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Home of Innovation A small taste of our cutting edge technology

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Valorisation Centre


Home of Innovation A small taste of our cutting edge technology

Research Exhibition


Table of Contents Explore possible collaborations

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About the Valorisation Centre

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How to contact the Valorisation Centre

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Technology Readiness Levels 6 Research Themes 7 Quote of Karel Luyben

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History Projects 11 Start-ups 23 Current Projects 35 Education Projects

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Research Facilities

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About DIG-it!

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Colophon

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Explore possible collaborations Using algorithms to accelerate DNA analyses. Shortening the length of European flights by an hour though personalised logistic processes. Tracking metal fatigue in steel structures by measuring magnetic fields. These are just some of the projects that researchers of the Delft University of Technology are working on. Some of these are still on the drawing board, others are in a prototype phase, while others are being brought to the market. Next to research and education, valorisation – also known as technology transfer – is the third focus of the Delft University of Technology. After all, it is important that the work of our researchers reaches the market. Collaboration with governments and enterprises plays a huge part in enabling technology transfer. This stimulates innovation and subsequently, this allows society to benefit from these new applications. The Research Exhibition enables you to take a close look at ongoing Delft University of Technology research. Here, you can meet the researchers and their research, and explore possible collaborations. ‘Technology for Life’ is the motto of the Delft University of Technology’s 175th anniversary. To celebrate this, we have highlighted 175 innovative research projects from all over the university by creating the biggest science expo of Europe. The research will be presented based on their technologyreadiness levels – these levels indicate which phase of development the research is in. The Research Exhibition is an excellent opportunity to behold the latest state of technological research. We hope you get excited to collaborate with us! Sincerely,

Paul Althuis Director of the Valorisation Centre

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About the Valorisation Centre Successful innovation not only calls for in-depth knowledge and cuttingedge creativity, but constructive partnership is just as essential. To transform technological innovations into practical added-value applications for society, we need assistance from external partners. By cooperating with business, government and civil society organisations or directly via individuals, we can make our knowledge work to the benefit of wider society. The Valorisation Centre is a good place to start to start doing business with the TU Delft and there are different ways in which this can take shape: Business Relations, Patents & licening and Research Fundiing. TU Delft has its own participation holding called Delft Enterprises. Delft Enterprises stimulates the initiation of spin-offs from the university into innovative start-ups, in order to accelerate technical process. Business Relations (incl. contract research) The team members of Business Relations are well informed on the latest scientific research at TU Delft, and they know the needs from the private sector. This enables them to contribute to very effective market research, business development and matchmaking between small medium and large enterprises and researchers. To initiate and facilitate sustainable collaborations, the team continuously searches for key-partners in multidisciplinary settings, resulting in research frame agreements in a later phase. High Tech / all other area’s: Antal Baggerman +31 (0)15-27 86973 A.F.J.Baggerman@tudelft.nl

Optics / Aerospace / Robotics: Anke Peters +31 (0)15-27 83254 A.Peters@tudelft.nl

Oil & Gas / Safety & Security: Harry de Groot +31 (0)15-27 86231 A.B.deGroot@tudelft.nl

Medtech / TU Delft Global Initiative: Emelie van Bentum +31 (0)15-27 84847 E.A.M.vanBentum@tudelft.nl

Health / Food / Chemistry: Steven Lohle +31 (0)15-27 84632 S.R.M.Lohle@tudelft.nl

Policy Analyses: Eelco de Groot +31 (0)15-278 96 83 E.O.deGroot@tudelft.nl

Cleantech / Science Park / Infrastructure: Friso Lippmann +31 (0)15-27 83875 F.G.Lippmann@tudelft.nl 4


How to contact the Valorisation Centre Administration & commercialisation of IP Licence agreements and partnerships are an important part of the valorisation of inventions and technical know-how developed at the university. The Intellectual Property Team explores the various possibilities, protects the intellectual property and gives advice on the commercialisation process to the employees and students of Delft University of Technology. They also advise on compliance with national regulations and compatibility with national and international research programmes. For more information: www.tudelft.nl/en/technology-transfer/patents-licencing/ +31 (0) 15 278 4859 patent@tudelft.nl Start-ups and spinouts Delft enterprises is the one-stop-shop for entrepreneurship and spin-out companies that have arisen from scientific research at TU Delft. The power of Delft Enterprises is to connect innovation (promising ideas from TU Delft), entrepreneurship (talented students and staff) and funding so that the valuable knowledge of the university makes its way to market. For more information: www.delftenterprises.nl/en/ +31 (0) 15 278 2122 info@delftenterprises.nl Dutch & European grant research projects Advisors from the Research Funding Teams assist academics in obtaining research grants. They also engage in dialogue with industry, policy makers and politicians of the Netherlands and the European Union. For more information: www.tudelft.nl/en/technology-transfer/tech-investment/public-privatepartnerships-portfolio/ subsidy-vc@tudelft.nl General information about the Valorisation Centre Van der Burghweg 1 2628 CS, Delft, the Netherlands www.tudelft.nl/en/technology-transfer/ valorisationcentre@tudelft.nl 5


Technology Readiness Levels The TU Delft is full of interesting, innovative research each within its own specific theme and, stage of development. Finding a project that matches your interest, amongst so many can be complex without some guidance. To facilitate your search we have developed a categorisation based on TRL & research themes.

Reading circle elements In this booklet you will find a circle element on top of the page of every project page, containing a specific number and colour code. These two represent the Technology Readines Level (TRL) and the project’s research theme(s). A TRL is a measure to indicate the matureness of a developing technology. When an innovative idea is discovered it is often not directly suitable for application. Usually such novel idea is subjected to further experimentation, testing and prototyping before it can be implemented.

Example

1

6

2

3

4

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6

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8

9

}

How to read: This example shows that it is basic research for the high-tech market.


Research themes Color Scheme In total eleven research themes have been used for a thematic categorisation. Each research theme has been assigned its own colour:

Technology Readiness Levels Below you find a list of the TRL’s - used to categorise the innovative ideas.

Aerospace

1

Basic research

Hi tech

2

Proof of principle

3

Early lab scale demonstration Late lab scale demonstration

Structural Engineering Water & Maritime Software technology & Intelligent systems

4

Robotics

5

Validation

Life Science & Health

6

Early prototype

7

Late prototype

8

Early stage commercial environment application

9

Market ready application

Social impact Energy Materials Chemistry, bio- & process technology

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’We work on usefulness driven questions and we approach these questions in a fundamental way. In celebration of our University’s 175th birthday we proudly present 175 past, present and future innovative ideas. These projects show how we have always excelled at generating new knowledge, and how we aim to continue to make an impact in society through collaboration with the public and private sectors.’ Karel Luyben Rector Magnificus

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History Projects Delft University of Technology is one of the most innovative universities of Europe. In our 175 years of history we have built a strong standing track record of generating new knowledge and finding smart solutions for the market and society. Taking a trip down to memory lane we present you with a selection of ten inventions and discoveries that have been done by researchers from Delft Univeristy of Technology.

Special thanks to: Abel Streefland | Sylvia Nijhuis | Rene Hagman | Marietje Ruijgrok | Thim Zuidewijk | Lesley Robertson - Beijerinck Museum | Fons Alkemade | Jos Sinke | Paul Hekkert | Matthijs van Dijk | Marga Schrijvershof-Vink

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Founding of the Royal Academy for the education of civilian engineers Antoine Lipkens

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1864

1905

Granting of university rights, name changed to Institute of Technology

1986

Name changed to Delft University of Technology

WHY

The academy becomes a Polytechnic School

In 1842 the Royal Academy in Delft was founded as the first civil engineering academy of the Netherlands. Its aim, by Royal Decree, was to educate engineers that would revive the Dutch industry and trade.

HOW

1842

The academy’s first director was the engineer Antoine Lipkens. Various technical disciplines were offered (e.g. water management, construction, mechanical engineering and mining), as well as programmes to become a tax official or East India Company civil servant.


