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THE TUFTS ADMISSIONS MAGAZINE ADMISSIONS.TUFTS.EDU

GLOBAL TUFTS CONNECTING THE WORLD THROUGH LANGUAGE

TOP TEN

CONVERSATIONS OVERHEARD IN THE DINING HALL

BEYOND PRE-MED

PURSUING HEALTH FIELDS AT TUFTS

BARE BODKIN

JUMBO PLAYWRIGHTS AND THE GROUP THAT CELEBRATES THEM

ISSUE 16 / FALL 2016


JUMBO 16

FALL ’16 INFOGRAPHIC | 3 LIVING | 7 ATHLETICS | 8 AROUND TOWN | 9 CLASS HIGHLIGHT | 10 ARTS | 12 ADMISSIONS ADVICE | 28 FEATURE

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BEYOND PRE-MED

PHOTO BY MELODY KO/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

PURSUING HEALTH FIELDS at Tufts. Clara Williamson ’18 talks about life as a pre-med Jumbo, both in and out of the classroom

ON THE COVER IMOGEN BROWDER ‘16 answer

ON THE COVER

your pressing questions lorem ipsum etc more text coming from OUR FOREIGN LANGUAGE classes Mere. will expand your world. Learn more on page 3.

FRONT COVER ILLUSTRATION BY DANTE TERZIGNI BACK COVER PHOTO BY 2009 TRUSTEES OF TUFTS COLLEGE

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GREETINGS

FROM THE DEAN professors studying climate change and sustainable energy generation, students taking part in our office’s newly created diversity council, and research at the intersection of prejudice, race and psychology. But more than just inviting you to read about these discoveries that are happening on the Tufts campus, my colleagues and I invite you to come and experience them for yourself. Visit if you can, read the student and staff blogs, take a virtual tour—immerse yourself in all that is Tufts. If, after doing these things, you still have some butterflies in your stomach, Tufts just might be the place for you. And as you work your way through the college application process, I encourage you to follow your gut. If the essay you’re writing seems like it’s asking for a playful answer, go for it! Likewise, if you’re on the more serious side, let that shine through. There is no one right answer to any question on our supplement (and you can quote me on that!). In the end, my colleagues and I want to know who YOU are—plain and simple. I hope that you’ll enjoy this issue of JUMBO. And when you’re finished reading it, get started on those essay questions—we’re anxious to get to know you.

MEET THE STUDENT COMMUNICATION GROUP

Most of what you’re about to read was written by these Tufts students. Keep an eye out for their voices as they introduce you to the Tufts community.

THE TUFTS ADMISSIONS MAGAZINE

come to appreciate the conversations about things both big and small, the laughter that we share as colleagues, and the community of learners that makes Tufts a destination for inquiring minds. As timely as JUMBO magazine tends to be, this issue feels even more on point given the things that are happening in our world today. The articles inside will introduce you to

Best, Karen Richardson Dean of Admissions and Enrollment Management

DESMOND FONSECA ’20 from Bridgewater, MA

CHLOE MALOUF ’20 from Gaithersburg, MD

CAMERON HARRIS ’18 from Shelburne, VT

ABIGAIL MCFEE ’17 from Chadron, NE

DYLAN HONG ’19 from West New York, NJ

HANNAH STEINBERG ’17 from Scarsdale, NY

LIAM KNOX ’19 from Princeton Junction, NJ

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS Tufts University / Bendetson Hall 2 The Green / Medford, MA 02155 617 627.3170 / admissions.tufts.edu / jumboeditor@tufts.edu

Produced by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Edited by Jaime Morgen, Assistant Director of Admissions Design by Hecht/Horton Partners

PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

to be writing this letter of introduction as the new(ish!) Dean of Admissions. Though I’ve called Tufts “home” for the past eight years—starting in the undergraduate admissions office and then with a brief twoyear stint in graduate admissions—I find myself learning something new and interesting about our students, faculty, and campus every day. Better yet, I find myself enjoying the people and place even more over time. I’ve I AM THRILLED


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TAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGES BEYOND THE CLASSROOM La ng

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Our Liberal Arts students complete a language and culture requirement because we value the ability to engage with other cultures. Studying a foreign language opens up numerous doors both during college and after graduation, and here are a few examples!

ILLUSTRATION BY DANTE TERZIGNI

Hannah Steinberg ’17 Psychology and Child Study and Human Development Even though she is pursuing two majors, Hannah still had time to take Hebrew reading classes throughout her time on campus. For her senior thesis, she is looking at reading disabilities in English and in Hebrew. She is interested in the way written language can alter how disabilities manifest themselves. “I wouldn’t have been able to do this or have been comfortable reading the Hebrew texts if it wasn’t for taking the Hebrew classes.” Alison Graham ’16 International Literary and Visual Studies “Thanks to a Fulbright grant, I will be spending the year as an English Teaching Assistant in a high school just outside of Lyon, France. I will also be working on an extracurricular photo-documentary program [at the school] so that students can use images to supplement written language while creating personal, meaningful work. I’m very grateful for this opportunity to apply my studies of French to everything from teaching English as a foreign language to experiencing that certain joie de vivre so particular to French culture.”

Jacob Brescia-Weiler ’17 Psychology “This past summer I interned at a non-profit called Project Citizenship, which provides free legal aid to eligible immigrants as they navigate the process of becoming citizens. Given that over half of our clients were Spanish-speaking (the largest demographic we served were immigrants from the Dominican Republic), my Spanish fluency was crucial as I spoke to clients to make the application process more accessible. The language requirement at Tufts allowed me to participate in this valuable work and help bridge the language gap.” Sylvia Ofoma ’17 Community Health “Learning American Sign Language was an amazing experience because not only do we learn the language, our professor also connects us to the Deaf community in Boston. I was able to volunteer with Deaf organizations and participate in fun Deaf hangouts in the Greater Boston Area such as dinners at Panera, Dingo (Deaf Bingo) Nights, and Deaf comedian performances.”

Adam Kercheval ’18 Spanish and Computer Science “I created a program called Sí that allows you to code entirely in Spanish without you ever having to see or use the English translation. So, for example, you could type “devolver 0;” into a program, run it through Sí, and the computer would interpret it as “return 0” without any extra effort on your part. The name is a play on the fact that it was originally intended for use with code written in C and C++.” Sara Fuhrman ’16 Biology and Philosophy “I completed the German language requirement and studied in Tübingen during my junior year. While I was abroad, I was able to take classes and study philosophers like Hannah Arendt and Immanuel Kant in their native language. The best part for me, though, was working as a nursing intern (nurse’s aide) in the general, visceral and transplantation surgery department at a teaching hospital in my town. It was one of the hardest, but most rewarding, things I’ve ever done and solidified my decision to pursue a career in medicine.”

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INS & OUTS

SNAPSHOTS PSHOTS FROM M THE HILL

LEARNING THE ROPES WHETHER YOU’RE CANOEING in New Hampsire with Tufts Wilderness Orientation (TWO), exploring ng

Boston with Global Orientation (GO), or painting a local community center with Freshman n Orientation CommUnity Service (FOCUS), there are plenty of opportunities for Tufts students to get their Jumbo experience started early. Around two-thirds of incoming freshmen will take part rt in one of Tufts’ six pre-orientation programs. In each program, a small group of incoming freshhmen and two upperclassmen leaders spend 4-5 days making new friends and getting an n introduction to Tufts before matriculation. Pre-orientation groups get weekly dinners to stay in n touch, a tradition that extends all the way until graduation!

