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A Year In Review Fall 2016-Spring 2017

REFLECTIONS


MISSION The School of Liberal Arts is dedicated to nurturing

and promoting innovative

scholarship, transformative

research, and creative inquiry within the arts, humanities,

and social sciences. Based on a distinctive vision comprised of

our interdisciplinary approach, dedication to place-based

creativity, and commitment

to service learning, the school provides students with an

outstanding education founded on close working relationships with distinguished faculty. In our belief in interdisciplinary inquiry, our faculty reach

beyond traditional academic

boundaries; in our dedication to place-based learning, we

engage with New Orleans and

the greater Gulf region; in our pursuit of social innovation,

we foster a lifelong enthusiasm for service to the community and the world.


SCHOOL OF LIBER AL ARTS LEADERSHIP SLA Dean and Professor of History Carole Haber Associate Deans Mary Clark Kevin Gotham Jeremy Jernegan DE VELOPMENT STAFF Director of Development Lauren Phipps 504.247.1375 lphipps@tulane.edu

Kevin W. Lander LA ’07 Richard I. Lane A&S ’85 Alan W. Lawrence A&S ’87 Carol S. Levin B ’80, Parent LA ’12 Albert T. Lojko, Jr. A&S ’94, Parent LA ’13 and LA ’13, CS ’16 Darrick U. McGowan TC ’98, SW ’99

Program Manager Nicole Long

Andrew M. Messina A&S ’89

DE AN ’ S ADVISORY COUNCIL

Russell S. Palmer A&S ’71, Parent TC ’03

Chair Wilson K. Magee A&S ’77

Suzanne Mandel Palmer NC ’73, SW ’76, Parent TC ’03

Vice Chair Paul H. McDowell A&S ’82 John P. Argenti A&S ’85 Curtis A. Baker A&S ’90, Parent LA ’19 Michael J. Bracci A&S ’87 Matthew K. Breitman A&S ’90

Bruce E. Murray A&S ’85

Steven B. Pearl A&S ’85 Christopher S. Petrikin A&S ’88 Meryl Poster NC ’86 Richard M. Rhodes A&S ’83, Parent LA ’18

Kenneth P. de Got A&S ’85

Mathew S. Rosengart A&S ’84

Michael S. Field A&S ’63

Richard L. Roskin A&S ’87

Andrew D. Fredman A&S ’84

Peter D. Russin A&S ’85, Parent A ’18

Reuben I. Friedman A&S ’68, L ’71 Constantine D. Georges A&S ’77, L ’80 Debra H. Gibbons, Parent LA ’13 and NC ’09 Paul F. Gibbons, Parent LA ’13 and NC ’09 James M. Horowitz A&S ’83 Charlotte Beyer Hubbell NC ’71

Kenneth R. Sadowsky A&S ’84 H. Andrew Schwartz A&S ’90 Mark L. Schwartz A&S ’80, Parent B ’07 Julie Parelman Silbert NC ’80, L ’84 John B. Strasburger A&S ’86, Parent B ’19

John A. Isakson A&S ’92

Travis A. Torrence TC ’02

Marjorie C. Jacobs NC ’81

Cecelia Cirone Wallace NC ’86

Hans A. B. Jonassen A&S ’63, Parent UC ’94

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Katharine Modisett Lander NC ’06

Eric H. West A&S ’86

Loryn C. Kass NC ’87

David H. Willis A&S ’91

Michael L. Kass A&S ’87

Mark Wladis, Parent LA ’14

Dianne L. LaBasse NC ’74, B ’76

Robert M. Wolfberg A&S ’92

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MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN

A Year in Review Between the bustle of spring graduation and the commotion of new and returning students in the fall, the summer gives us the opportunity to reflect on the remarkable occasions and accomplishments that have occurred during the last academic year. Selecting the events on which to focus is no small feat. Throughout the School of Liberal Arts, our students and faculty have compiled a record of outstanding achievements. They have created new knowledge, challenged prevailing assumptions, and demonstrated the importance of a broad liberal arts education. They have taken their knowledge and transformed the community in which we live and the world that future generations will inhabitant. As in the past, we have organized Reflections to highlight the distinctive School of Liberal Arts’ vision. While we celebrate the great range of knowledge and approaches that define our 16 departments and 19 programs, we also note that we are joined by our shared commitment to mission, place, and approach. Through our service learning mission, we dissolve the barrier between classroom and community; through our dedication to place, we engage the region as a source of inspiration and learning; through our original approach, we use our foundation in strong disciplinary research and teaching to foster innovative interdisciplinary conversations. The annual publication of Reflections also allows us to acknowledge the importance of our donors whose enthusiasm for our vision and support of our programs are essential for all we do. Along with the faculty, staff, and students, they make up the incredible community that is the School of Liberal Arts at Tulane University.

