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THE TUFTS ADMISSIONS MAGAZINE ADMISSIONS.TUFTS.EDU

NUTRITION AND FOOD STUDIES

FOOD ETHICS, FOOD SYSTEMS, AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

SUMMER SCHOLARS STUDENTS DIVE INTO INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

BOSTON BY THE NUMBERS

OUR FAVORITE HOMETOWN HIGHLIGHTS

CLASS HIGHLIGHTS

ALL OF THIS ISSUE’S COURSES FOCUS ON CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

ADMISSIONS ADVICE

SET YOURSELF UP FOR SUCCESS

ISSUE 19 / FALL 2017


JUMBO 19

F ALL ’17 INFOGRAPHIC | 3 LIVING | 7 ATHLETICS | 9 AROUND TOWN | 12 CLASS HIGHLIGHT | 16 ARTS | 20 ADMISSIONS ADVICE | 36 FEATURES

24 ROTC AT TUFTS OUR ROTC cadets are engineers, varsity athletes, and more

32 A JUMBO BITE AN INTERDISCIPLINARY LOOK at all

PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

things food and nutrition

ON THE COVER IMOGEN BROWDER ‘16 answer ON THE COVER your pressing questions lorem ENVIRONMENTAL ipsum etc morestudies, text coming from

anthropology, biology, philosophy, economics... and more! Check out our cover story on page 32.

Mere.

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY STUART BRADFORD (FRONT), PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY (BACK)

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GREETINGS

FROM THE DEAN WHAT YOU DO OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM DURING YOUR COLLEGE YEARS CAN BE AS IMPORTANT AS THE MAJOR ON WHICH YOU EVENTUALLY SETTLE.

fun. If that’s true, last year must have been one of the best of my life! Summer has transitioned to fall, and my colleagues and I are once again out on the road meeting you and preparing to settle in for a winter full of reading. For us, the cyclical nature of the college application process is a welcome one—each day brings something a little bit different as we tell you about the Tufts experience and learn about your hopes and dreams for your college years. But we also remember that the process can be a little nerve-wracking when you’re trying to find the right fit. After all, it’s not just about location or size of the student body—it’s also about the types of interactions and conversations that you can expect to have on the campus that you’ll call home for the next four

MEET THE STUDENT COMMUNICATIONS GROUP Most of what you’re about to read was written by these Tufts students. Keep an eye out for their voices as they introduce you to the Tufts community.

THE TUFTS ADMISSIONS MAGAZINE

years. One of the things you don’t always hear on your official visit is that what you do outside of the classroom during your college years can be as important as the major on which you eventually settle. Mentors, friendships, and networks are all important factors in post college success, and you’ll find most of these relationships form outside of the classroom.

I’m pleased to introduce this edition of JUMBO magazine. Within these pages, we’ve provided you with some information to help you get to know the university and its students. If after reading it your curiosity is piqued or questions remain, I invite you to be in touch or to visit us either in person or virtually through our online tour.

As you search for the right fit, I encourage you to think outside of the box (and the classroom) to explore how you will spend your time. Ask yourself: if I were to change my mind about the subject I want to study academically, would I still be content in this place? Would I still find people and situations that will help me stretch my mind and learn new things? If the answer to these questions is “no,” that feels like a good indication to broaden your search.

Happy exploring! And best wishes for the fall. Best,

Karen Richardson Dean of Admissions and Enrollment Management

DESMOND FONSECA ’20 from Bridgewater, MA

JULIE DOTEN ’18 from Enfield, CT

AINSLEY BALL ’21 from San Francisco, CA

CHLOE MALOUF ’20 from Gaithersburg, MD

JHEANELLE OWENS ’21 from Spanish Town, Jamaica

JACOB SHAW ’21 from Winnetka, IL

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS Tufts University / Bendetson Hall 2 The Green / Medford, MA 02155 617 627.3170 / admissions.tufts.edu / jumboeditor@tufts.edu

Produced by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Edited by Jaime Morgen, Assistant Director of Admissions Design by Hecht/Horton Partners

PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

THEY SAY that time flies when you’re having


The city of Boston is much more than just a beautiful skyline that Jumbos can see from the library roof. It is a city full of history, culture, and spirit. Check out some of our favorite Boston highlights!

BOSTON BY THE NUMBERS 2 5 0 0 0 01 Over 250,000 college students live in Boston, giving it a higher ratio of 20–34 year-olds than any other city in the US

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2500+

food vendors are set up inside Quincy Market, the largest food hall in New England

RESTAURANTS

AMERICA’S

Forbes Magazine ranks Boston as America’s Smartest City 57 National Historic Landmarks in the city

The Freedom trail is 2.5 miles long and passes by 16 historically significant locations such as the Paul Revere house

OVER 115 FILMS HAVE BEEN SET IN THE BOSTON AREA There are 500,000 works of art at the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)

70 music and comedy acts performed at the Boston Calling festival in 2017

287,403 patrons attended 1,699 performances of 207 original plays in the last year

Henry David Thoreau, a Boston-area native, would have turned 200 years old this year

THERE ARE TWO DOZEN HOSPITALS IN THE GREATER BOSTON AREA

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Boston Children’s Hospital is the #1 children’s hospital in the country

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Massachusetts General Hospital is ranked #3 on the US News and World Report rankings

The Old State House was built in 1713 and is the oldest surviving building in the city

The Boston Commons, founded in 1634, is the oldest public park in the US

1912 Fenway Park is the oldest ballpark in the MLB, opening its doors in 1912

In total, Boston major league sports teams (the Red Sox, Bruins, Celtics, and Patriots) have won 36 titles

SMARTEST CITY

The USS Constitution was launched in 1797 and is the oldest commissioned warship still afloat

286,000

tech jobs in Massachusetts

1,869

startups in the Boston Area

The state of MA has the highest patent volume per capita

500+

pharmaceutical and biotech companies in the Greater Boston Area

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INS & OUTS

SNAPSHOTS FROM THE HILL

VISITING ARTISTS

MENTAL HEALTH MONOLOGUES: STRENGTH IN STORIES

EACH SEMESTER, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts plays host to visiting artists from all over the world! This year we welcomed Keren Cytter, an artist and writer whose video art practice looks at the integration of text, absurd fragmentation, and the use of intertextuality. After showing in London, Chicago, and New York, she was welcomed to campus in conjunction with an exhibition entitled “Dream States: Video and the Political Imaginary,” hosted in the Grossman Gallery.

THIS EVENT, hosted by

the student group Active Minds, offers a space for students to share their experiences with mental illness on campus by anonymously submitting their stories. The event is part of a larger mission to destigmatize mental health and connect students through shared stories of struggle and recovery.

QRUNCH A FEW SUNDAYS each semester, the LGBT Center hosts Queer Brunches (Qrunches, if you will) where they provide food for students to come, eat, and socialize. Qrunch is open to all, and is a great way to get to know some of the peer leaders in the LGBT Center and some of the resources in a fantastic space on campus!

TEAM IMPACT THIS FALL, the football team welcomed a very special player

to their roster! Through Team IMPACT, a group that connects kids fighting life-threatening illnesses with the support system of a collegiate sports team, the team drafted 15-year-old Zack Cummings during a ceremony at Gillette Stadium. In addition to signing on for the Jumbos football season and receiving Tufts gear, Zack got to hold the most recent Super Bowl trophy and wear some of Tom Brady’s rings. No wonder Zack said that it was maybe the greatest day of his life!

EX-COLLEGE CLASS HIGHLIGHT: THE RIGHT TO PRIVACY IN MODERN AMERICA WARRANTLESS wiretapping. No-knock raids. E-mail and credit card hacks. Each of these

issues, and more, have recently arisen before the Supreme Court and in this modern era of government, the scope of the right to privacy has both contracted and expanded. Taught by Douglas Martland (an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts) and Steven Sharobem (an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts), this class will explore how the law has shaped the right to privacy and how this right may be evolving in the modern era. Through case studies and relevant examples, this class will dive into a topic that is at the forefront of the collective American conscience. 4


CHALK ABOUT IT! DURING reading period in the spring semester,

the walkway outside of Tisch Library is covered by hundreds of quotes, jokes, and inspirational messages written in colorful chalk. The event is hosted by Parnassus, a creative writing group, and offers students a chance to encourage their peers before finals and de-stress from studying as they walk out of the library!

A PRIZE FOR INNOVATION NATURE INDEX, a leading science journal, recently ranked Tufts 11th in its

2017 Innovation ranking. This list, which assesses the impact academic research is having on innovation, placed Tufts among the most influential universities in the world. Provost David Harris is especially proud of this ranking because it reflects the university’s long-standing commitment to creating innovative approaches to both local and global challenges.

TUFTS TWEET HERE’S our favorite recent Tufts-related tweet, coming to you

from the Boston Globe!