FURRY FRIENDS WORRIED ABOUT MISSING YOUR DOG when you move away to

college? Fear not! For those Tufts students who love our fourlegged friends, Animal Aid comes to the rescue! This community service group provides dog walking services for the local community. If you sign up on time, you may be lucky enough to get to walk Sandy and Coco, the two biggest celebrities on campus.

@MONACOANTHONY TWEETS FOLLOWING Tufts’ President Monaco on Twitter is a great way to learn more about what is happening at Tufts—and to celebrate the success of our Jumbos!

Congratulations @TuftsLacrosse on their 7th straight @NESCAC Championship! #GoJumbos!

LEARN FROM THE PROS

CANDLEPIN BOWLING WITH YOUR PROFESSORS

EACH YEAR, TUFTS POLYHACK brings representatives from

companies like Google, Facebook, Bose, and Kayak to campus. Our students hear from keynote speakers and then form teams to design an app in 24 hours...with a lot of caffeine. Last year, winners included Intime—to help you create playlists of a specified length—and Simterview—a fast way to help you prepare for interviews in the tech industry. 4

JUMBOS

THROUGHOUT THE YEAR, each department will host an event to show off their professors, course offerings and research to prospective majors. The Human Factors Engineering department decided to take this venture off campus to a popular spot called Flatbreads for a night of pizza and candlepin bowling. It is always fun to get to know professors outside of the classroom, and the free food is always a plus!


EXCOLLEGE CLASS HIGHLIGHT: PERSUASIVE POLITICS

FUN-MERGENCY!

HAVE YOU EVER THOUGHT about how the art of persuasion

number gets added to a list so that you’ll randomly be sent “Fun-Mergency” texts. These range from an impromptu pizza party to a bunch of slacklines set up on the President’s Lawn to a club movie night. Who doesn’t need a fun-mergency once in a while?

plays into political campaigns? Looking for another lens to examine this year’s election? You’ll find your dream course in Tufts’ Experimental College. Persuasive Politics is taught by an expert in political psychology and public opinion. Students in this class examine the concept of persuasion from many different professional lenses, and later apply them to contemporary political issues, ranging from gun control and abortion to LGBT rights and climate change. Later in the semester, students will form small groups and give presentations to persuade their classmates and other local community members on a political topic of their choice.

TUFTS MOUNTAIN CLUB is one of the most popular clubs at Tufts. When you join, your phone

MAKER STUDIO (AND FREE FOOD!)

SAILING PHOTO BY NICHOLAS PFOSI FOR TUFTS UNIVERSITY

DON’T THINK waffles and 3D printing go together? Think again! Each Thursday night, the Tufts Maker Studio holds an evening where students can get together to enjoy waffles and use any of the equipment, including 3D printers and laser cutters, to work on their own independent projects or take on a challenge offered by the studio. Creations include a miniature bluetooth controlled BB-8 from Star Wars, an inverted pendulum, and an Oreo de-creamer.

JUMBO CHEF: MAC C AN AND CHEE CH CHEESE HEE EESE S AS MADE BY Clara Williamson ’18 8 in Carmichael Din D Dining ing Hallll INGREDIENTS Pasta, Cheese, Milk, Butter DIRECTIONS Take a bowl full of your favorite type of dining

hall pasta, add two slices of sandwich cheese and a handful of shredded cheese from the salad bar. A splash of milk and a piece of butter are the last ingredients—then microwave for 45 seconds and you’re done! (Add toppings— like bacon bits from the salad bar—as you see fit).

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Professor Jack Ridge’s affinity for geological formations, as his last name might suggest, began early in life. When he was five years old, his grandfather started taking him along on hikes. While ambling through the outdoors, he developed an interest in the processes that shape it, which was cemented by his first college Geology course. Over the past 31 years as a professor in the Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) department, Professor Ridge has worked most often with students who are not like him: majors and minors who had no idea they were interested in studying Geology before coming to Tufts. According to Professor Ridge, fewer classes in this area of study are being taught in high schools. Impassioned explorers and scientific investigators who, upon their graduation, will proudly wield the rock hammer that is the major’s parting gift, often stumble into the department serendipitously, through its popular intro courses. For those who choose to stay, EOS offers a dynamic education in two majors: Geology

and Geological Sciences, as well as a minor in Geoscience and, for engineers, in Geology. Part of what excites EOS students is the immediacy of what they are studying: the department cares not only about theory but about applications. Professor Ridge’s own research examines how the atmosphere interacts with soils and glaciers to influence climate change. He explained that past glaciation can be determined from lake deposits. Like rings on trees, lakes have annual layers, which can be used to construct a detailed history of the climate in the area. One of his current projects finds its inspiration only a few miles from Tufts, in the Middlesex Fells Reservation, a state park that is popular among locals looking to escape into the outdoors. Professor Ridge and some of his students are mapping the Fells in order to create an app that visitors can use for navigation. He said that the project has gained ground through data collected for a recent senior thesis.

As an undergraduate-only department, EOS provides its students with unprecedented research opportunities. The department helps to fund research trips with destinations that are always changing. Two years ago, Professor Ridge led ten students on a trip to Death Valley. Caroline Gleason ’17, a Geological Sciences major, was a sophomore at the time. “Being out there in such a different world, and with the resources of the department, we were able see things that tourists might not catch on to,” she said. “We were thinking critically at every stop and became a tight knit group along the way.” For Professor Ridge, opportunities for field experience are “life-changing” because they allow students to engage directly with their area of study, not as textual material but as organic material: real, right before their eyes, and brimming with information. —-ABIGAIL MCFEE ’17

JACK RIDGE PROFESSOR, CHAIR OF THE EARTH AND OCEAN SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

“Part of what excites EOS students is the immediacy of what they are studying”


LIVING

UPHILL VS. DOWNHILL

Even though we like to think that Tufts is not a competitive place, there is definitely a rivalry between the uphill and downhill dorms. Students often fi nd themselves gravitating toward one or another—usually because they prefer one dining hall—and stay very loyal throughout their four years. Here, our summer tour guides sound off on the longstanding divide.

UPHILL •“This area better embodies the college campus vibe because it’s near both the Academic Quad and the Res Quad. You see more students just walking around, reading under a tree on a nice day, and playing Frisbee.” —Tess Cotter ’18 • “A good mix of students from all grades, closer to most of your classes, always people walking around. It’s just so happy.” — Chista Irani ’19 • “In April, the Res Quad had a free vegetarian barbeque (and those are my three favorite words in the English language).” —Carolyn Margulies ’18 • “Uphill is closer to Tamper (a great café near campus) AND mail services. Also, I love walking by Goddard Chapel and the “light on top of the hill” every night coming home from the library.” —Allison McGuirk ’19

ILLUSTRATION BY HYE JIN CHUNG

• “I could wake up 5 minutes before class started and still get to class 10 minutes early (don’t check my math on this one).” —Carolyn Margulies ’18 • “The Res Quad is prime for throwing a Frisbee in the fall and an epic snowball battleground in the winter.” —Sam Berzok ’16

DOWNHILL •“I loved living downhill as I was able to get from my bedroom door (on the 4th floor of South Hall) to the Red Line train door in just 13 minutes. Perfect for going into Boston!” —Daisy Draper ’18 •“Closer to the campus center, the Rez café and, most importantly, Hodgdon burritos.” —Tess Cotter ’18 •“Because I had to walk up the hill so much for class, I now have Beyoncé legs.” —Carolyn Margulies ’18 •“If you live downhill lots of the sports fields are close by! I was even able to watch our football games out the window of my bedroom.” —Daisy Draper ’18 • “I love being able to walk to Davis Square without having to worry about walking back up the hill afterwards.” —Carolyn Margulies ’18 •“If you need a last minute Halloween costume, you are super close to the Crafts Center (in the basement of Lewis Hall).” — Chista Irani ’19 • “If you are involved with any of the arts on campus— like drama, music or dance—you are right near all of the arts buildings, and the music library (one of the most underrated study spots on campus).” —Sam Berzok ’16

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ATHLETICS

ATHLETICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE Civic engagement is important to all students, but our athletes engage on a Jumbo scale. From weekly Fan the Fire spirit and service events to trips across the globe, check out some of the amazing service done by our Men’s and Women’s lacrosse teams!

