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THE TUF TS ADMISSIONS MAGAZINE ADMISSIONS.TUF TS.EDU

CLEAN WATER FOR ALL

TUFTS ENGINEERS WORK TOWARDS MAKING HEALTHY DRINKING WATER ACCESSIBLE WORLDWIDE.


ENGINEER

C ONTENTS INFOGRAPHIC | 3 AROUND TOWN | 8 CLASS HIGHLIGHT | 12 ATHLETICS | 14 ADMISSIONS ADVICE | 32

LOOKING FORWARD

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SUSTAINABILITY HOW TUFTS ENGINEERS are creating

solutions to the world’s most pressing environmental issues

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HUMAN TECHNOLOGY INTERFACE AS TECHNOLOGY continues to

advance, our engineers create projects to help us keep up

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HUMAN HEALTH

PHOTO BY ANNA MILLER/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

ADVANCING the medical field through collaboration and innovation

ON THE COVER FROM CLEAN WATER TECHNOLOGY TO SUSTAINABLE VILLAGES, Tufts’ civil

and environmental engineers are using systems to improve the world they live in. COVER PHOTOS BY ISTOCK.COM/NAZAR_AB (FRONT), STOCKBYTE/GETTY IMAGES (BACK)


GREETINGS

FROM THE DEAN Have a passion for business alongside your love of designing user interfaces? Perfect. Can’t imagine missing out on that class about women’s science fiction? Go for it! We want our students to feel prepared to tackle the world’s challenges as they leave Tufts, but also have the flexibility to explore and create the educational experiences that will matter most to them. Finally, Tufts engineers care about the world. Through three main themes—sustainability, engineering for human health, and human technology interface—Tufts students examine the difficulties we face in our lives and work toward finding solutions. Whether it’s finding better ways to provide clean water supplies for residents of a village in Uganda, or studying the impact of car emissions found in tunnels close to Boston on the air quality in the city, students are making a difference in how we approach cha llenges around the world.

In my ten years at Tufts, I have come to realize a few things about the School of Engineering: Tufts engineers are engaged in their learning. Whether they are in the lab working closely with an expert in their field, or getting hands-on experience learning from a

professor of the practice, our students are exposed to the highest level of learning by doing. They leave knowing not just how to think, but how to do as well—and that makes a difference as they head out into the world after graduation.

Best, Students in the School of Engineering enjoy a close community. With just over 200 undergraduates per class, spread over 12 programs, Tufts engineers get to know their classmates well—but not just their engineering classmates! We require students to take classes in the liberal arts and encourage them to explore beyond the engineering curriculum. Want to become fluent in a language? Great.

Karen Richardson, Dean of Admissions and Enrollment Management

CONNECT WITH US Tufts Admissions THE TUFTS ADMISSIONS MAGAZINE

@tuftsadmissions

@TuftsAdmissions

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS Tufts University / Bendetson Hall / 2 The Green / Medford, MA 02155 617.627.3170 / admissions.tufts.edu / jumboeditor@tufts.edu Produced by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions / Edited by Jaime Morgen ’14, Assistant Director of Admissions / Design by Hecht/Horton Partners

PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

THANK YOU for your interest in the Tufts University School of Engineering. Founded in 1898, the School of Engineering is an interesting blend of resources—it has the opportunities of a top-tier research university combined with the individual attention only found at a smaller liberal arts college.

I am pleased to introduce you to this issue of ENGINEER. Inside you will find stories about some of the exciting developments within the School of Engineering. I hope that you will find reasons to explore beyond our magazine and visit the campus. We look forward to meeting you sometime soon.


PICK AND CHOOSE

The engineering curriculum is broken down into categories to make sure our engineers are well prepared to handle the demands of the engineering profession while still providing flexibility for interdisciplinary exploration. Over the course of four years, our engineers take 10 introductory classes, 6 humanities/arts/social sciences (HASS) courses, 8 foundation classes, 12 concentration courses, and 2 free electives. Below, you will find some examples of classes, but there are many more to choose from!

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FREE ELECTIVES

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• 2D Animation • Environmental Policy • Design of Medical Instruments • Steel Bridge Design • Water at Risk: Flint and Beyond • Computer Interface Design • Natural Resource Conflicts: The Struggle for Earth’s Diminishing Health • Neuroscience and Criminal Justice • Human/Animal Studies • Kids and Computers: Exploring Educational Tech, Apps, and Games • Advanced Drawing: Systems, Serials, and Diagrams • 3D Design Studio • Sound and the Moving Image

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• Introduction to Engineering • Introductory Mathematics/Natural Science Class • Calculus I + II + III • General Physics I + II with Lab

FOUNDATION • Introduction to Electrical Systems • Chemical Process Principles • Computer Aided Design with Lab • Introduction to Mechanics (Statics and Dynamics) • Cells and Organisms with Lab • Introduction to Computer Science • Thermodynamics • Technical and Managerial Communication • Data Structures • Geographic Information Systems • Mathematical Modeling • Introduction to Materials Science • Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics • Optics and Wave Motion

• Mechanical Design and Fabrication • Public Health Engineering • Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics • Transport Phenomena II • Microprocessor Architecture and Applications with Lab • Dynamics and Vibration • Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine • Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering • Environmental Chemistry • Machine Structure and Assembly Language Programming • Electromagnetic Fields & Waves • Instrumentation and Experiments • Introduction to Hydraulic Engineering

CONCENTRATION

INTRODUCTORY CLASSES

BECOMING A TUFTS ENGINEER

• Introduction to Computing in Engineering • Chemical Foundations + Principles with Lab • General Physics with Lab • Differential Equations

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HASS

• Expository Writing • Politics in the American South • Epidemics: Plagues, Peoples, and Politics • Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine • Scene Painting • Myth, Ritual, and Symbol • Hitchcock: Cinema, Gender, Ideology • Colonialism in Global Perspectives • Elementary Sanskrit • Western Political Thought • Human Rights and Culture

• Reactor Design • Principles of Controlled Release and Drug Delivery • Chemical and Biological Engineering Lab • Environmental Toxicology • Operating Systems • The Art of Building • Human Robot Interaction • Introduction to Photonic Crystals • Design of Medical Instruments • Entrepreneurship for Computer Science • Engineering Management • Computational Biology • Introduction to Microwaves

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INS & OUTS

SNAPSHOTS FROM THE HILL

SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT ALL STUDENTS in the engineering school must take a senior design class that consists of a

semester-long project. Students have created a portable fetal heart rate monitor, a solar insolation calibration device, and redesigned the popular TuftsLife website. One team of five mechanical engineers is making a dog harness that dispenses treats by remote control. Their client trains dogs at the Tufts Veterinary School and needs to be able to give a dog a treat within one second of the dog completing the task, so the dog associates the treat with the action. Whether you love puppies, climate justice, pizza, or really anything with an associated design challenge, the senior project is sure to be a rewarding experience for all engineers.