ZACK CUMMINGS PHOTO BY PAUL SWEENEY; HARRY POTTER PHOTO BY MIAMI2YOU/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

@BostonGlobe: Former ‘Hogwarts’ class instructors from the @ExCollege at @TuftsUniversity talk about Harry Potter’s 20th anniversary

PEAK WEEKEND

DINING HALL HACK: ON-THE-GO “AFFOGATO” MAKE USE of the constant supply of vanilla ice cream in the

dining halls! Swirl some ice cream in a cup and pour some coffee over it and you’ve got a delicious, simple, and creamy coffee treat. If you really need the extra sugar rush, grab some whipped cream and put a little on top as a finishing touch.

DURING ‘peak’ fall foliage, head up to the Loj with Tufts Mountain Club (TMC). On Peak Weekend, Tufts Mountain Club makes it their goal to summit every peak in New Hampshire over 4,000 ft. (there’s 48 of them!). This is a great way to view the beautiful White Mountains, and to make new friends along the trail.

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A self-described disciplinary migrant, Professor Seaver explains the importance and relevance of Tufts’ newest interdisciplinary major.

NICK SEAVER ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

How is society influenced by technology? How do sociocultural forces shape the content of science and how we define “technology”? Assistant Professor Nick Seaver, a cultural anthropologist interested in the intersection of technology and the societies from which it arises, seeks to answer these questions. He studies technology as it reflects societal roles, relationships between people, and issues of personal and collective tastes. Professor Seaver and his colleagues are the brains behind Tufts’ newest major: Science, Technology, and Society (STS). With diverse courses such as the Sociology of Science and Risk, Human-Robot Interaction, and the Politics of Oil and Energy, the program is designed for students who are interested in STEM topics and how those topics relate to questions of society and culture. Professor Seaver’s recent research is a great example: he studies software developers who build music recommendation systems like Pandora and Spotify. He discovered that the algorithms—the software that processes data and makes output—only explained part of the outcome. The music selections reflected much more than the basic algorithms, showing other qualities the algorithms “aren’t supposed to have.” Why? Professor Seaver explained: “When you try to represent your musical taste in a computer, you inevitably embed certain assumptions about what taste is.” There are different ways to recommend what kind of music someone might like, but generally recommendation systems start with a high-level theory narrowed down into smaller decisions. For example, a developer may believe that you like the music you like because of how it sounds. But then they may decide later that the only sounds that matter are ones that correspond with specific notes, and those that do not are noise. Those personal beliefs become embedded in the technology and affect the music that is played. With a Bachelor’s Degree in Literature and a Master’s in Media Studies, Professor Seaver describes himself as a “disciplinary migrant” through his academic history. His work across several fields of study mirrors many Tufts students’ excitement about interdisciplinary study. As part of the major, half-credit “reading labs” can be taken alongside science courses as a more humanistic supplement to the traditional curriculum. These seminar-style discussions pair with different classes (like biology, physics, and mathematical modeling) but can also be taken to dive into more specific topics, like equality and education in STEM. Professor Seaver believes that the goal of STS is to ensure our understanding of science and technology is not just technical. Just as we know that developments in STEM shape people and societies, STS will help us understand how these advances are themselves shaped by the people and societies in which they are created. —CAROLINE BOLLINGER ’19


LIVING

JUMBOS ARE HERE TO HELP! With a recent revamping of our residential structure, all freshmen will now be living in dorms designed for first-year students. Also in these dorms are select older students who want to make the transition to college as seamless, and as fun, as possible. Meet the new faces of Tufts residential life! ACADEMIC AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT FELLOWS (ACE FELLOWS) Located in almost every freshman dorm, ACE Fellows are here to assist students with all things academic at Tufts. That can mean helping first-year students choose their schedules, utilize the Academic Resource Center, take advantage of research or scholarship opportunities, and much more. ACE Fellows also plan several co-curricular programs per semester for their residents. Desmond Fonseca ’20, an ACE Fellow in Bush Hall, sees himself as a human FAQ Board for first-year students. If ACE Fellows don’t have the answers, they will direct you to somebody who does.

FIRST YEAR ASSISTANTS (FYA) What if you had a Tufts mentor living just down the hall? That’s what First Year Assistants (FYA’s) are for! These Jumbos serve as guides for first-year students by introducing them to campus resources, creating a cohesive community in the dorms, and facilitating conversations that help contribute to the greater conversation occurring on campus. In addition to providing daily support for students, FYA’s also create and implement programming in the dorms to make these spaces feel like a home away from home. Hall snacks, anyone?

ILLUSTRATION BY JANNE IIVONEN

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANTS (CDA) Developing enduring relationships on campus lasts way beyond your freshman hall. Community Development Assistants (CDA’s) serve as guides as older students continue to build upon their friendships and communities at Tufts. CDA’s shape a living environment in which students feel supported and challenged to engage in important conversations. These Jumbos also encourage their residents to take ownership over their community and provide them with resources and skills to take on increased leadership positions.

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HOT ITEMS

YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN ABOUT TUFTS THROUGH RANDOM ITEMS FOUND ALL OVER CAMPUS.

Wild Card

Wild Card MINI WHITE BOARD FOR YOUR DORM DOOR Nothing beats coming back to your dorm room after a long exam to be greeted by a funny note left by a neighbor. My roommates and I wrote down events on and off campus that we wanted to attend, hung up old tickets from our favorite shows, and always left space for corner decorations and notes. —OLIVIA LADDLUTHRINGSHAUSER ’19

ANOMIA A laugh-out-loud card game, Anomia is like a cross between Scattergories and Taboo. This party favorite will keep you and your friends entertained all night long! —CAROLINE BOLLINGER ’19

A TICKET TO THE TUFTS DANCE COLLECTIVE SHOW TDC is the dance club for people who can’t danceand is one of the largest student groups on campus. The only way to get involved with this show is through a non-dance-related survey. Be sure to grab your ticket fast; this show sells out almost instantly as everyone likes to go laugh ~with~ (at) their friends. —STUART MONTGOMERY ’19

ALOE VERA PLANTS The perfect low-maintenance accessory for any dorm room! If you think you’re not watering them enough, then you’re correctly caring for your little plant friend. Add googly eyes for a bit more personality. And as an added bonus—Aloe plants improve air quality! —CAROLINE BANEVICIUS ’20

FROZEN HOAGIES FOOD TRUCK Looking for a change to the offerings of Tufts Campus Dining? The Leonard Carmichael Society (LCS), our umbrella community service organization, is here to help! In preparation for the Red Sox ticket giveaway in the beginning of April, LCS brings five different local food trucks right next to the Campus Center. Ice cream sandwiches, anyone?

SPORF This past spring, I went to an Eco-Rep event where they handed out free sporfs (a spoon, knife, and fork all in one utensil). Little did I know, they would completely run out and have to have a second event! I carry my sporf in my backpack at all times, and it allows me to avoid using plastic utensils wherever I am. —OLIVIA LADD-LUTHRINGSHAUSER ’19

—DANNY KNIGHT ’19

YOGA MAT You don’t have to be signed up for a yoga class (which counts as half a credit!) to make use of your trusty yoga mat. Weekly classes taught by students are offered through Tufts Student Resources (TSR) and I’ve even come across free outdoor yoga on Sunday afternoons on the Res Quad! —ALEX BRODEUR ’19

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ATHLETICS

ON THE FIELD AND IN THE LAB Jumbo athletes take as much pride in their athletic success as their triumphs in the classroom. Meet two varsity athletes who dominate not only on the field and in the pool, but in the research labs as well! BY AINSLEY BALL ’21

SARA WILLNER-GIWERC ’18 Mechanical engineering major and engineering management and engineering education minor from Saratoga Springs, NY

While you can often find Sara on Spicer Field with her softball team, you’re just as likely to find her in a cozy classroom in the Collaborative Learning and Innovation Complex (CLIC), surrounded by robots. At Tufts, this softball catcher has immersed herself in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, where one of her favorite courses has been Technological Tools for Learning. This course brought her to a local middle school classroom. “I especially valued that I was learning how to teach with technology by actually teaching with technology,” she said. Sara is also a research assistant at the Center for Engineering Education and Outreach (CEEO). There, her work focuses on exposing younger students

to engineering concepts. Some of her experiences with the CEEO include designing learning experiences for young students using the LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 robotics kits, writing a software package for LabVIEW to control digital fabrication tools, and even traveling to China to judge a LEGO Competition. Sara’s success at Tufts is not confined to the softball field or the classroom; she mentioned that her involvement with the team has made her a more adaptable student with the ability to learn from failure. Adjusting to new positions on the field mirrors the way she must adjust her academic approaches in order to succeed in the classroom.