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

TEAM IMPACT If you look on the Men’s Lacrosse Team roster you may notice that something seems amiss. One of their players is 4’1”, weighs 65 pounds, and…is a 3rd grader at a local elementary school. Since 2011, Tufts has been a part of Team IMPACT, a program where children facing life-threatening and chronic illnesses are paired with collegiate athletic teams. The men’s lacrosse team’s IMPACT player is Jacob, who was diagnosed with a stage 4 neuroblastoma right after his third birthday. After an official draft ceremony (where he received his own jersey), Jacob attended practices and even went trick-ortreating with the team. For the first time in his life, Jacob got to be a part of a team and play the sport he loves. Ask any student athlete on campus about their team IMPACT player and they’ll immediately light up. In fact, the Men’s Lacrosse Team is pretty open about the fact that Jacob was their good luck charm in Baltimore when he came to their NCAA championship game and the team won. To date, seven Tufts teams have drafted Team IMPACT players, including women’s basketball, men’s basketball, and the football team.

JAMAICA LACROSSE ASSOCIATION The Women’s Lacrosse Team had an incredible season this year, ranking in the national top 10 in NCAA DIII. But, besides being killer athletes on the field and students in the classroom (fun fact: athletes on average have a higher GPA than non-athletes at Tufts), the Women’s Lacrosse Team also had the chance to travel to Jamaica this past summer. While they competed against the Jamaica National Team, the most impactful part of their visit was playing, coaching, and having fun with children in the Jamaica Lacrosse Association. The whole team brought extra equipment for the kids to keep and play with. This trip to Jamaica allowed the lacrosse team to give back to the community, while also playing a sport that they love.

MEN’S LACROSSE PHOTO BY KELVIN MA/TUFTS UNIVERSITY; WOMEN’S LACROSSE PHOTO BY COURTNEY FARRELL

MEN’S LACROSSE


AROUND TOWN

BRUNCH Whether you call yourself a brunch aficionado or just like a perfectly golden brown waffle, the area around Tufts is full of great choices! RENEE’S The perfect place for a sit-down brunch in Teele Square. You can opt for their traditional menu, or a daily special. My favorite? Crab cake eggs benedict with home fries.

DIESEL CAFÉ A fan-favorite coffee shop in the heart of Davis. It is known for its trendier-than-thou baristas, industrial design and storefront that opens up onto the street on a warm day.

MR. CREPE If you are looking for any type of crepe, Mr. Crepe is the place to go! I recommend the s’mores crepe filled with marshmallow, graham crackers and Belgian chocolate.

DANISH PASTRY HOUSE A cute café with an extensive menu. My favorite sandwich is the fig, prosciutto, and goat cheese panini. On a sunny day, the mint iced tea with lemonade is perfect.

MAGNIFICENT MUFFIN For a shop no bigger than a dorm room, Mag Muff consistently has a line out the door. They have an impressive selection of flavors for bagels, coffee, and signature muffins.

TAMPER Although relatively new, Tamper has won over the hearts of Jumbos for their use of local ingredients and high-quality coffee. It is the perfect place to study or catch up with a friend.

ROSEBUD My favorite place to brunch in Davis is definitely Rosebud! I always order their Hash and Eggs (smoked chicken, veggies, “Wicked Good Sauce,” and two eggs sunny-side up).

SOUNDBITES AND BALL SQUARE Located next to each other, these favorites compete for customers but have similar menus—and serve breakfast all day! The stuffed French toast is a fan-favorite.

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CLASS HIGHLIGHT

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT How did sports influence politics in ancient civilizations? How did “sport” become synonymous with “entertainment?” How did this change how we experience sports today? Every two years, the world comes together to celebrate the games of the Olympiad. In these two weeks, athletes are featured on every media outlet, sports that typically fly under the radar become the center of global conversation, and the Olympics theme song is constantly stuck in your head. But have you ever thought about the origin of these games and how some of the original themes are still present and salient today? The class Sports and Entertainment in Greece and Rome aims to answer these questions, and more. Taught in the Classics department, this seminar examines the entanglement of sport and spectacle with both civic and religious life in the ancient world. If this is piqueing your interest, read on! Here’s the course description from the Department of Classics: Sport was inseparable from the civic and religious life of the ancient world; at the same time, the spectacle of the competition comprised a major element of public entertainment and daily life. This course will introduce students to the complex systems of local, regional, and “international” sports and entertainment in the ancient world, and it will explore the radically different ideas of the Greeks and Romans concerning sport and entertainment. At the same time as they served to train citizen children for the rigors of competition and war, gymnasia like the Academe of Plato or the Lyceum of Aristotle were centers of political life and philosophical discussion. Greek athletic competition linked the local gymnasia with the great Panhellenic games at Olympia, Delphi, Isthmia, and Nemea, where victory brought glory to the individual and to their city. Chariots raced in the Circus Maximus, gladiators fought in the amphitheatre, and actors performed on the many stages to honor the Roman gods—and to gain votes for the sponsors of the games. Like NASCAR or ultimate fighting, Roman sport could be deadly, but gladiators and charioteers were skilled athletes with wide popularity among the people. Since sport and entertainment were viewed as crucial political, religious, and moral issues by the ancient Greeks and Romans, they reveal much about how these ancient cultures viewed themselves and the question of what made a good citizen.

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IN GREECE AND ROME

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ARTS HIGHLIGHT

If you were to walk into the Balch Arena Theatre— Tufts’ theatre in the round—on a Monday at noon, there’s a good chance you would run into Pen Paint & Pretzels (3Ps), conducting their weekly meeting. 3Ps is the umbrella organization for student theater at Tufts, and it happens to be the oldest student organization on campus. Its members include sketch comics, musical theater enthusiasts and even mimes, but you’ll find me sitting with the members of Bare Bodkin. We’re the ones scribbling away in our notebooks and animatedly brainstorming how to tell old stories in new ways. On special occasions, you may witness the president of Bodkin run out as Leap Day William from 30 Rock’s Leap Day episode or watch an impromptu performance from Julius Caesar on the Ides of March. Beyond these weekly antics, though, Bodkin serves the theater community by honoring the written word. The cornerstone of Bodkin’s mission is to help student playwrights. Every other Saturday during

