaniel J. Higgins £ Dr. & Mrs. Steven I. Hightower § Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Hill Jr. Hillel Foundation of New Orleans Mr. & Mrs. Alfred E. Hiller Mr. & Mrs. Richard Hoff The Hon. Carol Schmidt Hoffmann & Mr. Gregory S. Hoffmann Ms. Christine L. Hoffman Marlin B. Hoge, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Tom Hopkins € Dr. & Mrs. Steven C. Horton Mr. & Reverend John B. Houck Mr. & Mrs. L. F. Huck Mr. & Mrs. Samuel A. Huffman Dr. Patricia A. Hurley & Mr. Kim Q. Hill Ms. Christina N. Herrera & Mr. Stephen E. Ihnot ¥ Intrepid Drilling Systems, LLC Mr. & Mrs. Toshinari Ishii Doug & Jane Kahn Jacobs Reverend James B. Jeffrey Mrs. Mary Beth Von Oehsen Jenkins Mr. & Mrs. Paul E.T. Jensen Dr. & Mrs. Robert H. Jernigan § Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin F. Joel II The Niels Frithjof & Anita Julia Johnsen Foundation Mr. & Mrs. R. Christian Johnsen £ Mr. & Mrs. C. Gordon Johnson Jr. Ms. Victoria D. Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Claude E. Johnston £ Mr. & Mrs. James A. Jones € Robert H. Kahn Jr. Family Foundation ¥ Kambur Law Firm £ Mr. Byron L. Kantrow ¥ The Hon. & Mrs. Jacob L. Karno £ Mr. Daniel A. Kaufman Mr. William H. Keck € Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Keeffe € Harry Kelleher & Co. € Ann J. Kelly, MD Mr. Jonathon B. Kemper Drs. Ann & John Kenney Mr. & Mrs. John Thomas Kenney Mr. & Mrs. John C. Kent Mr. & Mrs. Knox Kershaw Mr. & Mrs. David B. Kesler £ Mr. David A. Kettel & Mr. Michael Gleason £

P A G E

2 0 0 8

6 6

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

Ronald H. Killen, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Curt Killinger Mr. Hansel O. Kincaid* Mr. Frederick J. King Jr. Ms. Barbara Horowitz & Mr. David Kirshenbaum Ms. Andrea L. Kirstein Dr. & Mrs. Akio Kitahama § Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kittredge Mr. Steven C. Kline £ Dr. Richard J. Knight & Dr. Cristine Knight Mr. Michael K. Koesling € Ms. Jini Koh Dr. & Mrs. Rene Koppel € Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth W. Korach € Mr. & Mrs. Lewis Kornberg Dr. Patricia Spencer Krebs & Mr. David J. Krebs £ Dr. Paul A. Krogstad & Dr. Nan V. Heard § Mr. Robert A. Kromhout Mr. & Mrs. Wilfred M. Kullman Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Owen J. La Cour Sr. € Mr. Kevin Ashton Laborde Sr. Mr. & Mrs. John P. Laborde € Dr. & Mrs. William S. LaCorte Mr. & Mrs. Owen J. LaCour Jr. € Mr. & Mrs. G. Michael Lanaux Mr. & Mrs. John M. Landis € Dr. & Mrs. Saul F. Landry § Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Lanier Mr. Brian Larche € Mr. & Mrs. Carlton M. Larrieu € Ms. Laura A. Leach & Mr. Richard Lawrence Ms. Nancy P. McCarthy & Mr. Michael Lawson £ Mr. J. Dwight LeBlanc III £ Mr. & Mrs. J. Dwight LeBlanc Jr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. LeBreton III £ Dr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Lee Mr. Robert T. Lemon II Mr. & Mrs. Mitchell A. Levin Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Levin Dr. Walter E. Levy III & Dr. Laura Levy Mr. & Mrs. Tom L. Levy Mrs. Gail W. Lewis Mr. & Mrs. J. Thomas Lewis Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. Liever Dr. & Mrs. Hsin-Sun Lin Mr. Thomas Edward Littlejohn Mr. & Mrs. Paul F. Livaudais ¥ Mr. Robert L. Livingston Jr. & Mrs. Bonnie Livingston § Mr. & Mrs. James L. Loeb Jr. Loretta S. Loftus, MD Mr. & Mrs. John S. Logan Longview Orthopedic Associates, PLLC §