ZACH WALLACE ’18 Applied mathematics major and computer science minor from La Jolla, CA

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

Zach has always known that he likes to swim, but it was at Tufts that he discovered his passion for mathematics and computer science. Zach’s sophomore year computer science classes introduced him to the fascinating relationship between computer science and mathematics, and he has pursued this intersection of disciplines since. This summer, he put his interests to the test during a research internship in Bioinformatics at UC San Diego Health. There, he applied what he’s learned in class and got a taste of this “booming field,” studying and analyzing interactions between thousands of proteins. In this internship, Zach saw how his passions for math and computer science relate

to the medical field, and he is now ready to pursue a Senior Capstone project related to his summer findings. At Tufts, Zach has felt fulfilled by both his academic and athletic communities. He has loved his professors, and is appreciative that he has been able to work with these “absolutely brilliant people” both in and out of the classroom. Zach also finds motivation and inspiration through his teammates on the swimming and diving team. He explained: “If anything, being an athlete makes me even more driven as a student because I want to be a successful student-athlete, not just a successful student or just a successful athlete.”

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ALEXANDRA STRONG

’20

ENGLISH AND ANTHROPOLOGY DOUBLE MAJOR FROM LOS ANGELES, CA

I remember being a second semester senior in high school when the question of the day was: what made you decide to go to Tufts? It can become a boring conversation after about thirty people have asked you, but quite frankly, I love answering this question. I’ve been excited about Tufts since I found it two years ago, and that feeling has been amplified since I’ve been here. Since the day I stepped onto this campus, I cannot be thankful enough that my life has led me here. I chose Tufts for a multitude of reasons, but I’ve chalked it up to two: passion and support. Every student on this campus is involved in a slew of things ranging from mock trial to the cooking club, and they’re so excited to do each thing that they’re more than happy to make their life a circus. Even more inspiring is how, through all of that, everyone is someone else’s inspiration. 10

Since starting my Tufts career, I’ve had the opportunity to have English discussions that stay with me for weeks. I’ve learned how to look at a piece of Buddhist prose and instead of analyzing what’s given, I’ve learned to wonder about what isn’t there, and the significance of questioning the written word. I’ve been happily challenged in my anthropology class to find as many binaries as possible connecting cities and tourism, and I’ve furthered those discussions in social settings outside the classroom. Admittedly, college has its sad spots, but even my more frustrating moments have helped me to grow and self-reflect, which really speaks to the community here and the kind of person Tufts helps you to become. I’m involved in quite a few programs on campus: I’m an a cappella singer, a section editor for the Tufts Observer, a Writing Fellow, and

a tour guide. But no matter how many times I have to rearrange my schedule or cross things out in my planner, I know that every single one of those spaces is a constant support system for me. The incredible thing about clubs here is that once you find one that you connect with, the people become more than friends: they become your family forever. After college I’m hoping to explore a career in publishing, and when the time comes for me to step into the editing world, I have a feeling that what I’ve learned inside and outside the classroom will have made me more prepared than ever and given me plenty of stories to get started.


PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

Now in her sophomore year at Tufts, Alexandra reflects on the home she has found here and the people who have inspired her most.

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AROUND TOWN

BOSTON SPORTS There is no denying that Boston is an incredibly loyal and spirited city…especially when it comes to sports. With five major professional teams, the world’s oldest annual marathon, and the largest two-day regatta in the world, there is something for everyone here. Whether you are a three-sport athlete or sideline spectator, Boston is the town for you!

THE BOSTON

MARATHON

30,000

The Boston Marathon started in 1897, making it the world’s oldest annual marathon. It boasts

EA THE H

is the largest two-day regatta in the world, with

11,000 ATHLETES rowing over 1,900 boats in 61 different events.

Boston is home to the oldest continuously operating community sailing program in the country

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ATTA

Last year, 35 runners (including students, alumni, staff, and faculty) joined the Tufts Marathon Team and raised money for the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

H E C H A R L ES

R EG

participants each year and over 500,000 spectators

FT DO


F A N Boston is ranked the number one city for Active Living (based on things like bike paths, parks, walkability, and access to public transit) by a report from Gallup and Healthways.

B

ON OST

t s o M d 3r ble City a k l a W

S WA

R

ED ANK

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TH E

IN T

HE

TE D U NI

TE STA

Y SB

> Fenway Park is the oldest

F IN RE D

ballpark in the MLB, opening in 1912. It is also on the National Register of Historic Places. > In total, the Red Sox have won

8 WORLD SERIES TITLES,

the New England Patriots have won 5 Super Bowls, the Celtics have won 17 NBA championships, and the Bruins have won 6 Stanley Cup Titles. > There are two great bike paths right off of the Tufts

campus—the Somerville Community Path will take you on a tree-lined stroll through the area and the

MINUTEMAN BIKEWAY is a 10-mile path that bears a striking resemblance to Paul Revere’s historic ride.

> Each year, Provost David Harris hosts the

TUFTS CENTURY RIDE,

an event open to all members of the Tufts community that gives them the chance to bike to three different Tufts campuses (Medford/Somerville, Grafton, and Boston). More than 120 Tufts students, faculty, staff, and alumni took part in rides that ranged from 18 to 101 miles.

> Boston teams completed

Sports Illustrated Magazine’s Grand Slam of North American Sports in 6 years. The 2008 Celtics, 2011 Bruins, 2013 Red Sox and 2014 Patriots each won their respective sports championship titles. > There are 3 Rugby Super

League teams and 2 USA Rugby League Teams in Boston. > The New England Revolution

is the only major league soccer team to have every league game in its history televised.

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THIEN KHUU

CHEMISTRY AND ENGLISH DOUBLE MAJOR FROM HO CHI MINH CITY, VIETNAM 14

’18


PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

“As a scientist, I can tell you climate change is a very real and urgent issue, and the Tufts campus is very prominent in climate change work.”

QuestBridge Scholar Thien Khuu ’18 might just be living proof of why writer Patrick Rothfuss said, “If you give a man an answer, all he gains is a little fact. But give him a question and he’ll look for his own answers.” When Thien first entered the Laboratory for Water and Surface Analysis led by Professor of Chemistry Mary Shultz, he had never done independent research. But what mattered to him weren’t the answers he had, but rather the questions he yearned to ask. Two years later, now a chemistry and English double major, Thien just spent an industrious summer with the Summer Scholars Program back in the Shultz Lab continuing his independent research that he began sophomore year. Focusing on green energy, Thien explored Room Temperature Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy (RT-MIS), the potential formation of clathrate hydrates (essentially gas trapped in frozen water molecules) under atmospheric pressure and slightly below freezing temperature. RT-MIS is just steps away from tapping into the clathrate hydrates’ potential and revolutionizing global energy. Leveraging Tufts’ Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and other state-of-the-art equipment, Thien continues to ask the tough questions, drilling for solutions to new challenges that emerge. “If you can power a machine with methane hydrates,” he explained, “then by combustion you would produce CO2 and water. So if you can trap that CO2 with a clathrate hydrate, can you use it to feed organic synthesis? That’s the motivation of this research.” Thien

said hydrates are ideal to isolate the gas at a higher temperature without having to freeze it. Thien just submitted his discoveries from this summer to the Journal of Physical Chemistry for review and is excited about the prospect. Thien’s scientific research is brilliantly complex, but his mission is simple and personal: to enable greener, alternative energy. Thien moved to the United States at 12 from the notoriously polluted Ho Chi Minh City. “You have to wear a face mask at all times on public streets,” he shared. “Growing up in Vietnam, I always had breathing problems from all the chemicals in the air. People I knew, my friends, my peers, children growing up there, were all affected. As a scientist, I can tell you climate change is a very real and urgent issue, and the Tufts campus is very prominent in climate change work. When I entered the chemistry department, I was looking for some kind of research that had to do with alternative energy,” Thien explained. “My Principal Investigator, Professor Shultz, just believed in me and trusted me.” Thien continues to be amazed by the confidence of Tufts chemistry professors in their students, providing undergraduates with encouragement and opportunities to pursue independent research, while elsewhere students would be tasked with sanitizing beakers. Thien is now in the midst of applying to graduate school in atmospheric chemistry. And if he keeps asking questions, who knows? He might just save the world someday. —JACOB SHAW ’21

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CLASS HIGHLIGHT

COURSES IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT The only university-wide college of its kind, the Tisch College of Civic Life is a national leader in civic education. Each semester, the college works with various departments on campus, ranging from biology to political science and entrepreneurial leadership to environmental studies, to create courses that help Jumbos acquire the skills and values necessary to lead civic lives. Here are some of the courses they are offering this semester.