HONORING THE WRITTEN WORD

the school year, Bodkin hosts workshops for playwrights to hear their work aloud and receive constructive criticism through a talkback led by the group’s Artistic Director. Some of my favorite workshops of the past year have included a rap parody of The Lord of the Rings titled King of Bling and a semi-autobiographical musical named See You Have Me. Many playwrights move beyond the workshop process and see their work actually staged at Tufts. Each fall, Play by Play hits the Balch stage; playwrights get to see their original ten-minute one-acts directed and acted by their classmates. A veteran of Play by Play, Jake Hoover ’16, had his drama department thesis—an original play about a baboon named Aristotle and the last living human in a postapocalyptic zoo—workshopped and co-produced with Bodkin this past spring. In addition to student written work, Bodkin experiments with the classical canon. At the end of each semester, minor guerilla performances of highly

abridged Shakespeare pop up in students’ off-campus homes. Bodkin’s larger productions have included a roaming Romeo and Juliet and a Twelfth Night performed in a nearby park complete with original music adapted from the text. Last year, Bodkin’s adaptation of the play Doctor Faustus opened in Barnum 008, a biology lecture hall. Even those familiar with the original Doctor Faustus wouldn’t have recognized this particular production, which included a zombie punk rocker and a Ramones soundtrack. Between their original check-ins and works, Bodkin strives to create a space on campus for artists to share new pieces, like the monthly Salons, meetings where student artists come together to share ideas and hear about upcoming events. The group’s motto, “Write On,” says it all: Bare Bodkin is here to have fun with the written word. —Peter Secrest ’17

PHOTO BY NICHOLAS PFOSI FOR TUFTS UNIVERSITY

BARE BODKIN


COLORING WALL PHOTO BY CLARA WILLIAMSON ’18

HOT ITEMS

YOUR OPPORTUNITY TUNITY TO LEARN ABOUT TUFTS THROUGH RANDOM NDOM ITEMS S FOUND ALL OVER CAMPUS. VER CAMPUS S.

CHARLIE CARD

FRISBEES

REZ TO-GO MUG

Exploring Boston has been one of the most meaningful parts of my past three years at Tufts. My Charlie Card has been with me through it all: traveling to my favorite restaurant in Central Square, going to see concerts and author readings downtown, and embarking on late-night trips to Georgetown Cupcakes with friends. —Abigail McFee ’17

Where is the largest collection of Frisbees at Tufts? On the roof of the Olin Center, of course. How did they get there? No one can be sure, but it might have something to do with the alleged Frisbee golf course on campus. A lost disc is a 2 stroke penalty. —Alex Brodeur ’19

Do you love fancy coffee concoctions? Ordering a Lucy in the Chai (a chai tea latte with 2 espresso shots) or the much loved Bee Sting (a honey latte with cinnamon) from the student-run coffee shop (The Rez) is made easy if you get their signature to-go mug. This hot item brings the cost of even the most extravagant order down to the price of a small, making the to-go mug an essential investment for any coffee aficionado. —Jed McKinney ’17

GAYLE’S CANDY JAR 574 Boston ston Ave., the brand new Collaborative Learning and Innovation Complex, is also home to the most famous candy jar on campus. Gayle Grand of the Physics and Astronomy department keeps a perpetually overflowing jar of sweets and treats for students just passing by, or looking for that muchneeded study snack. —Jed McKinney ’17

CHALK ART

COMMON ROOM COLORING WALL

I dare you to try and walk anywhere on campus for less than two minutes without seeing something being “chalked.” Student groups will use chalk on the steps of Tisch Library and the academic quads to publicize club events and guest speakers. At this point, it is almost like a rite of passage to chalk before a big event. —Hannah Steinberg ’17

The common rooms in Wren Hall have a lot of empty wall space—what better to fill them with than giant coloring sheets? We kept a box of markers out in the hall and would color during study breaks or as suite bonding time. Everyone who visited (friends from home, parents on family weekend, classmates who came over to work on group projects) would add to it, too—we finished during finals week. —Clara Williamson ’18 13


CAMILLE SAIDNAWEY

’17

MECHANICAL ENGINEER FROM BELMONT, MA

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which makes it easy to constantly make new friends from varied backgrounds and world perspectives. It gives me adrenaline to keep a busy but varied lifestyle at school. My life is now fueled by coffee, which was sparked by interning at Keurig Green Mountain on the Puncture Mechanism team last summer. The company culture mirrors my own morals on sustainability and disruptive technology. I took on an independent project, which I was prepared for through my classes and by being exposed to the Tufts environment. From my experience, the Tufts community is very receptive and supportive to those who are willing to actively engage. Just by operating in a technical setting, communicating with peers and professors, being proactive in working through challenges, and managing my responsibilities, I have found how effectively the community facilitates learning. It keeps me intellectually stimulated and continually motivated to work hard and keep making the Tufts community just a little bit stronger.

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

The most basic definition of mechanical engineering is creating, understanding, and improving how physical systems work. This theme runs through all of my interests, especially when considering transportation systems. I could talk for hours about how transportation spans social and economic boundaries to make people’s lives easier, and right now we are on the brink of a rapid revolution regarding how people get around. Autonomous and electric cars will be the next innovation that reshapes our culture in the same way the iPhone wowed us ten years ago. The engineer in me is ready to jump into the industry as I’m itching to help fix the systemic problems like infrastructure failings and climate change in order to hopefully help the world. When sitting in my controls systems office hours every week, the conversation with my professor and other students quickly turns to self-driving cars and how the weather will affect a driver’s safety. As we work through many bags of chips and our homework assignments, we discuss the engineering ethics around such important innovations. I live for those conversations that challenge small talk and dive into people’s interests, and luckily, they happen all the time at Tufts. Sometimes they are intensely serious, but most of the time they are comical, sarcastic, and very imaginative. The school culture is friendly, approachable, and casually brilliant,


As her time at Tufts comes to an end, we asked Camille to reflect on her experience as a Mechanical Engineer and member of the Tufts community. Here’s her response.

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TUFTS’

TOP 10

CONVERSATIONS OVERHEARD IN THE DINING HALL

Our two all-you-can-eat dining halls offer up more than just food. Pay close attention while you’re eating and you may overhear some pretty entertaining conversations. Here are our recent favorites:

“IS IT ACCEPTABLE TO EAT 3 BOWLS OF CEREAL FOR DINNER?” “YEAH, ABSOLUTELY. ONE’S AN APPETIZER, ONE’S THE MAIN COURSE, AND ONE’S DESSERT.”

“Okay so after we finish writing this paper, do you want to just lie down on the res quad?”

“I spent an hour with my Chemistry professor talking about religion and Indian history. I think he’s teaching in the wrong department.”

“You know how you can use potatoes to power a clock? I wonder how many potatoes it would take to power my laptop…”

“I’m getting coffee with my advisor now, but I’ll meet you at 6 for Zumba in Hill?” “Sure, until then I’m just going to grab some more Nutella and then head back to Kaplan’s lab to check on my silks.”

“Business plan: a customizable wooden swingmaking company. Part mechanical engineering, part human metrics, and part creative design.” Next Tufts student on Forbes 30 under 30?

“I eat crunchy peanut butter because I have to chew it more and that burns calories and therefore it’s healthier than smooth peanut butter”

TEST SUBJECT

“I’m running late for intro to civil engineering. I’ll see you after I’m done testing my concrete block”

“CARM MUSIC SHOULD GET ITS OWN SPOTIFY PLAYLIST!”

“OKAY YOU GET THE CHEESE, I’LL GET THE CRACKERS. WE CAN’T WASTE TIME IN THE DINING HALL.”