Discovery of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Prof. Martinus Beijerinck

1886

1892

A.E. Mayer and D.I. Ivanovsky publish articles about the

1935

W.M. Stanley achieves crystallisation of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus

1939

G.A. Kausche et al. visualise the virus using electron microscopy

WHY

1898

Professor Beijerinck is credited with demonstrating that viruses exist and are biological because of his research on the Tobacco Mosaic Disease. Virology, as a discipline, is of obvious importance.

HOW

Tobacco Mosaic Disease

1895

M.W. Beijerinck is appointed Professor of Microbiology at the Delft Polytechnic School

| Dr. Lesley A. Robertson FRSB

His experiments demonstrated that the infectious agent could replicate in living plant cells and was thus not a chemical. He also proved that it was much smaller than known bacteria. He called it “contagium vivum fluidum�. 13


Ring analysis: unravelling the structure of petroleum Prof. dr. ir. Hein Israel Waterman

1919

14

1932

WHY

First ring analysis publication by J.C. Vlugter, H.I. Waterman and H.A. Van Westen

Petroleum is a mixture of a large number of different hydrocarbons. Investigating its applications requires characterisation of this mixture. Waterman played a pioneering role in this and developed the ring analysis.

HOW

H.I. Waterman becomes professor at TU Delft

His ring analysis uses the density and specific refraction of a petroleum sample to determine its hydrogen content. Comparing this content before and after hydrogenation, the proportions of paraffinic, naphthenic and aromatic carbon, and the number of aromatic and naphthenic rings can be determined.


Dutch cell test apparatus: measuring soil properties Prof. ir. Albert Keverling Buisman

1918

1919

1925

First publication on mechanics of soils by K. Terzaghi

1934

The laboratory for soil mechanics is founded (now part of Deltares)

1938

WHY

A.S. Keverling Buisman becomes professor at TU Delft

In order to be able to build safely with and/or on top of soil, its geotechnical properties need to be measured. Buismans Dutch cell test apparatus is the predecessor of current devices used for these measurements.

HOW

Landslide in Weesp

A soil sample is surrounded by water in a closed cell. A vertical load generates a vertical deformation and increase in the cell pressure. These parameters indicate important soil properties such as the maximum allowable load. 15


Influence of imperfections on the buckling load Prof. dr. ir. Warner Koiter

1744

First fundamental work on stability of structures by

16

1970

First publication of Koiter’s work in English

WHY

W. Koiter’s dissertation ‘On the stability of the elastic equilibrium’

1949

W. Koiter becomes professor at TU Delft

Buckling behaviour of constructions occurs at a critical load. Until professor Koiter did, no one ever described which factors influence this critical load, often leading to large deviations between theoretical and experimental results.

HOW

L. Euler

1945

Koiter described how small imperfections such as undulations and thickness variations influenced the critical load. He found that this was especially relevant for thin-walled shell structures such as those found in aeronautics, aerospace, and civil works.


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Cladding fibre optic cables Prof. Bram van Heel

1790

1880

1920s

1954

B. van Heel’s first paper on clad fibres (in Nature)

1960

Glass-clad fibres used for medical imaging

1977

First commercial fibre optic cable application in Longbeach, CA (US)

WHY

First optical Patent for glass fibre use telephone system to transmit images

A great obstacle for optical-fibre communication was signal interference and attenuation. Professor Van Heel came up with the idea of cladding to eliminate this obstacle. Currently, fibre optic cables carry more than 80% of the world’s long-distance telecommunication.

HOW

First preliminary optical communication system

Cladding involves coating the cable’s core with a transparent lower refractive index material. The interface between these two materials acts as a mirror, keeping the signal in and distortions out. Because this reduces attenuation, high volume long distance signal transport is now possible. 17


Burgers’ equation Prof. dr. Jan Burgers

1918

18

1920s

1940

Presentation of Burgers’ equation at the KNAW

1950

First publication of the equation as it is best known

WHY

Hot-wire experiments on turbulence

Professor Burgers developed an equation to describe turbulence. It proved to be a valuable model equation to describe non-linear phenomena. It’s still being used today, with a much wider field of application ranging from neural networks to tumour growth, heat flow and the distribution of stars over the galaxy.

HOW

J. Burgers becomes professor at TU Delft

After important work with hot-wire measurements in turbulent boundary layers, Burgers moved to, among other things, model problems and the essence of turbulence. He proposed the Burgers equation as a more convenient, and analytically solvable, alternative to the Navier-Stokes equations.


ART: Automatic Reducing Tachymeter Prof. dr. ir. Theo Bogaerts

1960

1969

1976

T. Bogaerts becomes professor at TU Delft

WHY

T. Bogaerts’ dissertation on the topic of ART

1970

Prototyping the ART in collaboration with ‘De Oude Delft’

A tachymeter is used to map a certain area (distances, directions and relative elevations), often as preparation for civil construction activities. Professor Bogaerts developed the first automated version of a tachymeter to reduce the workload.

HOW

T. Bogaerts starts employment at TU Delft

The Automatic Reducing Tachymeter (ART) automatically reduced (processed) the measured distances and directions into coordinates, and stored this data on coded disks. These could be transferred to punched cards, enabling further calculations with computers. 19


GLAss Reinforced Aluminium (GLARE) Prof. ir. Boud Vogelesang | Dr. Geert Roebroeks | Ir. Jos Sinke

1985

20

1987

WHY

GLARE is patented

Ongoing

Development of next generation FML

GLARE is a Fibre Metal Laminate (FML) developed at the TU Delft that is applied on a large scale in aircraft. Compared to conventional aircraft aluminium, it has a lower density and much better resistance to impact and fatigue, fire, and corrosion.

HOW

Development of ARALL

GLARE consists of layers of 0,3 – 0,4 mm thick aluminium alternating with epoxy-bonded glass fibres. Though material and production costs are relatively high, the material allows for a design tailored to local stresses and functionalities and the production of very large skin panels. This results in lower assembly costs and significant weight savings.


Vision in Product design method Prof. dr. Paul Hekkert | Prof. ir. Matthijs van Dijk

1970

1984

1991

1995

2009

ViP becomes part of the course curriculum of the TU Delft faculty of IDE

2011

‘Vision in Product Design: A Guidebook for Innovators’ is first published

WHY

Development of the ViP method

2003

P. Hekkert and M. van Dijk become professors at TU Delft

Vision in Product design (ViP) is a design method that enables designers to design for the future, yielding designs that have value and meaning for people. It makes the designer personally responsible for the outcome.

HOW

J.C. Jones, G. Pahl & W. Beitz, and S. Pugh publish methods that structure design processes using requirements and rank/weigh systems

ViP starts with thinking of the likely future context of a design. After this, you define the raison d’être you want your design to have and how people would interact with it. The last step is to generate the actual design. 21


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Start-ups

Tomorrow’s entrepreneur comes from Delft University of Technology. Not only do we educate our students and staff in what it takes to become a successful engineer. We also support them on their journey to set-up an independent business. These Delft University of Technology start-ups show in what way new knowledge from currently makes an impact.

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IMSystems: the Archimedes drive Jack Schorsch MSc

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3

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9

WHY

2

Gearboxes are complex and costly components that often limit the technical lifespan of moving machinery such as robotics. In order to revolutionise the application of robotics, a smaller and cheaper drive is needed. IMSystems developed such a drive.

HOW

1

Key are the patented “flex-rollers�. These elastically deforming hollow rollers are used instead of teethed gears to transfer torque. The device offers superior gear ratios (up to 10.000:1) and double the power density at lower costs as alternatives.

WHEN

TRL

The technology is infinitely and relatively easy scalable, enabling fast translation from idea to product. First commercial applications have been realised at scales ranging from robot to wind turbines.


Nano-coatings: ready for mass production Aris Goulas MSc | Dr. Bart van Limpt | Prof. dr. ir. Ruud van Ommen

3

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WHY

2

HOW

1

The pneumatic transport reactor of Delft IMP relies on the principle of Atomic Layer Deposition to coat particles with sub-nanometre precision. The tubular reactor’s modular and robust design allows easy in-line integration with other continuous processes.

