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CAMERON RINGNESS Faculty Advisor: Irene Keil

Ethno City

Layers of Urban Alterity: The Unrelenting Paseo The American City is layered in differences. Over time the city has been shaped and reshaped by different cultures and identities in the urban landscape. However, difference is still consistently “otherized,” and ethnicity becomes excluded by society as this other. Despite the city’s rich history of Latin American culture, the population’s identity is still ambiguous and mainly invisible to society at large. Neighborhoods evolve over time based on hybridity, juxtaposition and improvisation; this temporal condition is visible within a 24-hour cycle in Hispanic everyday life, where place is altered across different hours of the day, and along different paths. Utilizing this transitional element of Latino Urbanism and the emphasis on provisional social space existing along lines of difference, the project redefines building typologies to anticipate and support the growing ethnic identity. In New Orleans, the Latino community has specific economic, social and cultural needs, which the city is currently lacking, thus the project seeks to address these absences through the place-making strategy of layered exchanges and interwoven paths, in which the tectonics of space respond to these paths, and a visual, as well as a physical, exchange occurs between city and others.

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THESIS // SPRING 12

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SEAN MCGuIRE Faculty Advisor: Kentaro Tsubaki

Chaotic Territoriality

Mediating Spatial Conflict In Barrio Bravo, Mexico City The open-air tianguis, or street markets, of Tepito have defined its cultural identity since its Aztec beginnings. Conflict with government officials, commonplace since the arrival of the Spaniards, has accelerated with the initiation of gentrification schemes in the bordering historic district, with property being seized under the guise of preventing drug trafficking. Many vendors and locals realize the imminent threat to the integrity of their community, and seek to preempt the destruction of their traditional ways. The increasing willingness of local vendors to seize space in the public domain, and seek a new system of organization that balances private (vendor) and public (circulatory) space. This unique system of informal economic ingenuity must be preserved yet modified to mitigate inevitable spatial conflict. The emergent properties of this economic system, coupled with its continuously variable systems of self-organization, has the potential to influence an architecture defined by informality, instead of imposing upon it. Through exploration of self-organized behavior, interactive aggregation and kinetic systems, the proposal derives localized found conditions as a defining parameter of its design methodology. While past government backed proposals have focused upon aggressive relocation strategies to contrived concrete-cast vendor stalls in barren plazas, this proposal will emphasize the necessity of creating relational nodes of commerce situated within the streets.

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1

MARKET REFORMA

DS

LARGE GOO

APPLIANCES LEIS

TION SUPP

FURNITURE

CONSTRUC

ELECTRONICS PRODUCE

DS

SMALL GOO

GLASSES

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TOYS

PIRATED MUSIC/DVDs

SHOES

VENDING FOOD

CLOTHING

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IAN O’CAIN Faculty Advisor: Judith Kinnard

Downtown Now

New public space for a reactivated city Downtown has long stood as the center of life in the American city. However, over the course of the 20th century, they faced a steady decline in terms of use. They were reduced to the center of business in the city as the center of life shifted outwards with the patterns of urban sprawl. This thesis seeks to examine the way in which the imbalance of program created by zoning and urban sprawl is corrected in city centers. It attempts to edit the 9 to 5 condition that urban centers face today and transform them into 24/7 communities of activity and social interaction. Using New Orleans as a testing ground, the project is sited on an existing surface parking lot in the Central Business District. The main focus of the investigation is the interaction between building and context and building and occupant. The mixed-use program comprised of residential, office, and retail space is separated into public and private functions and organized around a public courtyard. While the public spaces remain highly transparent to allow for visual connections between the courtyard and the street, the private spaces are lifted off the ground. The public space is read upwards through the vertical circulation which highlights the overlap of program and connects visitors to an elevated roof park.

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PYRAMID WELLNESS INSTITUTE critics Emilie Taylor Sam Richards Abigail Feldman

students Steven Baker, Victoria Bryant, Jose Cotto, Katherine Delacey, Hunter Duplantier, Gage Edwards, Rena Foster, Em-

This community design build studio studied the issues sur-

During the studio’s semester state funding for mental health

rounding mental illness in New Orleans through the lens of

care was slashed, Pyramid was left scrambling for the re-

a specific project, the Pyramid Resources Wellness Institute

sources to continue serving the community, and the design

(PRWI). Located in Mid City, PRWI provides treatment

build project site was moved. In response to these changes

services for persons in the greater New Orleans area who

a team of students also worked with Pyramid Wellness on

are homeless, have mental illness diagnosis or co-occurring

a graphic advocacy campaign to spread the word about

substance use. Pyramid provides housing assistance and

the prevalence of mental illness, the effects of the budget

intensive individualized support services under the direction

cuts, and the resources that do exist for those in need.