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CAROLE HABER Dean, Tulane School of Liberal Arts t u l a n e.e d u / l i b e r a l - a r t s


SL A REFLEC TIONS Year In Review A Magazine for Alumni and Friends of the School of Liberal Arts Volume 4, 2016–2017 WRITING AND EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Carole Haber, Makenzie Kozojet, Kirby Messinger, Arielle Pentes, Lauren Phipps, Mary Sparacello, Nicole Westerfield DESIGN Anna Toujas PHOTOGR APHY Paula Burch-Celentano, Cheryl Gerber, Arielle Pentes, Ryan Rivet

4 ................... Mission 8 ................... Place

CONTRIBUTORS Mary Cross, Rachel Hoormann, Agnieszka Nance, Rebecca Snedeker ON THE COVER Assistant Professor of Art, Anne Nelson (MFA ’13), Boundaries, Overlaps, 2012; Oil on Canvas PIC TURED Tulane School of Liberal Arts students visit the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare, Ireland as part of the Dublin summer study abroad program. The month long program offers courses in English, History, and Political Science as well as field trips and excursions to historic and cultural sites in Ireland. Photo provided by Laura Kelley.

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Inside

14 ................... Approach 18 ................... Donor Honor Roll 23 ................... Looking Ahead 24 ................... SLA By the Numbers

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MISSION

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MISSION

PROMOTING POSITIVE

SocialChange In 2011, a generous gift from Andrew (A&S ’84) and Kerin Fredman to the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South launched the Fredman Gulf South Studies Courses. All of these courses are based on three essential components: place-based storytelling, service-learning, and economic impact. Since the program’s inception, seven stellar Fredman Gulf South Studies Courses have been developed, producing scores of short films, oral histories, and online articles. This past year, three courses were offered in collaboration with the School of Liberal Arts’ Communication and English departments, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and the Center for Public Service at Tulane, as well as four community partner organizations. In Professor Betsy Weiss’s course, “Media and Criminal Justice,” students conducted interviews and created videos for two prominent anti-incarceration grassroots organizations, Voices of the Experienced (VOTE) and Families and Friends of Louisiana’s Incarcerated Children (FFLIC). Distinguished journalists and investigative reporters visited the class and inspired students to pursue careers in journalism. CONTINUED ON NE X T PAGE...

PIC TURED LEF T TO RIG HT: The Food, Migration, and Culture course created a permanent Latin Foodways exhibit at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, photo by Gigsy; At New Orleans City Hall, students participate with VOTE in a voting rights demonstration for the recently incarcerated, photo by Bruce Reilly, Deputy Director of Voice of the Experienced (VOTE).

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MISSION Promoting Positive Social Change CONTINUED...

Students in Professor Sarah Fouts’ course, “Food, Migration, and Culture,” delved into the intersection of New Orleans’ longstanding restaurant industry and growing Latinx community. They conducted field work with local Latinx restaurateurs and restaurant workers to create a new showcase of Latin Foodways in New Orleans, “New Orleans con Sabor Latino,” now on permanent exhibit at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum. The longest running Fredman course, Professor Michael Luke’s “Journalism,” produced the 7th edition of the journal

Krewe in partnership with Sophie Teitelbaum’s 9th grade English students at New Orleans Charter Science and Math High School. Already known for its original stories, this year’s edition of Krewe also showcased the participants’ artistic skills as they designed the layout and hand sewed and bound the journals. The Fredman Gulf South Studies Courses have affected many lives—inspiring former students’ career choices and developing an understanding of local policy and economic opportunity. Next year, an exciting new course will focus on water management, further adding to our students’ understanding of the region and their ability to affect positive social change.

Tulane Receives Grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to Support Graduate Fellowship Program for Community Engagement Community engagement is central to the Tulane experience.

understanding of the region and a platform for developing numerous skills.

The Princeton Review recently ranked Tulane as the leading university in the country for public service. In the past, this activity was largely limited to undergraduates whose required course work took them into the community, providing them with an

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Now, however, thanks to a $1.5 million grant from the Mellon Foundation, graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences will be able to pursue communityengaged research or teaching. Leading to a unique certificate, the new program is the result of a collaborative effort of the School of Liberal Arts, the Center for Engaged Teaching and Learning,

and the Center for Public Service.

and everyone working with them.”

Not only will graduate students at Tulane be enriched by the program, but, through the grant, the School of Liberal Arts will be able to recruit a new wave of talented applicants. “Some of the most exciting work taking place on our campus is already being done by graduate students,” says Ryan McBride, an Administrative Associate Professor who will direct the new program. “They enrich their departments

“The more we can offer them in terms of resources, new perspectives, and challenging conversations,” adds McBride, “the more they will be able to accomplish both academically and in the wider community.”

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PIC TURED: Adrian Gutierrez and Tayler Payton work with Administrative Assoc. Prof. Ryan McBride who will direct the new program for graduate students interested in community-engaged research or teaching.

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MISSION

The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane, in conjunction with Cripple Creek Theatre Company, toured Shakespeare’s The Taming of The Shrew in the Greater New Orleans area for underserved audiences. Directed by Emilie Whelan, the outreach effort included the rehabilitation centers Bridge House and Grace House, New Orleans Women and Children’s Shelter, Tremé Community Center, and Dixon Correctional Institute. With the help of Tulane School of Liberal Arts students James McClendon and Jordan Selesnick, the project also included audience interviews in order to understand how viewers shape theatre, as well as to see how Shakespeare is received in contemporary society.