WHEN

TRL

Manufacturing of nano-coatings is often tipped as complex and expensive, hindering their integration as product components. Delft IMP develops simple and cost-effective manufacturing schemes for powder nano-coatings, enabling nanotechnology’s benefits at an industrially-relevant production scale.

Delft IMP is currently scaling its reactor to a 10 kg/h coating capacity. The envisioned mass production scheme will deliver customisable nano-coated powder for applications in catalysis, batteries, lighting and healthcare.

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Nanoparticles at the push of a button Aaike van Vugt MSc | Vincent Laban MSc | Prof. dr. Andreas Schmidt-Ott

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3

4

5

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9

WHY

2

Nanoscientsists spend the majority of their time on the synthesis of nanoparticles. Besides, it is very hard to scale up production. VSParticle eliminated both challenges by simplifying the production of nanoparticles.

HOW

1

The VSParticle Generator One uses spark ablation to produce well defined nanoparticles of 0-20 nm in diameter. By adjusting gas flow, spark energy and spark frequency, the particle size and production rate can be controlled.

WHEN

TRL

VSParticle offers a cost effective, on-demand, on-location way of producing nanoparticles. It brings nanotechnology from the lab to commercially available products in microelectronics, catalysis and healthcare.


aanmelder.nl : a do-it-yourself tool forguest-registration at events Guido de Neve

3

4

5

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9

WHY

2

Organisers of an event should be able to spend their time on the content of their event instead of on the administrative knickknack of the registration of guests.

HOW

1

We offer a novel user-friendly do-it-yourself software tool complemented by personal support to ease the registration process. It covers everything from creating a website to the invitations and registration forms.

WHEN

TRL

In 2008, aanmelder.nl started as TU Delft spin-out. By now aanmelder.nl has hundreds of organisers, and served thousands of events, with over a million visitors combined.

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Umincorp: urban mining of plastics Jaap Vandehoek | Prof. dr. Peter Rem

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3

4

5

6

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8

9

WHY

2

Umincorp has developed a technology that separates plastics with such accuracy that it enables true circularity of plastics. It doubles the recovery rate at lower cost, less environmental burden, and higher selectivity than state-of-the-art alternatives.

HOW

1

Magnetic Density Separation (MDS) is used to separate a fine mixed material flow of small particles, primarily rigid packaging waste. The output volume is large and pure enough for plastic manufacturers to use as secondary polymer source.

WHEN

TRL

In 2017, a full scale plant of 10.000 ton / year is completed. Considering the double recovery and fourfold added value of the end product, this technology already enables an economically self-sustaining recycling programme.


WaveDroid: measuring waves with a smartphone Max Radermacher MSc

3

4

5

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9

WHY

2

Wave monitoring with buoys is used for offshore workability monitoring, determining design conditions for water-related structures and assessments of coastal erosion. Conventional wave buoys are advanced and robust, but also very expensive and heavy.

HOW

1

The WaveDroid buoy is ten times cheaper as conventional buoys while maintaining similar accuracies. It uses a smartphone as easy, cheap and versatile core. The buoy is able to replace conventional buoys in roughly 85% of the situations.

WHEN

TRL

The WaveDroid buoy is already being applied around the world as commercial product. It is especially suited for near shore application. Further developments focus on extending this range.

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WaterWindow Drs. Joost de Haan

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3

4

5

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WHY

2

Solutions for water and climate problems are not easily found. Available information is often difficult to find and compare and does not provide easy accessible insight in the usability of solutions. WaterWindow solves this problem.

HOW

1

WaterWindow is an online platform with easily found and comparable solutions, both innovative and proven. Beside a basic description, each solution includes contact details of the users and suppliers involved, allowing for easy exchange of knowledge and experiences.

WHEN

TRL

Since 2016, our users are using and thereby expanding the available content. Currently, Dutch and European governments (local, regional and national), knowledge institutes and commercial businesses are using and endorsing the platform.


Field Factors’ micro urban wetlands Wilrik Kok MSc | Karina Peùa MSc | Mirthe Snoek

3

4

5

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9

WHY

2

There is an increasing need for rainwater harvesting and buffering in urban settings. Field Factors developed a multipurpose modular and scalable neighbourhood-scale system that buffers, purifies and distributes rainwater.

HOW

1

The system is easily integrated in urban areas. Its Lego-like components are configured into a ring-like structure, with a biofilter in the middle. The components can quickly take up and store rainwater, and slowly release it into the biofilter.

WHEN

TRL

This system could support the current 100.000 km long aging sewage system. First commercial applications of the system have been initiated and a demonstrator is under development at The Green Village.

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Nowi: Wi-Fi powered climate sensors Omar Link MSc | Andre Mansano PhD | Simon van der Jagt MSc | Ehsan Zabihi BSc

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3

4

5

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7

8

9

WHY

2

Current climate sensors in buildings require batteries (costly because they need to be replaced often) or wiring (inflexible and expensive) to function. Nowi sensors harvest energy from radio frequencies instead.

HOW

1

The sensors use ambient Wi-Fi, 3G, 4G or GSM signals as a power source. They are therefore wireless and need much less battery replacements, which saves maintenance costs and reduces the environmental load.

WHEN

TRL

Nowi’s first product is a smart temperature sensor, other sensor types (motion, air quality) will follow soon. A complete sensor system will be tested at The Green Village. A market ready application will be finished before the end of 2017.


Polder roof: water management on rooftops Ing. Matthijs Monkelbaan | Dr. ir. Olivier Hoes | Ing. Friso Klapwijk

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

WHY

2

The frequency of extreme weather and heavy rain is increasing, as is the hard surface area in urban setting. The resulting increased demand on sewage capacity can be mitigated using blue-green roofs as temporary water storage.

HOW

1

Polder roof developed a smart discharge method, offering unique control over storage and discharge timing of rainwater. This enables a richer plant life on the roof, a less fluctuating and more controlled discharge of rainwater and possibly a reduced water tax.

WHEN

TRL

A fieldlab is being set up at the TU Delft to explore new designs, control algorithms and governance of the Polder roof. In the meantime the first commercial projects have been delivered.

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Current Projects The science we practice and technologies we develop have different levels of maturity. Some of the projects are close to entering the market, making almost an immediate impact. Whilst the impact of other projects lies further in the future. This is a selection of our current cutting edge innovative ideas.

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Sand motor: a new technique to save our beaches Prof. dr. Marcel Stive | Dr. Matthieu de Schipper | Dr. Sierd de Vries

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5

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9

WHY

2

The Sand Motor combines three functions in one international “building with nature� flagship for the Dutch water management sector: recreation and nature, innovative coastal protection, and a platform for knowledge development on coastal management.

HOW

1

Instead of a manual 3 to 5 year beach re-nourishment, the Sand Motor is a concentrated 21 million m3 mega nourishment that created a dynamic peninsula that will feed a 20 km stretch of coast with the aid of tides, waves and winds for the coming 20 years.

WHEN

TRL

Since its completion in 2011, the Sand Motor concluded a very successful initial 5 year evaluation period. There are now concrete plans for application at various other locations around the world.


Solar-powered infotainment spot 2.0 Dr. Olindo Isabella | Simone Regondi MSc

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

WHY

2

This movable stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered system can be placed as service provider at events and festivals (e.g. providing information and internet access, charging phones). It remains functional for up to one week without sun.

HOW

1

A 102 W semi-flexible crystalline silicon PV module and a 210 Ah battery bank are used to generate and store the required energy. The infotainment spot is a demonstrator for aesthetically pleasing and compact curved PV modules.

WHEN

TRL

A fully functional autonomous system prototype is available. The idea is ready to be commercialised and used at upcoming events and festivals.

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The RoboTutor: a teaching aid for schools Dr. Koen Hindriks | Dr. Joachim de Greeff

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9

WHY

2

Humanoid robots that are able to interact make people familiar with the possibilities and limitations of robots. They offer a more natural, comfortable and flexible way for humans to interact with automated systems.

HOW

1

Unique software equips robots with interactive, cognitive, and affective capabilities. It allows the robots to reason about what happens, make the right decisions, remember things, and understand and respond to natural language phrases.