Massachusetts State Government: How the Sausage Gets Made Learn from Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg about the process and strategic thinking involved in creating public policy addressing today’s most pressing issues. This class will operate by identifying a problem, creating and debating possible solutions from the perspective of key stakeholders and interest groups, and drafting and passing comprehensive legislation. Course methods focus on experiential learning in addition to discussion and debate, research, and policy writing. This class also includes guest speakers and visits to the Massachusetts State House. Philanthropy, Social Enterprise, and Community Philanthropy plays many roles in our communities, from alleviating crisis situations to encouraging systemic change. Working with a grant from a Tufts trustee, students have the opportunity to practice philanthropy by serving as a young adult grantmaking board to award $25,000 to local nonprofits in the immediate surrounding area. Students will

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be immersed in the philanthropic world and will learn how to evaluate philanthropic impact, assess nonprofit organizational health, and implement a community project. Media and Environment: Creating Change The focus of this course is to illuminate the powerful role media can play in giving a voice to underrepresented opinions and illuminating issues of environmental justice. This class will help students sharpen their skills to produce effective and targeted messages surrounding current issues such as the pollution of oceans and climate change. Guest speakers include important environmental activists, including filmmakers and journalists, who will tell their story of creating environmental awareness and change. U.S. Elections - Rules, Strategies, and Outcomes This course examines past elections in the United States and connects the dots from laws (the Constitution, case law, state and federal statutes) to strategies (by political parties, candidates, interest groups, and donors), and from strategies to outcomes (voting, public opinion, activism). Past elections will serve as case studies to learn the intricacies behind the hype. Information, Technology, and Privacy This course focuses on the intersection of politics, technology, and privacy. How do politics affect information technology? How does technology impact politics and governance? Topics covered in this course include government leaks, free speech, surveillance, collective action, voter decision-making, campaign targeting, antitrust laws, and companies including Uber and Amazon.

Science and Civic Action This course will link science issues to our professional, personal, civic, and moral responsibilities and will equip students to make critical choices on divisive, contemporary topics. Future scientists and engineers will learn to be active citizens by acquiring skills that build civic capacities, including advocacy and communication on complex science issues. Students from the humanities and social sciences will learn skills indispensable for positive civic and democratic engagement that will guide critical decisions. Mass Incarceration and The Literature of Confinement How have writers from different historical periods, regions, cultures, and genders understood experiences of confinement and freedom? What are some of the effects on human beings of different kinds of confinement—economic, educational, legal, physical, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and social? A weekly focus on interactive learning across cultural, social, and literal barriers and on the regular practice of self-reflection will enable students to develop qualitative knowledge about power and human possibilities in the face of social injustice and structural inequalities. Media Literacy What is New Media Literacy? How can systems of mass media influence how we analyze and critique what is right in front of our eyes? This class, offered in tandem with the Film and Media Studies program, dives into these questions and more. Discussions regarding new media technologies and participatory culture in the context of American public education will fuel class discussions.

ILLUSTRATION BY ©2017 ALEX NABAUM C/O THEISPOT.COM

Peace through Entrepreneurship International political instability, unrest, and violence most often stem from massive rates of youth unemployment, and the most effective way to address this is by spurring entrepreneurship—the greatest single, private sector job-creator. Using this central theory, this course covers a range of related topics including theories of international economic development, impact investing, and microfinance. Visiting lecturer Steven Koltai uses his experience as the State Department’s Senior Advisor for Entrepreneurship to create a classroom experience grounded in real world context.


SHAFIQUL ISLAM PROFESSOR OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND DIRECTOR OF THE WATER DIPLOMACY PROGRAM

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PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

“If you want to understand water it can’t be numbers or narratives, it has to be numbers and narratives. If you combine those two things together you get Tufts, and you get water diplomacy.”

Professor Shafiqul Islam is a man with an almost impossible laundry list of accomplishments and interests. He began his career as an engineer at the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology. He has worked with and for everyone from the National Science Foundation, to the US Army, to NASA, and on everything from research on the 1990 Clean Air Act to the “Effects of SpaceTime Dynamics of Surface Processes on Land.” The one common thread through all of it is something very simple: water. Professor Islam attributes his fascination with water to a kind of unique double status: “Water always fascinated me because… [it’s] everywhere. Water is the source of life almost everywhere, and is a resource that is simply not replaceable. It’s the most prevalent solvent in the world, and is something that is essential for human survival.” Through Islam’s eyes, not only is water something that we can control physically or chemically, but culturally as well. It is this duality that led him to his two main fields of study.

Professor Islam came to Tufts in 2004 as a Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and soon after joined the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy to teach on the topic of water diplomacy, a course of study he created himself. His classes typically use case studies to examine topics like water law, treaty databases, and international organizations. Professor Islam explained: “We turn to water diplomacy when there is no clear-cut scientific answer to a problem. The questions that we ask are: ‘Water for who? Water for what cost? And water on what scale?’ The amount of fresh water we have hasn’t changed in the last million years—since the dinosaurs—but the number of people using that water has. That’s where the conflict arises, and that’s where water diplomacy is involved.” The discipline calls on multiple fields in a way that Islam sees as inherent to water’s status as a finite object and as a resource: “I always tell my students that whether I feel happy or sad, water flows downhill. That is a

scientific principle. But water can also flow uphill to money. An engineer can understand water as an object, but water as a resource must be understood through anthropology, sociology, political science, etc. So, if you want to understand water it can’t be numbers or narratives, it has to be numbers and narratives. If you combine those two things together you get Tufts, and you get water diplomacy.” In short, Professor Islam occupies a unique niche, in a place made for people who occupy unique niches. His civically-minded approach to engineering, and the ideas that arise from it, exemplifies the way Tufts professors think from a variety of perspectives to solve the problems in their fields and the world at large. As he put it: “If you want to change the world and make an impact, you come to Tufts.” —STUART MONTGOMERY ’19

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ARTS HIGHLIGHT

B UILDING A COMMUNITY THROUGH PERFORMANCE Performance art can seem intimidating to the casual art viewer—it even has its own history and specialized vocabulary. But what happens when artists use performance as a direct way of engaging underrepresented audiences? Can a medium often considered high art be used as a rallying cry? Several members of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA) at Tufts have been approaching these issues in exhibitions that reach beyond art’s traditional setting in the gallery. Danielle Abrams, Professor of the Practice at the SMFA at Tufts, addresses issues of access and visibility. Her practice grew through joining communities, collaborating in an underground scene, and engaging with non-profit spaces that mixed theater, performance, literature, dance, and social activism. Raised by a white Jewish college-educated mother and a labor-class African-American father in culturally-mixed Flushing, New York, Danielle learned early to navigate radically different cultural spaces. Rather than thinking of her art as purely centered in the gallery, she employed “art as a decoy for social activism”—teaching art in underfunded high schools and community colleges, working with inmates in prisons, and letting her performance characters loose in the world at large. Danielle’s piece ‘Rules to Follow When You Are a Really LightSkinned Black Person’ took the form of a riff on ill-defined notions of “white-blackness and blackwhiteness” and, ultimately, tactics for creating systems of living in the world. Alicia Rodriguez Alvisa ’18 grew up in Cuba as the daughter of visual artists and made her way to SMFA at Tufts as an international student. When she arrived in the US she began to think of herself for the first time as a person of color. She was interested in representations of race and gender in art and explored these themes through her work as a photographer. Quickly her work started to center around her own body as a representation of her cultural background. Presenting herself as diverging

from the “European standard of beauty” meant that she could reach women with different ideas about beauty, capability, and strength—creating “newer and better conversations around women-artists, race, and status.” Her work blends extensive research with humor and everyday activities like hair-braiding and fitness routines to connect with the widest audience possible. Alicia began exploring performance after taking a class with Danielle. The relationship they began in the classroom led Danielle to invite Alicia to participate in STAND UP, an exhibition she co-curated at Gallery Kayafas in Boston this July. STAND UP focused on women and non-gender conforming artists, with an emphasis on people of color, members of the LGBTQ community, and immigrants as groups that disproportionately lack visibility in galleries and museum collections. Donning a muscle suit and high heels for her piece ‘I Can Look Strong,’ Alicia proceeded to lift weights while addressing the audience, at first conversationally, about machismo and gender stereotypes. As she unfurled a golden scroll, her talk turned to numbers like the percentage of pieces by women-artists in permanent collections, the percentage of women among gallery-represented artists, the number of women in museum directorships. Her performance ended by offering a toast to the crowd celebrating women’s voices, the voices of minorities, and a call to get involved. Both of these artists are working toward building a broader community. Danielle explained, “Being an artist doesn’t mean you’re being an artist by yourself. You have allies and you need to be an ally.” These practices give us a vision of performance art reaching beyond the gallery audience, making real connections to communities, and driving social change. —THOMAS DUNCAN, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS, SMFA AT TUFTS

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PHOTOS BY ANÍBAL MARTEL

TOP Danielle Abrams rehearses an upcoming performance piece at the SMFA at the Haley House Bakery Café. BOTTOM Alicia Rodriguez Alvisa ’18 performs in a muscle suit in STAND UP at the Gallery Kayafas in Boston.


“WHAT HAPPENS WHEN ARTISTS USE PERFORMANCE AS A DIRECT WAY OF ENGAGING UNDERREPRESENTED AUDIENCES? CAN A MEDIUM OFTEN CONSIDERED HIGH ART BE USED AS A RALLYING CRY?”