EX-COLLEGE CLASS HIGHLIGHT: THE UNIVERSE: ILLUMINATED BY WOMEN HISTORICALLY, we think of astronomy and space exploration as

a domain dominated by men. In this seminar, students will study the women astronomers, engineers, mathematicians, and astronauts that made intellectual contributions to our understanding of space. Set against the backdrop of women’s evolving role in society, this course will dive into understanding how inventions were discovered, what they mean, and why many of these discoveries were originally attributed to men.

HACKATHON THIS PAST OCTOBER, Tufts held a 24-Hour Hackathon com-

petition for students to create a product or proof of concept. Fueled by snacks, adrenaline, and lots of caffeine, the 300 coders utilized a team of mentors and designers to create any app or program that they’d been day-dreaming about. Final projects included practical and innovative solutions to important problems, such as an app to help sexual assault victims find mental health resources, physical health, and legal resources. Another project allows students to order takeout food directly to the computer science building, a much-needed service for late-night programmers.

BEST THE BRIDGE TO ENGINEERING SUCCESS AT TUFTS (BEST) program is designed to help prepare

first-generation and historically underrepresented engineering students for the rigors of an engineering curriculum by enrolling them in two summer courses before their freshman year. Additionally, students participate in academic and college-life workshops specifically created to assist first-year students in their transition from high school to college life. BEST program administrator Campbell Halligan said the program aims to create a family of students who support and nurture each other all four years of their Tufts education and beyond. 4


STUDY ABROAD WHO SAYS engineers can’t study abroad? Thanks to the ten Tufts Programs Abroad and over

150 other pre-approved programs available to Jumbo undergraduates, the world is at our students’ fingertips, no matter their major. Engineers often choose to study abroad in Englishspeaking countries, like civil engineer Mateo Galeano ’18 and computer engineer Michelle Chan ’19, who studied in Hong Kong. Even though that may be the more common course of study, our engineers are not limited to those destinations! Engineering psychology major Zaila Foster ’20 and mechanical engineers Martin Maikut ’19 and Handy Dorceus ’20 took their studies to the French Alps as part of the Tufts in Talloires summer program. While in France, students traveled across the country, formed relationships with their host families, and took in the breath-taking beauty of their surroundings.

BEST PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY, STUDY ABROAD PHOTO BY MATEO GALEANO, SHPE PHOTO COURTESY OF CAMPBELL HALLIGAN, CLIC PHOTO BY KELVIN MA/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

CENTER FOR STEM DIVERSITY TUFTS UNIVERSITY’S CENTER FOR STEM Diversity works in con-

junction with the Schools of Engineering and Arts and Sciences to establish an inclusive and diverse environment. The center serves as an umbrella organization for the various diversity programs on campus, including SWE (Society of Women Engineers), NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers), SHPE (Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers), and OSTEM (Out in STEM).

TUFTS ATTENDS GRACE HOPPER CELEBRATION THIS PAST YEAR, 12 undergraduate engineers received fund-

ing from the Department of Computer Science to attend the 2017 Grace Hopper Celebration, the world’s largest gathering of women technologists. The conference, which took place in Orlando, FL, featured career fairs, networking, and a keynote address by Melinda Gates and Mary Sio, CEO and President of CEEK VR INC. One student said it was “awesome to see so many intelligent and creative women in one place,” while others appreciated the presence of affinity groups like Black Women in Computing and Latinas in Computing. With the Tufts Engineering Class of 2022 at about 50% female, we can expect to see many more women at this conference in the future!

JUMBO CHEF: APPLE NACHOS INGREDIENTS : 4 sliced apples and from the sundae bar: hot fudge, caramel, chunky peanut butter, and M&Ms

Cover a plate with sliced apples. Spread chunky peanut butter on half or the slices. At the sundae bar (available three nights each week!), add hot fudge, caramel, and any other sundae toppings. Consume with a bunch of friends!

CLIC THE COLLABORATIVE LEARNING AND INNOVATION COMPLEX (CLIC)

holds more than just the Departments of Physics and Human Factors Engineering and a maker studio. With many openconcept collaboration spaces and colorful murals, it has quickly become a favorite study spot on campus. If you study on the third floor then you might be lucky enough to meet Paul, the physics labs coordinator. He stops by to give students chocolate, cookies, or cool demos on different mechanical devices! 5


“Strong individual disciplines, brought together by collaboration and interaction, offer the best potential for discoveries that address a wide range of human and environmental concerns.” That was what Tufts President Anthony Monaco—a geneticist himself—had to say about the newest building on campus: the brand new Science and Engineering Complex, or SEC. The SEC, which opened in the Fall of 2017, houses two inaugural thematic research collaborations. First, the theme of global and environmental change synthesizes research from the Departments of Biology, Earth and Ocean Sciences, and Civil and Environmental Engineering. The second theme is neuroscience—it focuses on the brain’s function

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and adaptability—and works to bring together not only departments but campuses, creating a bridge between our undergraduate, medical, and veterinary students. At the heart of the SEC, surrounded by labs and classrooms, stands an atrium that is designed not only for socializing, but also for collaborating. The atrium is capped by a clear glass ceiling and includes a sixty-foot long art wall designed by artists from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts. Throughout the building, conversations about regenerative medicine and research, buzz about a particularly challenging problem set, and the scratch of pencils in sketchbooks and on graph paper meld together in the interdisciplinary and collaborative

spirit of the SEC. “It is through working together— and socializing in the bright new spaces in [this building]—that interaction and exciting innovation can occur,” said President Monaco. With this new space and emphasis on collaboration, our students can take their work to new heights. Less than a year after opening, the building earned LEED Gold certification and is one of the most energy-efficient buildings of its kind in the country. Director of the Office of Sustainabilty Tina Woolston is thrilled that the SEC achieved this recognition, as it is often difficult for a lab of its size. This building proves what can happen when great design is shaped by the values of sustainability.

PHOTOS BY ANNA MILLER/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

THE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING COMPLEX


DATA SCIENCE

TUFTS’ NEWEST ENGINEERING MAJOR

ILLUSTRATION BY ALEKSANDAR SAVIC

Data is everywhere we look. Thanks to a collaboration between students and faculty, this new major reflects the ever-changing world of numbers and how students can use information to influence real-world situations. Everywhere we look, people are collecting data for uses ranging from healthcare to marketing, and from business to politics. But none of that data has any value unless we can discover insights to help us identify trends, draw conclusions, or offer solutions to problems. This is where data scientists enter the picture, or—in this case—the campus. Starting in the Fall of 2018, the School of Engineering will offer a Bachelor of Science in Data Science (BSDS). This brand new interdisciplinary major bridges material and courses within the Departments of Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mathematics. Students in the major will learn how to analyze data to solve real-world problems through techniques such as statistics, data visualization, and machine learning. “From voice commands given to Siri and Alexa, to constant monitoring of phone location, and even smart refrigerators that monitor their content, data collection is ubiquitous in the current world,” explained Alva Couch, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Co-Director of the Data Science Program. “Those who master data analysis may seem like sorcerers, making subtle decisions that alter world events and perhaps even influence elections.” To comprehend these numbers, students will have to understand the algorithms and computer codes behind the methods and techniques of data analysis. They’ll also have to understand its theoretical and computational aspects. The program is unique in that it utilizes courses that already existed at Tufts, creating a specific path of study that will build upon the strengths of