Mr. Jeff Lorio € Dr. & Mrs. Peter L. Lou Mr. & Mrs. Stavros D. Louchis Dr. & Mrs. Dexter Louie § Mr. Steven T. Lovett Dr. & Mrs. Donald C. Luebke § Mr. & Mrs. Wilburn V. Lunn Jr. ¥ Ms. Elyse M. Luray Dr. & Mrs. James E. Lusk § Dr. & Mrs. Paul S. Lux § Mrs. Anne U. MacClintock & Dr. Jerry L. Mashaw Sr. £ Mr. & Mrs. Grant H. MacDiarmid Mr. David F. Madsen Mr. Patrick T. Maguire € Mr. James W. Mahaffey £ Mr. & Mrs. Henry M. Mannheimer Dr. & Mrs. Calvin Moy Mar Dr. & Mrs. Randall E. Marcus Dr. Lawrence Margolies & Mrs. Sylvia Roth Margolies Dr. & Mrs. Robert I. Markenson § Mr. & Mrs. William A. Marko Marriott Corp. Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Marston IV Mr. & Mrs. Ralph M. Martin Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. Marvins Dr. & Mrs. Gilbert L. Marx § Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Maselli Jr. € Mr. Andrew N. Massey € Dr. & Mrs. Harry R. Maxon § Dr. Laurence J. Mazzotta & Dr. Mary Mazzotta § MBIA, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Earl R. McCallon III € Ms. Anne Segrest McCulloch Dr. & Mrs. Michael W. McDonald § Dr. & Mrs. John P. McDowell Dr. & Mrs. P. Michael McFadden § James T. McIlwain, MD § Ms. Kristen L. Melton £ Mr. Robert L. Mendow Merrill Lynch Trust Co. § Mr. & Mrs. Dewitt T. Methvin III Metropolitan Life Foundation Meyer Engineers, LTD Mr. Peter J. Michel Dr. Alan & Mrs. Ellen Miller § Mr. & Mrs. James H. Miller Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Saul A. Mintz Mr. Steven L. Mintz Mr. John C. & Dr. Julie K. Mitby Mr. Steven K. Dickens & Mr. G. Martin Moeller Jr. Mr. & Mrs. James Monroe III Mrs. Carmen M. Moore £ Mr. & Mrs. William R. Moore III Dr. & Mrs. John L. Moore Dr. & Mrs. Howard A. Moore € Mr. & Mrs. Donald P. Moore € Frank J. Morgan Jr., MD §


Tulane University Associates Dr. & Mrs. Cecil Morgan § Moss Antiques Mr. Joseph C. Moss II Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Mouton ¥ Mrs. Kimberly L. Mueller & Mr. Alexander H. Martin Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Munch Jr. ¥ Drs. Lamar & William Murphy Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Myers Mystic Krewe of Olympia Mr. Max Nathan Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Howard A. Nelson Mr. & Mrs. Peter C. Newhouse Ms. Julianne Nice & Mr. Herbert V. Larson Jr. £ Mark E. Nicol Family Trust Mr. & Mrs. John P. Noel III Mr. & Mrs. William D. Norman Jr. Angela M. Noto, MD & William W. Bohn, MD ¥ Mr. Gregory J. Noto € Mr. & Mrs. John M. Nunez Sr. € Mr. & Mrs. L. Dow Oliver Ms. Paula A. O’Neil & Mr. Joseph E. Melancon Jr. € Dr. John M. Onofrio & Dr. Karen Onofrio € Andrew Orestano, MD § The Orthopedic Center of St. Louis § Mr. & Mrs. George E. Ounjian ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Chris G. Outlaw £ Park One Holdings, LLC ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Homer L. Parsons Mr. Anthony A. Pastor £ Dr. James A. Paulson & Mrs. M. San Miguel Paulson Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Paulson € Dr. & Mrs. Stanley R. Payne Mrs. Evelyn L. Pelias* Mr. Gerald C. Pelias € Mr. & Mrs. Ward Pennebaker Pensacola Radiation Medicine, PA § Mr. Laurie Joseph Petipas Mr. James A. Petrequin Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Alan H. Philipson Mr. Randall J. Phillips & Ms. Debbie Austin Pi Foundation Verre S. Picard, MD § Dr. & Mrs. John D. Pigott Dr. Michael K. Pinnolis & Ms. Miriam Newman § Mrs. Shirley M. Piotrowski Dr. & Mrs. Gilbert J. Pitisci § Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Pohl ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Polack Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Ponoroff £ Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey C. Poole Mr. & Mrs. Frank P. Porcelli Porter Family Charitable Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Charles K. Porter Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Prather