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PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

Everyone wants to pursue a “greener” future. We talk about clean energy and enhanced efficiency, but do we really know what reaching those goals entails? Professor Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos is bridging the gap between intention and reality. On campus, she directs the Nano Catalysis and Energy Laboratory where her main focus has been producing hydrogen from a variety of fuels. “Hydrogen is important as a clean fuel for cells,” Professor Flytzani-Stephanopoulos explained. “But we need more efficient and robust catalysts to produce hydrogen.” When you process biomass (anything that contains carbon) at high temperatures, you will end up with carbon monoxide formed from oxidation. The carbon monoxide can then be reacted with water over a catalyst to extract hydrogen from the water. Using specialized catalysts, Professor Flytzani-Stephanopoulos has been able to create this reaction extremely successfully. To make her process even more efficient, Professor Flytzani-Stephanopoulos has been aiming to lower the necessary temperature. She explained; “By finding very active catalysts that work at low temperatures, we can save a lot of energy…The goal would be around room temperature. That’s where nature’s catalysts work, so can we go there with synthetic catalysts?” In past years, Professor Flytzani-Stephanopoulos taught a course called Clean Energy and Policy with a professor from the Fletcher School. “The students that attended the course were a mix of engineering undergrads, Fletcher School graduate students, students from economics, sciences, humanities.” These students combined their specialties to create innovative solutions. For one project, the question of “what should we do with waste from rice?” came up. A group of students wanted to do something with wasted rice husks in Thailand. Professor Flytzani-Stephanopoulos said, “The engineers found out pretty quickly that this husk is actually silicon based- the same silicon that we use for making microelectronics. This silicon could be repurposed back into the microelectronics industry.” The economists then made sure that the financial analysis of the idea made sense, and the policy people explained how they could effect the change. Once the idea was looked over by the economics and policy students, the proposal was sent to the government of Thailand!

Of the Chemical Engineering department, Professor Flytzani-Stephanopoulos said, “I think students really enjoy their time here. It’s a difficult course, I shouldn’t lie to you. Yet looking at the feedback from the seniors, they all would have done it again!” And no wonder: a Chemical Engineering degree opens up almost unlimited opportunities. “It can be a stepping stone to a graduate program, or you could be a professional and not have to go to graduate school. You could use this degree to do anything.” —-DYLAN HONG ’19

Using hydrogen to lead the way toward a greener future.

MARIA FLYTZANISTEPHANOPOULOS DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


KEITH MADDOX

“You have to take his class before you graduate or you will really regret it.” It seems that students say this about every class Professor Keith Maddox teaches. His lectures are engaging and thoughtprovoking, and his research touches on topics that are relevant and important today: things like stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination in social psychology. Professor Maddox was always interested in issues like stereotyping and prejudice. “I grew up outside of Detroit, in a pretty White, suburban environment,” he said. “I remember as a kid always seeing this contrast between what my experience was like compared to [that of] some of my cousins who lived in Detroit, which was majority Black.” He remembered thinking about these issues all the time as he was growing up, “[But I didn’t] really have a framework for understanding it,” he said. One of the first times that Professor Maddox got a perspective on these issues was in a psychology class in college. “I started looking at my own experience through this lens, and this field ultimately spoke to me with respect to how I can look at the world.” Professor Maddox is taking this idea one step further by looking at how he can effect change. The research that he is doing can be used to help promote mutual understanding, conversation, and healthy action to be taken. 18

Most of the work in Professor Maddox’s lab works to “understand how people try to mentally represent the world, especially in regards to how people try to represent other people,” he told me. His lab focuses on how we group people together, the stereotypes we have about those groups, and how that manifests itself in everyday life. These bigger questions are looked at through many different lenses in Professor Maddox’s lab. One research project, for example, looks at why people use humor to overcome stressful interracial and intergroup interactions. Another project looks at the ways that people’s physical appearance—their clothes, for example—affects how they are viewed and judged. Professor Maddox started working at Tufts right after he got his PhD, and hasn’t left. So naturally, I was curious as to what his favorite thing has been over the past 20 years. “I really like the small size and the intimacy of Tufts. Opportunities to get to know the students better and interact with them on a 1–1 basis or in a group are the best.” As we finished our interview, Professor Maddox disclosed some classified information: at the end of the year, all of his senior advisees are invited over to his house for a Karaoke party…so he really does take his bonding seriously. —HANNAH STEINBERG ’17

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY


Social Psychologist Keith Maddox uses his own background to effect change and help promote mutual understanding.

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ILLUSTRATION BY PETE RYAN


THE

TRUTH ABOUT BEING PRE-HEALTH AT TUFTS By Clara Williamson ’18

CARNITINE, BRAF, PHENYLKETONURIA—THESE WERE THREE OF MANY WORDS THAT WERE THROWN AT

ME ON MY FIRST DAY SHADOWING TWO CLINICAL GENETICISTS AT BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL THIS PAST AUGUST. Carnitine—wasn’t that a chemical involved in lipid metabolism that my friends in biochemistry discussed over dinner once? BRAF—an oncogenic kinase we spent a whole lecture discussing in cell biology? And phenylketonuria—a genetic disorder we discussed when metabolic pathways were introduced in Bio 13? Yes, yes, and yes. Shockingly enough, it was not my undying and lifelong love of medical TV shows (sorry, Doctors Grey and House) that provided me with just enough fundamental knowledge to understand what these doctors were discussing, but my first two years as a pre-med biology major here at Tufts. As a pre-med tour guide, I get a lot of questions from students (and, more frequently, their excited parents) about what it’s like being a pre-health Jumbo, and why Tufts specifically is

the best environment to begin pursuing a career in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, public health, or any number of other health professions. My answer to the latter question is always two-fold: you can truly be a liberal arts pre-health student at Tufts, and Tufts is one of the most supportive environments I’ve ever encountered, both socially and academically. Our students can “have it all”—study whatever they like, be involved in a whole host of clubs and activities on the side, and actually have spare time to spend with friends on top of it all. Similarly, the community of students and faculty living on the hill are some of the most caring you’ll ever meet— everyone has a vested interest in watching their friends and classmates succeed.

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P

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ILLUSTRATION BY PETE RYAN

re-health at Tufts is not a major (you never have to sign a piece of paper “declaring” yourself pre-med, pre-dental, or pre-vet), but rather a track: students wishing to apply to a medical, dental, or veterinary school eventually must take a specific handful of classes in order to be eligible to apply and be well-prepared for these schools’ entrance exams, but may otherwise study whatever they like. There are eight to ten such classes depending on which pre-health track you choose, including biology, chemistry, physics, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and a recommended one or two classes in psychology or math (think biostatistics). Given the nature of the pre-health requirements, many prehealth students choose to pursue degrees in biochemistry, biomedical engineering, and other STEM fields because there is so much overlap between the major requirements and the prehealth track. However, students majoring in these fields also have a vested interest in biology, chemistry, or technology that extends beyond the mindset of “I should major in this field because it completes my pre-med requirements.” They’re researching with their professors, writing theses, and co-authoring papers. Kelly Burk ’18, who studies biopsychology as a pre-med student, researches substance abuse in the Miczek Psychopharmacology lab. “The research I do focuses on alcohol abuse,” she said. “Conducting behavioral studies like these requires dedication and a genuine interest in the topic,” she said. “[It] can be difficult at times, [but] I love working in the lab because I feel that the results we find can have a meaningful impact on the world.” One of the things I love most about Tufts pre-health students, though, is that they don’t limit themselves to scientific fields, especially if their academic interests spill over into another department. Even a brief survey of about thirty Tufts pre-health students that I conducted with this article in mind showed this diversity in our pre-health population. The answers to “what’s your major?” revealed my friends and classmates as double majors studying both child study and human development and community health or chemical physics and Spanish, social scientists studying anthropology and sociology, an environmental engineer with a minor in engineering management, and a biopsychology major with a minor in Roman civilization. Even more diverse were the responses to “what are you involved in on campus?” Many students involve themselves with health-related groups such as Peer Health Exchange, the PreMedical Society, or the Sharewood Project (a free clinic in downtown Boston run by undergraduates and medical students), but Tufts pre-health students are varsity athletes (Sharon Kelmar ’19 is on the track & field team, and involved with The Tufts Daily), community service leaders (Eura Myrta ’18 and Duncan Kimmel ’18, worked with me to coordinate Kids’ Day this past year… Duncan is also minoring in philosophy), and economists (Ilana Zelinksi ’19 is an economics major and a member of Tufts


‘OUR STUDENTS TRULY CAN “HAVE IT ALL”—STUDY WHATEVER THEY LIKE, BE INVOLVED IN A WHOLE HOST OF CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES ON THE SIDE, AND ACTUALLY HAVE SPARE TIME TO SPEND WITH FRIENDS ON TOP OF IT ALL.’