of a treatment team consisting of psychiatrists, psycholo-

The graphic advocacy took the form of advertisements in

gist, clinical staff, nurses, support professionals, case man-

the local street exchange paper, a website, and a series of

agers, and others as needed.

postcards, stickers, and magnets to spread the message and

ily Green, Charlotte Hutton,

The studio team worked with the staff and residents of

Baha Javadi, Whitney Jordan,

Pyramid to design their common outdoor space into an

Leslie Katz, Michael Kirschner,

area that can adapt to the multiple needs of the residents; a

Sarah Knapp, Jacob Mc-

space that can accommodate group meetings, outdoor din-

Gregor, Kevin Michniok,

ing, conflict resolution, activity area, and provides a calming

Danielle Musselman, Alison

outdoor space for the clients and staff of the facility. Stu-

Rodberg, Risa Schoenfeld,

dents designed a durable and adaptive series of benches,

Guan Wang, Grant Whittaker,

tables, planters, and bbq which are used for eating, therapy,

William Zink

and breaktime activities. Construction of the outdoor space began in October and was completed in December of 2012.

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brand Pyramid’s campaign.


DSGN DSGN 4100/5100 4100/5100 //// FALL FALL 1211

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URBANbuild 08 LASALLE critic Byron Mouton

co-teachers Tom Holloman (fall) Matt Decotiis (spring)

To date, Tulane School of Architecture’s URBANbuild pro-

nomic activities, such as farmers markets and local events

gram has enjoyed success while focusing on the design and

directed by neighborhood occupants. While the individual

construction of homes by student groups. In the eighth year

units were placed as a collective whole, they are mobile

of the program, the focus shifted to a larger scale. Harmony

architectural elements that allow for an interactive change

Neighborhood Development provided a site along La Salle

in the use of the site and also allow for future deployment

corridor for the program’s research. At the heart of Central

into the community.

City, La Salle Street has historically been a vital commercial corridor. During the design phase of URBANbuild in fall

students

community partner

2012, students developed proposals to revitalize this area

Harmony Neighborhood

with the establishment of a mixed-use commercial center

Deshotels, Victor Du Peloux, Gage Edwards, Lauren Evans,

Development

that acts as an amenity for Harmony Oaks residents. The

Matthew Fishman, Drew Hauck, Elizabeth Kovacevic, James

realization of the project was intended to be phased. Har-

Lacroix, Yuegi (Jazzy) Li, Melissa Longano, Daniel McDon-

mony, therefore, has the opportunity to expand the project

ald, Naveed Namaky, John Nelson, William Nemitoff, Tayson

incrementally as desired. Phase one construction involved

Ng, Dennis Palmadessa, Julien Remond, Kyle Ryan, Aaron

the implementation of micro-business pods for the site, also

Schenker, Katherine Schuff, Nora Schwaller, Alexander

known as “Community Place Makers.” The realization of the

Shporer, Matthew Skoda, Rolan Solinski, Joshua Ungar,

overall design, because of its scale, needed to be construct-

Lucas Velle

ed in stages. URBANbuild students spent the spring of 2013 constructing the ‘Place Makers’. They are grouped and sited on La Salle Avenue, and are programed to support eco-

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Rianna Bennett, David Campanella, Marine Charlot, Alyce


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METHoDS oF ASSEMBLY: Magellan Street Garden The Magellan Garden project is a 15 week design build

critic Doug Harmon Sam Richards

students Sarah Cumming, Michelle Finan, Elisha Grossman, Annelise Haskell, Kristen Korndoerfer, Beau LaCroix, Katlyn Leach, Gregory Mathieu, William Nemitoff, Devin Reynolds, Kyle Ryan, Fan Xiong

studio located on the West Bank of New Orleans. The site, run by Parkway Partners gardener Tony Lee, provides a hub of learning for local youth and veterans involving complementary activities of food education and production. The team of 12 students and 2 faculty members engaged the community in the design process, and innovation in materials, assembly, and detailing was emphasized. The project includes a shade structure that collects rainwater which is used to feed a constructed wetland filled with fish and indigenous plants. The site also houses raised beds, tool storage, and ground cover strategies to support Mr. Lee’s aim for a community resource and teaching space. The design team devised a strategy for fabricating the project components at the Tulane Shop and moved those compo-

community partner

nents to the remote project location in one day. This project

Tony Lee, Parkway Partners

was done through the Tulane City Center’s Engage-Design-

Community Gardener

Build series of studios.