the School of Engineering and speak to students’ interests. As an “agile degree program,” the data science major will continuously evolve as new developments and challenges in data analysis and computing arise. Students are encouraged to be on the lookout for courses or subjects that are relevant so they can be incorporated into the major. The data science major is structured to not only give students the technical background they need to be able to handle and analyze data, but also the opportunity to get out from behind a computer and apply these skills to other fields. The disciplinary breadth of the major prepares students for their capstone in data analysis and gives them real-world experience in applying their knowledge to a specific discipline outside of computer science, electrical and computer engineering, and mathematics. “It’s a very ‘Tufts’ approach to doing this, I think,” Professor and Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Eric Miller stated. “It demands [that] engineers get out there and interact with other folks in our community at Tufts to see how these computational tools can be useful in other areas, like the digital humanities, healthcare, or even veterinary medicine. It’s a nice balanced approach to data science.” He stressed that the real-world application of data science is the most interesting part of the field. The new program will focus on students getting to use real data sets from the communities and people around them. “We’re not just creating people that are going to live in cubicles staring at computers. You have to get out [there].” — JULIE DOTEN ’18 7


AROUND TOWN

WORLDWIDE PROBLEM SOLVING Whether it is through an internship, full-time job, or grant through the new Global Research Assistant Program, Jumbo engineers go across the country (and the world) to create solutions to problems facing society today.

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ILLUSTRATION BY CRISTINA GUITIAN

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TUFTS’

TOP 10 CLUBS/STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

EVEN THOUGH TUFTS ENGINEERS ARE BUSY INSIDE THE CLASSROOM, THAT DOESN’T MEAN THEY DON’T HAVE TIME TO JOIN ONE (OR MORE) OF OUR VARIOUS STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. HERE ARE OUR FAVORITE CLUBS WITH AN ENGINEERING TWIST.

Jumbo Code A collective of students that develop awesome software at no charge for nonprofit and federal organizations. (Fun fact: this group developed the interactive app for Jumbo Days, our admitted student program!).

Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Over 30% of our engineers identify as female. So it’s no surprise that Tufts SWE is such a successful student organization. From social events like SWE-iesta and SWEets with SWE to their annual professional development conference, there is no better club to celebrate being a pioneer in a male-dominated field.

Tufts Robotics Club This club is more than just students flying drones on the academic quad. The team’s firefighting robot and battle bot (“The Jumbonator”) have participated in—and won—many competitions around the Northeast.

Engineering Mentors Ever been speed dating? Tufts Engineering Mentors pairs first and second-year engineers with third and fourth-year mentors within their major. This group is a great way to have a support system, get advice, and make a friend.

Robotic Sail Team They are not your traditional sailing team. Their goal? To autonomously sail across the Atlantic Ocean. They recently developed a retractable wing “sail” and participated in an international competition called Sailbot.

Tufts Racing Their mission is to design and build, from the ground up, an open-wheel, single-seat, plug-in hybrid race car. From welding to racing, Tufts Racing competes annually in the Formula Hybrid and Formula Electric SAE competitions against colleges nationwide.

Student Teacher Outreach Mentor Program (STOMP) STOMP uses LEGO bricks and robotics to inspire the next generation of engineers. They bring fun, hands-on, engineering-based curricula to middle school classrooms all over Boston! Favorite units include building an earthquake box, fabricating a prosthetic hand, and making ice cream.

Engineers Without Borders (EWB) Want to travel to a new place and provide clean water to local communities? EWB members—engineers with a sense of social responsibility—create sustainable solutions for clean water systems. Current projects are in Malawi and Nicaragua. While the primary focus is on water quality testing and treatment systems, the group also strives to include educational activities and build a lasting relationship with the community.

Tufts Entrepreneurs Society (TES) You can find many of our engineers participating in Tufts Entrepreneurs Society’s events, including their Elevator Pitch Competition and Entrepreneurship Conference. Through valuable connections with faculty, alumni, students, and Boston-area professionals, TES inspires Jumbos to build big.

Tufts Computer Science Exchange What do Facebook, Google, and 300 Tufts students have in common? Tufts PolyHack, a 24-hour Hackathon. The 24 hours consists of coding, collaborating with peers, learning from industry professionals, and presenting their projects for prize money. Throughout the year you can also find Tufts CSE hosting Idea and Project Nights at Tamper Café.

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PHOTO BY PAUL RUTHERFORD

BRINGING ENTREPRENEURSHIP TO TUFTS UNIVERSITY

The Gordon Institute specializes in developing the newest leaders and innovators by promoting entrepreneurship amongst undergraduate and graduate students. Run through the School of Engineering, it gives students the opportunity for both real-world experience and classroom collaboration through the engineering management and entrepreneurial leadership minors. The classes for both minors, which include Entrepreneurial Marketing, Management of Innovation, and Creative Design Process of Products, are taught by Professors of the Practice. These individuals have successful backgrounds in the industry and can share their real-world experience and insight with students (read: they’ll bring in gadgets that aren’t on the market yet and ask students

for feedback for extra credit assignments—yes please!). Recognizing that engineering doesn’t happen in a bubble, classes are project based and often involve working for real companies in the Boston Area. One of the many faculty members behind the mission of the Gordon Institute is Jack Derby, who was recently named the Cummings Family Professor of the Practice of Entrepreneurship at the School of Engineering. In his role, he works to get undergraduate students out into the real world as consultants for companies ranging from bigleague medical device and chemical manufacturers to granola start-ups.

The Gordon Institute also plays host to the Tufts 100K New Ventures Competition. Teams with products relating to the life sciences, social impact, or high-tech pitch their product to a panel of judges in hopes of receiving funding and mentorship, basically the Tufts version of Shark Tank. This past year, a group of four engineers won the Stephen and Geraldine Ricci Interdisciplinary Prize for their pitch of an injectable silk-based hydrogen technology that would provide a male user with effective and nonhormonal contraception for one year. Even though Tufts may not have a business school, the Gordon Institute is doing important work to provide students with the background they need to make their innovations a reality.

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CLASS HIGHLIGHT

APPLICATIONS IN ENGINEERING At Tufts, we want our engineers to get hands-on, team-based H[SHULHQFHLQWKHLUYHU\ÞUVWVHPHVWHU7KDWpVZK\HYHU\ engineer takes an intro to engineering class that gives them practical experience with an engineering discipline as they explore their interests. Read up on the classes below! Music and the Art of Engineering If you are curious about the different ways that sound can be engineered, this may be the class for you! This course covers topics such as pitch, tone, filters, distortion, amplification, sampling, and digital filtering. An introduction of MATLAB allows students to also dive into the physics of sound, as well as the ethics behind sound engineering. Introduction to Renewable Energy While going off the fossil-fuel-driven grid might sound like a great idea in the face of climate change, implementing a system of alternative energy remains a significant engineering challenge. Solar and wind energy sources require a lot of land, and efficient energy storage technology does not exist. This class uses labs to explore the renewable energy technology of today, as well as the natural resource requirements of different energy systems. Biomechanics After a quick introduction to skeletal and muscular anatomy and the mechanics of the human body, students learn about the techniques to evaluate the body’s performance, including muscle strength, reaction time, and balance. With this new knowledge, students discuss the applications of biomechanics in sports and complete a final group project which involves capturing the body’s motion during walking. Introduction to Computational Design With the availability of increased computing power, many engineering disciplines now rely on computation to explore different design options. This class will teach you how to model a problem with math, and how to use computers to optimize a product using a digital model. The class culminates in a project that involves making a soft-bodied robot caterpillar that crawls as fast as possible, using the latest computing and design technology. Simple Robotics Excited about competition-based laboratories and hands-on group projects? Do you love LEGO MINDSTORMS? If you answered yes to either of these questions, then look no further than Simple Robotics! Aimed at students with no prior programming or building background, this class will look at all facets of robotics, including construction, programming, computer vision, event-based programming, artificial intelligence, and elementary controls.

