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ARCHITECTURE AT TULANE Wendy Redfield Editor and Associate Professor of Architecture

In his preface to the revised edition of Communitas, by Percival and Paul Goodman, architecture critic Paul Goldberger declared that the time had come for architects to shake off their complacency and get back to the “business of being visionary.” He exhorts us to remember: “ . . . that the architect’s mission is a broad one: that he or she is not merely a maker of shapes, but a force for social good. . . . that the city is a collective, shared place, a place that is in the most literal sense common ground. [This vision] emerges from the belief that the architect has an ability, not to mention a duty, to exercise vision, to dream of better ways of doing things and not merely to respond to the narrow demands of the moment.”

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From his vantage at the time of writing in 1990, Goldberger characterized the decades since the book’s original publication in 1947 as a period of architectural modesty and pragmatism. The generation of architects “shaken by the arrogance” of the 20th century’s utopian planners and the spectacular failure of many of modernism’s most influential urban schemes were understandably reluctant to contemplate ideal plans and solutions. Each worldview supporting urban proposals such as Broadacre City, Ville Radieuse, and Garden City, among others was too simplistic, too rigid, and too narrow by far to meaningfully engage real cities with their complex and contradictory forces. But if there is risk of failure in architectural overreach in speculating on possibly brighter futures and the ways architecture might promote them, so too, surely is there risk in complacent acceptance of the status quo. At this point in time, faced as we are with global crises on every front—mounting and catastrophic environmental threats, profound economic and social inequity, failing physical infrastructure, public institutions that are frayed almost to the breaking point—how can we fail to act? In light of these conditions on both the local and global scale architects cannot afford to be passive when there is so much at stake. Atop the watery mouth of the mighty Mississippi River our geographic location is at once a privileged and vulnerable perch; it places us at the intersection of a complexly layered urban culture, a uniquely fragile and poignantly beautiful landscape, and now, the leading edge of an existential crisis of global proportion. As front-line observers of climate change and its consequences that become more disruptive to life in coastal regions every year, the aspiring architects who inhabit the Tulane School of Architecture are keenly aware of this and other crises—foreclosures, urban blight, social injustice—that greet us daily in our own city, and reports from afar. In view of the urgency of these challenges, perhaps it seems incongruous to place the emphasis we do on the rigorous precision of your line weights, and crispness of your drawings; the craft of the joints, corners, and assembly of your models; and the specific words you use to communicate your ideas and intentions. You may wonder at our insistence on discussing certain architectural texts—Vitruvius, Alberti, Venturi and others—and the enduring impact they have had on architecture over time. Or the learning of other bits of knowledge whose application may not immediately be clear: the sixteen divisions of the Construction Specifications Institute; the names of the Greek orders and their origins in wood construction; the social and political context leading to 19th century Eclecticism.

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We stress these things because in sum they represent the body of knowledge of our discipline, without which there is no basis for knowing how, why, or in what ways to better the world through architecture. Architecture’s capacity to direct and influence complex systems of exchange through precisely targeted strategies and interventions; its nearly unlimited capacity to lend identity, status, and relevance to public institutions; and to reframe relationships between people, places, and things render our discipline of vital importance as we face the vexing problems ahead. The challenges before us, and the expanding scope and complexity of the work ahead portends the need for an ever-broadening body of relevant knowledge to equip the aspiring architect. While the unprecedented availability of information at the tip of the nearest web browser gives hope, it also brings the endless haystacks and rabbit holes we all have fallen into, only to emerge hours later barely remembering what prompted our initial quest, and without the time to graphically represent the endless information, let alone incorporate it into the project itself. Since our aim as architects is not merely to analyze and interpret, but to propose possible solutions, determining what information is relevant to a given problem, and what is not is of primary importance. As a school, we seek to provide a strong and well-rounded education in the discipline of architecture and the liberal arts and sciences to which it is inextricably allied. As a faculty, we seek to help students build a reliable methodology of design and a capacity for discernment in framing the right questions. We seek to further our students’ understanding of what knowledge is relevant to those questions, and how, most importantly, to direct this knowledge toward the proposition of architectural projects seeking to define better futures. Paul Goldberger’s exhortation to architects “to exercise vision, to dream of better ways of doing things” while avoiding the pitfalls that doomed the proposals of the 20th century utopian planners, sets a very high bar. Such work requires conscientious engagement with the many contexts—historical, physical, social, environmental, ethical—of a proposed action’s domain, coupled with speculative conjecture unhampered by the enormity of the challenge. All of these activities, furthermore, must be guided by strong and clear values as to what will constitute a better and more just world. On the following pages, we offer a small sampling of the work our students have done that has made us very proud and very hopeful for the future.