TUFTS’

TOP 10 PROCRASTINATION TIPS

WILL WALK FOR ICE CREAM Walk to Hodgdon Food-on-the-Run and see if Ben and Jerry’s has released a new flavor. Worst case scenario, just get some Cherry Garcia and talk about your day with Idah, a Tufts celebrity who will always put a smile on your face.

That essay you’re supposed to be writing? Exam you need to study for? Everyone procrastinates sometimes…even Tufts students! If you’re going to procrastinate, you should at least do it well. Here, Jeremy Caldwell ’19, Eliza Lawless ’18 and Cory Sagerstrom ’20 share their best tips.

GATEWAY TO CHILDHOOD DREAMS Go to the librar y, and check out the books in range PZ 1-8. It has all your favorite children’s books, including Harry Potter and Dr. Seuss.

ROCK ON Look at course listings for next semester. It’s always a good idea to plan ahead, and you can avoid thinking about your upcoming exam or problem set. History of Rock and Roll, anyone?

WHAT CAN I SAY, BUT MORE BEY?

REVISIT THE CLASSICS Re-watch Mean Girls and challenge your friends to a competition to see who knows the most quotes. It’s so fetch.

Watch both of Beyoncé’s Super Bowl half-time performances. We’re counting the Coldplay show too, because she stole the show.

Watch every live video of Beyoncé performing “End of Time.” The choreography is phenomenal, and there are at least thirty videos of her performing it on YouTube.

INSTA GRATIFICATION Watch videos of Beyoncé performing “Halo” directly to fans. This is a great one if you just need to cry a little bit.

Take artsy photos of the trees on the quad (this is especially great in the fall) or Goddard Chapel’s tower and post them on Instagram with the Juno filter. It makes everything look great.

TAKE A SNOOZE

Ask your roommate to explain their major again, and where they see themself in ten years. Maybe you’ll be inspired to try something new, or maybe you’ll avoid your own stress for another hour…either way, we’ll call it a win.

BEYONCÉ PHOTO BY JSTONE/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

LET’S CHAT Take a nap. Your body will thank you later, and you can’t think about homework when you’re unconscious. We recommend the comfy couches in Tisch Library or some of the snazzy neon green chairs in the Collaborative Learning and Innovation Complex (CLIC).


PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

With interests in child study and human development, French, and environmental policy, Sylvie used her time as a Summer Scholar to meld her passions together.

SYLVIE GRENIER CHILD STUDY AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FRENCH DOUBLE MAJOR FROM SCITUATE, MA

Sylvie Grenier is a perfect example of how having too many interests or passions is a good thing. After talking with Sylvie, I thought she would be busy enough being involved in Tufts Democrats, the Marathon Team, Chi Omega Sorority, the Child Development Association, and tutoring through the Leonard Carmichael Society. But on top of all of that, she spent her summer as a Tufts Summer Scholar doing exciting research on the behavior of young adults and their perception of climate change. The Summer Scholars program funds independent research projects for rising juniors and seniors. These students work closely with a faculty mentor and, come fall, present their findings at the Undergraduate Research Symposium. With interests like child study and human development, French, and environmental policy, Sylvie took advantage of this opportunity to combine all of these areas. Her current study looks at the behaviors, thoughts, and actions of French and American young adults in regards to the environment and climate change to shed light on how to unite diverse groups of individuals. She explained: “With programs like Summer Scholars, you can really push yourself and cultivate all of your interests.” Sylvie believes that Tufts is the perfect place to foster this interdisciplinary kind of thinking. “The students here have so many interests and Tufts encourages you to pursue interdisciplinary things. It’s really cool that the environment here engenders in you the [knowledge] that it’s okay to be interested in multiple things.” Sylvie knew she wanted to study abroad in France, so she started her research there. Being the home of the Paris Climate Agreement of 2016, France is an especially interesting place to research regional differences in environmental awareness. She centered her research around questions like: How can we unite different groups of people? What is the relationship between young adults’ civic identities and environmental attitudes? While abroad, Sylvie went on six different data collections in cafés, universities, and other public areas in the city. Talking about her preliminary findings (and ideas for her Senior Honors Thesis) made Sylvie visibly giddy. She said, “I just like to understand people!” Sylvie told me that she took the GRE yesterday and would like to eventually go to graduate school. “I’m also looking into the realm of non-profits and program development,” she said. In fact, she is spending some of her time this fall interning at the Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Boston in their Department of Evaluation and Learning. No matter what Sylvie decides to pursue, I have no doubt that she will make her mark on the world with her passion for helping people understand each other. —CHLOE MALOUF ’20

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ON ANY GIVEN DAY, YOU MAY SEE SOME STUDENTS DRESSED IN UNIFORM AS THEY MAKE THEIR WAY TO CLASSES, THE DINING HALL, AND EVEN VARSITY SPORTS PRACTICE. THESE STUDENTS ARE PART OF THE RESERVE OFFICERS’ TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) AT TUFTS, WHERE THEY TRAIN WITH OTHER BOSTON-AREA SCHOOLS AND TAKE SOME SPECIALIZED CLASSES, LIKE SEA NAVIGATION, MILITARY CULTURE, AND A LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS SEMINAR. UPON GRADUATING, THESE STUDENTS COMMISSION AS OFFICERS IN ONE OF THE THREE BRANCHES (ARMY, AIR FORCE, OR NAVY). HERE, CADETS FROM ALL THREE BRANCHES DISCUSS THEIR FAVORITE CLASSES, BALANCING THEIR DEMANDING SCHEDULES, AND THE SUPPORT THEY HAVE RECEIVED FROM THE TUFTS COMMUNITY.

RO AT TUFTS By Jaime Morgen ’14 Assistant Director of Admissions

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PHOTOS BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

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Renée LaMarche ’18 History major from Lynnfield, MA. Battalion Operations Officer, Army ROTC Between running from history seminars to ROTC trainings, Renée is quick to note that no two days are ever the same. Outside of her involvement in the Tufts University Social Collective (TUSC), as a leader for her sorority’s executive board, and as a student employee for the athletic department, Renée also holds a major leadership role within the ROTC community. This year, as one of the top cadets, she was hand-picked to lead the group as the Battalion Operations Officer. In this role, she is in charge of planning and coordinating all of the training for the rest of the cadets. As a transfer student, Renée had to catch up faster than a typical cadet, but she is thankful to the ROTC community for giving her confidence to overcome challenges. She said ROTC has afforded her the opportunity to interact with some of the brightest minds in the country. Want to know more? Feel free to contact any of our ROTC branches: AIR FORCE afrotc@mit.edu NAVY wielgus@mit.edu ARMY smcd@mit.edu

Ryan Friedman ’19 Electrical engineering major from San Diego, CA. Air Force ROTC

“ROTC HAS AFFORDED ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO INTERACT WITH SOME OF THE BRIGHTEST MINDS IN THE COUNTRY.”

While engineering and physical training may seem like they have nothing in common, Ryan believes there is a lot of overlap between his work in the classroom and ROTC training. Ryan said: “The biggest overlap between engineering and ROTC doesn’t lie so much in the content, but rather in the process. The problem-identifying and solving mentality that I have learned through my classes has helped me in many aspects of ROTC. At the same time, the very practical, hands-on, and leadership-oriented ROTC training has greatly benefited my academics.” In addition to balancing his training with his electrical engineering (and foreign language!) courses, Ryan serves as an Academic and Community Engagement (ACE) Fellow and a member of the Tufts Alliance Linking Leaders in Education and the Services (ALLIES). After graduation, Ryan will serve in the Air Force, but he is eager to put the specific skills that he has learned at Tufts to use. He hopes to do intelligence work that combines his technical skills with foreign language, and eventually become a Regional Affairs Strategist. *Want to know more about being an ACE fellow? Check out page 7.


PHOTOS BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

Andrew Seiter ’18 Quantitative economics major from Ridgewood, NJ. Navy ROTC

“ENGAGING IN PUBLIC SERVICE IS A PRIVILEGE THAT I DO NOT TAKE LIGHTLY. IT COMES WITH IMMENSE AMOUNTS OF RESPONSIBILITY TO STUDY AND UNDERSTAND HISTORY, THINK CRITICALLY ABOUT THE PRESENT, AND MAINTAIN AN ADAPTIVE OPERATIONAL READINESS FOR THE FUTURE.”

Andrew came to Tufts with two main goals: to play collegiate lacrosse and commission as a Naval Officer upon graduation. On his path to pursuing both goals (and following in his grandfather’s footsteps as a Naval Officer), he has learned to rely on the Tufts community for support. Whether he is finding motivation in his teammates or extra wisdom from his professors, Andrew says everyone he has interacted with on campus has supported him as he fulfills his Navy ROTC commitments. Outside of lacrosse practices and ROTC training, Andrew is pursuing a major in quantitative economics, where his favorite class so far has been Quantitative Games and Information. He recalled, “I have always been interested in game theory, and this course took a more mathematical approach, which allowed us to study more complicated games and the role of information.” When looking back on his time at Tufts so far, Andrew said his most memorable moment was the Tufts Veterans Day Ceremony in 2016. His worlds collided when members of the Tufts football and lacrosse teams showed their support for all Tufts veterans.