WHEN

TRL

The research is being commercialised by a spinoff, in the form of developing software modules for developers. Possible applications of humanoid robots are as RoboTutor in classrooms, RoboPresenter at events, and general service provider.


Using persuasive technology interventions and big data to reduce household energy usage Dr. Laurens Rook | Prof. dr. Markus Zanker | Rebekka Aigner MSc | Prof. dr. Wolfgang Ketter

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4

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9

WHY

2

This research helps consumers to reduce their household energy consumption.

HOW

1

This research does so by providing energy consumers with (gamified) persuasive technology - you will climb the ranks of the game when you use less energy than the other people in the neighbourhood.

WHEN

TRL

Our software and intervention were tested in practice and have been proven stable and functional. It will have an impact as soon as energy providers and (local) energy communities start using it on a larger scale.

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Solar-powered bidirectional electric vehicle charging station Gautham Ram Chandra Mouli MSc | Prof. dr. eng. Pavol Bauer | Prof. dr. Miro Zeman | Menno Kardolus MSc | Jos Schijffelen BSc

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3

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WHY

2

Truly ‘green’ Electric Vehicles (EVs) require renewables for charging. Hence, we have developed a bidirectional smart charging station for EVs with integrated solar electricity generation, increased efficiency and reduced costs.

HOW

1

The EVs are directly charged from PV panels on Direct Current (DC) without going via the AC grid. The charger is bidirectional, so the EV can power your home (V2G). A smart energy management system enables >100% reduction in net costs.

WHEN

TRL

The prototype is in demonstration phase and has been tested with commercial EVs. Full market production is expected by year-end. The charger will accelerate the sustainable charging of EVs and DC grids.


Cost-effective recycling of end-of-life concrete for high-grade applications Dr. Francesco Di Maio | Dr. Somayeh Lotfi | Dr. Abraham Gebremariam

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4

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WHY

2

Recycling of end-of-life concrete reduces environmental impact, dependency on raw materials, concrete price fluctuations, and landfill demand. This technology enables the final step, separating the 0-4 mm fine fraction, in an economically viable and sustainable way.

HOW

1

A Heating-Air classification System (HAS) simultaneously heats, grinds and separates the concrete in fluidized-bed-like conditions. This weakens the bond between silica and cement paste, allowing the production of clean sand and cement clinker-type products.

WHEN

TRL

This technology completes earlier TU Delft recycling innovations (i.e. ADR). The project will upscale the lab scale facility to an economically viable 3000 kg/hour system, using its output to construct 100% recycled concrete buildings at The Green Village.

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Bacteria based healing of concrete - Using crack management to enhance durability Dr. Henk Jonkers | Ir. RenĂŠe Mors | Dr. Virginie Wiktor | Dr. ir. Lupita Sierra-Beltran | and many more

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3

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5

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9

WHY

2

Self-healing concrete maintains and repairs itself. Cracks are automatically sealed far beyond the autogenous repair limit, resolving leakages and delaying durability issues. This reduces the total costs of ownership.

HOW

1

Capsules of dormant limestone forming bacteria and their nutrients are mixed in the concrete during construction. A crack exposes the bacteria to water, which will repair the crack by converting their nutrients into limestone.

WHEN

TRL

The bacteria are already being applied ‘ad hoc’ as spray or mortar, as an innovative method of crack repair. Application of the capsules at the construction stage would be even more beneficial.


Wireless e-bike charger Prof. dr. eng. Pavol Bauer | Dr. ir. Peter van Duijsen

3

4

5

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7

8

9

WHY

2

In order to promote the use of e-bikes as alternative to cars, this research aims to increase the ease of using an e-bike. In particular, increasing the ease of charging an e-bike with a wireless charging tile.

HOW

1

An e-bike’s modified double legged kickstand uses the magnetic field generated by the tile to charge its battery. The tile is fully automatic, vandalism proof and can be integrated invisibly in urban design.

WHEN

TRL

The technology is ready for commercial application. The aim is to develop a <100 euro kit that can be added to every e-bike to enable it to use the wireless charging system.

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Monitoring surface stability from space Dr. ir. Sami Samiei Esfahany | Prof. dr. ir. Ramon Hanssen | Dr. ir. Freek van Leijen

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3

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9

WHY

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Surface stability is important for safety and sustainability. Instability can follow from e.g. gas production or mining, leading to land subsidence in the range of millimetres to centimetres. We developed a technique to observe this from space.

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Using a technique called satellite radar interferometry (InSAR), it is possible to detect surface motion with millimetre precision. The transformation of raw satellite data to quantitative information about surface stability is the essence of our research.

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We have been involved in development of geodetic deformation analysis using InSAR for the last 15 years. The technique is currently applied to monitor the effects of gas production in Groningen, and other subsidence areas in the Netherlands.


Printed flexible silicon electronics on paper Dr. Ryoichi Ishihara | Yuanxing Xu MSc | Dr. Miki Trifunovic

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Our new production process for printed flexible electronics makes it possible to print high performance chemically stable crystalline silicon on flexible, biocompatible or biodegradable substrates such as paper.

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The new process uses a novel â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;silicon inkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that uses UV light to cure instead of the traditional very high temperatures. Because crystalline silicon can be used, there is no need for poor performing and often toxic organic inks.

WHEN

TRL

The process has been developed, optimised and patented. Basic circuit components have been fabricated, confirming superior performance and improved chemical stability. Next step is to develop a complete sensor system. 45


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Evolutionary engineering of lager brewing yeast Anja Brickwedde MSc | Prof. dr. Jack Pronk | Dr. Jean-Marc Daran

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Evolutionary engineering is a strategy to improve the performance of microorganisms, the workhorses of many industrial processes. In this case the ability of lager brewing yeast to fast and more completely ferment maltotriose, an abundant sugar in barley wort, has been improved.

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A maltotriose-enriched growth medium was used to create an evolutionary pressure to a model yeast over a multitude of generations. In this survival-ofthe-fittest-like process, the yeast population evolved (via naturally occurring mutations) the enhanced fermentation characteristics.

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TRL

The evolved model yeast has been tested in a 10 hL batch, with results that match the lab results. Because of the close collaboration with industry, a successful technology transfer from laboratory to industrial scale could be demonstrated.


Sensing temperature with heat Prof. dr. Kofi Makinwa | Dr. Fabio Sebastiano | Ir. Jan Angevare | Ugur Sonmez MSc

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CPU’s can overheat and self-destruct. Preventing this requires tens of temperature sensors. Since CPU area is very expensive, such sensors need to be very small and, to save further costs, not require calibration.

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The diffusion time of heat through silicon is used to measure temperature. Since chips are made from highly pure silicon, the sensor is very accurate. A tiny (1650 µm2) sensor achieved an (uncalibrated) error of only 1.4°C.

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Professor Makinwa is the first to successfully use this principle in a practical prototype. The resulting sensor is 5x smaller and 3x more accurate than all commercial alternatives.

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CrackGuard: Monitoring fatigue cracks in steel structure Prof. dr. ir. Mirek Kaminski | Ing. Erik Puik | Menno van der Horst MSc | Sylvia van Kreveld BSc

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Steel structures in the maritime, offshore and civil industry are continuously cyclically loaded, resulting in fatigue damage. Periodic visual inspection of fatigue cracks in large steel structures is very costly and often hazardous.

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The non-invasive, wireless, low-power CrackGuard system monitors cracks by measuring discontinuities in the magnetic field in the vicinity of the defect. It can be applied on any steel structure that suffers from fatigue damage.

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The system has been validated in experiments, simulations and as labprototype. A late prototype is being developed, potential customers / pilot test cases are sought.


Up scaling the productionof solar fuels Dr. Wilson Smith

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Converting solar energy, water and CO2 with artificial photosynthesis into high energy density fuels such as H2 and CH4 promises to enable short and long term solar energy storage.

HOW

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Our artificial photosynthesis device uses only earth abundant materials and cheap, scalable fabrication techniques. The use of a bipolar membrane enables individual optimisation of reaction properties at each electrode, enabling unique overall system efficiency.