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Design of the Built Environment What does it mean to design safe and sustainable structures? Using case studies such as the Pantheon, Sagrada Familia, and Burj Khalifa, this class will examine the phenomena of mechanics, materials, and form in architectural engineering. Observational experiences and hands-on activities from our own backyard and around the globe will show future engineers how we can learn from the world’s best structures of yesteryear to build even better ones tomorrow. Bringing Innovation to Engineering for Biomedical Sciences What does the future of biomedical engineering look like? This class gives engineers the opportunity to gain insight into the current state of technology as it relates to human health, while also considering its potential impact in the future. Students will examine big picture themes, collaborate to problem solve, and challenge current limitations in the field of biomedical engineering. Engineering in Crisis Through four emergency case studies (Haiti cholera outbreak, Hurricane Sandy, Japanese Tsunami, and Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill), students will explore the interdisciplinary link between environmental health, structural engineering and mechanics, geosystems engineering, and environmental and water resources engineering. Civil Infrastructure This class serves as an introduction to civil infrastructure, with a focus on transportation, water, energy, and waste components. Though this class emphasizes technical content and entrepreneurship, students will also employ a more holistic mindset and dive into the ethical issues and broader social, cultural, economic, and political impact of civil infrastructure. Climate Change Engineering How do engineers respond to problems related to climate change? This question will only become more relevant as time goes on, and this class will attempt to tackle this crucial issue from an interdisciplinary perspective, starting with the basic principles of climate science, environmental mitigation, and adaptation. In the lab, students will take a close look at biofuel production, solar and wind energy, and hydrologic modeling.


ILLUSTRATION BY ©2017 HARRY CAMPBELL C/O THEISPOT.COM


ATHLETICS

ENGINEER? ATHLETE? BOTH! :KRVD\VWKDWHQJLQHHUVFDQpWGRLWDOO"$W7XIWVRYHURIRXUYDUVLW\DWKOHWHVDUHDOVR HQJLQHHUV+HUH\RXpOOPHHW-XPERHQJLQHHUVZKRDUHNLFNLQJEXWWRQDQGRIIWKHĂžHOG

“Being a biomedical engineer and a member of the varsity softball team deďŹ nes my Tufts experience in the best way possible. I am able to study what I love, play my favorite sport, and meet amazing people from both areas. Balancing engineering and athletics can be challenging at times, but I’ve found that planning ahead is key. I take my harder classes when I am out of season, and always start assignments early.â€?

Michael Eve ’21 from Brooklyn, NY Computer Engineering—Men’s Varsity Crew “The easiest thing to control when it comes to being a varsity student-athlete, in my opinion, is your behavior. Whether it’s maintaining focus in the classroom or on the water, I always ďŹ nd that keeping your best intentions at heart makes the experience that much more gratifying.â€?

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David Lackner ’19 from Newport, RI Electrical Engineer and Entrepreneurial Leadership Minor—Varsity Ice Hockey “Balancing the workload of an engineer and a varsity athlete can be challenging at times; however, it allows you to partake in so many of the opportunities this school has to offer. It has exposed me to both the rigorous studies of Tufts and the pride in playing for your school. I have been fortunate to build so many friendships with people from all different parts of campus. Whether it is in the lab or on the ice, being involved in both electrical engineering and ice hockey has brought me closer to what I believe it means to be a Jumbo.�

Ipek Emekli ’18 from Istanbul, Turkey Mechanical Engineer and Engineering Management Minor—Varsity Track and Field

Lena Chang ’19 from Palo Alto, CA Engineering Psychology Major—Women’s Varsity Soccer Team “I handle the time commitments of being an engineer and athlete by making to-do lists to help me prioritize my work. I love my major, and I can’t image college without soccer. Having a team beside me for constant support has shaped me into who I am today!�

Jamie Weiss ’21 from Manhasset, NY Data Science Engineering and Applied Math Double Major—Men’s Varsity Baseball

“I joined the track and ďŹ eld team as a walk-on, and “Studying engineering and playing baseball are two it was the best decision I made since I came to of my greatest passions, and when coming to Tufts, college—you get an amazing family while doing the I was worried about whether it would be possible to sport that you love. It is a huge time commitment, ďŹ nd a balance between sports and school. As soon but I don’t know how I could have managed the as I arrived, I realized that this balance is possible workload without the support of my team. My wish because of the culture that Tufts provides. Just like to see all my teammates succeed has made me being on a varsity team, engineers here are like love Tufts even more.â€? teammates where they each push you to reach your full potential in the toughest way possible.â€?

PHOTOS BY ALONSO NICHOLS AND ANNA MILLER FOR TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Isabel Smokelin ’19 from Boxborough, MA Biomedical Engineer—Women’s Varsity Softball


BRUCE PHOTO BY KELVIN MA/TUFTS UNIVERSITY; PLEO, SPAGHETTI TOWER, MUNCHA! MUNCHA! MUNCHA!, AND PORTABLE SPACE PHOTOS BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

HOT ITEMS THE GREAT WALL OF LEGO

BRUCE, JUMBO’S UNDERSTUDY

The CEEO may sound professional, but they love their toys. The Student Teacher Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP) teaches middle school students how to create robots out of this dizzying collection of LEGO bricks. You will often find STOMP fellows hanging out by the wall to get inspired, building model prototypes or, sometimes, just playing around.

This is Bruce, a robot chicken puppet (awesome, right??). If you pet him on the back of his neck, his built-in sensors will detect your movement and Bruce will do a funky dance! Bruce was created using an NXT software which, due to its user-friendly nature, is commonly used to introduce robotics and coding to middle school students.

THESE ITEMS CAN ALL BE FOUND IN OUR CENTER FOR ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND OUTREACH!

3D PRINTING @ JUMBO’S MAKER STUDIO From iPhone cases to replacement implants, 3D Printing technology has been pushing boundaries for years. Thanks to Jumbo’s Maker Studio, which houses Tufts’ own 3D printer, any Jumbo can use the printer and turn their designs and ideas into reality.