“I AM ABLE TO BE AS SUCCESSFUL AS I AM IN BALANCING SCHOOL, ROTC, AND LACROSSE BECAUSE OF THE CONSTANT SUPPORT I RECEIVE FROM THE SCHOOL”

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LISA SHIN Now approaching her 20th year at Tufts, Professor Lisa Shin, Chair of the Department of Psychology, mainly studies the anxiety disorder called Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD. But as she recounted to me in our interview, she actually discovered her passion for this area of research by accident. “I’d love to tell you that I’ve always wanted to be a PTSD researcher, but that’s not true.” Professor Shin noted how she believes her unplanned journey into PTSD research is important to share with students, who may feel frustrated that they don’t know yet what they want to study or research. When she first started college, she was pre-med and thinking about being a French major; after getting involved in research, she was able to address her interest in clinical disorders and the brain. She didn’t plan to become a clinical neuroscientist but was able to discover this career through exploring classes and working alongside her professors in research. At her Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Neuroimaging Lab, Professor Shin currently examines brain function during the performance of cognitive tasks in individuals with PTSD. Specifically, the lab looks at whether certain abnormalities in the brain function of patients are preexisting or if they are acquired after trauma is experienced. By using sets of twins where one individual has PTSD and the other does

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not, she can draw direct comparisons. She uses two different types of neuroimaging devices (positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging) to further study these brain abnormalities and see if they will predict anything clinically important for patients. “When people begin treatments of one kind or another, you never really know how they’re going to respond,” she told me. “But if you have an objective, biological marker that can tell you how—or at least help you to predict how—they’re going to respond, that’s useful!” In Professor Shin’s world, the unknown is nothing to be afraid of—in fact, it’s embraced. “When I started studying PTSD with imaging, no one had studied that before. I knew that was a good place to start.” She found the pioneering aspect of the research freeing. Now, as a professor, she frequently asks her students questions that she doesn’t have the answers to (unbeknownst to them!). “Sometimes they come up with tough questions for me, questions I don’t know the answer to, and that’s okay!” she said. “Learning to ask a question and then trying to figure out how to answer it using the scientific method is really kind of cool. It’s nice to see that spark in students, and see them really excited about learning and about research in general. I mean, that’s nerdy, but it’s true.” —JULIE DOTEN ’18

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

PROFESSOR AND CHAIR, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY


Professor Lisa Shin is among the first in her field to research how neuroimaging can be used to predict the success of treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

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VOXJUMBO ABI WILLIAMS ( F’86, F’87) DIRECTOR OF THE INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICS AT THE FLETCHER SCHOOL OF LAW AND DIPLOMACY

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

Directing the Institute for Global Leadership is the perfect job for Abi. After serving as Director of Strategic Planning for United Nations SecretariesGeneral Ban Ki-moon and Kofi Annan, Senior Vice President of the Center for Conflict Management at the United States Institute of Peace, and the first President of The Hague Institute for Global Justice, he is back at his alma mater to share his knowledge with the community. Here, he answers our supplemental essay questions so you can get to know him, Tufts, and our application all at the same time!

INTRODUCING THE TUFTS COMMUNITY THROUGH OUR SUPPLEMENT … ONE PERSON AT A TIME.

“Why Tufts?” (50–100 words) Nestled on a hilltop, Tufts provides a special vantage point to view the world. Diverse views, cultures, and stimulating exchanges enlarge your vision. It is a place of inspiration, and a catalyst for new ideas. A sense of mission permeates all. Amid clouds of cynicism it is a beacon of light which pierces the gloom. It is 165 years old but continues to breathe the bold, enterprising spirit of youth, driven by ideas as well as idealism.

There is a Quaker saying: “Let your life speak.” Describe the environment in which you were raised—your family, home, neighborhood, or community—and how it influenced the person you are today. (200–250 words) I grew up in a home in Sierra Leone which was stimulating and organized. My parents were voracious readers and had an extensive collection of wonderful books. They stressed the importance of responsibility, and of a responsibility based on values. We had to ensure that those values were purposeful, compassionate, and cosmopolitan. Most importantly, we had a responsibility to serve others. They helped me to recognize that realizing ambition requires hard work, dedication, and a sense of adventure. When I was 15, they allowed me to make a brave and life-changing decision to pursue an education at the Lester B. Pearson United World College of the Pacific, in Victoria, British Columbia, 6,685 miles from home. My parents made an even braver decision in allowing me to pursue my dream. Pearson College changed my view of the world, and of myself, opening up new horizons of possibility and teaching me not only about literature and history, but also volumes about my own potential. It was an education that took place not only in the classroom, but through the rich and varied interaction with peers from all corners and cultures of the globe. My upbringing and time as a student in Victoria left me with an immense sense of gratitude, but also with a sense of responsibility to live up to the high ideals of my parents and of the UWC movement.

It’s cool to be smart. Tell us about the subjects or ideas that excite your intellectual curiosity. (200–250 words)* The critical intersection of order and justice is a dynamic I find intriguing. It offers an avenue to deal with contemporary threats and challenges. It is also at the core of my own personal ethic. Working in the varied worlds of academia, the United Nations, and think tanks, I have been trying to figure out how to make the noble aspiration of a just international order a reality. While a just international order ought to be a consistent aspiration, detached from the circumstances of any one age, it is clear that order with justice is an especially urgent imperative in our own times. What, then, is the relationship between order and justice? Are they indivisible concepts at the heart of successful societies? Perhaps contrary aims, pursued in parallel but intrinsically in tension? Or are they merely the elusive concepts of the rhetorician, coupled together as any two abstract nouns might be? I believe that order and justice are indeed linked together. In the kind of societies we wish to see flourish, and in a world at peace, giving all its peoples the chance of a decent life, order and justice would be two sides of the same coin. I would go so far as to say that international order is not possible without justice. But it is equally true that, without order, justice will never be secure. In short, a concern for international order must include a concern for justice, and vice versa.

*Want to see the other options for the third question on our supplemental application? Visit admissions.tufts.edu/apply/essay-questions 31


A JUMBO BITE: HOW TUFTS LOOKS AT FOOD SYSTEMS Chloe Malouf ’20

No individual or society is capable of thriving without access to nutritious food. Students and professors at Tufts—along with scientists across the globe— face the difficult task of determining how to feed a changing world.

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ILLUSTRATION BY STUART BRADFORD


O

ne of the biggest questions of our generation is: How do we feed the world in a sustainable way? There is no simple way to answer this, but Tufts aims to prepare its students to contribute to this discussion with the new Food Systems and Nutrition minor. Launched in the fall of 2016 through the Environmental Studies Program, it encompasses a wide array of topics including food sustainability, policy, access, and nutrition. Drawing from a variety of departments and programs like environmental studies, anthropology, biology, philosophy, and economics, this minor is the perfect complement to any major because of its interdisciplinary nature. In addition, if you fall in love with this field of study, Tufts is home to the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, the only graduate program in North America whose mission is to improve nutritional health and the well-being of populations around the world. I chose to come to Tufts for the interdisciplinary approach to teaching, and to be surrounded by fellow students who are motivated to solve the world’s toughest problems. I believe that climate change is the biggest fight of our generation, and as an environmental studies and international relations double major, I am constantly asking myself how I will contribute to this fight. It is no secret that as the climate continues to change, traditional farming methods will need to change as well. If that was not enough, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that 1 in 9 people in the world are already suffering from chronic malnourishment. Naturally, Tufts’ faculty are coming together to prepare Jumbos to tackle world hunger. After reading about the minor, I was inspired to speak to various professors to see how they approach this important topic. Senior Lecturer of Anthropology Cathy Stanton believes nutrition and access to healthy food is an important area for undergraduates to explore. “There are lots of obviously useful applications for knowledge about food and nutrition,” Professor Stanton explained, “but I think these topics are important because they allow students to link their own experiences with much bigger issues in ways that they might not have done before.” For me, learning that anthropologists cared about food and nutrition was news. I always assumed studying food and nutrition was only about the science and agricultural practices, but I forgot about the most essential element: the people! Excited to learn more about this field, I asked Professor Stanton about fun class options for me to explore. “Right now, my favorite food-related class at Tufts is probably the ethnographic methods class I teach in the Department of Anthropology, called Fieldwork Lab. We are partnering for the third year in a row with the Boston Public Market, a new experiment in year-round, locally-sourced food in the downtown market district. It’s fun to do research at a site where you can get ice cream!” While Professor Stanton focuses on food as an essential part of culture, Professor Ujjayant Chakravorty looks at food through the lens of economics. He believes that economics is a key player in determining how we feed the world for a sustainable future. “As societies develop, people are willing to spend resources to eat healthier foods,” Professor Chakravorty told me. “In poor countries, there are still large numbers of people suffering from malnutrition and lack of access to basic foods, so the topic is important for them as well.” I’ve enjoyed taking courses in history and economics at Tufts, without realizing that these courses gave me an essential background for food systems and nutrition. As societies have changed throughout history, their needs and resources have changed as well. So have the prices of food. When economists apply even the most basic principles of their field, like supply and demand, to the study of food systems and nutrition, they can identify current trends and problems in our