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LoNDoN AVENUE CANAL REDESIGN AND DILLARD UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS/INFRASTRUCTURE This studio explored the transformation of the London

critic John Klingman

student Robert Mosby

Avenue Canal from a concrete drainage channel into a wet canal as an urban amenity. Continuous public access and provision for crossing the canal were designed so that the canal is a locus of activity rather than a barrier. The site focused on the Dillard University campus and the expansion of the University into a landlocked city-owned site of bottomland forest on the other side of the canal. Through an ecosystem restoration project, including enhanced water management, this site parcel could become a campus arboretum. A pavilion for study/teaching of environmental issues and student housing were the architectural design components. Other programs serving the needs of the university and community were also proposed. The buildings established a strong presence with water, and the campus was redesigned as a hydrophilic environment, incorporating fountains, ponds and wetlands for water storage, creating an oasis within the city. The work of the studio may be viewed at www.dutchdialogues.com.

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DSGN 3100 // FALL 11

KYLE RYAN PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE FRENCH QUARTER Critic: Kentaro Tsubaki

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DSGN 3100 // FALL 11

JACK WATERMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE FRENCH QUARTER Critic: Ammar Eloueini

10’

20’

40’

60’

10’

20’

40’

60’

10’

20’

40’

60’

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DSGN 3100 // FALL 12

SANAA SHAIKH BOAT MAKING SCHOOL Critic: Irene Keil

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DSGN 3100 // FALL 12

JAKE GAMBERG BOAT MAKING SCHOOL Critic: Charles Jones

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DSGN 3200 // SPRING 12

ROBERT MOSBY NEW ORLEANS CULINARY ARTS COLLEGE Critic: Doug Harmon

Frame for glass enclosure Translucent Insulated Glass

Steel Roof Frame

Point Supported Curtian Wall Hardware Glass Support Fin

Structural Column

Polished Concrete Floor

Polished Concrete Floor

Precast Concrete Slab

Compact fluorescent lighting Fire Protection High Velocity HVAC Duct

Raised Floor System

0’

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1’

2’

4’

8’


DSGN 3200 // SPRING 12

KATLYN LEACH NEW ORLEANS CULINARY ARTS COLLEGE Critic: Bruce Goodwin

ATCS4200_Spring 2012: Final Project The purpose of this New Orleans Culinary Institute project is to bring the New Orleans community to the area. OC Haley Boulevard is undergoing a revitalization to bring the street and surrounding area back to life or the way that it used to be. By creating a center that recognizes not only the need for culinary cultivation in New Orleans’ students, but in the New Orleans community as well the steps toward fixing the OC Haley Boulevard are a little closer to the goal. This project should attract students and community alike to learn about the culinary arts, to use indoor facilities and the garden. By displaying plants in planter boxes on the building’s facade, it acts as signage to what the structure is, invites people to enter, and helps the environment and climate of the building. Greenery adorns the facade to allow students immediate access to the goods that they need to cook. Operable windows allow for quick gardening of vegetables and greens that will be used in the culinary school. The plants also act as a mediator for the building environment by providing shade for diffused light to enter the building, and fresher air when the operable windows are open. The facade is a teaching tool for the students, and example for the community. KATLYN LEACH_5-3-2012

concrete parapet metal flashing wear course drainage layer thermal insulation roofing membrane vapor retarder concrete roof slab metal roof decking

The concrete planter boxes hang from a nonstructural column and beam system that attaches to the structural system on the interior of the building. Students can access the planter boxes through operable windows that move both up and down for easier reach. The second and third floors show teaching kitchens while the first is the restaurant.

operable window header

steel window frame double glazed low e glass glass curtain wall

operable window concrete planter box

sill flashing operable window sill

Several different types of plants that grow well in New Orleans can be planted in these beds. The beds are different depths to allow for many different types of herbs or vegetables to grow. They would not only be a teaching tool but promote cleaniless and clean air, and diffuse natural light that comes through the operable windows.