Financial Group as well as Timmy Global Health). As Collette King ’17, a biology major and a sister of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority who works for a technology start-up, puts it: “pre-health is not a bubble that you’re forced to live in. Pre-health is not my identity in the slightest...health is an interest of mine, but it does not dominate my life. I’m using this time to explore other areas because I plan on being in healthcare for the rest of my life.” But besides being involved, Tufts’ pre-health students are kind. This is true of Tufts students in general. I’ve never studied for a test alone here. My peers will stay up late at night to help a friend out with a problem set or give their paper a once-over for spelling, even if it means they get less sleep. That’s what makes Jumbos special. There’s a real sense of community and collaboration between Tufts students—none of that tearmy-classmate-down-so-I-have-a-higher-GPA nonsense that I’ve heard about as a danger in the pre-health world. The diversity of Tufts pre-health students adds another dimension to this—we recognize that although we may have similar end goals for our careers, we come from entirely different backgrounds, think in different ways, and have plenty of other interests that don’t overlap in quite the same way. This is not to say that pre-health support services do not exist beyond classmate interaction, however. Other than student mentoring programs, there is an amazing pre-health advising program based in Dowling Hall headed by one of Tufts’ academic deans, Carol Baffi-Dugan. In addition to providing students with resources for standardized testing, medical school applications, and opportunities for clinical shadowing gigs and lecture series, Dean Baffi-Dugan and Stephanie Ripley, the Associate Director of Health Professions Advising, are available all year round. “We consider ourselves so fortunate to work with such a motivated and talented group of students who truly want to address healthcare issues from the individual patient level to the global level,” said Dean Baffi-Dugan. “Tufts offers them so many ways to explore their goals and develop their skills but they bring so much enthusiasm with them when they come to Tufts. We enjoy staying in touch with them and working with them even after they have left the Hill.” Leaving Boston Children’s for the summer after having met quite a few Jumbos-made-doctors, I realized that I was no longer thinking of medical school as an impenetrable fortress. This realization was entirely thanks to the things I’ve learned and the absolutely amazing people who I’ve surrounded myself with in my two years as a pre-health student at Tufts. There’s a lot more school in my future and infinitely more things to learn, but the way I’ve learned to think and the avenues I’ve been allowed to explore in my first two years of undergrad have been infinitely helpful in building the base of academic and interpersonal skills that I’ll need for every remaining step of the way.

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VOXJUMBO ABIGAIL MCFEE ’17 ENGLISH MAJOR FROM CHADRON, NE

Abby has worked on our Student Communication Group, creating content for this magazine and our admissions website, for all four of her years at Tufts. We figured it was time to highlight her— we think you’ll love her just as much as we do. Here, she answers our supplemental essay questions so you can get to know her, Tufts, and our application all at the same time!

INTRODUCING THE TUFTS COMMUNITY THROUGH OUR SUPPLEMENT … ONE PERSON AT A TIME.

Which aspects of Tufts’ curriculum or undergraduate experience prompt your application? In short: “Why Tufts?” (50–100 words) I always felt alone in middle school and high school classrooms: it wasn’t cool to care so much about the course material, or Kate Chopin, or other people’s perspectives. When I started applying to colleges, I wanted to find a school where the students would be unabashedly passionate. I found that at Tufts, along with so much I hadn’t known to ask for: professors who celebrate uncertainty, friends who made all my meals for me the day my grandpa died, a community that embraces its own fractured beauty. Tufts has taught me that it’s good, and necessary, to care.

There is a Quaker saying: “Let your life speak.” Describe the environment in which you were raised—your family, home, neighborhood, or community—and how it influenced the person you are today. (200–250 words) My mother, a California native smelling ever so slightly of patchouli, raised me in a small Nebraska town where I was consistently the only Democrat in my grade. In the blue trailer we bought after my parents separated, nothing occupied its own place: the hallway overflowed with books, the kitchen rattled with a washer and dryer, the wide yard grew mainly weeds. As the sturdy, eccentric center of my Midwest childhood, my mom taught me to appreciate the beauty in incongruity. When she returned to college at age forty, she sat in classrooms with twenty-year-olds who partied in their dorms at night, while she came home as the sun set to my sister and me, carrying The Norton Anthology in the crook of one arm and grocery bags in the other. We read The Importance of Being Earnest one night on the couch: her assignment, my becoming. Past my bedtime, I would devour books through the slit of light at the bottom of my bedroom door, listening for the sound of her footsteps approaching. I fell in love with words recklessly, finding in them an innate ambiguity, an intimate expansiveness, a refusal to mean only one thing. I began to play with the idea of myself as a writer. “Dr. Griffith says that good writers know the rules well enough to break them,” my mom told me one day, thumbing through her grammar textbook. It was a contradiction, like all the other contradictions, that spurred me onward.

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

What makes you happy? What I remember most vividly is the hour on the train each morning, drinking a 1€ cup of café con leche, letting the sunlight slide over my face through shatterproof windows, and listening to podcasts. The voices of Ira Glass and Jad Abumrad and Krista Tippett carried me across the Spanish countryside, from the home of my host mom in Alcalá de Henares to Madrid for my morning classes. Speaking Spanish, while rewarding, was often overwhelming to me. In the space between my thoughts and articulation, so much of intention and humor and identity fell away. But listening to stories each morning, I was capable once again of the full spectrum of expression: I was quick to laugh, brought to tears by a well-placed transition, ready to retell the entire episode to my friends the moment the closing credits began. The stories themselves inspired me, as stories always have, but it was more than that. What I found in the podcasts’ most poignant moments was the possibility of human connection that transcends anonymity and distance. This type of connection is what makes me happy: the moment in conversation when one person leans in closer; the experience of reading a book, which Vladimir Nabokov describes as a petal falling on water, as the author’s experiences meet the reader’s; the hour on a train each morning when familiar voices gave me the courage to open to the unfamiliar, and keep opening.

*Want to see the other options for the third question on our supplemental application? Visit admissions.tufts.edu/apply/essay-questions 25


DIVERSITY COUNCIL MEET THE STUDENTS SHAPING THE CONVERSATION ABOUT DIVERSITY IN THE TUFTS ADMISSIONS OFFICE.

Yash K Gurditta ’19 Wood-Ridge, New Jersey •Economics and Computer science double major, minor in Entrepreneurial Leadership •“Last summer, I was a marketing intern at an education technology startup.”

Alexandra Fognani ’19 Washington, DC •Considering majors in International Relations, Peace and Justice Studies and Middle Eastern Studies •“If I could have a superpower, it would be the ability to speak every foreign language in the world.”