S

hakespeare in the

Community

By James McClendon (SLA ’18) and Jordan Selesnick (SLA ’18)

PIC TURED: As part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane, the Cripple Creek Theatre Company performs The Taming of the Shrew for inmates at the Dixon Correctional Institute in Jackson, La. Photo by Jason Kruppa.

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The Taming of The Shrew confronts problems such as class struggle, misogyny, power, and most importantly, dignity in the face of adversity. Although the play is from the 16th century, many of these themes translate to the current cultural climate. After the Tremé performance, audience member Steffie Hernandez shared, “Seeing how Petruchio belittles Kate within their relationship—that’s still happening today. History repeats itself.” The most common theme observed resonates in the words of a Dixon Correctional Institute inmate who said, “No matter where we come from, it’s possible to take on a new character.” These performances and the students’ interviews culminated in an interactive lobby display on Tulane’s uptown campus, highlighting important conversations about theatre through the perspective of multiple lenses. Whether reading the play or watching its modern adaptation, the tour illustrates that Shakespeare’s words are still relevant and accessible to all.

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PLACE

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P L AC E

Jane Goodall’s

HOPE

MESSAGE OF

Jane Goodall’s indomitable dedication to studying animal behavior began in an unlikely place—a henhouse. At 4 years old, Goodall crawled in after a hen on her family’s farm and waited for hours hoping to observe the bird laying an egg, taking her first step on a lifelong path of discovery. “Isn’t that the making of a little scientist—asking questions, not getting answers and deciding to find out for yourself?” said the world-renowned conservationist during a sold-out lecture in Dixon Hall on the Tulane University uptown campus. Goodall spent the evening as both a storyteller sharing tales of her life’s work, and as a scientist urging audience members to take action in preserving our planet for future generations. “There’s nothing more amazing than being out in the rainforest and learning about how everything is connected; every little creature has a special part to play in the tapestry of life.” Her childhood curiosity turned into the desire to travel to Africa to study the continent’s wildlife. That desire became a reality in 1960 when archaeologist Louis Leakey sent Goodall on an expedition to study the wild chimpanzees of Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania. CONTINUED ON NE X T PAGE...

PIC TURED: Jane Goodall spoke to the Tulane community about her life experiences that led to her becoming an activist. Her visit to Tualne was made possible by Environmental Studies Director and Anthropology Professor Katharine Jack.

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P L AC E Jane Goodall ’s Messa ge of Hope CONTINUED...

Immersing herself within the animals’ habitat for months, Goodall made the groundbreaking discovery that chimpanzees make and use tools, forever changing scientific definitions of human and animal behavior. During her discussion, Goodall also credited a conference that took place in Chicago 30 years ago for opening her eyes to the dangers faced by African chimpanzees, such as animal trafficking. “I left as a different person. I left as an activist,” she said. Her experience at the conference planted the seeds for her Roots and Shoots program. Established in 1991, the youth-led

community action program flourishes in 130 countries, where children collaborate on projects aimed at bettering their world such as saving wild elephants and plotting school gardens. Goodall now travels 300 days a year spreading a message of hope to communities facing environmental crises across the globe. “Have we compromised the future of young people? You bet we have. But I think we have a window of time left to heal,” she said. “I hope that the New Orleans community will realize that every one of us has a role to play and everybody can make a difference.”

Uncovering Ancient Worlds

In the summer of 2016, Professor Tatsuya Murakami of the Department of Anthropology, along with six graduate students, joined with professors and students from Mexico, the United States, and Japan in the NSF-supported Proyecto Arqueológico Tlalancaleca-Puebla (PATP: Tlalancaleca Archaeological Project, Puebla) in Mexico. The explorations went to the very heart of the creation, transformation, and collapse of early cities during the period 800BC-AD200 in Central Mexico. Through excavations at Tres Marias Complex, they uncovered pyramids, residential spaces, and plazas that allowed them to date and trace the process of urban transformation. In addition, findings around the ancient springs revealed a segment of canal systems that may have played a large role in attracting migrants and establishing a communal identity. As they work to publish an artifact catalog, photograph significant artifacts, digitize field publications, and analyze the soil geochemistry, Tulane’s faculty and students will undoubtedly change the way we think about the formation and function of ancient urban centers.

PICTURED: Anthropology graduate students Jocelyne Ponce and Bobbie Simova, along with Assistant Professor of Anthropology Tatsuya Murakami, research ancient pyramids in Central Mexico. Photo provided by Tatsuya Murakami.

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P L AC E

Soil

NOT OIL

A PUBLIC LECTURE BY DR. VANDANA SHIVA By Liat Perlin (SLA ’17)

Renowned ecofeminst scholar and indigenous rights activist Dr. Vandana Shiva spoke at Tulane this past spring.