HVAC supply branch duct diffuser flourescent tube suspended down lighting

structural steel column finish flooring gypsum floor board concrete floor slab metal decking nonstructural steel column steel beam welded moment connection steel girder acoustical tile barrier steel mullion

ceiling tie perforated metal suspended ceiling

metal flashing finish flooring concrete ground slab vapor barrier leveling nuts steel baseplate

concrete pile cap

steel piles subsurface drainage system

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DSGN 3200 GRAD // SPRING // SPRING 13 13

NATAN DIACON-FURTADO TANZAKADEMIE Critic: Wayne Troyer

10’

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15’


DSGN 3200 GRAD // SPRING 13

EVAN AMATO TANZAKADEMIE Critic: Irene Keil

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DSGN 3200 // SPRING 13

COLLEEN LOUGHLIN TANZAKADEMIE Critic: Bruce Goodwin

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DSGN 3200 // SPRING 13

ATCS 4020/6150 B

A C

D

A

A

INTEGRATED BUILDING SYSTEMS Critic: Andrew Liles

A | Elliot Brown undergraduate B | Ray Croft graduate C | Rena Foster graduate D | Aubrey Keady-Molanphy undergraduate

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DSGN 2200 // SPRING 12

DANIEL OMURO LOUIS ARMSTRONG MUSICIANS CENTER Critic: Michael Nius

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DSGN 2200 // SPRING 12

HILLARY BOCASH LOUIS ARMSTRONG MUSICIANS CENTER Critic: Michael Nius

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DSGN 2200 // SPRING 13

THOMAS FERRER PHASE TWO Critic: Charles Jones

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DSGN 2200 GRAD // SPRING 13

ELIZABETH HIMMEL PHASE TWO Critic: Tiffany Lin

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DSGN 1100 3200GRAD // SPRING // SUMMER 13 12 B

C

A

E

A

F A

D

INSIDE . OUTSIDE . IN BETWEEN Critic: Irene Keil with Jill Stoll (AVSM 1100 Visual Media)

A | Alison Rex

F | Elizabeth Himmel

B | Stuart Hurt

G | Claire Leavengood-Boxer

C | Ashley Jackson

H | Marielle Asenjo

D | Lou Wright

  I | Helen Lummis

E | Sebastian Pierre

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DSGN 1100 GRAD // SUMMER 12 G

G

G

I

F

H

G

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DSGN 1100 3200////FALL SPRING 12 13

B

A

C

D

C

THE SPACE OF THE FACADE Fall 2012

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E


DSGN 1100 // FALL 12

F

E

G

I

J

H

architecture.tulane.edu

A | Christophe Blanchard, Critic: Tracie Ashe

F | Kevin Atkinson, Critic: Thaddeus Zarse

B  | Haley Lindsley, Critic: Tracie Ashe

G   | Calvin Gallion, Critic: Michael Crosby

C | Jill Thompson, Critic: Seth Welty

H | Cassidy Self, Critic: Seth Welty

D | Ben Tulman, Critic: Seth Welty

   I   | Hunter Nagy, Critic: Doug Harmon

E  | Laura Gil, Critic: Michael Crosby

J   | Malayne Matherne, Critic: Doug Harmon

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DSGN 1200 3200 //// SPRING SPRING 1213

PHASE 3: FRERET STREET FETE Spring 2012

B A E

C

D

E

D

FRERET STREET ELEV

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DSGN 1200 // SPRING 12

E

C

D

C

B

E

A

B

A | Alyssa Rogut, Critic: Tiffany Lin B | Sam Naylor, Critic: Thaddeus Zarse C | Jamie (Seunghee) Park, Critic: Seth Welty D | Alex Sixt, Critic: Marilyn Feldmeier E  | Gustavo Rodas, Critic: Sheena Garcia

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RBST 3400 // FALL 11

DESIGN URBANISM Biloxi, Mississippi critic

A

Grover Mouton

student A | Guan Wang B | Jack Waterman

course description Fall 2011 Design Urbanism students continued a collaborative community outreach design effort begun by Spring semester students in Biloxi, MS. Consulting with Mayor AJ Holloway and other public of-

TO DOWNTOWN

Drawing explanation or notation... Etc. Etc.

ficials, the students studied a 17-acre

PARKSD Drawing rawing Title SNAKING PATHWAY SPLASH STEPS A

waterfront site in East Biloxi known as Point Cadet. Long neglected, the site represents the last green

B

waterfront park space available to the public, and will soon be home to the new Seafood Industry Museum. Students analyzed the site and used public input to create design proposals incorporating an expansion of the public marina, the addition of boardwalks and fishing piers,

Section Perspective

small commercial establishments, restaurants, gardens, playgrounds, and an open-air pavilion for farmers’ markets and other events. While

B

landscape proposals were critical to the large open site, definition of the urban space and user-experience were complemented by site planning and schematic architectural design. Final designs were presented to the City of Biloxi and are under consid-

Precedents

eration as the project continues to raise state and federal funding for

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center

implementation. B

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Diagrams Perspectives

A. Program diagrams (L to R) - Housing, Entertainment, Mixed Use (Commercial + Residential), Recreational. B. User Gradient - Darker areas indicate more adult use, while lighter areas indicate family or recreational use.