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CORE DESIGN STUDIOS

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COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN Tanzakademie

10


10 AM

10 AM

10 AM

8 AM

8 AM

8 AM

JUNE 21 10 AM

SEPTEMBER 23 10 AM

DECEMBER 21 10 AM

11 12AM PM

11PM AM 12

11 12 AM PM

1 PM

1 PM

1 PM

3 PM

3 PM

3 PM

5 PM

5 PM

5 PM

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DESIGN BUILD Louisiana Outdoor Outreach Program (LOOP) Studio

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ADVANCED DESIGN Retreat for a Maritime Craftsman

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wall of ritual _living, gathering and bathing isometric vignette with living cells + gathering spaces Plans 1’ - 0” = 0’ - 1/16”

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Elevation + 35’

Elevation + 22’

Elevation + 8’

wall of ritual _living, gathering and bathing isometric vignette with living cells + gathering spaces Plans 1’ - 0” = 0’ - 1/16”

Elevation - 3’

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BUILDING 1 - Floor 2 1/8” - 1’0”

BUILDING 1 - Floor 1 1/8” - 1’0”

N N

N N

BUILDING 2 - Floor 2 1/8” - 1’0”

BUILDING 2 - Floor 1 1/8” - 1’0”

N N

N N

BUILDING 3 - Floor 2 1/8” - 1’0”

BUILDING 3 - Floor 1 1/8” - 1’0”

N N

N N

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DESIGN BUILD URBANbuild

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THESIS

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COAL RIVER VALLEY, WEST VIRGINIA Location of 3 Sites in the Valley

+ To Whitesville, WV 2 mi

1 mi

6 mi

4 mi

7 mi

8 mi

9 mi

10 mi

11 mi

+ Marfork, WV

1 mi

+ Twilight, WV 2 mi

+ Montcoal, WV

X

Marfork Processing Pond

Montcoal Prep Plant

X

+ Lindytown, WV

3 mi

X

Lindytown Mining Operation + Stickney, WV

Appalachian Trail

4 mi

+ Naoma, WV

C

O

A

L

R

I

V

E

R

M N T.

5 mi

X

Brushy Fork Prep Plant

+ Bald Knob, WV 6 mi

+ Dry Creek, WV

X

Brushy Fork Mine

7 mi

+ Rock Creek, WV

8 mi

+ Glen Daniel, WV

SITE PLAN | RESEARCH & PROCESSING FACILITY Scale:

0

.125 mi

.25 mi

3.75 mi

.5 mi

1500

.625 mi

3000

X Entering Coal River Valley

1:3000

6000

.75 mi

12000

.875mi

1 mi

1.125 mi

1.25 mi

1.375 mi

.125 mi

.25 mi

.375 mi

.5 mi

.625 mi

.75 mi

675 ft .875 mi

600 ft 525 ft 450 ft

375 ft 300 ft 1 mi

225 ft 150 ft

75 ft

+ To Particulate Collectors

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STUDENT WORK

COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN

DESIGN BUILD

Tanzakademie

Louisiana Outdoor Outreach Program - LOOP

Instructor

Irene Keil

Instructors Emilie Taylor

Students

Elizabeth Himmel

Sam Richards

Christopher Longman

Students

Dan Akerley, Madison Baker, Casey Bemis, Jose Cotto, John Coyle, Rachel Conques,

ADVANCED DESIGN

Michelle Carroll, Maggie Easley, Ellen Hearle, Emma Jasinski, Kate Luxner, Sarah

Retreat for a Maritime Craftsman

Satterlee, Meredith Zelenka

Instructor

Marty McElveen

Students

Christina Buschman

URBANbuild

Elizabeth Himmel

Instructors Byron Mouton

Colin Keith

Eric Lynn

Kyle Graham

Shelby Mills

Sarah Morasso

Sam Richards

Students UB 01

Jared Bowers, Ned Brown, Claire Cahan, Nick Crowley, Robert Deacon, David Demsey, Mark Enlow, Jason Heinze, Tyler Hutcherson, Matt Hux, Maggie Joyce,