Mr. & Mrs. Robert N. Price Gabriella Coletti Pridjian, MD Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Priskie Mr. & Mrs. Harry Fred Quarls Dr. & Mrs. Ronald R. Quinton § Mr. & Mrs. Saul L. Rachelson II ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey L. Raizner Mr. & Mrs. Noel M. Rando Sr. ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin F. Rassieur III Mr. & Mrs. Frederick D. Rau Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Rebold The Reily Companies Mr. & Mrs. Michael L. Reinert Mr. & Mrs. Michael D. Remington Republic National Distributing Co., LLC Mr. & Mrs. Peter F. Ricchiuti Mr. & Mrs. Dennis L. Richard € Mr. & Mrs. Herschel E. Richard Jr. Dr. Ben Bashinski III & Dr. Deborah K. Richardson § Dr. & Mrs. James G. Richeson Mr. Jon M. Richter Dr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Riefkohl Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Rinella Mr. Henry T. Ritchie Rittenberg Family Foundation £ River Road Green Wave Club € Mr. & Mrs. Ivens Robinson ¥ Dr. Reuven Porges & Dr. Maria M. Rodriguez Dr. & Mrs. Leonard J. Rolfes Mr. & Mrs. David L. Ronn Dr. & Mrs. Michael J. Rooney § Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Roskin Mr. Michael F. Ross Louis T. Roth Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Peter B. Rubnitz The Rudolf B. Becker Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Juhan Runne Mrs. Rosemary G. Ryan Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Salomon III The Hon. Kaliste J. Saloom Jr. & Mrs. Yvonne Saloom € Ms. Lisa Samson ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Walton D. Sanchez Dr. & Mrs. Gerald F. Sandler § Mr. & Mrs. Robert Jean Saner Mr. & Mrs. Jerry L. Saporito € Oliver Sartor, MD & Sissy Sartor, MD Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Scariano Jr. € Mr. Phil G. D. Schaefer Dr. & Mrs. John C. Scharfenberg § Mr. & Mrs. Donald B. Schell € Mrs. Mary Brown Scheps Mr. & Mrs. Milton G. Scheuermann Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Martin B. Schiel Dr. & Mrs. Everett A. Schneider § Dr. & Mrs. Philip L. Schneider