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TRL

A full scale and fully functioning 10 cm2 prototype with an efficiency of 2% has been developed. This prototype is ready for further commercialisation. Research will continue on the underlying fundamentals and the reduction of CO2. 49


Streaming DNA analysis Dr. ir. Zaid Al-Ars | Nauman Ahmed MSc

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Speeding up DNA analysis algorithms enables faster and more economic use of results and equipment, e.g. for cancer diagnosis. Waiting until the fully sequenced DNA is generated before starting the DNA analysis is currently the bottleneck.

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The TU Delft is the first to succeed in starting DNA analysis before sequencing is completed, using algorithms that predict the unsequenced part with minimal inaccuracy. This way analysis can start with incomplete sequence. The user can now choose the required accuracy versus the desired time or cost.

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TRL

A patent has been filed to protect the intellectual property rights of this solution, potential users are sought for deployment of the solution in practice and commercial exploitation.


Railway catenary simulator Ir. Evert van Veldhuizen

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A well-functioning pantograph and catenary system is crucial in electrified railway systems. Testing of innovations in this system is time consuming, labour intensive and costly. The catenary simulator offers a versatile and easy-to-use tool that accelerates their implementation.

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This novel test facility can simulate real behaviour and interaction between pantograph and catenary, as if the train would be driving on an actual railway track. This enables the development of pantograph and catenary innovations and contributes to a better understanding of the system.

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TRL

Hard- and software are now ready and results are being validated with field measurements, preliminary tests are feasible. In 2017 it underwent its first functional extension, now also allowing for sideways catenary movement.

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FuturA: future value chains of architectural services Marina Bos-de Vos MSc | Dr. ir. Leentje Volker | Prof. dr. ir. Hans Wamelink | Bente Lieftink MSc | Dr. Armand Smits | Prof. dr. Kristina Lauche

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Commercial and professional goals are often competing, especially for architects, designers, engineers and other creative professionals. Developing economically viable and socially sustainable business models for future service delivery is therefore challenging.

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This research has developed the first science-based method that supports the design of business models for creative professionals in the construction industry. The method incorporates strategies to mitigate conflicts between competing goals.

WHEN

TRL

The research has been conducted in close collaboration with industrial partners from the construction field. Results are being disseminated. A final version of the method is due at the end of 2017.

futurA future value chains of architectural services


Tackling the Grand Challenges through theatrical games Dr. Rens Kortmann | Arlon Luijten

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Games have proven to be more effective than classroom education, professional training, and policy workshops to tackle the Grand Challenges of today’s society. Adding elements from theatre will even further enhance a game’s ability to do so. Players of theatrical games are intensely confronted with their own values and behaviour in an immersive environment. Such embodied experiences produce deep learning and readiness to change one’s behaviour and its underlying values. We develop these games and design principles. The Parsifal Playingfields game was a major field experiment in this research. Several design principles and learning outcomes were established. We welcome external partners to join our explorations and make societal impact.

playingfields

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PARSIFAL

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Composite piezoelectric material for energy harvesting Prof. dr. Pim Groen | Dr. Jibran Khalig

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Piezoelectric materials can be used to harvest energy from vibrations. Our polymer/ceramic composite piezoelectric material combines the flexibility of polymers with the performance of ceramics, expanding the scope of practical application of these kind of materials.

HOW

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Our material consist of chains of micron-sized ceramic particles in a polymer matrix. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flexible enough to vibrate, and efficient enough to produce a useable amount of energy. This energy can be used to power batteryless sensors.

WHEN

TRL

The material is ready for experimental application in commercial products. For instance as energy source for internet of things sensor systems or for (constant) structural health monitoring.


ROSIN: digital industrial platform for robotics Dr. Carlos Hernandez Corbato | Prof. dr. ir. Martijn Wisse | Ir. Gijs van der Hoorn | Ir. Mukunda Bharatheesha

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Advanced robot capabilities promise more flexibility and productivity in new tasks, affordable for SMEs. The bottleneck for widespread application in industry is the limited availability of industrial quality robot software.

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Robot Operating System for Industry (ROS-Industrial) builds on industrial quality open-source software to develop advanced robots. Via education, quality-assurance tools, community building and funding, ROSIN promotes market application of robotics in industry.

WHEN

TRL

By 2020, ROS-Industrial will be the standard platform for robotics, with more than 50 successful industrial systems installed, 1000 engineers trained, and a self-sustaining community of developers and users.

Funded by European Union Horizon 2020 Programme Grant No. 732287

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Faรงade leasing Ir. Juan Azcรกrate-Aguerre | Dr. ir. Alexandra den Heijer | Dr. -Ing. Tillmann Klein

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A multidisciplinary team within the Faculty of Architecture is the first to operationalize a Product-Service System (PSS) for building facades. A PSS delivers performance instead of products with positive financial, environmental and social consequences.

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With a practical, design-driven research approach the team investigates the challenges of such a PSS. These involve creating a business case for all stakeholders involved with the right distribution of benefits, responsibilities and risks.

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TRL

A consortium of over 15 partner companies, representing suppliers and clients in the construction industry, are working on a pilot project at the TU Delft campus. The first circular, multi-functional faรงade will be installed in June 2016.


The potential of emerging materials Prof. dr. ir. Kaspar Jansen | Ir. dr. Elvin Karana

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Novel materials with unique properties are constantly becoming available to designers. Kaspar Jansen and his group work on exploring the potential of such materials and develop theories, tools and methods for their application.

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Tangible problems and products form the vehicle to show a materialâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential. Both the social and the technological aspects are included in the research, coupling materials science, design engineering and social science.

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TRL

Currently, four research topics are studied: flexible electroluminescent materials, environmentally sensitive materials, shape morphing materials and smart textiles.

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Engaging augmented reality Dr. Marina Cidota | Dr. Stephan Lukosch

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Augmented Reality (AR) enriches a userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perception of the present reality. Relevant information can be provided in real-time and in-place to support and improve awareness, decision-making, experience sharing, training, and collaboration.

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Engaging, unobtrusive, and user-friendly AR systems are developed for application in security, medicine, sports, and training contexts. Combined with serious gaming, they allow users to interact and co-create with each other while providing motivating, enjoyable and rewarding experiences.

WHEN

TRL

The developed AR systems are currently evaluated in experiments with groups of actual users from the research partners and collaborating companies. The insights are used to create early prototype systems for reallife application.


Collaborative Virtual Research Environment Dr. Anneke Zuiderwijk - Van Eijk | Yi Yin MSc

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Virtual Research Environments (VREs) are required for efficient collaboration between scientific disciplines to solve societal challenges. Current VREs suffer from data heterogeneity, user experience issues, and data context issues.

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This novel collaborative VRE architecture and prototype integrate existing VRE tools, standardized building blocks and workflows where appropriate, and develops innovative new ones where needed. This results in improved VRE usability, interoperability and deployment.

WHEN

TRL

The VRE will be demonstrated for research in various scientific domains, including the environmental and earth science domain (e.g. environmental pollution, climate change, earthquakes), building on 25 real use cases.

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SocialGlass Dr. Alessandro Bozzon | Achilleas Psyllidis

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Understanding the complexity of urban dynamics requires the combination of information from multiple city data sources and the active involvement of people for knowledge creation. SocialGlass supports social data analysis and sense-making at scale.

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SocialGlass is a platform that exploits big data processing and crowd-sourcing techniques to create, integrate, analyse and interpret big heterogeneous social data in real-time. Its output is a real-time dashboard for monitoring and/or adhoc reports for sense making of data.

WHEN

TRL

SocialGlass has been successfully used during real-world city-scale events such as Milan Design Week 2013, Amsterdam Light Festival 2014, SAIL 2015, and Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day 2016.


Cast glass interlocking components Ir. Faidra Oikonomopoulou | Ir. Telesilla Bristogianni | Ir. Lida Barou | Dr. ir. Fred Veer | Prof. ir. Rob Nijsse

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Interlocking cast glass bricks form aesthetically pleasing, stronger than concrete, easy to assemble and disassemble (and thereby easy to recycle), fully transparent construction components for load-bearing structures.