In her first visit to New Orleans, Shiva was thrilled to be a part of the Tulane Environmental Studies Focus on the Environment Speaker Series The Petrochemical City: The Costs and Consequences of Petrochemical Industrial Production. “The only place we’ll be able to reclaim freedom, the only place we’ll be able to reclaim fearlessness, and the only place people will realize that the earth provides enough for everyone’s needs is from the soil,” said Shiva to an audience of over 300 students, faculty, and community members. Referencing her 2007 publication entitled “Soil Not Oil,” Shiva detailed the detrimental impacts that industrialized agricultural production has had on humanity as well as the earth. “Farming without farmers,” as she characterized fossil fuel-based industrial agriculture, “means farming with poisons t u l a n e.e d u / l i b e r a l - a r t s

that will never produce real food.” Shiva advocated for a system of food production in which food is grown for consumption, not for profit. Shiva passionately relayed a story of a young boy who learned to grow a tomato plant and marveled at how a single seed could produce so many. “Children are being taught scarcity, dependence and fear, rather than lessons of abundance.” She encouraged the audience to plant “gardens of hope” to reinstall humanity’s connection to the natural world, break their reliance on fossil fuels, and model the importance of growing our own food. In addition to her lecture, Shiva shared time with student leaders who helped organize the event. She challenged these Tulane students, as well as the greater New Orleans community, to embody equity, diversity, and richness, all values that come from the soil. PIC TURED ABOVE: Renowned ecofeminst scholar and indigenous rights activist, Dr. Vandana Shiva, visited Tulane to give a lecture as part of the Tulane Environmental Studies Focus on the Environment Speaker Series The Petrochemical City: The Costs and Consequences of Petrochemical Industrial Production.

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P L AC E

New York Times Columnist Maureen Dowd Reflects on 2016 Election By Samah Ahmed (PHTM ’18)

Renowned New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd spoke at Tulane University this past fall.

Dowd’s discussion focused on the politics and personalities of the 2016 presidential race as explored in her book The Year of Voting Dangerously: The Derangement of American Politics. Dowd, a longtime White House correspondent, delineated the challenges faced by both the Clinton and Trump campaigns during the election. In addition, through a series of anecdotes from her interviews with Washington elites and the candidates, she described several possible scenarios of

what a Trump presidency might look like. School of Liberal Arts Associate Professor Brian Brox, whose research focuses on campaigns and elections, served as a guide to Dowd’s discussion. Explaining the Clinton defeat, Dowd said, “Hillary lost mainly because she didn’t have a clear message. The subtext of her campaign was basically ‘It’s my turn now’.” Made possible by School of Liberal Arts Dean’s Advisory Council member H. Andrew Schwartz, Dowd’s talk was part of Forum Tulane,

an initiative designed to foster intellectual exploration through an annual university-wide conversation around a common theme. The 2016-2017 year’s theme was power. “Power warps some people who get it, while others rise to the occasion,” said Dowd. “We don’t know what will happen in the coming months. It is our responsibility to hold politicians accountable.”

PIC TURED: New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd discusses the 2016 election at Tulane University.

TULANE TO HOLLYWOOD As a part of an intensive five-week introduction to the film industry, students participating in the SLA Contemporary Hollywood Film Industry summer program visited Sony Pictures Studios in Culvert City, CA where they met with industry professionals including writers, directors, producers, agents, and studio heads.

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P L AC E

G I F T E S TA B L I S H E S

Gulf South Foodways Program Following in their family tradition of philanthropy, Ashli Rosenthal Blumenfeld (NC ’03) and Todd Blumenfeld (B ’03) are giving back to Tulane.

Through a generous gift to the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South (NOCGS), the Blumenfelds, along with Ashli’s parents, William “Billy” and Rozanne Rosenthal, have created the Rosenthal Blumenfeld Endowment to support the exploration, documentation, and study of the diverse food cultures of the Gulf South. The gift will empower NOCGS to cultivate a program that deepens our understanding of the role of food in our lives, economy, and environment and celebrates our region’s rich culinary traditions. The gift has already sparked developments, as NOCGS begins to shape plans that will touch students, faculty, and community members through the Gulf South Foodways program. “It’s wonderful that the gift is already having an impact,” said Ashli Rosenthal Blumenfield. “I’m hoping that it will also inspire other people our age to give to Tulane.” For NOCGS, the Rosenthal Blumenfeld Endowment is transformational and will allow Tulane to launch and sustain a dynamic program for many years to come, nourishing many here on campus and beyond. PIC TURED: Ashli Rosenthal Blumenfeld and Todd Blumenfeld and their two children along with Ashli’s parents - William and Rozanne Rosenthal. Photo provided by Ashli Rosenthal Blumenfeld.

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APPROACH

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A P P R OAC H

INTERSECTING

Social Policy AND

ART

Lilith Winkler-Schor, the School of Liberal Arts graduation speaker, Truman Scholar, and Gordon Summer Fellow, personifies the interdisciplinary virtuosity of a liberal arts education. “Liberal arts for me is really about the flexibility to execute my passion,” says Winkler-Schor, who in May received a bachelor’s degree in political science and social policy and practice, a bachelor of fine arts degree in glass and sculpture, as well as a minor in Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship (SISE). Winkler-Schor, who was born in Germany, now hails from Seattle, Washington. She co-founded Roots of Renewal, an organization that trains formerly incarcerated young adults in construction and connects them with work thereafter. In majoring across disciplines, Winkler-Schor has been able to connect her passion for art with her dedication to social policy. “Being able to combine these two fields has been hugely important for me and something that I’ve loved,” she remarked. “And how they’ve helped me think about the opposite field as well has been really interesting.” CONTINUED ON NE X T PAGE...