Dr. & Mrs. Sydney S. Schochet § Mr. Jan Schoonmaker £ Ira & Susan Schulman £ Mr. Kenneth B. Schwartz £ Science Applications International Corp. Mr. & Mrs. John L. Shapiro £ Mr. & Mrs. Stephen B. Shear Mr. & Mrs. James W. Shephard £ Mr. & Mrs. Mettery I. Sherry Jr. € Mr. & Mrs. Donald A. Shindler £ Mr. Jeff Shipp Mr. & Mrs. Lewis S. Shubin Mrs. Lauri Sussman Siegel & Mr. Alex M. Siegel Significance Foundation § Mr. & Mrs. Charles M. Silverman Mr. Joel M. Silvershein & Ms. Marcia H. Gelman Mr. James B. Simmons Dr. & Mrs. John G. Simmons § Marilyn Mackey Skinner, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Gerald F. Slattery Jr. £ Mrs. Julie Slattery-Brown & Mr. Robert A. Brown Thompson Smith Foundation Mr. Cameron Smith € Mr. & Mrs. Hudson D. Smith € Mr. & Mrs. Elmer L. Smith Mr. & Mrs. Everett C. Smith III Dr. & Mrs. John M. Snodsmith § Mrs. Lorraine W. Shanley & David H. Snyder, MD Mr. & Mrs. Stephan E. Sotkin Mr. Thomas E. Sova € Mr. & Mrs. Mark A. Spiegel Dr. Stephen L. Squires Dr. & Mrs. Charles M. Stedman § Mr. & Mrs. Sylvan J. Steinberg £ Mr. Jeremy T. Stillings Ms. Lisa D. Stockton € Dr. & Mrs. Mark B. Stoopler Dr. & Mrs. Henry L. Stoutz § Mr. William A. Streff Jr. Mr. Edward L. Streiffer* Mrs. Amelie Porter Stroh Mrs. Kathleen L. Stull-Harris & Friedrichs H. Harris Jr., MD Dr. & Mrs. Robert G. Sugar § Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Sullivan III Mr. R. Scott Sullivan The Hon. William K. Suter & Mrs. Margaret Suter £ Dr. & Mrs. Roger C. Suttle S.Z.S. Consultants € Mr. Cecil W. Talley Mr. & Mrs. Bernard J. Tanenbaum III Mrs. Consuella Simmons Taylor £ Ms. Cheryl R. Teamer £ Dr. & Mrs. Palmer J. Texada § Mr. & Mrs. James S. Thompson Thomson Tax & Accounting £

The Thorne Foundation ¥ Dr. & Mrs. Mitsuo Tottori § Mr. & Mrs. Rik S. Tozzi £ Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Dr. John M. Trapani III & Ms. Carolina Thompson-Trapani ¥ Trial Exhibits Tulane Law School American Inn of Court £ Dr. & Mrs. John L. Turner IV § TWB Ventures, LLC Mr. & Mrs. E. Peter Urbanowicz Jr. Valentine Chemicals, LLC Mr. & Mrs. Michael W. Valls € Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Van der Linden James W. Vildibill Jr., MD § Mr. & Mrs. John W. Vining Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Guy T. Vise § Mrs. Margaret R. Vizzi § Mr. Nicholas K. Vlahos € Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Vosbein £ Theodore P. Votteler, MD* Wachovia Bank Charitable Funds Management Mr. & Mrs. Wesley A. Walk Walker Automotive ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Michael W. Walker € Wall Street Transcript ¥ David W. Wall, MD § Mrs. Dorothy B. Walsh Martha A. Walton, MD § Mrs. Mary Ann Wannamaker Dr. Nell Pape Waring & Dr. William W. Waring Sr. § Barton L. Warren II, MD § Mr. & Mrs. Irving J. Warshauer £ Steven & Stephanie Wasser Dr. & Mrs. James H. Watts § Dr. & Mrs. Lee Weathington II § Dr. & Mrs. Joseph W. Weaver § Webber Air Cargo ¥ Ms. Martha Peters & Mr. J. Michael Webber ¥ Mr. Henry S. Webert € Mrs. Jodi M. Wechsler-Becker ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Eric M. Wedig Ms. Susan J. Wedlan & Mr. Harold S. Rosen Dr. & Mrs. Rudolph F. Weichert III § Weinmann Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Andrew D. Weinstock Mr. & Mrs. Michael Weinstock Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth A. Weiss £ Dr. & Mrs. James W. Welch Jr. § Wellpoint Foundation Wells Fargo Bank, NA Mr. & Mrs. Andrew N. Wells Mr. & Mrs. Allan B. Wesler Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Whelan ¥ Mr. & Mrs. H. Hunter White Jr. §