DSGN 3200 ADGM // SPRING 6200 //13FALL 12

ADVANCED DIGITAL FABRICATION critic David Merlin

student Ian O’Cain

course description ADGM 6200 Advanced Digital Fabrication was a survey of digital fabrication processes, both additive and subtractive, and explored fabrication and assembly at the building material scale. Through a series of three exercises, students designed and fabricated connection details, relief surface panels, and synthesized joinery and ornament to create a cultural object. The goal was to gain a better understanding of the qualitative and quantitative properties of typical building materials to inform future design thinking and open a dialogue about the role of the architect in fabrication and construction. Culture Cube, the third final project, used the ideas developed by Farshid Moussavi in the Function of Ornament to understand the roll of ornament in the built environment. Students translated methods of cultural connection at the architectural scale to the scale of an object to demonstrate how physical objects can transcend form to become “forces that shape society as material.”

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AVSM 4444 // SPRING 13

B

C

D

A

E

C

F

G

H

I

cREAtIvE MODES OF REPRESENtAtION critic Jill Stoll

students

The digital camera is a handy tool in the 21st Century. So

We considered the work of modern and contemporary art-

handy in fact it is practically an extension of the hand. But is

ists, photographers, and architects who draw as a founda-

digital technology a crutch to the creative process? Are dig-

tion for inquiry; the conversation broadened and students

ital tools so integrated into our daily lives that we take them

used these works as a point of departure to develop their

for granted? Have our eyes been dulled by the convenience

own creative modes of representation.

A | Stuart Hurt

and the sheer abundance of the pixelated image? Are there

B | Victoria Bryant

limits to digital technology that influence how we observe

C | Ann Ascherman

and understand the built world? Is digital always the right

D | Kaci Taylor

answer? By combining both digital and analog methods,

E | Michelle Carroll

students explored sketching/drawing from observation,

F | Jeremy Maloney

watercolor painting, still photography using film cameras,

G | William Zink

and mixed media The physical act of sketching, drawing,

H | Nick Sackos

painting, collaging and handling film required students to

   I   | Jared Morganstein

enter the analog world.

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DSGN 3200 AHST//4646 SPRING // SPRING 13 13

PREPARING FOR ROME This course covered a number of topics related to Study

Format

Abroad in Rome. Intended to prepare students who will

The course met once per week and was comprised of

study in Rome in Fall 2013 to gain the most from this

lectures, film screenings, discussions, project reviews, and

extraordinary experience, the course selectively engaged

on-site drawing.

critics Wendy Redfield Giovanna Galfione-Cox

issues of Rome’s cultural history and urban form, method-

student

ologies of urban mapping, and on-site drawing.

Ian Rosenfield •

Pedagogical Objectives to become aware of primary architectural, social, cultural, and environmental issues at play in the contemporary Roman context •

to read and effectively represent various aspects of Rome’s urban form and distinct neighborhoods through analytical mapping •

architecture.tulane.edu

to develop skills in on-site drawing in an urban context

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PRST 6510 // FALL 11

A

166 | PLANNINg CONSIDERATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

PRESERVATION STUDIO: Historic Structure Report and Planning Considerations for the Rehabilitation and Expansion of Richardson Memorial Hall critic

course description

John Stubbs

students A | Carter Quina B | Scott Heath C | Elizabeth Simpson

Studio I: Building Preservation concentrated on document-

The Historic Structure Report and Planning Considerations

ing, analyzing and planning for the preservation of indi-

for the Rehabilitation and Expansion of Richardson Memo-

vidual historic buildings as a basis for understanding

rial Hall at Tulane involved the whole class working for

the technical, theoretical and procedural aspects of archi-

seven weeks on a detailed report for the School of Architec-

tectural preservation practice. The course included intensive

ture’s building in anticipation of its planned rehabilitation.

study of selected buildings in the New Orleans area where

Produced with the guidance of several Preservation and

students worked both as independent researchers and

Architecture program faculty members it is expected that

in teams producing architectural preservation projects to

this study will help inform and enhance the planned reha-

professional standards. The studio examined the differences

bilitation of Tulane’s School of Architecture building.

between building stabilization, adaptive reuse, rehabilitation and restoration.