PIC TURED: SLA student commencement speaker, Truman Scholar, Gordon Summer Fellow, and Co-Founder of Roots of Renewal, Lilith Winkler-Schor, (SLA ’17), poses with her BFA Senior Exhibition titled Lebenslauf.

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A P P R OAC H Inter sec ting Social Polic y and Ar t CONTINUED...

As a long-range goal, Winkler-Schor is dedicated to the creation of equitable cities, although she realizes that doing so will take a two-pronged approach requiring both creativity and practicality. “I think we need to change the systems that are inequitable. But we also need people to buy into the fact that they need to be changed. That’s where policy and art come together. Art is often the catalyst to get people to think about how systems aren’t equitable in the first place or why we need to change things or just provoke thought to begin with.”

demonstrated leadership in public service. She has deferred graduate school to work with Roots of Renewal, and ultimately plans to pursue urban planning or urban design. This summer, as a recipient of the Gordon Summer Fellowship, she will travel to nine cities to study and compare social practice art and social impact design. “I believe that the role of future Tulane graduates is constantly to be thinking outside of our own neighborhood,” she says. “We must understand where we are and what our responsibilities and opportunities are in order to make sure that we’re thinking beyond ourselves.”

Winkler-Schor has been awarded the prestigious Truman Scholarship, a graduate school scholarship rewarding

Resurrecting Religious Studies School of Liberal Arts alumna Jane Wolfe has often remarked that religious studies changed her outlook on life. “It opened my eyes,” said Wolfe, who graduated from Tulane in 2012 with majors in religious studies and history. “It expanded my horizons. I’m the same Jane, but I’m different.” Before Hurricane Katrina, Tulane had a religious studies major and minor. Now, thanks to Wolfe’s tenacity and a generous gift she made to the School of Liberal Arts, the minor has been resurrected for the spring 2017 semester. Ronna Burger, Professor of Philosophy and Catherine and Henry J. Gaisman Chair in the School of Liberal Arts, led the charge to bring back religious studies at Tulane. “Religion is and always has been a central feature of human life, for individuals and communities,” says Burger. Students can approach the interdisciplinary field of religious studies from a variety of perspectives, including philosophical,

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historical, political, sociological, anthropological and literary. Burger credits Wolfe with being the catalyst for revitalizing the religious studies minor. As an undergraduate, Wolfe fashioned a religious studies major herself, knocking on many professors’ doors to make it happen. Already a mother of two adult children and a successful entrepreneur, Wolfe was an unconventional student when she attended Tulane in her 40s. After her undergraduate studies, Wolfe received a Masters in Theological Studies at Harvard Divinity School. She returned to Tulane in 2015 as an adjunct professor to teach an Introduction to World Religions course, which she will teach again for the religious studies minor. Wolfe’s gift to the School of Liberal Arts helps create foundational support for the religious studies minor. It’s a cause she fervently supports: “I believe that religious studies helps students understand the intellectual history of the world they live in.”

PIC TURED: SLA alumna and adjunct professor Jane Wolfe was instrumental in revitalizing religious studies at Tulane.

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A P P R OAC H

Pre-med Track with a Creative Twist

SLA Fast Track to a Career in Law

The Creative Premedical Scholars Program gives talented School of Liberal Arts undergraduates a unique opportunity to tie an exploration of a liberal arts major to a career in medicine. Acceptance into the program at the end of the sophomore year gives students automatic entry into Tulane University School of Medicine at the end of the undergraduate career without taking the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Instead of preparing for the exam, creative premedical scholars are encouraged to enrich their education and develop wide-ranging skills and experiences.

Tulane University School of Law’s joint degree 3/3 Program gives students the rare opportunity to obtain both a School of Liberal Arts undergraduate degree and a JD in only six years. To be part of the competitive program, they apply to Tulane Law School during their junior year. In what would otherwise be their senior year, students enroll as a full-time law student. Once admitted, students not only expedite their time to complete their BA and JD degrees but are still eligible for their undergraduate scholarship assistance for the first year of law school.

The program allowed Jonathan Rizner (SLA ’17), a premedical creative scholar who majored in Spanish and music, to study abroad and join the local New Orleans musical community. “Just doing science all your life, you miss out on other aspects of life,” Rizner remarked. “When you are a doctor, it’s not just a body, but a person you have to deal with.” More info at tulane.edu/liberal-arts/cpsp.cfm

PIC TURED: Jonathan Rizner (SLA ’17) studied the trumpet and its influence on jazz culture in New Orleans as part of his senior thesis as a member of the Creative Premedical Scholars Program.

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Ashton Yarnall (SLA ’17, JD ’19), who has completed her first year in the program, said the School of Liberal Arts prepared her well for law school by training her in critical thinking and argumentation. “I always knew I wanted to be a lawyer, and the 3/3 program gave me an opportunity to fast track my career,” said Yarnall. “I love Tulane, and I love New Orleans. I couldn’t be happier with my decision.” More info at tulane.edu/liberal-arts/slajd.cfm

PIC TURED: Ashton Yarnell (SLA ’17, JD ’19) is participating in the joint degree Law 3/3 Program.