PLEO THE HUGGABLE DINOSAUR Pleo is a pet (robot) dinosaur that can interact with humans through programmed gestures, expressions, lights, sounds, and even speech. The CEEO uses this adorable dino to conduct research on children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

SPAGHETTI TOWERS What would you come up with if you were given 20 sticks of raw spaghetti, a piece of tape and a marshmallow? Spaghetti towers introduce the concept of the engineering design process by challenging students to build the tallest, sturdiest, and most creative tower to hold a single marshmallow.

MUNCHA! MUNCHA! MUNCHA!

A PORTABLE SPACE FOR A BETTER WORLD

To inspire the next generation of engineers, the CEEO has developed a novel engineering approach to integrate engineering and literacy curricula in elementary and middle schools. Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! is a book about a farmer who tries to protect his vegetables from three hungry bunnies. Students use this book as a foundation to help them learn to identify problems and engineer solutions, helping the farmer build structures throughout the book to keep the bunnies out!

A maker’s space has all the tools and equipment needed for anyone to explore, discover, create, and build. It provides the perfect balance between design, engineering, and education. The CEEO has created its own Portable Maker Space which travels to local classrooms for these kinds of creative projects.

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Dean Jianmin Qu’s energy is infectious. From the moment he stepped onto campus as the newly appointed Dean of the School of Engineering in the fall of 2015, his enthusiasm has not wavered. Dean Qu is an accomplished mechanical engineer (whose research in theoretical and applied mechanics has led to safer airplanes), an author of a book that is still being used at universities around the world, and a teacher and mentor to many. But right now, his job is to bring our School of Engineering to new heights. With years of experience in the engineering field, Dean Qu knows what qualities will make a strong engineer both today in the classroom, and years from now in the future. With the current technological revolution, jobs that exist today may be gone tomorrow, but new jobs will be created just as rapidly. “It will be the engineers who create them,” he said. And in order to be the pioneers of tomorrow’s job force, Dean Qu knows that today’s engineers need to be creative, innovative, civic-minded, adaptive, and socially conscious leaders. Dean Qu was drawn to Tufts because of our interdisciplinary curriculum, project and teambased learning, global teaching, design-focused classes, and emphasis on entrepreneurship. Specifically, he believes in the power of an engineering school with strong ties to the liberal arts. “I’ve always believed that engineers shouldn’t be just engineers. The liberal arts should be a prerequisite to everything,” he said. Dean Qu understands that it is important, and even crucial, for engineers to know about areas outside of their discipline. “Society and its problems are so complex that engineers have to go beyond the bounds of a classical

engineering education,” he said. Because society’s problems are interdisciplinary, the solutions need to draw upon different areas (like politics, law, public policy, and culture) as well. Fortunately, the School of Engineering is part of a constellation of Tufts Schools—like the Tufts University School of Medicine, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and the Friedman School of Nutrition—that students can interact with and learn from. Dean Qu also values hands-on and experiential learning. Because Tufts is a small and studentcentered research university, about 60% of the engineering undergraduates engage in research with faculty members in state-of-the-art facilities right on the Medford campus. These labs include the Visual Analytics Lab, Brain-Computer Interaction Lab, Soft-Materials Robotics Lab, SilkLab, Molecular Beam Epitaxy Lab (the only one east of the Mississippi!), and the Virtual Reality Center (also known as the Caves). He also mentions the maker space, consisting of materials like a 3D printer and laser cutter, that embody his emphasis on creativity. Lastly, Dean Qu prides himself on the small size of our engineering school. A teacher and mentor himself (he has guided the work of over 30 Ph.D. students, 27 M.S. students, and 14 postdocs!), he believes that the best way to educate young people is with experiential learning in an intimate setting. With just over 200 students in each undergraduate class, there are more chances for students to work with faculty and receive a personalized education. All of us at Tufts are so excited to see what Dean Qu does next!

MEET DEAN JIANMIN QU KAROL FAMILY PROFESSOR AND DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

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PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER

“Engineering education is not just about learning technology and techniques.”


LOOKING

Tufts engineers are engaging in research th sustainability, human technology interface,

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FORWARD PHOTO BY FIORENZO OMENETTO

at is looking ahead in three thematic areas— and human health.

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SUSTAINABILITY PHOTO BY DR JEREMY BURGESS/SCIENCE SOURCE

How can the engineering projects we develop today help us create a more sustainable world tomorrow? Professors and students collaborate to tackle issues such as water and water diplomacy, climate change mitigation, environmental remediation, alternative energy, and smart grids.

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THE POWER OF SILK FIORENZO OMENETTO

Professor Omenetto runs the Silklab—an applied biomaterials science laboratory that builds on the world-class biomaterials expertise resident at Tufts. This laboratory has deep roots in photonics nanotechnology and materials science and is a highly interdisciplinary research space. The core goal of the laboratory’s activities is to provide innovation for new advanced material processing and manufacturing, based on sustainable carbon-neutral technologies like silk. These “living materials” will redefine applications in medicine, food safety, sustainable manufacturing and technology. The lab’s research has been covered in multiple media outlets worldwide with results encompassing edible electronics, implantable wireless therapy, bioinspired architectures, photonic chemotherapy, natural fuel cells, brain interfaces, and food preservation. The laboratory brings together researchers from multiple fields that share the common goal of making a difference.

DEVELOPING RECYCLABLE ELECTROLYTES FOR BATTERIES MATTHEW PANZER

Associate Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering What do cell phones, hybrid/electric cars, and an increasing deployment of wind/solar electricity generation technologies have in common? They all highlight the critical need to develop reliable, safe, and efficient electrical energy storage devices across a wide range of sizes. Professor Panzer’s research group has been actively exploring the use of room temperature molten salts, also known as ionic liquids, to serve as safe, stable, and recyclable electrolytes for next-generation supercapacitors and batteries. They are currently focused on the development of leakproof gel electrolytes that feature ionic liquids, as well as understanding the various chemical interactions within these materials that may be used to enhance and tune their ionic transport properties.

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LAB PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER; ISLAM PHOTO BY KELVIN MA/TUFTS UNIVERSITY; DEBARI PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Dean for Research, School of Engineering


SHAFIQUL ISLAM (Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) was recently awarded the 7th Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water for his work in early cholera outbreak prevention. Professor Islam, who also holds an appointment at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and serves as the Director of the Water Diplomacy Program, was recognized for his work using chlorophyll information from satellite data to predict cholera outbreaks at least three to six months in advance.

WATER FILTRATION AND SANITATION INTERVENTIONS DANIELE LANTAGNE

Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering In the Lantagne Research Group, engineers seek to reduce the burden of infectious diseases—such as Ebola, cholera, and diarrhea—by investigating and evaluating the effectiveness of water and sanitation interventions in developing countries and emergencies. To do this, students and professors complete laboratory research, field work, and policy work. In the lab, they are working to determine what disinfection options can be used to efficaciously clean surfaces, hands, and human wastes in Ebola treatment units. Out in the field, water filters are being tested to determine effectiveness and acceptability to reduce childhood diarrhea. The policy work in this lab is centered on developing recommendations for implementing water and sanitation programs to reduce cholera transmission.