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DSGN 3200PRST // SPRING 6510 //13FALL 11 B

Gallier House Interpretative/Exhibit Reception/Bookstore Educational Storage/Mech Circulation

Parking Landscaping

ROYAL STREET 0

5

10

50

5,980 SF

Gallier House Interpretative/Exhibit Office/Meeting Curatorial Storage/Mech Circulation

3,100 SF

ROYAL STREET

5,478 SF 2,260 SF

A

1,570 SF

EXISTING RMH WEST SIDE SPACE AVAILABLE (3,110-5,980 SF) NORTH SIDE SPACE AVAILABLE (5,478 SF) EAST SIDE SPACE AVAILABLE (4,830 SF) EXISTING SURROUNDING BUILDING 0

5

10

50

SITE PLAN SPACE ANALYSIS

RICHARD

WEST ELEVATION: CURRENT CONDITION

A 1960 1959 1953 1950

193

1961

1957

1958

1954

1955

1962

1951

1952

1949

1948

1947

1946

1945

1944

1944

1943

1942

1938

1929

1928

1927

1926

1925

1924

1923

1922

B

1921

C CREDIT: FIELD SURVEY AND ORIGINAL ANDRY & BENDERNAGEL DRAWINGS

|

RICHARDSON MEMORIAL HALL HISTORIC STRUCTURE REPORT 173

C C

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DSGN 4200 // SPRING 13

A

B

HISTORIC FAUBOURG MARIGNY critic

course description

Eugene Cizek

This studio focused on new construction in residential Faubourg Marigny along the industrial riverfront. Students were assigned a block and were given the task of designing

students

new infill or adaptive reuse and rehabilitation of the existing

A | Drew Hauck graduate

structure. All projects utilized the HDLC guidelines and were

B | John Coyle undergraduate

under the 50 foot height limit.

C | Bahareh Javadi graduate

John Coyle designed a layered structure to house the Marigny Community Center, equipped with a practical parking garage, residential units, a rooftop park, and a landscaped path through the building, among other spaces. His creativity produced a practical and aesthetically pleasing space that capitalizes on every available space and transforms an industrial corridor into a walkable, usable space. THE MARIGNY REFRAMING

tulane school of architecture john coyle

Drew Hauck’s adaptive reuse design was named “Riverfront Roast” with respect to its current use as the Standard Coffee warehouse. As a mixed-use commercial, residential, and entertainment venue, the design incorporates the residential functions of the Marigny, encourages foot traffic and provides living spaces with a unique courtyard. Bahareh Javadi’s proposal for a linear park and follies on N. Peters provides a well-lit transit stop, public access to river views framed by the structure, and celebrates the industrial nature of the immediate surrounding area.

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A

dr. eugene cizek

spring 2013


DSGN 3PRST DSGN 4200 6520G//13SPRING 13

A

C

B

C

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SRED 6320 // SPRING 13

A

B

C

D

CASE STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT critic

course description

Will Bradshaw

This course used case studies of real projects to explore concepts of sustainable real estate development and to

students Brennan Fournerat Sarah Hargrove LaQuanda Smith

deepen students understanding of how actual projects get done. The principal building blocks of the course were readings related to the case study topics, case studies themselves which had associated problem sets, and guest lectures from project developers and their partners. Each case study was intended to highlight an area of critical importance to the development process and provide a deep-dive in that space.

However, each project also touched on all the other aspects of the development process because we were using real projects as the models, inclusive of the major aspects of the development process which included: • Entitlements • Finance • Design and Construction • Marketing • Property Management/operations We touched on all of these areas through the lens of sustainability, building a clearer picture of what it means to be a real estate developer in this space.