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DONOR HONOR ROLL

Why We Give

Because of the support of alumni and friends, the School of Liberal Arts is able to give students an innovative and transformative education. We are grateful to the following individuals, companies, and foundations that gave gifts and made pledges or pledge payments of $1,000 or more from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017.

Anne Abbott and Herschel Abbott

Marc Behar

Alphawood Foundation

Louellen Berger and Darryl Berger

Diane Althouse and Herbert Althouse Anonymous Donors Janice Apple and Jerry Apple John Argenti Arts Midwest

Adelaide Benjamin

Donna Berger Rose Bernstein and George Bernstein Kelly Biesecker and Frederick Biesecker

AT&T, Inc.

Ashli Rosenthal Blumenfeld and Todd Blumenfeld

Hillary Baker and Curtis Baker

Ellen Kanner and Benjamin Bohlmann

Manda D’Agata and Ian Barnes

Joy Bollinger and Donald Bollinger

PIC TURED: As a part of a four-week SLA Environmental Studies summer program, directed by Assistant Professor of Sociology Laura McKinney, students toured areas of New Orleans that were heavily impacted by Hurricane Katrina and climate change. This program is supported by generous SLA donors and allows environmental studies students to meet with area experts providing a hands-on learning opportunity. Location: Industrial Canal in front of the St. Claude Ave. Bridge.

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Inspired Alum Establishes French Travel Fund The influence of a supportive, encouraging French professor transformed Jeff Klein’s life, inspiring him in turn to transform the lives of his fellow Tulanians by establishing an endowed fund in her honor. “It almost feels like a movie that a teacher changed my life, but she did,” Klein says. A 1993 Tulane graduate, Jeff Klein is now the owner of several hotels, including the iconic Sunset Tower on Los Angeles’ Sunset Strip. But it wasn’t always obvious that he would be successful. When Klein was 10, a doctor told the dyslexic youth that he would never speak a foreign language. At Tulane, he enrolled in French and was fortunate to have Elizabeth Poe as his professor.

Her encouragement shifted the trajectory of his life. Poe urged him to study abroad for a year in Paris. Although he was hesitant, he took the plunge and embarked for France. As a result, he became a fluent speaker—he still is—and developed a sense of style that has inspired the unique look of his acclaimed hotels. “She encouraged me to step outside of my comfort zone,” Klein says. “In a storybook way, she taught me to follow my instincts. She taught me that there’s nothing wrong with dreaming, and she taught me that if you work hard enough you can achieve your dreams.” With Poe retiring in spring 2017, Klein thought the timing was perfect to make a gift to Tulane in her honor. He chose to support a cause that is meaningful to them both, creating the opportunity for students to have a profound experience in France through the Professor Beth Poe Travel Fund in French Immersion Studies.Poe said that there were tears

streaming down her face when she learned of Klein’s generosity. “When you’ve taught for 40 years, you like to think you’ve had a positive impact on some of the students you’ve taught or tried to help. This incredibly generous and kind gesture on my behalf was like validation of everything I’ve tried to do for 40 years.”

gift. And all because a teacher believed in her student, and because he always rose to her expectations. “It all really does go back to her teaching me to follow my gut,” Klein says “and that dreaming is OK.”

PIC TURED: Tulane Professor Elizabeth Poe and Jeff Klein (A&S ’93).

Both hope many future Tulane students will be able to enjoy life-changing immersive opportunities in France funded through this generous

Rene Fransen and Edward Bonin

Victoria Brubaker and Dennis Brubaker

Aloha Collins and Robert Collins

Dr. Donald and J.J. Dooley Foundation

Margaretta Bourgeois and Lionel Bourgeois

Penny Bryant and Jack Bryant

Christine Cooper and Richard Cooper

Laurie Dubin and Scott Dubin

Bonnie Boyd and John Boyd

Sally Corning and Edison Buchanan

Pamela Crigler and Jeremy Crigler

Colleen Bracci and Michael Bracci

Steve Burgess

Alison Crowther

Bridget Eckerd and Rick Eckerd

Adele Cahn

Laura Curns

Educational Testing Services

Katherine Brewer and Lyons Brewer

Marie Cahn and James Cahn

Gregory Dadourian

Vivian Cahn and Richard Cahn

David Darragh

Catherine Edwards and David Edwards

Sarina Bronfin and Kenneth Bronfin

Sue Canizaro and Joseph Canizaro

Michelle de Freitas and Dean de Freitas

Melanie Bronfin and Daniel Bronfin

The Capital Group Companies, Inc.