world—and work to find a solution. “Tufts, in my view, is one of the few schools with a lot of presence in this area,” said Professor Chakravorty. His ideas are complemented by the work of Kyle Emerick, Assistant Professor of Economics, who described even further how economics ties into this subject: “Ultimately, food production is a business for people — whether it be smallholder farmers in Africa or large commercial farmers in the middle of the United States. Thus, we can apply classic economic models to study how farmers behave just as we would for any other firms.” As an environmental studies major, I asked Professor Emerick to add his perspective on how climate change plays a role in food and nutrition. “Research is conclusive that rising temperatures will have a detrimental impact on agriculture,” he said. “Tackling climate change is necessary to prevent these negative impacts on food production.” No individual or society is capable of thriving without access to nutritious food. Students and professors at Tufts—along with scientists across the globe—face the difficult task of determining how to feed a changing world, and in order to do that, they must view food as part of an interconnected system. But the experience of consuming food is multisensory and personal, according to Silvia Bottinelli, a practicing artist and a Lecturer at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts. She teaches and studies food art, and—tellingly—responded to my questions over e-mail while eating a delicious meal of spaghetti with truffle sauce in Bologna, Italy. She explained, “I look at food art from an art historical point of view. I am interested in analyzing artworks created by using food as a material or prop for performances. Food provides multi-sensorial experiences that can deeply involve the viewer.” One of her courses, Food as Sculpture, which is offered in the Department of Visual and Critical Studies at SMFA at Tufts and is cross-listed with environmental studies, combines critical thinking with artistic skills as students explore topics ranging from consumerism to hospitality to food as ritual. Even though economics, science, and anthropology are crucial lenses through which we can view food systems and nutrition, Professor Bottinelli explained that “art can help us rethink our relationship with food as individuals and as a society.” After hearing from Professor Bottinelli, I contemplated how the food in my life has always had an emotional component. Whether it was connecting to my Latinx culture with my mom’s famous Cuban picadillo or my decision to become a vegetarian, food influenced the way I looked at the world and at myself. Professor Bottinelli helps ignite that type of thought through her food art. “Food art pushes art beyond the limits of the visual. It is unique because it is at the same time universal and culture-specific. Everybody eats, but the values, meanings, and behaviors that people attach to food are complex and diverse.” If we’re going to tackle the global problem of food insecurity, we’ll have to understand food not only as a collection of calories but as an essential component of cultures across the world. We’ll have to feed the world in a way that is sustainable, affordable, respectful of cultural traditions, and aligned with individual preferences. No single area of study can accomplish all of that, but if anthropologists, economists, nutritionists, and artists came together in conversation… well, it just might be possible. That’s what the Food Systems and Nutrition minor offers to students: the opportunity to look at this issue through an interdisciplinary lens. Their conversations will be more exciting because of it, but—more importantly—their impact will be greater. As for me—who knows? I may be talking to my advisor soon about adding this minor to my plate.

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ILLUSTRATION BY STUART BRADFORD

Drawing from a variety of departments like environmental studies, anthropology, biology, philosophy, and economics, this minor is the perfect complement to any major because of its interdisciplinary nature.


ADVICE

HOW TO SET YOURSELF UP FOR FOR JUNIORS Maybe you’ve visited some colleges already. Maybe your parents are starting to ask nonchalant but increasingly pressing questions about your plans. Maybe you see your senior friends in a frenzy as they finalize their applications. It can all be overwhelming, but we are here to help! Here are some easy and manageable steps you can take right now to set yourself up for future success.

posts written by both admissions officers and students, and explore different areas of study. Whether you come to campus or not, think about more than student-faculty ratios or retention rates. At a certain point, the schools you are looking at all have similar numbers, so focus on the people, place, and programs (the 3 P’s, if you will, not to be confused with Tufts’ theater organization) to help you find your fit.

1. Draft (and love) your list: Wading through all

2. Start thinking about your senior year schedule: Your senior year schedule will be

the information and developing a list that feels right to you is half the battle of this process. But the end goal? To compile a list that you are happy with. In the end, you should be excited about each and every school to which you apply. Attending an information session and tour is helpful, but take this a step further. Sit on the President’s Lawn and people-watch for a bit. Grab a bite to eat in the Campus Center and strike up a conversation with a current student. These small things will help you figure out the vibe of a school and can help you answer the question: “Can I picture myself here?” If you don’t have the chance to visit, take advantage of our website—the internet can be your best friend throughout this exploration process. Check out a virtual tour, look at blog

important to us as we look for evidence of academic preparedness. Associate Director of Admissions Meghan Dangremond wrote a blog post on this exact topic, and she wants to share her tips with you. First, she encourages you to go big! “If you’ve just had a solid three years, try to take it up a notch,” said Meghan. “A very strong first semester performance can make you a real contender in this process.” Tufts recommends five rigorous courses each year of high school, from the five core areas (English, social studies, math, science, and foreign language). That’s the goal, but it’s OK to specialize by doubling up in one area. Finally, she urges you to look out for yourself! Yes, we like a challenging senior year

curriculum. But you need to be able to succeed in these classes, so don’t overwhelm yourself. It’s also important to enjoy senior year and take time to do the things you love outside of the classroom!

3. Plan out standardized tests: Take this time to try out both the ACT and SAT (even if it is just practice questions online) to see which exam feels the most comfortable. For Tufts, you can submit either exam, and we have no preference! Also, use this year to plan accordingly. Look at the testing requirements for schools you might be interested in so that you have an idea of what you will need to apply. For example, if you are applying to our School of Engineering and submitting the SAT, we ask that one of your subject tests be in math, and we recommend that the other is in chemistry or physics. On the other hand, students applying for the BFA through the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts do not need to submit subject tests. Knowing the nuances will help you plan for any tests you may take at the end of this year. Finally, don’t let these long Saturday mornings get in the way of your grades or your sanity.

FOR SENIORS

1. Focus on the supplement: Even if you saved it for last, it should definitely not be an afterthought. In fact, the supplement is often our favorite part of the application, and gives us the best sense of you as a person. Use the supplement to convey fit (you can customize your answer

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to fit the school to which you are applying!) and define your voice (when you chat with your friends are you loud and gregarious? Soft spoken and thoughtful?). Each answer to the supplement should be purposeful and should tell us something important about you, your worldview, or your passions.

use this time to talk about things that are not in your application; and take a deep breath. Our interviews are meant to be a conversation, not an audition. Our alumni interviewers are excited to meet you and they love that you are interested in their alma mater. You are not expected to be anything other than a high school senior, so relax and let this be fun!

2. Nail the interview…if you choose to do it: Interviews at Tufts are optional (yes, we mean optional) and are not guaranteed. If you do request and receive an interview with one of our alumni interviewers, you’ll want to make the most out of your time. Here are three things you can do to prepare for an outstanding college interview: Prepare questions ahead of time that help you fill in gaps in your knowledge; remind yourself what the admissions team already knows so you can

3. Keep up the hustle: Your senior year counts. In fact, your academic performance only becomes more predictive of college success over time. So admissions officers receive your midyear grades and often use them in the decision-making process. We like to see a challenging (but manageable) senior year and strong grades, so keep focusing on school!

ILLUSTRATION BY CRISTINA GUITIAN

It’s senior year, and many pieces of your college application are behind you. Your grades are what they are. Your course schedule is set. You’ve taken some (if not all) of your standardized tests. But there is still plenty you can do to make your application the best it can be. Our team is here to help! We have more advice online (check out the Inside Admissions blogs on our website) but here we’ve prioritized what you can do right now to make your application submit-ready.