Camille Carlisle ’19 Portland, OR •Cognitive and Brain Sciences major •”Last summer, I had an internship at the Oregon Health Authority in the Public Health division—it was perfect because I am interested in doing an M.D./MPH.”

Melanie Ramirez ’19 Concord, California •Double major in Biology and Community Health •“On campus, I am a STEM ambassador, part of the burlesque dance group and I play intramural basketball.”

Guadalupe Garcia ’19 Hialeah, Florida •Architectural Studies, minors in Urban Studies and Latino Studies •“I am a part of the Alliance of Latin American Students and am an intern at the Latino Center.”

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Hillary Guadalupe Rodriguez ’19 Brooklyn, New York •Double major in American Studies and Latino Studies •“I am a part of the Tisch Scholars program, La Salsa (a dance group) and United for Immigrant Justice.”


Diversity on college campuses—and what we can do to provide greater access to our institutions of higher education—is at the center of conversations nationwide. We are so excited to introduce you to our Diversity Admissions Council, who are bringing the student perspective to that conversation in our office. We are inspired by their dedication to reaching out to people of all backgrounds to talk about Tufts. Isaiah Marshall-Thomas ’19 Baltimore, Maryland •Music Major •“I am a part of S-Factor (an A Capella group), even though I had no singing experience prior to the audition.” Riane Janine Ragno ’19 Gulfport, Mississippi •Education major •“Even though I have lived on the Gulf Coast my whole life, I didn’t know how to swim until senior year of high school!”

Amanda Borquaye ’18 Savannah, Georgia •Double major in International Relations and Sociology •“My favorite spot in Somerville is The Taza chocolate factory. Lots of free samples!”

Evelyn Ocampo ’17 Chicago, Illinois •Double major in Child Study and Human Development and Latino Studies •“My favorite class at Tufts was Queer Pop, taught by Professor Stephan Pennington in the Music department.”

Rafael Roman Mendoza ’17 St. Paul, Minnesota •Economics major •“My favorite class so far has been the ExCollege course, Illegal: Undocumented Latinos.“

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

Priyanka Kumar ’18 Bangalore, India •Double major in Film and Media Studies and Archaeology •“I’ve been researching a lot more Indian history to piece together a timeline for the civilization as written by the local population.”

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ADVICE

APPLICATION ADVICE

Writing college applications can be a daunting task—so we’re here to help! After reading so many applications from all over the world, Tufts Admissions Officers are here to share their words of wisdom so this process can be—dare we say it—stress-free. Whether you are just starting to brainstorm or are in the final editing stages, check out these bits of essay writing advice to help you out along the way.

Some of us have unfortunate circumstances in our lives—if that’s the case for you, talk about it. However, the majority of students will not. Let me be the first to say that you don’t need to have a “sad story” or life-changing event to be admitted to a selective college or university. What you do need for the application process is to own your story. Whether that is one of privilege or one mixed with struggles (like me), this is your time to both reflect on where you’ve been, and also look forward to where you want to go. —Eddie Pickett, Associate Director of Admissions The charge is often “be yourself” in your essays. Easier said than done. Which topic allows you to showcase what makes you unique? Instead of worrying about the topic, just start writing. Write about a time that will show the reader qualities about you that won’t come through in any other part of the application. —Patrick Gladstone, Assistant Director of Admissions

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ILLUSTRATION BY GREG MABLY

Craft a narrative. Your supplement should remain consistent with the rest of your application including your Common Application essay and recommendations. Once an admission officer finishes reading your file, we ask ourselves if it made sense, if it captured different parts of your personality and identity without compromising a sense of cohesion. Together, as a whole, we want it to reflect a multifaceted individual with a story that feels complete. —Greg Wong, Associate Director of Admissions Take all of your essays and give them to someone who only kind of knows you, like a parent of a friend or a former teacher. Ask them to read through your essays and say what they learned about you solely from those essays. If the person they describe back to you is exactly who you are, leave your essays as is, you’re done. If the person they describe back is a shell of who you are or is missing some fundamental component of your personality, go back and add that voice to your essays. —Yulia Korovikov ’13, Assistant Director of Admissions

When we read your supplement, we are looking for clues about who will arrive on our campus in the fall. What perspective will they bring, which classrooms will they gravitate towards, what kind of roommate will they be? The best way to arm us with the answers to these questions is to talk about recent you, not ten years ago you. Of course you should tell us where you’re coming from as it pertains to your perspective today, but beyond that you should avoid stories from your childhood. Essays about what questions you asked at the dinner table as a toddler, or how you wore the same superhero costume every day of third grade, tell us little about the person we will actually be meeting in a few months. Tell us about that person, so that we can find the fit in them for Tufts. —Meredith Reynolds ’11, Associate Director of Admissions

The third question of the supplement is meant to be fun, especially the prompt: “What makes you happy?” But it’s also a bit of a Catch 22: this prompt provides the most authentic glimpse into an applicant’s personal life but you also need to keep in mind that you’re applying to college. Essays that are missing an intellectual spark tend to fall the flattest. You want to tell us about how your fascination with Christian rap defies stereotypes surrounding Asian women? Awesome. You plan to share the story about the Pokémon Volleyball video game you created? Can’t wait. These are both great (and real) examples of essays that combine the perfect blend of silly and studious, which reflects the Tufts’ student body as a whole: students who take their work very seriously, but don’t take themselves too seriously. —Gracie Marshall ’15, Admissions Counselor

“Let your life speak” feels big, but the strongest responses stay small. Focus on doing justice to one topic, rather than glossing over huge portions of your existence. We don’t want you to do it all, we want you to give us one quality glimpse. —Meghan Dangremond, Associate Director of Admissions 29


PROGRAMS With nearly 150 majors and minors, 30 interdisciplinary programs, and the courses of the ExCollege, Tufts’ offerings require more than a brief skimming, so you can find an expansion of this quick list on our website. But in the meantime, skim away. Just note that Tufts undergraduate programs are offered in three schools: Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts. Students may take classes across schools and many students do. SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES MAJORS *available only as a second major Africana Studies American Studies Anthropology Applied Mathematics Applied Physics Arabic Archaeology Architectural Studies Art History Astrophysics Biochemistry Biology Biomedical Engineering Sciences* Biopsychology Biotechnology* Chemical Physics Chemistry Child Study and Human Development Chinese Classical Studies Cognitive and Brain Sciences Community Health Computer Science Drama Economics Education* Engineering Psychology/ Human Factors English Environmental Studies* Film and Media Studies French Geological Sciences/Earth and Ocean Sciences Geology/Earth and Ocean Sciences German Language and Literature German Studies Greek Greek and Latin History Interdisciplinary Studies

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International Literary and Visual Studies International Relations Italian Studies Japanese Judaic Studies Latin Latin American Studies Mathematics Middle Eastern Studies Music Peace and Justice Studies Philosophy Physics Political Science Psychology Psychology/Clinical Concentration Quantitative Economics Religion Russian and Eastern European Studies Russian Language and Literature Science, Technology, and Society* Sociology Spanish Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Engineering Science Environmental Health

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING MAJORS

Africana Studies Arabic Architectural Engineering Architectural Studies Art History Asian American Studies Astrophysics Biotechnology Engineering Chemical Engineering Child Study and Human Development Chinese Colonialism Studies Computer Science Dance Drama Economics Education

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES

Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Engineering Mechanical Engineering ADDITIONAL DEGREE OPTIONS