Collins C. Diboll Private Foundation

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TUL ANE UNIVERSIT Y SCHOOL OF LIBER AL ARTS

Janet Duval and Stanwood Duval

Nicole Eichberger Solitario Stacey Eisenberg and Glenn Eisenberg Kate Elkins and Gary Elkins

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LEADING THE WAY

“By funding this series, we wanted Tulane to be a leader in furthering discussion and debate on how CO 2 emissions are affecting climate change, an event that directly threatens coastal cities like New Orleans.” - CHARLOTTE & FRED HUBBELL Charlotte (NC ’71) and Fred Hubbell give

Alice Grossman and Harvey Grossman

Jeffrey Klein

Carole Haber Jim Hart Vivienne Hayne and Peck Hayne Adrea Heebe and Dominick Russo

English-Speaking Union

Marlene Friedman and Reuben Friedman Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Gina Genz and Peter Genz Georges Lurcy Charitable and Educational Trust

Ferber Family of Houma Foundation, a supporting foundation within the Jewish Endowment Foundation

Constantine Georges

Roxanne Field and Michael Field

Jennifer Goldberg and Jordan Goldberg

Olivia Fischer and Harlan Fischer

Carol Goldman and Peter Goldman

Ella Flower

The Goldring Foundation

Anne Higgins Foley

William Goldring

Susan Fox and David Fox

Shannie Goldstein and David Goldstein

Kerin Fredman and Andrew Fredman

Nathan Gordon

Debra Gibbons and Paul Gibbons

Christian Granzow t u l a n e.e d u / l i b e r a l - a r t s

Charles Lacoste Rachel Ladin and Brian Ladin

Sandra Herman and Russ Herman

Katharine Lander and Kevin Lander

Angela Hill and Irwin Marcus

Elizabeth Landis and James Landis

C. Hilliard

Marie Holcombe and Gregory Holcombe

Rita Montlack and Howard Freedman

Lynne Kullman and Wilfred Kullman

Lesley Lahm and Martin Lahm

speakers’ series, which

Patricia Truscelli and Emmett Ellis

KPMG Foundation

Jill Heller and Sanford Heller

Louise Hoffman

local communities.

Kathleen Favrot

Rosemary Kozar and Brent King

on the Environment

issues affecting

Noriko Faust and Michael Faust

Linda Green and Michael Brown

annually to the Focus

of environmental

John Fairchild

Lynn Kerdyk and William Kerdyk

Mary Beth Hines and Douglas Hines

explores the impact

Robin Epstein and Steven Epstein

The Greater New Orleans Foundation

Rebecca Hollingsworth and Michael Hollingsworth

Martha Landrum and John Landrum Ann Lane and Bruce Lane Jill Lane and Richard Lane Caroline Lavender Nead and Arthur Nead Alan Lawrence

Joan Hooper Feibelman and Julian Feibelman

Christine LeBlanc and V. LeBlanc

Ann Hopkins and Tom Hopkins

Melissa Legier and William Legier

Joi Horowitz and James Horowitz

Bob Lemon

Charlotte Hubbell and Fred Hubbell

Donald Levy

Nancy Inabnett and Carrick Inabnett

Douglass Lore

Carol Levin Albert Lojko

Maya Irimpen and Anand Irimpen

Louisiana Board of Regents

John Isakson

Hilary Magee and Wilson Magee

Marjorie Jacobs and Jeffrey Jacobs

M. W. Murphy Foundation

Jodi Block and Barry Malkin

Emmett Johnson

Annette Mani and Peter Mani

Timothy Johnson

Chanida Martin

Pierce Jonassen and Hans Jonassen

Louise Martin and Edward Martin

Jones Walker, LLP

Ruchirawan Meemeskul and Ralph Martin

Rosan Jordan and Francis de Caro Kathy Kanter and Lawrence Kanter Loryn Kass and Michael Kass Claudia Katzner and Daniel Katzner

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Eva Martinez and Andrew Martinez Kris McGee and Richard McGee The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Joyce Menschel R E F L E C T I O N S 2 016 -2 017

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PAYING IT FORWARD

Mara Buxbaum and Mathew Rosengart

“I wanted to do something that could help anybody who wanted to be involved in communications because of how much it’s meant to me.” - BRUCE MURR AY Bruce Murray (A&S ’85) made a generous gift to support the Television and Radio Fund in the School of Liberal Arts, promoting teaching, researching, and digitally archiving significant media. Murray is a Dean’s Advisory Council Member and a SiriusXM Sports Radio Show host.

Julie Meyer and Michael Meyer Linda Mintz Anne Morse and James Morse Morton and Barbara Mandel Family Foundation Barbara Motley and Lawrence Motley Mozel Charitable Trust Mpress

Rozanne Rosenthal and William Rosenthal Colette Dartnall-Roskin and Richard Roskin Nancy Rotering and Robert Rotering Christine Rothman and Donald Rothman Andi Russin and Peter Russin Kenneth Sadowsky Sazerac Company, Inc. Amy Goldberg and H. Andrew Schwartz

The Zeldin Family Foundation LaVerne Thomas Maureen Thunell and Robert Thunell The Estate of Thelma Toole Christine Tuchler and Andrew Tuchler Eli Tullis Julie Turken and Donald Turken Madilyn Turken United Scrap Metal, Inc. Rae Victor Villa I Tatti