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SRED 6320 //SPRING 13

The Firehouse: An Urban Rehab Development at 4877 Laurel

images A | Existing conditions B | Building proposal render C | First floor plan D | Second floor plan

Introduction

self-contained residential world. It’s a place where late 19th

The Firehouse on Laurel is the inaugural endeavor of the

century homes are scrupulously maintained and small scale

newly formed FHS Development team, comprised of 3 re-

restaurants and shops reinforce the feeling that you are

cent Tulane MSRED grads. With a focus on creating vibrant

visiting a village, not a city. The median sale price for homes

community spaces through urban infill and historic renova-

in the subject’s 70115 area code, according to Trulia, from

tions, the Firehouse project will restore a community cen-

June 2012 to August 2012 was $370,000 based on 102 sales.

terpiece to its former glory in the form of a neighborhood

Compared to one year ago, the median sale price increased

café and 3 residential units. The Total Development Cost for

10.1% or $27,100, and the number of sales increased 14.6%.

the project is $1,047,914 based on an acquisition price of

There are currently 103 resale and new home sales including

$255,000. The property is being sold through public auction

62 homes in pre-foreclosure, auction, or bank-owned stages

on May 17, 2013 with a starting price of $190,000. We have

of the foreclosure process. The average list price for single

structured our financials to allow us to pay up to $270,000

family residential in this area is currently around $437,589.

for the building, with an expectation that actual purchase price will be considerably lower.

Zoning

In addition to the developer equity put into the deal by FHS

The purpose of the district is to maintain a residential

Development (10% hard cash, 10% deferred fee), we are

environment while permitting a variety of dwelling types.

looking to secure project financing through traditional debt

Population density is maintained in the high-medium range,

(56% LTV) and Federal and State Historic Tax Credits. The

while buildings are permitted to rise to seventy-five feet.

project is expected to yield an average After Tax Cash on

Larger buildings are permitted to contain certain necessary

Cash ROE of 11.7% and an IRR after sale in year ten of 17.1%.

commercial uses for the convenience of tenants. Although

Building Overview and Current Conditions The building consists of a two-story vacant former fire station building built in 1910. It contains 3,779± square feet including a 546± square stable in the rear. It is located within the Uptown National Historic District, in which the period of significance applies to building built prior to 1935.

a variance would need to be accepted in order to open a café on the first level, the official appraisal document for the property suggests community oriented commercial uses as a fitting rehabilitation focus of the property. A café would be an added value for the neighborhood and we anticipate that the variance would have full neighborhood support.

The renovation of the fire station would be eligible for Fed-

Our Vision

eral and State Historic Tax Credits. The fire station has been

Our vision for the renovation of the Laurel fire station is

vacant since Hurricane Katrina. The property was further

to pay homage to its history as a community staple. We

damaged by Hurricane Isaac from wind and water intrusion.

envision a café on the first level that takes full advantage

The building is a combination of masonry and wood frame

of the existing fire station design. Capitalizing on the heavy

two-story on a reinforced concrete slab. The roof frame is

morning, afternoon and evening traffic of Wisner Park, we

wood. Roof cover is approximately 50% intact. The building

plan to partner with an established New Orleans restauntuer

is basically open span on the first level. The second level is

that will open a “Grab-and-go”, healthy and quick dining

accessed via a wood stairwell that will need to be replaced.

alternative for dog owners, park goers and neighborhood

The windows have been boarded. The roof, gutters, and

residents. The café will have an indoor/outdoor dining area

eaves are in poor condition. The plaster walls and ceilings

that extends into the side alley once used for parking the

are no longer intact. The building requires total renovation.

Fire Engine 37. By creating a space that is an extension of

Surrounding Neighborhood The West Riverside neighborhood of New Orleans is a sub-

architecture.tulane.edu

The subject property is zoned RM-2, Multi-Family District.

the park and the neighborhood, we hope to encourage the rebuilding and revitalization of the area.

district of the Uptown/Carrollton, its boundaries as defined

Upstairs will be two one bedroom apartments at 750±

by the City Planning Commission are: Magazine Street to

square feet a piece. Both will ample windows and space,

the north, Napoleon Avenue to the east, the Mississippi

these apartments will rent for around $1200 a month. In the

River to the south and Webster Street to the west. Most of

rear of the building is the original stable structure. This will

this area has been considered part of Uptown New Orleans

be repurposed into a 550 square foot efficiency apartment

throughout its history. The Uptown District, beginning up-

with a private entrance off of Laurel. This will rent for close

river at the Garden District and stretching to Broadway, is a

to $950 a month.

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DSGN 4300 // SUMMER 11

A

B

C

tulaneBASEbeijing critics Irene Keil Tiffany Lin

students A | Laura Dilorio and  Nick Sackos graduates B | Elizabeth Davis graduate C | Laura Dilorio graduate

From May 16th to July 10th, thirteen Tulane architecture

The BASE facilities occupy a former factory building in the

students, together with twenty students from various uni-

urban village of Caochangdi, located at the 5th ringroad of

versities in the U.S., participated in a study abroad program

Beijing, between the airport and the Forbidden City. The

initiated and conducted by BASE Beijing (Robert Mangu-

village is part of a thriving arts district in Beijing, home to

rian, Mary-Ann Ray, David Gregor), assisted by professor

many artists and galleries, but also to farmers, squatters,

of practice Irene Keil (coordinator) and assistant professor

students and taxi drivers.