BUILDING STRUCTURES TO CHANGE HOW WE INTERACT WITH LIGHT TOM VANDERVELDE

Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering By bending light to their will, the Renewable Energy and Applied Photonics (REAP) laboratory helps us see better on the micro and the macro scale. REAP engineers are depositing materials, one single atomic layer at a time, in order to build complex structures that fundamentally change how we interact with and use light. These structures form the foundation of countless revolutionary devices, including thermophotovoltaics, which convert heat directly into electricity, photovoltaics (like solar cells), and high-speed transistors. Using the fundamental principles of mechanical and electrical engineering, physics, and materials science, REAP researchers are refining materials and devices in a way that brings us closer to a sustainable future.

ANNALISA DEBARI (Mechanical Engineer ’18) spent her time as a summer scholar in Iryna Zenyuk’s lab, which researches the reliability and safety of metal and lithium ion batteries (which are used in many smartphones). Specifically, Annalisa designed a battery holder that researchers can use to X-ray the battery without having to dissemble it. With the goal of attending graduate school and eventually pursuing a career in green energy, Annalisa enjoyed spending this time diving into one project. She explained, “During this break from classes and varsity track, I’ve really enjoyed being able to have the time and full attention to go down some rabbit holes.”

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PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

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H UMAN TECHNOLOGY INTERFACE Touch screens and implantable devices blur the line between technology and the body. Robotics take inspiration from cognition and the human mind. Tufts engineers integrate knowledge of thought, sight, and touch into interfaces as intuitive as they are high-tech.

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ROBERT JACOB (Professor of Computer Science, pictured at right) leads the Human-Computer Interaction Lab, which is currently focusing on implicit braincomputer interfaces. He says, “Our research in real-time measurement and machine learning classification of functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) brain data leads us to develop, use, and evaluate brain measurement as input to adaptable user interfaces for the larger population.”

ANU GAMAGE (Electrical Engineer ’18) spent her summer working with Assistant Professor Usman Khan to create an inverted pendulum system. While most inverted pendulums have built-in sensors to provide the appropriate amount of force to balance themselves, Anu took her model one step further. She created a system that separates the pendulum from its sensor so it would continue to balance and collect accurate measurements in the case of a cyberattack.

VALENCIA JOYNER KOOMSON

Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering The Advanced Integrated Circuits and Systems (AICS) Lab conducts research on the design of nanoscale heterogeneous systems by integrating optical, RF, millimeter-wave devices, and nanomaterials to tackle problems in the biological sciences. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising non-invasive imaging tool for fundamental studies of biological processes, offering greater biochemical specificity, high temporal resolution, potential for concurrent intracellular and intravascular event measurement, and portability. This lab is working on the design of novel imaging sensors to increase the visibility of sub-millimeter structures and enable development of low-cost, portable NIRS systems for use in oncology and neurobiology.

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JACOB PHOTO BY KATHLEEN DOOHER; GAMAGE PHOTO BY TIM CORREIRA

DESIGNING NANOSCALE HETEREOGENEOUS SYSTEMS


DEVELOPING EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DANIEL HANNON

Professor of the Practice in Human Factors, Department of Mechanical Engineering Professor Hannon combines interests in engineering, product design, and psychology to develop educational technology, with a particular emphasis on supporting children and adults with special needs, such as autism and cognitive disabilities. A current project focuses on the use of robotics and rapid prototyping tools to encourage the development of social skills in children and adolescents on the autism spectrum. The lab includes equipment for supporting student research into ergonomics and biomechanics, psychophysical measurement, anthropometry, vehicle simulation, visual display design, usability testing, and team performance.

THE ETHICS BEHIND ROBOTICS MATTHIAS SCHEUTZ

Professor, Department of Computer Science The focus of this lab is to make interactions with future robots as natural and effective as possible. In particular, Professor Scheutz is interested in programming robots to respond to natural language. The challenge with such robots, aside from making natural language comprehension and dialogue production function correctly, is to ensure that robots will not carry out commands that could cause harm to humans or damage property. The lab has started to develop robotic control systems that make simple inferences based on human commands to determine whether the robot should carry them out as instructed or reject them because they violate an ethical principle.

NAVIGATING AUTOMATIC VEHICLES JASON RIFE

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering Safely operating automated vehicles represents a major challenge in developing a next-generation transportation infrastructure. Professor Rife’s research group is investigating methods for validating and bounding navigation performance to make automated vehicle operations safer. Applications include driving automated ground vehicles in highway trafďŹ c and automated aircraft landing. The end goal of this research is to develop novel control, navigation, and interface technologies that ensure safe, reliable, and seamless interactions between human and machine. The lab also analyzes the control of novel biomimetic robots from soft materials based on a caterpillar!

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PHOTO BY SAM YEH/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

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HUMAN HEALTH Tissue engineering. Genomics. Arterial grafts made of silk. When Tufts engineers think about human health advances, we think on every scale—from tracing the neurological effects of nano-sized pollutants to mapping patterns of disease transmission worldwide.

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FINDING PATTERNS IN HUMAN GENOMICS

ENGINEERING FOR PUBLIC HEALTH

IRENE GEORGAKOUDI

LENORE COWEN

DAVID M. GUTE

The Georgakoudi Lab is working on the development of non-invasive, high-resolution optical imaging modalities that enable visualization of fine structures within cellular and extracellular components of tissue, without the need to add a contrast agent that may introduce artifacts or have side effects. Our tissues already have enzymes and proteins that can interact with light in unique ways that can be detected and exploited to help us identify subtle changes in important functional tissue aspects, such as metabolism and biomechanical properties. Since the techniques are non-invasive, they enable us to study multiple tissue characteristics simultaneously and dynamically over time. The lab is developing these methods to improve the understanding of diseases such as cervical and breast cancer, tissue repair mechanisms following injuries such as heart attacks, and interactions that occur in engineered tissue models. It is expected that this improved understanding will lead to improved diagnostics and therapeutics for a very broad range of applications.

When the first draft sequence of the human genome was published in 2001, scientists were able to start reading nature’s blueprint, the instruction set for all the cells in our body. But just spelling out the letters is very different from understanding what they mean, or identifying which portions are important for different biological processes. Professor Cowen is interested in applying techniques from mathematics and computer science to identify patterns of importance in this data that can help find genes and proteins that play critical roles in human health and disease. Integrating genomic data with data from other high-throughput data (for example, measurements of gene expression levels in patients with emphysema, versus healthy controls), the lab designs algorithms and machine learning methods that seek to identify genes that may be important in different complex diseases, and predict the structure or the function of their associated proteins.

Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering

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Professor, Department of Computer Science

Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Gute’s research lies at the intersection of engineering, public health, and social justice. Some of his recent work aims to address the dangerous and unethical working conditions of immigrant workers here in Massachusetts. In a three-year study, Professor Gute and several other Tufts researchers found that immigrant workers in certain professions (like construction, production, and service) who were older, less proficient in English, and had little or no health insurance were more likely to be injured on the job than their non-immigrant counterparts. In addition, Gute received a grant from the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH) to develop a community-based initiative that provides green housecleaning products to its members, who are primarily Brazilian immigrant housecleaners in Somerville. In the past, Professor Gute has also worked to apply engineering principles to public health efforts in the eastern region of Ghana looking at the primary prevention of urinary schistosomiasis. In all his work, he strives to solve problems at home and around the world.