Judy Schwartz and Mark Schwartz

Thomas Vining

Kathryn Scurlock and Jeffrey Scurlock

Walt Disney Company Foundation

Anjali Sheffrin and Steven Sheffrin

Elmon Webb

Thomas Wald

Shell Oil Company Foundation

Nancy Weingrad and Howard Weingrad

Wendy Sibley and Lawrence Sibley

Kenneth Weissbrot

Elliot Siegel

Martha Wells and Max Wells

Julie Silbert and Scott Silbert

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropology

Louise Simon and John Simon

Natalie West and Eric West

Spencer Foundation

Whitney National Bank

Sammy Steele

Ginger Willis and David Willis

Stacy Mandel Palagye and Keith Palagye

The Corky and Rick Steiner Family Foundation

Diane Wladis and Mark Wladis

Suzanne Palmer and Russell Palmer

Corky Steiner

Ann Wolfberg and Joseph Wolfberg

Paulette Stewart and Frank Stewart

Lynne Wolfberg and Robert Wolfberg

Carol Stone

Jane Wolfe and Scott Wolfe

Pamela Strasburger and John Strasburger

The Estate of Emily Wolfson

Cynthia O’Neill and Timothy O’Neill Andrew Orestano Nancy Oswald and Markham Oswald

Gordon Mueller

Stacy Pellerin and James Pellerin

Martha Murphy

Nicholas Petras

Hilary Murray and Bruce Murray

Isabel Petrikin and Christopher Petrikin

Max Nathan National Geographic Society

Kimberlee Swig

Barbara Workman and Mark Workman

Joyce Post

Jeffrey Taft

The Estate of H. Yoder

M. Cleland Powell

Cecil Talley

Kevin Yorn

Therese Esperdy and Robert Neborak

Susie Raizner and Jeffrey Raizner

Monica Tanenbaum and Myron Tanenbaum

Nell Young and Robert Young

Network for Good

Nancy Rebold and Matthew Rebold

Patrick F. Taylor Foundation

Reily Foods Company

John Templeton Foundation

Mary Nichols and Hudson Nichols Amy Stoken and Benjamin Nortman Kenneth Barnes and Roger Ogden

Deborah Reily and James Reily Rene J.L. Fransen Landscape Architect, LLC

Once Upon a Time Foundation

Cheryl Rhodes and Richard Rhodes

Lynn O’Neill and James O’Neill

Mimi Rose and Stuart Rose

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Phyllis Taylor

E VERY EFFORT has been made to ensure the accuracy of this list. Please contact Lauren Phipps at 504.247.1375 or email lphipps@tulane.edu with corrections or questions.

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Looking Ahead SLAMM Art Acquisition Course Through generous donor support, an exciting new art acquisition class will be taught through the School of Liberal Arts Management Minor (SLAMM). The course will allow students to research local art, learn the criteria curators use to select works, and ultimately purchase artwork that will be prominently displayed in the School of Liberal Arts.

Walter Isaacson Joins SLA Faculty Walter Isaacson, the New Orleans native and former Times-Picayune reporter who became chairman and CEO of CNN, managing editor of TIME, a best-selling author, and leader of the Aspen Institute, is joining Tulane’s School of Liberal Arts History Department. Isaacson will teach his first course, “The History of the Digital Revolution: From Ada Lovelace to Mark Zuckerberg,” in the spring semester of 2018.

3rd Coast Student Residency Program The Third Coast Residential Learning Community, a new program forged by the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South and Tulane Housing and Residence Life, will launch this fall with 16 first-year students who are curious about our region’s rich culture, tenuous urbanism, and changing coast. The students will reside in Butler House, engage in weekly gatherings, including dinners with scholars and artists, and have outings in New Orleans and along the coast. Through this dynamic placebased learning, they will explore how culture and environment intertwine, how their interests and academic goals connect with the local and universal, as well as make friends, in a home base that will enrich all of their years at Tulane and beyond.

PIC TURED AT RIG HT: Marcella Escarfuller (SLA ’14), Restorer, 2014; Oil on Canvas.

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2016-2017

SLA by the Numbers 2,528 Declared SLA Students

2,171 Undergraduate

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TOTAL FACULTY

375

$5,539,028

VISITORS

$833 Average Annual Fund Gift

TENURE TRACK

201 20

1,554 Number of Donors Who Contributed

PROFESSORS OF PRACTICE AND LECTURERS

$528,044 Total Amount of

59

$1,505,620 TOTAL

95 Masters

ADJUNCTS

262 PhD

95

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TOTAL AMOUNT OF DONORS’ GIFTS & PLEDGES

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Annual Fund Gifts

SPONSORED RESEARCH

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Graduate Programs

13 PhD

PERCENTAGE OF SLA STUDENTS WHO DOUBLE MAJOR

58%

14

47

MAJORS OFFERED

Top Major

MA

POLITICAL SCIENCE

5

432 DECLARED MAJORS

11

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS MANAGEMENT MINOR (SLAMM)

MFA

Top Minor

268 DECLARED MINORS

4+1 MA t u l a n e.e d u / l i b e r a l - a r t s

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31

MINORS OFFERED

19

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS

16

DEPARTMENTS

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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 102 Newcomb Hall New Orleans, LA 70118

School of Liberal Arts Reflections  

A Year in Review: Fall 2016 to Spring 2017

School of Liberal Arts Reflections  

A Year in Review: Fall 2016 to Spring 2017

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