HOW

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The interlocking bricks are stacked with a dry, colourless intermediate layer in between to account for size tolerances due to the production method. The casting enables thicker, more complex, and stronger components than the usual float glass.

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TRL

The knowledge base is being advanced by research through design to enable the application of glass in load-bearing elements. The resulting knowledge (e.g. design rules, production methods and design software), is shared with both practice and scientific community. 61


XY360: ferrofluid microscope stage Ir. Jo Spronck | Ir. Stefan Lampaert

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Ferrofluid offers a 10 to 100 times more cost effective way to combine translation and rotation in high precision nanometre positioning systems such as microscope stages.

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The microscope stage, named XY360, is supported by drops of ferrofluid, a colloidal liquid of oil and ferromagnetic nanoparticles. The oilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lubrication and viscous damping enable a robust, compact and cost effective high precision stage.

WHEN

TRL

A functioning early prototype is now available for investors and microscope fabricators. Other potential applications of ferrofluid are stick-slip-free high precision bearings, targeted lubrication, active seals, micro valves, medical applications, art, and more.


Mechanical snake-like structures Ir. Paul Henselmans | Ir. Costanza Culmone | Prof. dr. ir. Paul Breedveld

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Snakes are able to navigate cluttered environments by steering their flexible bodies along the same path as their head. A device with similar abilities will have a variety of interesting applications of various scales. Examples range from steerable endoscopes to search and rescue robots.

HOW

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A cable-driven structure inspired by the tentacles of a Loliginidae squid enables the movement of the flexible device. Controlling the snake-like motion is based on a fully mechanical approach, excluding the need for computerised sensing and actuation, reducing space and costs.

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TRL

Various prototypes already validated the workings of the proposed technique. Its implementation is the next step. Currently, the focus is on the implementation as a surgical tool, but other fields of application are being explored. 63


Real-time feedback on individual facility usage Dr. Stefan van der Spek | Ir. Edward Verbree

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Connected devices can be used for indoor and outdoor tracking of people. Combining this individual location-based data with other datasets generates user feedback on facilities that benefits asset management as well as users.

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This research focusses on network-based (Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, etc.) methods to locate people. Applications for this technology and ways to enable realtime and post-processing sense making of data are investigated.

WHEN

TRL

TU Delft campus has been a living lab for the technology, using studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and staffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wi-Fi connections to study classroom occupation rates, routings over campus, Wi-Fi capacity, and more.


Ebarcodes: micro barcodes for food and pharmaceuticals with integrated anticounterfeiting and sensory function Dr. Burak Eral | Dr. Ivan Rehor | Eric Reza Safai BSc

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To counter increasing trade in counterfeit and contaminated food products, edible labelling and sensing technologies that can be integrated into produce are required.

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Our natural polymer micro barcode integrates micro-scale methods for sculpturing particle form (to counter counterfeiting) with molecular level chemical design (enabling microbiological sensory functions and biodegradability). Read-out is simple with a portable optical microscope attached to a cell phone.

WHEN

TRL

Currently, model food products, intravenous solutions and solid oral formulations are successfully labelled with micro particles and the functionality of the sensors is demonstrated. Using 100% edible materials for production is the next challenge. 65


Computer-assisted managing of geothermal energy Dr. Denis Voskov | Mark Khait MSc | Prof. dr. David Bruhn

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Geothermal projects demand high capital investments to reach their resource - deep subsurface hot water reservoirs. Management decisions thus rely heavily on modelling of reactive flow and transport through various types of rocks.

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We have a unique expertise on modelling and evaluation of reservoir uncertainties. Applied to geothermal energy, this provides better prediction, improves control of project performance, and indicates levels of financial, environmental and safety risks.

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TRL

Our approach is being applied in the Delft Geothermal Project (DAP). The goal is to deliver energy to the TU Delft central heating system and provide scientific data for monitoring and research purposes.


Photoconductive Connected Arrays for THz Time Domain Systems Dr. Giorgio Carluccio | Dr. Alessandro Garufo | Dr. Nuria Llombart | Prof. dr. Andrea Neto

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Practical application of THz radiation is characterised by the low energy output of current antennas, thus limiting the performances of time domain systems (short range and long integration time). This novel antenna has a tenfold power output and a larger bandwidth.

HOW

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An array of antennas are connected via their metallic parts, and powered by a single laser. Though challenging to produce, the design is suitable for radiating energy on the large bandwidth required by THz time domain systems.

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TRL

The production process is currently being developed in collaboration with the Else Kooi lab. Once completed (expected time 1-2 years), the antenna can be integrated in already existing THz time domain systems typically used by chemical and pharmaceutical industries as well as safety and security. 67


Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion control Dr. QiPing Chu | Dr. ir. Erik-Jan van Kampen

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Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion (INDI) control provides robustness for nonlinear control systems (such as aircraft, pneumatic actuator systems, robotic manipulators) and reduces dependency on model information.

HOW

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The INDI control strategy uses already available sensor data to generate an incremental control law that does not rely on model information.

WHEN

TRL

Since its introduction in 2010 INDI has significantly advanced, with successful applications in e.g. an unmanned helicopter, unmanned fixed wing aircrafts, quadrotors, a fly-by-wire military helicopter, and a real flight test of the TU Delft Cessna Citation II fly-by-wire aircraft.


Dynamically adaptive processors Dr. ir. Stephan Wong | Ir. Joost Hoozemans | Ir. Jeroen van Straten

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The Ď -VEX processor adapts itself to programs by splitting or merging cores. Efficient execution of any workload can be achieved without wasting resources resulting in improved energy efficiency.

HOW

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The underlying processor organization allows for dynamic rerouting of (parallel) program instructions. Consequently, a single design can execute one program fast or multiple programs in parallel.

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TRL

The processor is designed by the TU Delft and widely used by other academics in research settings. The proof of concept is now being evaluated in aerospace, robotics, and healthcare applications.

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Femto-pipetting for quick cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy sample preparation

Dr. Murali Krishna Ghatkesar | Ir. Eleonoor Verlinden | Ir. Jochem Pronk Prof. Urs Staufer | Prof. Andreas Engel

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Current freeze-slice-and-search method for sub-cellular component sample preparation is time consuming. It even has the risk of damaging and thus altering the sample.

HOW

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A microfluidic cantilever that can pipette femto-litre volumes is developed. It injects fluorophores inside a cell and aspirates the desired labelled component. The in-situ force sensor detects cell penetration.

WHEN

TRL

In two years, an early prototype of the setup will be ready. It will redefine the sample preparation technique for cryo-TEM making it fast and efficient, saving a lot of costs.


Surgical equipment for safe surgery worldwide Roos Oostings MSc | Prof. dr. Jenny Dankelman | Dr. ir. Linda Wauben

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In order to increase worldwide access to safe surgery, we develop basic surgical equipment for low- and middle-income countries. This could for example introduce minimally invasive surgery there, which reduces recovery times and chances on infections.

HOW

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We aim to make equipment cheaper and easier to, or less needy of, repair by using locally available components, or by using standardised (e.g. USB cameras and smart phones) instead of brand-specific components.

WHEN

TRL

Our first devices are a video laryngoscope used for general anaesthetics and a laparoscope used for minimally invasive surgery. The devices are expected to be ready for clinical validation in 4 years.

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Magnetic cooling Prof. dr. Ekkes BrĂźck | Dr. ir. Niels van Dijk

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Current refrigerants will be banned in the near future because of their environmental impact and/or safety issues. Magnetic cooling promises to be the most efficient and viable alternative.

HOW

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Advanced material research yielded an efficient magnetocaloric material that changes temperature when exposed to a changing magnetic field, enabling water-based heat pumps. These pumps are quiet, environmentally friendly and safe.

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TRL

Two fully functioning prototypes have been built by the researchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partners. Current bottleneck is the cost of the permanent magnets (not the magneto- caloric materials), but the concept is becoming increasingly economically viable.