LAB AND GHEZZI PHOTOS BY KATHLEEN DOOHER; BERUMEN PHOTO BY ANNA MILLER/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

VISUALIZING STRUCTURES WITHOUT A CONTRAST AGENT


CHIARA GHEZZI (Research Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering) and David Kaplan (Professor of Biomedical Engineering) direct the Tissue Engineering Resource Center. With a focus of advancing our research in biomaterials and bioreactors, this lab looks at everything from creating tissue that best mimics native tissue (like bone, intestine, and cartilage) to the biological and chemical reactions that take place within a system.

CAN BACTERIA BE USED AS MEDICINE? NIKHIL NAIR

Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering There are more bacterial cells living on our skin and in our bodies than there are human cells. These bacteria benefit our health in many ways, and we have barely started to understand their contributions. The goal of this lab is twofold—to understand what these microbes are doing and then engineer these bacteria to be programmed as medicines to treat a variety of disorders, many of which currently have no cures. In addition, Professor Nair’s lab is interested in why various features of life evolved the way they did and how different components (such as genes and proteins) can be altered to achieve a desired outcome. Professor Nair was recently honored with the 2016 National Institute of Health Director’s New Innovator Award. Upon receiving the award, he said, “I want my lab to do work that not only has a major scientific impact, but also a major societal impact.”

GREG BERUMEN (Chemical Engineer ’19) spent his summer examining highly specific enzyme inhibitors as they relate to the growth of cancerous cells. His faculty mentor, Assistant Professor James Van Deventer says that Greg is “fearless” in the lab, and that many of his findings are already shaping the future of work in this area. Like many of us, Greg has seen loved ones suffer from cancer. He explains, “It’s always in the back of my mind, which is why this work is so rewarding. I’m glad that what I’m doing could have a broader impact on society.”

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ADVICE

DO YOU THINK YOU WANT TO BE

Think you want to be a Tufts engineer? If so, we want to help you get there. Here are our top tips for applying to the School of Engineering from our very own Associate Director for Engineering Recruitment, Beky Stiles!

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Determine if you’re an engineer If the classes, research, and projects you’ve read about here make you jump for joy: You’re an engineer! But, if you’re on the fence between majors like biomedical engineering and biology or chemical engineering and chemistry, look at the online “degree sheet” for your intended major. If that lineup entices you more than the thought of fulfilling the distribution requirements for the School of Arts and Sciences: You’re an engineer. Still unsure? Talk to current students, faculty, counselors, and family members. Then go with your gut and apply to whichever school feels like the best fit that day.


ILLUSTRATION BY PATRIC SANDRI

AN ENGINEER?

Map out your schedule

Line up your recommendations

Harness your engineering “voice”

All applicants to the School of Engineering MUST have taken physics and calculus in high school. Our most competitive applicants will be in the most advanced science and math courses their school offers. The more STEM strength you show, the stronger your application will be. And embrace any electives that let you celebrate your inner engineer. Computer science, woodshop, orchestra… they all show an aptitude and mindset for engineering. It’s okay and even encouraged to specialize a little bit your senior year—if you need to forego a fourth year of foreign language in order to double up in math or science, that’s a decision we understand and support as we review your transcript.

Your school counselors and teachers are some of your biggest advocates in this process. Tufts requires one counselor recommendation and one teacher recommendation (but yes, you can send us more than one teacher recommendation!). For engineers, it is especially helpful to have a recommendation from a math or science teacher. Instead of asking a teacher who doesn’t know you well but who gave you an A++ on every assignment, ask a teacher who truly knows you and can write stories and anecdotes to help us understand you better as a community member, collaborator, and tinkerer.

Tufts engineers aren’t just math and science whizzes. They’re also playful, creative, collaborative, logical, enthusiastic, and down to earth. In your essays, we’ll be looking for the soft skills that will make you a great engineer and the je ne sais quoi that will make you a great Jumbo. While you shouldn’t feel pressured to write about engineering specifically, do ask yourself if the topics you tackle showcase those attributes. And if writing isn’t your thing, don’t panic. Do the best you can with the task at hand; then feel free to show us your engineering skills through a Maker Portfolio.

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PROGRAMS With nearly 150 majors and minors, 30 interdisciplinary programs, and the courses of the ExCollege, Tufts’ offerings UHTXLUHPRUHWKDQDEULHIVNLPPLQJVR\RXFDQÞQGDQH[SDQVLRQRIWKLVTXLFNOLVWRQRXUZHEVLWH%XWLQWKHPHDQWLPH skim away. Just note that Tufts’ undergraduate programs are offered in three schools: Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts. Students may take classes across schools, and many students do. COPY AND PASTE LIST FROM PREVIOUS ISSUE Finance

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING MAJORS

Chemical Physics

Physics

Sculpture

Chemistry

Political Science

Sound

Food Systems and Nutrition

ABET ACCREDITED

Child Study and Human Development

Psychology

Welding

French°

Woodworking

Geology°

Chinese

Psychology/Clinical Concentration Quantitative Economics

FIVE-YEAR COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAMS

Geoscience

Civic Studies* Classical Studies

Religion

Computer Science

Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Russian and European Studies

Electrical Engineering

Community Health

Russian Language and Literature

Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Engineering

Environmental Engineering

Computer Science

Mechanical Engineering

Drama

ADDITIONAL DEGREE OPTIONS

Economics

Architectural Studies

Education*

Data Science

Engineering Psychology

Engineering

English

Engineering Physics

Environmental Geology

Human Factors Engineering

Environmental Studies*

Engineering Science

Film and Media Studies

Environmental Health

French

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES MAJORS

Geological Sciences

Science, Technology, and Society*

German Tufts/New England Conservatory: BA or BS and Bachelor of Music Tufts/SMFA (School of the Museum of Fine Arts): BA or BS and Bachelor of Fine Arts

Sociology Spanish

Geosystems

MINORS

Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Africana Studies

SMFA AT TUFTS AREAS OF STUDY

Architectural Engineering Art History

Arabic Architectural Studies

Greek Greek Archaeology Greek Civilization Hebrew History Human Factors Engineering° Italian Judaic Studies Latin Latin American Studies Latino Studies Leadership Studies

Africana Studies

German Studies

All BFA students at the SMFA at Tufts focus in interdisciplinary art. They may explore many of the following areas of study while pursuing this interdisciplinary art education.