Tiffany Lin from Tulane University. Chinese students from the Beijing University of Technology assisted with research, provided translations and helped conduct interviews during the field work in urban and rural villages.

During their time in Caochangdi, the students looked at the relationships between rural villages and cities, in this case Beijing, and analyzed the problems created by issues of mass migration and speculative development. In addition,

D | Ian O’Cain undergraduate

independent projects explored the culture of making in the

E | Cameron Ringness and

villages where students collaborated with local residents

Matt DeCotiis graduates

and artisans. At the end, all projects were printed in book form; the original works, and the books were displayed in a final exhibit open to the public at BASE.

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AVSM 3310 // FALL 12

roME Architectural drawing

A

critics Errol Barron John Klingman

students A | Annalise Haskell B | Alia Soomro C | Madison Baker D | Mary Catherine Bullock graduate

B

B

course description This course engaged on-site drawing in Rome and environs. During the first half of the semester under the direction of Professor Barron, students concentrated on pencil drawing. During the second half of the semester with Professor Klingman, students focused on ink line drawing with prismacolor shading.

B

C

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DSGN 3200AVSM // SPRING 3310 //13FALL 12

A

D

B B D

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C

architecture.tulane.edu

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231


ACKNoWLEdGEMENtS Many thanks to Dean Kenneth Schwartz, FAIA for his support of the School and commitment to revive the reVIEW. This book would not have been possible without the guidance and tireless efforts of Jill Stoll, Associate Dean of Students at the School of Architecture. She collected, photographed, and edited all of the student work for this publication. Leigh Wilkerson has been the driving force in the School’s graphic identity for five years now. We all owe her a debt of gratitude for the way she has worked to communicate and celebrate the remarkable trajectory of the School through her own design talent and dedication.

CrEdItS DEAN Kenneth Schwartz, FAIA Favrot Professor EDITORS Jill Stoll, Associate Dean of Students Daisy Dodge, MArch I, TSA’15 DESIGNER Leigh Wilkerson, 10½ Studios

DESIGN STUDIO COORDINATORS

© 2013 by Tulane School of Architecture, Richardson

FALL 11

Memorial Hall, 6823 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans,

First Year: Associate Professor Scott Ruff

Louisiana 70118. All rights reserved. No part of this

Second Year: Adjunct Lecturer Andrew Liles

publication may be reproduced in any manner without

Third Year: Favrot Professor Ammar Eloueini, Intl. Assoc.

permission.

AIA, RA-France FALL 12

dents, copyright Tulane School of Architecture, unless

First Year: Adjunct Assistant Professor Thaddeus Zarse 

otherwise noted.

Second Year: Favrot Associate Professor and Associate

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Dean for Academics Wendy Redfield, AIA Associate

Christine Foley, TSA’13

Third Year: Assistant Professor Kentaro Tsubaki, RA 

DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST

SPRING 12

David Armentor

First Year: Assistant Professor Tiffany Lin Second Year: Koch Chair of Architecture John Klingman

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE DEAN

Third Year: Adjunct Associate Professor Doug Harmon

Christy Crosby

Thesis: Favrot Associate Professor of Architecture and Dean for Academics Wendy Redfield, AIA Associate

PRINTING Regal Printing Ltd., Hong Kong

SPRING 13 First Year: Assistant Professor Marcella Del Signore,

Cover Image:

RA-Italy

Marielle Asenjo, M.Arch I Candidate, TSA’15

Second Year: Assistant Professor Tiffany Lin

From the assignment

Third Year: Professor of Practice Irene Keil

“Inside. Outside. Inbetween,”

Thesis: Harvey-Wadsworth Chair of Landscape Urban-

DSGN1100/AVSM1100 with Irene Keil

ism and Professor Judith Kinnard, FAIA

and Jill Stoll, Summer 2012

All images of student work appear courtesy of the stu-

Profile for Tulane School of Architecture

the reVIEW 2011-2013  

Contains excerpts from our faculty-curated publication of student architectural work, featuring first, second, and third year studio work, o...

the reVIEW 2011-2013  

Contains excerpts from our faculty-curated publication of student architectural work, featuring first, second, and third year studio work, o...