Self-healing toolbox for polymer structuresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and -goodsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lifetime extension Dr. Santiago Garcia | Arijana Susa MSc | Wouter Post MSc | Nan Zhong MSc | Vincenzo Montano MSc

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Over the last years we have developed a wide range of self-healing strategies and characterisation methods. This forms a unique in-house `toolbox´ to implement service-life extending strategies in areas such as (protective) coatings, adhesives and composites.

HOW

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Some examples of these tools are intrinsic self-healing polymers and coatings, processable thermosets, smart release systems, responsive composites, and functional fibres. We work on material development and characterisation and are able to produce demonstrators.

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TRL

We now have a broad spectrum of self-healing materials and sufficient scientific understanding of their potential. It is the moment to actively explore and develop lab-scale strategies for specific real industrial problems or new business opportunities in close collaboration with companies. 73


Energy piles in the Netherlands Dr. Rafid Al-Khoury | Dr. Phil Vardon | Dr. Mehdi Musivand Arzanfudi

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Energy piles are a technology for heating and cooling buildings. Construction companies remain reluctant to apply it because of the potential failure risks due to unforeseen cyclic thermal stresses. No worldwide design method is accepted yet.

HOW

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The technology is developed and validated for Dutch application in laboratory and full-scale tests and with numerical modelling. Efficiency, design methods, energy saving potential, and more is investigated for short term (seasonal) and long term (years) periods.

WHEN

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A full-scale energy pile demonstrator at The Green Village will be complemented with lab-scale experiments. This research will enhance the feasibility of commercial application in the Netherlands.


Composites to innovate sport Dr. Otto Bergsma | Marco Reijne MSc

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Tuning of a compositeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constituents, shape and manufacturing process enables enhancement of the performance of a product. Lightness and de-materialisation are key aspects of composites for sports, enhancing performance and offering new features.

HOW

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Our expertise on composites allows development of close to market composite solutions ranging from sports items (e.g. pole vaulting poles, prostheses blades) to protective structures (e.g. UN shrapnel helmets), and performance items (e.g. compressor pistons).

WHEN

TRL

A recent innovation is a pole vaulting pole that stores energy in both bending and compression. Impact on the shoulders decreases, leading to less injuries and enhanced skills. In the coming year collaborations with companies for pole vaulting poles are sought. 75


Local water treatment and reuse in megacities Dr. ir. Merle de Kreuk | Dr. ir. Ralph Lindeboom | Dr. ir. Doris van Halem | Dr. Andre Marques Arsenio | Prof. dr. ir. Luuk Rietveld

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Small scale decentralised wastewater treatment plants can solve fresh water scarcity in developing megacities, where central wastewater treatment and -infrastructure is typically lacking.

HOW

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This project aims to integrate different innovative and proven technologies into decentralised water treatment plants. These will recover water of a location-specific and reuse-dictated quality, as well as recover fuels and nutrients.

WHEN

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Pilot projects of this philosophy and technology are (to be) realised in India and Mozambique. The resulting knowhow will be applicable in all megacities with these (waste)water challenges.


New vitamins for enzymes Dr. Caroline Paul

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Currently, unstable and expensive natural cofactors are used for redox reactions with oxidoreductase enzymes. Synthetic analogues are now possible, providing much better characteristics.

HOW

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Synthetic analogues can increase reaction rates by orders of magnitude, are orders of magnitude cheaper to produce, and are more stable than the natural cofactor.

WHEN

TRL

The synthetic cofactors have already been proven to work for various oxidoreductase-catalysed reactions. Caroline is now engineering new cofactors as well as the enzymes themselves to expand the range of applications. 77


3D Handscanner: to obtain a 3D surface model of the hand Dr. Johan Molenbroek | Dr. Yu Song | Annette de Vries MSc | Dolores Hilhorst MSc | Alexander Weiss MSc

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3D Scans of the hand are time- and labour-intensive, but necessary to produce personalized products like surgical instruments, orthoses and prosthetics. This research developed a dedicated and affordable 3D Handscanner.

HOW

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The user-friendly device simultaneously takes multiple pictures of the hand from different angles and combines these almost instantly into a highly detailed and accurate 3D surface scan of the hand using photogrammetry.

WHEN

TRL

The prototype is further improved from a system level, enhancing userfriendliness for user and patient. Possible other applications, for instance in customised sportswear, are explored.


Real time accurate prediction of approaching waves and wave induced ship motions Peter Naaijen MSc | Prof. dr. ir. Rene Huijsmans

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Accurately predicting approaching waves and resulting ship motions several minutes ahead enables to anticipate during offshore operations: avoid situations with high waves, grab a window of opportunity with low waves.

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An innovative algorithm uses the shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s radar data to image the 3D wave pattern around the ship. Modeling its propagation yields the waves arriving at the ship and the shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motions of up to several minutes in the future.

WHEN

TRL

There has been a very successful proof of concept on board of a ship in the North Sea. Next step is to further validate the technology in multiple case studies.

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4D-Fatigue Ir. Paula van Lieshout | Prof. dr. ir. Mirek Kaminski | Dr. ir. Henk den Besten

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This unique hexapod enables to compare multiaxial fatigue design models with each other and with the results of representative experiments. This reduces model uncertainty and thus increases safety. Ultimately, it leads to reduced costs, downtime and risks.

HOW

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Different load schemes are applied to a welded test piece, and per scheme the results are compared to estimates from different fatigue design models. The hexapodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to apply multiaxial and non-proportional loading significantly increases the value of these results.

WHEN

TRL

The massive hexapod is installed at the TU Delft in 2017, enabling multiaxial and non-proportional loading of up to 1 MN on a test piece of 1 m3. Forces can be applied with a frequ ency of up to 30 Hz.


Double Face 2.0 Dr. ir. Martin Tenpierik | Dr. Michela Turrin MArch | Tudor Cosmatu MArch | Ir. Yvonne Wattez

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Double Face 2.0 offers an adjustable, lightweight and translucent alternative to current heavy and opaque Trombe walls to encourage wide-spread application. These passive facade elements save energy and stabilise room temperatures.

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This novel Trombe wall applies an insulator (aerogel) and heat storage (phase change material) on either side of a rotatable element. In winter it captures, stores, and re-radiates heat from the sun (heating); in summer it captures internal heat (cooling).

WHEN

TRL

The aim is to develop the concept into a computational designable element that can be tailored to and produced for any given design and environment. A first prototype has already been constructed and analysed.

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Delfi-PQ: next level of satellite miniaturisation Ir. Jasper Bouwmeester | Dr. Stefano Speretta | Jiun Chia MSc | Dr. Alessandra Menicucci | Prof. dr. Eberhard Gill

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Delfi-PQ is the next level in satellite miniaturisation: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eight times smaller than its predecessors Delfi-C3 and Delfi-n3Xt . It functions as platform for technology demonstration and hands-on education

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Miniaturisation of space technology and distributed space systems are key research themes driving the development of Delfi satellites. Miniaturisation is beneficial because of cheaper launches, more potential payload volume and the ability to be applied as swarm or large constellation.

WHEN

TRL

Delfi-C3 was launched in 2008 and Delfi-n3Xt in 2013. Delfi-PQ will be developed iteratively and expected to be launched in 2018. From there onwards, annual launches of Delfi satellites are foreseen.


SewerSense: multi-sensor condition assessment for sewer asset management Dr. Lisa Scholten | Dr. Arno Knobbe | Danai Konti MSc | Dirk Meijer MSc

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As sewer systems deteriorate, rehabilitation is needed. Current rehabilitation decisions are based on CCTV inspection and subjective condition rating. Shifting from rating-based to performance-based asset management is needed.

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Novel self-learning algorithms combine data from existing and novel sensors to speed-up and objectify defect detection. Failure models are used to assess performance on key objectives to prioritise asset management activities.

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TRL

The focus for the coming years is to increase the ability and reliability of automated defect detection and to assess the performance implications of defects and failure. Concepts will be validated using a multi-sensor inspection prototype.