THESIS Student

Sam Naylor

Advisor

Ammar Eloueini

Student

Max Katz

Advisor

Marianne Desmarais

Student

Colin Keith

Advisor

Marty McElveen

Student

Eric Lynn

Advisor

Marty McElveen

Student

Cameron Ringness

Advisor

Irene Keil

Student

Megan Artsdalen

Advisor

Cordula Roser-Gray

Nicole McGlinn, Andrea Patrick, Jonathon Reyes Carlos Sanchez, Heather Skeehan, Emilie Taylor, Steve Thesman, Ben Wasserman, Seth Welty, Daniel Zangara UB 10

Daisy Dodge, Ali Rex, Kaitlin Seibert, Rosemary Philips, Shira Latch, Casey Hill, Nicole Mehaffey, Blair Begbie, Helen Lummis, Nicole Esser, Jeffrey Zolan, Jonathan Sharp, Max Katz, Lee Cooper, Christopher Collins, Peter Henseler, Ari Levine, Michael Nunnik, Caitlin Parker, Vincent Baudoin, Sara Connerr, Alfia White, Colleen Loughlin, Ian Rosenfield, Mat Ngo, Lizzie Himmel

UB 11

Carly Bowman, Charles Boyne, Ben Feiger, Diana Mendez, Ruben Contreras, Kathleen Aurora Smith, Chesley McCarty, Mike Meline, John Ludlam, Alisha Croft, Ashley Ricketson, Laura Gil-Diaz, Jamie Park, Kyle Graham, Francke Wurzelbacher

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FACULTY

Dean Kenneth Schwartz Faculty

Adjunct and Visiting Faculty

Core Studio Coordinators

Errol Barron

Christian Ardeneaux

2014–2017

Ammar Eloueini

Marianne Desmarais

Emily Baker

Judith Kinnard

Sabri Farouki

Scott Bernhard

John Klingman

Giovanna Galfione-Cox

Maurice Cox

Carol Reese

Maggie Hansen

Marcela del Signore

Scott Bernhard

Lauren Hickman

Irene Keil

Michael Crosby

Stuart Hurt

Andrew Liles

Bruce Goodwin

Charles Jones

Tiffany Lin

Tiffany Lin

Andrew Liles

Wendy Redfield

Graham Owen

David Merlin

Cordula Roser Gray

Wendy Redfield

Jenny Pelc-Chandela

Scott Ruff

Kentaro Tsubaki

Brian Rome

Kentaro Tsubaki

Emily Baker

Melissa Rome

Ben Smith

Z Smith

Emeriti

Richard Campanella

Seth Welty

Geoffrey Baker

Byron Mouton

Megan Weyland

Eugene Cizek

John Stubbs

Maggie Williams

Ronald Filson

Marcella Del Signore

Tyler Young

Elizabeth Gamard

Irene Keil

Shawn Rickenbacker

Karen Kingsley

Casius Pealer

Eugene Cizek

Eean McNaughton

Cordula Roser-Gray

Grover Mouton

Richard Powell

Emilie Taylor Welty

Ellen Weiss

ABOUT TULANE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE The mission of the Tulane School of Architecture is to prepare students for leadership positions in the design professions and in their communities. This school aspires to provide the highest quality professional education in architecture, to develop and conserve knowledge, and to promote excellence and innovation in architecture, landscape urbanism, preservation, and urban and environmental design and development. The School aspires to reach many students within and beyond Richardson Memorial Hall through undergraduate minors in Architecture, Sustainable Real Estate Development, Preservation Studies, and Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship, and graduate certificates in Preservation Studies and Sustainable Real Estate Development. The School recognizes the centrality of design thinking as a process of synthesis that incorporates history, theory, technology, economics, behavior, and culture. The School supports diversity and meaningful engagement with urban and community issues, while embracing the creative potential and imperative of sustainable design.

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Publisher

For more information on all programs at

Tulane School of Architecture

the Tulane School of Architecture, visit http://architecture.tulane.edu/

Editor Wendy Redfield

Tulane University

Favrot Associate Professor of

School of Architecture

Architecture

Richardson Memorial Hall 6823 St. Charles Ave.

Designer

New Orleans, LA 70118-5698

Leigh Ayers, 10/HALF Studios

(504) 865-5389

Production Assistants

facebook: facebook.com/TulaneArch

Maggie Harris

twitter: @TulaneArch

Haynes Johnson

Instagram: tulanearch

Photographer David Armentor Printing Emprint, Baton Rouge, LA Sponsorship We thank Robert Dean, FAIA and Rick Powell for their generous support of this publication. Cover Student work from Phlatness workshop run by Michael Nesbit. Front: Sam Naylor Back: Charles Weimer All images of student work appear courtesy of the students, copyright Tulane School of Architecture, unless otherwise noted.

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