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8

|

P A G E

6 7


Tulane University Associates The Whitehead Family Foundation § Whole Foods Market Mr. & Mrs. Harry G. Wiederspahn Mr. & Mrs. Donald B. Wiener £ Wilkinson Otolaryngology Consultants PA § Mr. & Mrs. Casey Willems £ Drs. Cornelia & Claude Williams Dr. & Mrs. Charles L. Williams § Dr. & Mrs. Lyal G. Williams § Dr. & Mrs. Daniel K. Winstead § Mr. & Mrs. William J. Winter Ms. Lizbeth Ann Turner & Mr. Clarence D. Wolbrette £ Dr. & Mrs. Carlos L. Wolf Ms. Anita Kedia & Dr. Nicholas J. Wolf Mr. & Mrs. Theodore P. Wolf Mr. & Mrs. Howard S. Wolofsky Women in Film Mr. & Mrs. William E. Wright Jr. Dr. Kimberly J. Yamanouchi & Dr. James R. Sackett § Young Presidents’ Organization Southern 7 Chapter Mr. & Mrs. Chuck Young Mr. Jason P. Young Mr. John D. Young Mr. Lanny R. Zatzkis £ Dr. Charles H. Zeanah Jr. & Dr. Paula D. Zeanah § Zehnder Communications ¥ Mr. & Mrs. Frederick H. Zeisberg Mr. Jing Zhang Alan M. Zimmer Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Michael Zoller § Dr. & Mrs. David S. Zorub

Associates GOLD (Graduates Of the Last Decade) Anonymous Donors Ms. Amanda N. Albin Mr. Alan G. Bern Ms. Veronica R. Beskin Mr. Turner D. Brumby Arthur A. Caire V, MD Mrs. Allison Liebman Cannizaro Mrs. Elese Resneck Denis Ms. Keely C. Downs Mr. Richter J. Fridman Mr. Peter J. Gauthier Mr. Travis C. Goff Prashant Gupta, MD Mr. Robert J. Habermann Ms. Kristen Hall Mr. Karl A. Herchold Dr. Wen Chao Ho Mr. Nathan J. Hole Mr. Michael W. Kearney Mr. Hiroyuki Konno Mr. Michael Krupa Mr. Daniel K. Latham Ms. Alexandra Lerman Ms. Sharan E. Lieberman Mr. Aleksei Masiuk Dr. James J. McKinnie Ms. Natasha E. Mroczek Mr. Brian P. Murphy Mr. Keith M. Murphy Mr. Thomas P. O’Connor Ms. Avery B. Pardee Mrs. Kassandra Slangan Savicki Mrs. Kelley Siemon Mrs. Melanie S. Spring Mr. Justin F. Termine Katherine L. Thome Kevin M. Timmel, MD Mr. Raymond T. Waid Mr. Robbie Whitman Mrs. Rachel Rhein Zarghami