SUCCESS


PROGRAMS With nearly 150 majors and minors, 30 interdisciplinary programs, and the courses of the ExCollege, Tufts’ offerings require more than a brief skimming, so you can find an expansion of this quick list on our website. But in the meantime, skim away. Just note that Tufts undergraduate programs are offered in three schools: Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts. Students may take classes across schools, and many students do. SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES MAJORS *available only as a second major Africana Studies American Studies Anthropology Applied Mathematics Applied Physics Arabic Archaeology Architectural Studies Art History Astrophysics Biochemistry Biology Biomedical Engineering Sciences* Biopsychology Biotechnology* Chemical Physics Chemistry Child Study and Human Development Chinese Classical Studies Cognitive and Brain Sciences Community Health Computer Science Drama Economics Education* Engineering Psychology/ Human Factors English Environmental Studies* Film and Media Studies French Geological Sciences/Earth and Ocean Sciences Geology/Earth and Ocean Sciences German Language and Literature German Studies Greek Greek and Latin History Interdisciplinary Studies International Literary and Visual Studies

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International Relations Italian Studies Japanese Judaic Studies Latin Latin American Studies Mathematics Middle Eastern Studies Music Peace and Justice Studies Philosophy Physics Political Science Psychology Psychology/Clinical Concentration Quantitative Economics Religion Russian and Eastern European Studies Russian Language and Literature Science, Technology, and Society* Sociology Spanish Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING MAJORS PROFESSIONAL DEGREES

Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Engineering Mechanical Engineering ADDITIONAL DEGREE OPTIONS

Architectural Studies Engineering Engineering Physics Engineering Psychology/ Human Factors Engineering Science Environmental Health

ARTISTIC DISCIPLINES The SMFA at Tufts’ curriculum is interdisciplinary. All students explore many of the following artistic areas: Animation Bookmaking Film/Video Ceramics Drawing Digital Media Graphic Arts Graphic Design Illustration Installation Metals Painting Papermaking Performance Photography Printmaking Sculpture Sound Visual and Critical Studies FIVE-YEAR COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAMS Tufts/New England Conservatory: BA or BS and Bachelor of Music Tufts/SMFA (School of the Museum of Fine Arts): BA or BS and Bachelor of Fine Arts MINORS Africana Studies Arabic Architectural Engineering Architectural Studies Art History Asian American Studies Astrophysics Biotechnology Engineering Chemical Engineering Child Study and Human Development Chinese Colonialism Studies Computer Science Dance

COPY AND PASTE LIST FROM Drama PREVIOUS ISSUE Economics Education Engineering Education Engineering Management English Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies Film and Media Studies Finance Food Systems and Nutrition French Geology Geoscience Geosystems/Earth and Ocean Sciences German Greek Greek Archaeology Greek Civilization Hebrew History Italian Japanese Judaic Studies Latin Latin American Studies Latino Studies Leadership Studies Linguistics Mathematics Medieval Studies Music Music Engineering Philosophy Physics Political Science Religion Roman Archaeology Roman Civilization Russian Science, Technology, and Society Sociology Spanish Studio Art Urban Studies Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies


CLASS HIGHLIGHTS CONSORTIUM OF STUDIES IN RACE, COLONIALISM, AND DIASPORA This is the academic home for Africana, American, Asian American, Colonialism, and Latino Studies—all interdisciplinary programs that link innovative thinking, independent study, and an active commitment to social justice. Here are just some of the classes being offered in those programs this semester. Human Rights in the U.S. Studies in Women in Music: Black Divas Racial Politics and Urban Space in the U.S. Health, Policy, and Inequality Representation and Asian American Cultural Production Issues in Native American and Indigenous Studies American Orientalism Latina/o/x Presence in Art and Visual Culture American Highways, Routes, and Roots Queer Diasporas

COMPUTER ENGINEERING Computing has become an integral part of our everyday lives, from mobile healthcare, to self-driving cars, and high-performance data centers. Computer engineers will combine technology and creativity so they can leave as outstanding innovators and problems solvers. Introduction to Digital Logic Circuits Electronics I Microprocessor Architecture and Applications Probabilistic Systems Analysis Introduction to VLSI Design Operating Systems PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Senior Design Project Computer Communication Networks Parallel Computing Product Design and Development


ADMISSIONS INFORMATION WHAT TO SUBMIT: HERE’S THE LIST, FIND MORE DETAILS ON OUR WEBSITE!

1

Common Application or Coalition Application

2

Tufts Writing Supplement

3

High School Transcript(s)

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APPLICATION DEADLINES AND NOTIFICATION DATES Early Decision I Application Deadline: November 1 Notification Deadline: Mid-December

Senior Year Grades

Early Decision II Application Deadline: January 1 Notification Deadline: Mid-February Regular Decision Application Deadline: January 1 Notification Deadline: April 1 Transfer Admission Application Deadline: March 15 Notification Deadline: Mid-May

TUFTS CLASS OF 2021 STATISTICS*

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Testing a. For applicants to the School of Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering, or the Combined Degree Programs with the SMFA at Tufts or the NEC: SAT with two subject tests or ACT. b. For applicants to the SMFA at Tufts’ BFA program: SAT or ACT. Subject tests are not required.

21,101 Applications 3,127 Acceptances 15% Acceptance rate 100% of Demonstrated Financial Need Met 12% First Generation Students 10% International Students

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Letters of Recommendation We require one from a guidance counselor and one from a teacher. You may send us one additional one if you’d like.

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Art Portfolio Required only for students applying to the Combined Degree BFA/BA or BFA/BS and BFA applicants to the SMFA at Tufts.

32–34 Middle 50% ACT 710–770 Middle 50% SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing 720–790 Middle 50% SAT Math

TUFTS UNDERGRADUATE STATISTICS 5,459 Undergraduate Enrollment

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Financial Aid Documents If you are applying for aid, you will need to submit 1. FAFSA 2. CSS profile 3. Federal Income Tax Returns For a list of financial aid documents required of international, undocumented, or DACA applicants, please visit admissions.tufts.edu/apply

4.8 Miles from Boston 23 Average Class Size 28 Varsity Sports Teams 300+ Student Groups 36% Women in the School of Engineering

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Optional Materials • Alumni Interview • Arts or Maker Portfolio: Students applying to the School of Arts and Sciences or the School of Engineering may submit an optional arts or maker portfolio to highlight talent in studio art, drama, dance, music, or engineering.

45% of Juniors Study Abroad 36% Need Based Aid Recipients 80 Countries Represented 31% US Students of Color *As of July 1, 2017


H E Y.

JUST STARTING YOUR SEARCH? HERE’S WHAT TUFTS IS ALL ABOUT. WE DO OUR RESEARCH

WE ARE INTERESTED

Tufts is a student-centered research university, which means that we like to dig into our passions deeply and figure things out for ourselves—whether that involves using silk to regenerate tissue or spending a fully-funded summer exploring the political implications of Shakespeare’s plays through the Summer Scholars program. Students and professors come together, across disciplines, to ask questions and create meaning.

....in a lot of things. Tufts students don’t limit themselves: they combine biology with philosophy, compete as nationally-ranked D3 athletes, pursue Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees in studio art at our School of the Museum of Fine Arts, and solve problems as engineers. They’re part of a community that embraces the unconventional and the uncategorizable.

WE ARE ACTIVE CITIZENS

WE DON’T TAKE OURSELVES TOO SERIOUSLY

Jumbos use their skills and ideas to better people’s lives, whether they are teaching engineering in local elementary schools, creating sustainable businesses, or spending a year doing full-time service as a 1+4 Bridge Year Fellow. They understand that they are citizens of a global community, and they embrace that responsibility.

This is a place where students are as excited to debate Game of Thrones fan theories as they are to apply mathematical theorems—as intellectually playful as they are powerful. We believe that ideas can have a profound impact on the world, and those ideas can be born around the seminar table but also in the dorm common room.

Sound about right? Read the stories here to learn more. Also check out our website: admissions.tufts.edu

PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Equal Opportunity Applicants for admission and employment, students, employees, sources of referral of applicants for admission and employment, and all unions or professional organizations holding collective bargaining or professional agreements with Tufts University are hereby notified that this institution does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, veteran status, or national origin in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in its programs and activities. Any person having inquiries or complaints concerning Tufts University’s compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, or Section 504 is directed to contact the Office of Equal Opportunity on the Medford/Somerville campus, 617-6273298 or 800-611-5060 (TDD 617-627-3370). This office has been designated by Tufts University to coordinate the institution’s efforts to comply with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and Section 504. Any person may also contact the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202, or the Director, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Region One, Boston, Massachusetts 02109, regarding the institution’s compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, 34 C.F.R. Part 100; Title IX, 34 C.F.R. Part 106; the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, 45 C.F.R. 90; or, Section 504, 34 C.F.R. Part 104. In addition, Tufts has formulated an administrative policy that educational and employment decisions are based on the principle of equal opportunity. The consideration of factors such as sex, race, color, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, veteran status, or disability unrelated to a person’s ability, qualifications, and performance is inconsistent with this policy. In accordance with both federal and state law, the university maintains information concerning current security policies and procedures and prepares an annual crime report concerning crimes committed within the geographical limits of the university. Upon request to the Office of Public Safety, 617-627-3912, the university will provide such information to any applicant for admission. The report is also available online at http://publicsafety.tufts.edu/wp-content/uploads/Tufts-Public-Safety-Security-2016-2017.10.21.pdf.


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OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS Tufts University Bendetson Hall 2 The Green Medford, MA 02155-7057 617- 627-3170 admissions.tufts.edu

Jumbo Magazine - Fall 2017  
Jumbo Magazine - Fall 2017  

JUMBO is the Tufts undergraduate admissions magazine.

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