Architectural Studies Engineering Engineering Physics Engineering Psychology/ Human Factors

SMFA AT TUFTS AREAS OF STUDY The SMFA at Tufts’ curriculum is interdisciplinary. All students explore many of the following areas of study: Ceramics Drawing Film & Animation Graphic Arts Metals Painting Performance Photography Print & Paper Sculpture Sound Video FIVE-YEAR COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAMS Tufts/New England Conservatory: BA or BS and Bachelor of Music Tufts/SMFA (School of the Museum of Fine Arts): BA or BS and Bachelor of Fine Arts MINORS

COPY AND PASTE LIST FROM Engineering Education PREVIOUS ISSUE Engineering Management English Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies Film and Media Studies Finance Food Systems and Nutrition French Geology Geoscience Geosystems/Earth and Ocean Sciences German Greek Greek Archaeology Greek Civilization Hebrew History Italian Japanese Judaic Studies Latin Latin American Studies Latino Studies Leadership Studies Mathematics Medieval Studies Music Music Engineering Philosophy Physics Political Science Religion Roman Archaeology Roman Civilization Russian Science, Technology, and Society Sociology Spanish Studio Art Urban Studies Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies


CLASS HIGHLIGHTS ECONOMICS There is a reason that economics is one of the most popular majors among undergraduates—courses in the department allow students to search for concrete analysis of real social problems.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Here are just some of the courses available in our Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Business Law

Women in the Labor Market

Environmental Toxicology

Water Diplomacy Colloquium

Principles of Financial Accounting

Health Economics

Environmental Chemistry

Game Theory

American Economic Development in Historical Perspectives, 1630–1930

Groundwater

Chemical Principles in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering

Environmental Economics Macroeconomic Analysis for Development

PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

International Economics

Economics of the British Industrial Revolution, 1750–1850

Public Health Geographical Information Systems River Hydraulics and Stream Restoration

Measurement Soil Properties Subsurface Fluid Dynamics

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ADMISSIONS INFORMATION WHAT TO SUBMIT: HERE’S THE LIST, FIND MORE DETAILS ON OUR WEBSITE!

1

Common Application or Coalition Application

Early Decision I Application Deadline: November 1 Notification Deadline: Mid-December

2

Tufts Writing Supplement

3

High School Transcript(s)

4 5

6 7

APPLICATION DEADLINES AND NOTIFICATION DATES

Senior Year Grades

A

B

C

D

Testing: a. For applicants to the School or Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering or the Combined Degree Programs with the SMFA at Tufts or the NEC: SAT with two subject tests or ACT. b. For applicants to the SMFA at Tufts’ BFA program: SAT or ACT. Subject tests are not required.

Early Decision II Application Deadline: January 1 Notification Deadline: Mid-February Regular Decision Application Deadline: January 1 Notification Deadline: April 1 Transfer Admission Application Deadline: March 15 Notification Deadline: Mid-May

TUFTS CLASS OF 2020 STATISTICS 20,223 Applications, 2,896 Acceptances, 14% Acceptance rate 100% of Financial Aid met 10% First Generation Students 11% International Students

Letters of Recommendation We require one from a Guidance Counselor and one from a teacher. You may send us one additional one if you’d like.

Art Portfolio: Required only for students applying to the Combined Degree BFA/BA or BFA/BS and BFA applicants to the SMFA at Tufts.

Mean ACT 31 Middle 50% SAT Critical Reasoning (old SAT) 680–750 Middle 50% SAT Math (old SAT) 690–770

TUFTS UNDERGRADUATE STATISTICS 5,196 Undergraduate Enrollment

8 +

Financial Aid Documents If you are applying for aid, you will need to submit 1. FAFSA 2. CSS profile 3. Federal Income Tax Returns

4.8 Miles from Boston 20 Average Class Size 28 Varsity Sports Teams 300+ Student Groups 45% of Juniors Study Abroad

Optional Materials • Alumni Interview • Arts or Maker Portfolio: Students applying to the School of Arts and Sciences or the School of Engineering may submit an optional arts or maker portfolio to highlight talent in studio art, drama, dance, music, or engineering.

37% Need Based Aid Recipients 11% International Students 27% US Students of Color


JUMBO SIGHTINGS TUFTS STUDENTS CAN’T LOOK AT ELEPHANTS WITHOUT SEEING JUMBO. IF YOU’VE SPOTTED ONE LATELY, SEND AN EMAIL WITH YOUR PHOTOS AND CAPTIONS TO JUMBOEDITOR@TUFTS.EDU

ANA MARIA SAMPER ’20

DAISY DRAPER ’18

JILL ARMENIA ’20

JAIME MORGEN ’14

LILY PISANO ’21

DYLAN HONG ’17

THOMAS ESPONNETTE

MEGHAN DANGREMOND

TESS COTTER ’18

JAKE ZASLAV ’20

from Bogotá, Colombia Taken this summer in Siem Reap, Cambodia!

PHOTOS BY STUDENTS, PARENTS, AND ADMINISTRATION

from West New York, NJ This 3D-printed Jumbo is front and center on my desk

from Holmfirth, United Kingdom Jumbo took center stage at the Revere Beach Sand Sculpting Competition.

Assistant Director of Admissions The first annual Bendetson vs. Ballou field day

from Schenectady, NY I found Jumbo outside the Musée D’Orsay in Paris, France.

Associate Director of Admissions I found a vintage Tufts pennant during my fall travels!

Assistant Director of Admissions Combining two of my favorite things—Tufts and office supplies!

from Tucson, AZ Elephant keychain to keep me from losing my house key.

from Brooklyn, NY Graduation cap I wore when graduating from La Guardia High School in Manhattan.

from Richmond, VA My dog and his toy are super pumped to be part of the Jumbo family.

Equal Opportunity Applicants for admission and employment, students, employees, sources of referral of applicants for admission and employment, and all unions or professional organizations holding collective bargaining or professional agreements with Tufts University are hereby notified that this institution does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, veteran status, or national origin in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in its programs and activities. Any person having inquiries or complaints concerning Tufts University’s compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, or Section 504 is directed to contact the Office of Equal Opportunity on the Medford/Somerville campus, 617-6273298 or 800-611-5060 (TDD 617-627-3370). This office has been designated by Tufts University to coordinate the institution’s efforts to comply with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and Section 504. Any person may also contact the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202, or the Director, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Region One, Boston, Massachusetts 02109, regarding the institution’s compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, 34 C.F.R. Part 100; Title IX, 34 C.F.R. Part 106; the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, 45 C.F.R. 90; or, Section 504, 34 C.F.R. Part 104. In addition, Tufts has formulated an administrative policy that educational and employment decisions are based on the principle of equal opportunity. The consideration of factors such as sex, race, color, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, veteran status, or disability unrelated to a person’s ability, qualifications, and performance is inconsistent with this policy. In accordance with both federal and state law, the university maintains information concerning current security policies and procedures and prepares an annual crime report concerning crimes committed within the geographical limits of the university. Upon request to the Office of Public Safety, 617-627-3912, the university will provide such information to any applicant for admission. The report is also available online at http://publicsafety.tufts.edu/asr/wp-content/uploads/Annual-Security-Report-2014-2015.pdf.


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OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS Tufts University Bendetson Hall 2 The Green Medford, MA 02155 -7057 617- 627-3170 admissions.tufts.edu

JUMBO Magazine - Fall 2016  

JUMBO is the Tufts undergraduate admissions magazine.

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