American Studies

Greek

Animation

Anthropology

Greek and Latin

Bookmaking

Child Study and Human Development

Applied Environmental Studies

History

Ceramics

Chinese

Physics

Interdisciplinary Studies

Drawing

Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Political Science

International Literary and Visual Studies

Digital Media

Colonialism Studies

Portuguese

Applied Physics

Religion

Arabic

Film and Video

Computer Science

International Relations

Roman Archaeology

Archaeology

Graphic Arts

Dance

Italian Studies

Roman Civilization

Architectural Studies

Illustration

Drama

Japanese

Russian

Art History

Installation

Economics

Judaic Studies

Jewelry

Education

Science, Technology, and Society

Applied Mathematics

German Language and Literature

Asian American Studies Astrophysics Biotechnology Engineering° Chemical Engineering

Astrophysics

Latin

Biochemistry

Metals

Engineering Education

Latin American Studies

Painting

Engineering Management°

Biology

Mathematics

Papermaking

English

Biomedical Sciences*

Middle Eastern Studies

Performance

Entrepreneurial Leadership

Biopsychology

Music

Biotechnology*

Photography

Music, Sound, and Culture

Printmaking

Environmental Science and Policy°

Philosophy

*Available only as a co-major 34

Film and Media Studies

Linguistics Multimedia Arts Music Music Engineering Peace and Justice Studies Philosophy

Sociology Spanish° Studio Art Urban Studies Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

°Available only to students enrolled in the School of Engineering


CLASS HIGHLIGHTS MUSIC ENGINEERING The following classes, all of which count toward the music engineering minor, are offered from the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Departments, the Music Department, and even the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts. Computer Tools for Musicians

Principles of Tonal Theory

Music Recording and Production

Advanced Dynamics and Vibrations

Electronic Musical Instrument Design

Intermediate Electronics with Lab

Electronic Music Ensemble Music, Technology, and Digital Culture

The Science and Engineering of Music Digital Signal Processing History of Sonic Art

Acoustics

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES Offered jointly by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Art History, this major gives engineers a solid foundation in the technical aspects of structural systems, as well as the aesthetic characteristics of buildings. Introduction to Architecture

Boston: Architecture and Urbanism

Japanese Architecture Computer Assisted Design

Developing Sustainable Communities

Bridge Design

Steel Design

Engineering Economy

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Urban Policy and Planning

PHOTO BY ANNA MILLER/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Aesthetic Psychology

Planning for Low Impact Development


ADMISSIONS INFORMATION WHAT TO SUBMIT: HERE’S THE LIST, FIND MORE DETAILS ON OUR WEBSITE!

1

Common Application or Coalition Application

Early Decision I Application Deadline: November 1 Notification Deadline: December 15

2

Tufts Writing Supplement

Early Decision II Application Deadline: January 1 Notification Deadline: Early February Regular Decision Application Deadline: January 1 Notification Deadline: April 1

3

High School Transcript(s)

4 5

APPLICATION DEADLINES AND NOTIFICATION DATES

Senior Year Grades

Transfer Admission Application Deadline: March 15 Notification Deadline: Mid-May

TUFTS CLASS OF 2022 STATISTICS 21,501 Applications 3,143 Acceptances 15% Acceptance Rate

A

B

C

D

Testing: Beginning with applications to the Class of 2023, we require either the SAT or the ACT

100% of Demonstrated Financial Need Met 13% First Generation Students 11% International Students

6 7

49% Women in the Engineering Class of 2022 Letters of Recommendation We require one from a guidance counselor and one from a teacher. You may send us one additional one if you’d like.

32–35 Middle 50% ACT 690–760 Middle 50% SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing 720–790 Middle 50% SAT Math

Financial Aid Documents If you are applying for aid, you will need to submit 1. FAFSA 2. CSS profile 3. Federal Income Tax Returns

TUFTS UNDERGRADUATE STATISTICS 5,492 Undergraduate Enrollment 4.8 Miles from Boston 22 Average Class Size

+

28 Varsity Sports Teams Optional Materials • Alumni Interview • Arts or Maker Portfolio: Students applying to the School of Arts and Sciences or the School of Engineering may submit an additional Arts or Maker Portfolio to highlight talent in studio art, drama, dance, music, or engineering.

300+ Student Groups 35% Women in the School of Engineering 45% of Juniors Study Abroad 39% Need-Based Aid Recipients 11% International Students 33% US Students of Color


H E Y.

JUST STARTING YOUR SEARCH? HERE’S WHAT TUFTS IS ALL ABOUT. WE DO OUR RESEARCH

WE ARE INTERESTED

Tufts is a student-centered research university, which means that we like to dig into our passions deeply and figure things out for ourselves—whether that involves using silk to regenerate tissue or spending a fully-funded summer exploring the political implications of Shakespeare’s plays through the Summer Scholars program. Students and professors come together, across disciplines, to ask questions and create meaning.

....in a lot of things. Tufts students don’t limit themselves: they combine biology with philosophy, compete as nationally-ranked D3 athletes, pursue Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees in studio art at our School of the Museum of Fine Arts, and solve problems as engineers. They’re part of a community that embraces the unconventional and the uncategorizable.

WE ARE ACTIVE CITIZENS

WE DON’T TAKE OURSELVES TOO SERIOUSLY

Jumbos use their skills and ideas to better people’s lives, whether they are teaching engineering in local elementary schools, creating sustainable businesses, or spending a year doing full-time service as a 1+4 Bridge Year Fellow. They understand that they are citizens of a global community, and they embrace that responsibility.

This is a place where students are as excited to debate Game of Thrones fan theories as they are to apply mathematical theorems—as intellectually playful as they are powerful. We believe that ideas can have a profound impact on the world, and those ideas can be born around the seminar table but also in the dorm common room.

Sound about right? Read the stories here to learn more. Also check out our website: admissions.tufts.edu

PHOTO BY ALONSO NICHOLS/TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Equal Opportunity Applicants for admission and employment, students, employees, sources of referral of applicants for admission and employment, and all unions or professional organizations holding collective bargaining or professional agreements with Tufts University are hereby notified that this institution does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, veteran status, or national origin in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in its programs and activities. Any person having inquiries or complaints concerning Tufts University’s compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, or Section 504 is directed to contact the Office of Equal Opportunity on the Medford/Somerville campus, 617-6273298 or 800-611-5060 (TDD 617-627-3370). This office has been designated by Tufts University to coordinate the institution’s efforts to comply with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and Section 504. Any person may also contact the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202, or the Director, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Region One, Boston, Massachusetts 02109, regarding the institution’s compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, 34 C.F.R. Part 100; Title IX, 34 C.F.R. Part 106; the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, 45 C.F.R. 90; or, Section 504, 34 C.F.R. Part 104. In addition, Tufts has formulated an administrative policy that educational and employment decisions are based on the principle of equal opportunity. The consideration of factors such as sex, race, color, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, veteran status, or disability unrelated to a person’s ability, qualifications, and performance is inconsistent with this policy. In accordance with both federal and state law, the university maintains information concerning current security policies and procedures and prepares an annual crime report concerning crimes committed within the geographical limits of the university. Upon request to the Office of Public Safety, 617-627-3912, the university will provide such information to any applicant for admission. The report is also available online at http://publicsafety.tufts.edu/wp-content/uploads/Tufts-Public-Safety-Security-2017-2018-09.28.pdf


NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. Postage PAID Burlington, VT Permit No. 149

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS Tufts University Bendetson Hall 2 The Green Medford, MA 02155-7057 617- 627-3170 admissions.tufts.edu

Profile for TuftsAdmissions

Jumbo Engineer - 2018  

Jumbo Engineer - 2018