Associates Board of Directors Executive Committee Mark W. Tipton (A&S ’78), chair Ozgur Karaosmanoglu (A&S ’84, B ’87), vice chair Tommy P. Meehan (E ’83), nominations chair Bill Brown (A&S ’73), at-large member Jeffrey P. Feingold, DDS (A&S ’67), at-large member Tom Hopkins (A&S ’76), at-large member Martha M. Kimmerling (NC ’63), at-large member Members Mary Anne C. Ball (NC ’80) Joseph E. Bavaria, MD (E ’79, M ’83) Emile J. Bayle (B ’53) William T. Beam Jr (A&S ’80) Stacey M. Berger (A&S ’76, B ’78) Benjamin D. Bohlmann (A&S ’82) Susan Hobbs Boone (B ’76) James F. Booth (A&S ’75, L ’78) Bruce P. Bordlee, MD (A&S ’77, M ’81) JoBeth G. Brown (NC ’72) Steven “Caesar” Cahall (TC ’02) Joseph C. Cali (E ’71, ’74, B ’92) Veronica K. Callaghan (NC ’64, SW ’68) Jason L. Cook (A&S ’93, B ’95, G ’95) & Jeri Ann Cook (NC ’91, B ’95) Robert Cousin (A&S ’91) Victor A. Dubuclet III (L ’74) Candice Frembling Dykhuizen (L ’98) Steven Fader (B ’80) Cliff M. Gevirtz, MD (M ’81) Mac W. Hancock III (L ’72) C. Bryce Hartley, MD (M ’82) Gary S. Hirsch, MD (M ’78) & Karen Elkind-Hirsch, PhD (G ’78, ’80) Patrick J. Hojlo (E ’95) Roch B. Hontas, MD (A&S ’80, M ’84, ’89) Jennifer Kottler (NC ’83) John M. Lie-Nielsen (TC ’95) Chad Ludwig (TC ’98) & Molly Ludwig (NC ’98) Karen V. McGlasson (NC ’59) James R. Nieset (A&S ’64, L ’67) Heather F. Perram (NC ’81) Rubin M. Piha (A&S ’68) Mr. Herschel E. Richard Jr. (A&S ’67) John Rossi (G ’78) & Ann Rossi (NC ’78) I. William Sizeler (A ’65) George Sundby (B ’76) & Ann Sundby (B ’75) Szabolcs Szentpetery, MD (Parent ’07) Bruce Van Dusen (Parent ’07) & Susan Whiting Van Dusen (Parent ’07) Cheryl Verlander (NC ’70, SW ’75) Laura Rhodes Waller (NC ’66, SW ’68) Gordon Weil, PhD (A&S ’71) & Kathy Glick-Weil (NC ’71) Eric H. Weimers (E ’80, L ’85) Thomas C. Wicker Jr. (B ’44, L ’49) John J. Witmeyer III (A&S ’68) For more information about Associates membership, contact Jeff Bush, Associate Vice President for Development 6823 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70115-5663 504.862.8385 (direct) 888.265.7576 (toll free) jbush@tulane.edu

Key: § 1834 Society (Medicine) ¥ Aldrich Society (Business) € Coach’s Corner (Athletics) £ Law Fellows Society (Law) * deceased

P A G E

6 8

|

T U L A N I A N

F A L L

2 0 0 8


The Power of Bequests Mrs. Mary H. Irvine’s (NC ’25, G ’32) bequest honors her sister-in-law, the renowned Newcomb pottery decorator Sadie Irvine. Her gifts support scholarships for outstanding female students as well as research projects focusing on the craftworks of the Newcomb art faculty between 1940 and 1952.

s

From the Newcomb Archive

Milton Rosenson (B ’44, L ’48) split his bequest to benefit the Law School Library and the A. B. Freeman School of Business.

Jonathan Ching (M ’75) left an unrestricted bequest to the School of Medicine for pressing needs in medical education. He also designated funds to support undergraduate arts and sciences at Tulane.

 ONE OF THE EASIEST WAYS to create or support a project you love is to include Tulane in your estate plan. A bequest can be a specific amount, or all or part of what is left after family needs are met. Simply meet with your attorney to draft, update, or supplement your will. THEN LET US KNOW. We would like to honor you with lifetime membership in the prestigious William Preston Johnston Society. For sample bequest language and more, visit www.plannedgiving.tulane.edu.

Your Gift. Your Way. Office of Planned Gifts • 504-865-5794 • toll free 800-999-0181 Bequests • Gift Annuities • Charitable Trusts • Retirement Plan Gifts • Securities Gifts • Real Estate Gifts • Insurance Gifts


‘ P R O M I S E A N D D I S T I N C T I O N ’ : T H E C A M PA I G N ’ S S U C C E S S SPOKESPEOPLE • CAVE DWELLERS • HOME COOKING INTERVENTION • FALL 2008 Tu l a n i a n

hiddenTulane

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID

Office of University Publications 31 McAlister Drive, Drawer 1 New Orleans, LA 70118–5624

T H E M AG A Z I N E O F T U L A N E U N I V E R S I T Y

A brush with autumn. Fall colors mix with less seasonal hues in decorating the workspace of the theater department’s prop room, whose floor has taken on the look of an abstract painting.

Tulanian T H E M AG A Z I N E O F

TULANE UNIVERSITY

FA L L 2 0 0 8

Profile for Tulane University

Tulanian Fall 2008  

Tulanian Fall 2008  

Advertisement