Knowledge Programme Urban Drainage (KPUD)

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SoSEAL: Soil Sealing by Enhanced Aluminium and dissolved organic matter Leaching

Dr. Susanne Laumann | Prof. dr. ir. Timo Heimovaara | Jiani Zhou MSc | Dr. Boris Jansen | Olaf Brock MSc

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In-situ permeability reduction by SoSEAL allows control of unwanted seepage on large scales, while being a cost-effective alternative to existing techniques with an additional self-healing capacity and low impact to the surrounding environment.

HOW

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SoSEAL is inspired by the podzolisation process, in which metal-organic matter precipitates form an almost impermeable soil layer. The parallel development of applied in-situ technology and fundamental insights into processes within the project is unique.

WHEN

TRL

The first pilot has been carried out and shows promising results. More field tests are performed within the next years in close cooperation with our commercial partners to develop the necessary knowhow for application.


Modelling of complex suspensions Dr. ir. Wim-Paul Breugem | Dr. ir. Geert Keetels

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Suspensions are widely used in industry (energy, dredging, mining, food), prompting an increasing need for more reliable models. Current - empirical models often donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide the desired reliability.

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Interface-resolved simulations of turbulent dense suspensions at the microscopic (grain) level will be supplemented with new experimental data. This will enable the development of reliable continuum models.

WHEN

TRL

This research focuses on dredging applications, but it is equally interesting for the energy sector, process industry, and other industrial partners working with heat and mass transport in and by suspensions.

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Context Variation by Design: intentional design for scalability Ir. Wouter Kersten | Prof. dr. ir. Jo van Engelen | Dr. ir. Jan-Carel Diehl

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Context Variation by Design (CVD) acknowledges realityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complexity as starting point to address societal challenges. This enables design of solution architectures that can be easier adapted to different contextual demands.

HOW

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CVD uses four principles: systematic variation, hierarchical decomposition, satisficing, and discursiveness. These principles create design spaces based on collective- instead of only context-specific intelligence. They reveal unexpected connections between contexts and inspire novel solutions.

WHEN

TRL

We are already applying this approach in a variety of projects, working with a variety of companies. We aim at increasing our understanding of CVDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s applicability and its conditions for success.


GPU-based solid modeller for complex objects Prof. dr. Charlie Wang | Dr. Jun Wu

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Robust geometric computation is essential to deal with the complex geometry in the design phase of, and print path generation in, 3D printing. This new modeller is faster, simpler, and more robust as current alternatives.

HOW

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Instead of explicitly defining and computing geometry, this Layered DepthNormal Image (LDNI) based method represents objects as a collection of images. With LDNI, operations like scaffolding and offsetting can be executed near real-time compared to hours.

WHEN

TRL

A number of test cases has demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of the developed modeller. The open source solid modeller is ready to be further integrated into various computer-aided design and manufacturing software systems.

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On-chip optical sensors with attonewton sensitivity Dr. Richard Norte | Dr. Simon Groeblacher | JoĂŁo Moura MSc

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We fabricate the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thinnest and most mechanically-isolated mirrors with potential applications in force and mass sensing, inertial navigation, optomechanics, optical filters, quantum information processing, and gravity detection.

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Our novel sensors operate at room-temperature and on-chip making them the highest quality and commercially viable platform for integrated photonic and MEMS circuits. Their simple design makes them immediately packageable and easy to functionalise.

WHEN

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Using world-class expertise in nanofabrication, we produce the highest yield in ultra-thin MEMS literature. Coupled with simple designs, this can be translated into industrial manufacturing, significantly reducing production costs and timelines.


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Nano-carriers for alpha radionuclide therapy Dr. ir. Antonia Denkova | Ir. Robin de Kruijff

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The recoil of their decay enables nuclides used in alpha radionuclide therapy to escape the targeted area and damage healthy tissue. Nano-carriers can retain the recoil to the targeted area.

HOW

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Block polymer based nano-carriers (polymersomes) are loaded with the alpha emitter 225Ac. The emitter is precipitated inside the nano-carrier into nanometric particles.

WHEN

TRL

The technology has been proven effective in in vitro experiments on 3D spheroidal tumours. To further this technology, in vivo studies are now necessary.

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WISENT: Wireless (re)programming of batteryless sensors Dr. Przemysław Pawełczak | Jethro Tan MSc | Henko Aantjes | Amjad Majid MSc

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Truly battery-/wireless implementation of CRFIDs is inhibited by the need for a cable to program the CRFID and the difficulty in streaming data from a reader to the CRFID.

HOW

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Przemysław developed the Wisent communication protocol that operates on top of the commercial UHF RFID communication protocol. It enables the RFID reader to (re)programme the CRFID even when it’s already implanted/ embedded.

WHEN

TRL

Future CRFIDs will be able to form a network by communicating with each other. This extends their reach and functionality, bringing even more need for protocols such as Wisent.


On-site sports aerodynamics with the Ring of Fire Dr. Andrea Sciacchitano | Wouter Terra MSc | Prof. dr. Fulvio Scarano

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Andrea and his team developed Large Volume Particle Image Velocimetry, enabling a multitude of new (life size) objects to be aerodynamically analysed. For instance professional cyclists.

HOW

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The possible volume is increased using innovations in software and hardware: among others using relatively large helium filled soap bubbles as tracer material and a new type of nozzle.

WHEN

TRL

Already in use for static analysis of cyclists of the Giant Alpecin team, a future application is real time aerodynamic analysis of training cyclists in a Ring of Fire (indoor cycling track).

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WaterTagging: DNA micro particles for tracing and modelling water flows Dr. Thom Bogaard | Dr. Jan-Willem Foppen | Dr. Sulalit Bandyopadhyay

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Being able to follow and quantify water flow paths is of key importance for pollution studies and water flow analysis. There is a need for environmental friendly technologies for this with increased spatial and temporal coverage.

HOW

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Micro particles with DNA-tags are proposed as solution, because they are detectable in extremely low concentrations and can be coded in innumerable ways while keeping identical particle properties.

WHEN

TRL

We are currently working on tailoring the particles. The next step is to develop protocols for application into surface and subsurface water systems. Widespread application is foreseen within years.


ADAM: Acoustics by parametric Design and Additive Manufacturing Ir. Foteini Setaki MSc | Prof. dr. ir. Arjan van Timmeren | Dr. ir. Martin Tenpierik | Dr. Michela Turrin MArch | Dr. ir. Fengnian Tian

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Cancelling out undesired low frequencies is hard to do effectively and limits architectual freedom. Our novel passive sound absorbing method offers an easily customisable solution.

HOW

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Tubes integrated in a 3D printed geometry such as a curved panel or freestanding form apply Passive Destructive Interference to cancel out a specific, tuneable, frequency band. It does so especially effective for lower frequency ranges (heavy machinery, airplanes).

WHEN

TRL

The method is being demonstrated in three typical application areas. Further scale up involves developing design software for easy application of the technology by architects.

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A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory Dr. Sander Otte | Floris Kalff MSc | Marnix Rebergen | Nora Fahrenfort Dr. Jan Girovsky | Ranko Toskovic MSc

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Every day, modern society creates more than a billion gigabytes of new data. To cope with this ever increasing quantity of data, this new storage technique represents each bit by a single atom.

HOW

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A self-organised two-dimensional layer of chlorine atoms on a copper crystal surface is manipulated with scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) technology. Uniquely, the data is stored in missing atoms (vacancies), rather than actual atoms, offering superior control and robustness.

WHEN

TRL

A successful 1 kilobyte proof of concept with a storage density ~500 times higher as state-of-the-art hard disk drives has been developed. It is stable up to 77 K. Companies that can take on further development towards commercial application are being sought.


Self-healing asphalt Shi Xu MSc | Prof. dr. ir. Erik Schlangen

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Aging of asphalt roads can be countered by applying a rejuvenator. While a spray of asphalt rejuvenator only penetrates the top layer, these rejuvenator capsules in the asphalt concrete can rejuvenate the asphalt where and when necessary.

HOW

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The 1,8 mm capsules are made of a cheap and easy to process alginate, containing the rejuvenator in their matrix. When a micro crack occurs across the capsule, the matrix breaks and the rejuvenator leaks out, filling and repairing the asphalt.

WHEN

TRL

The capsules are already able to withstand the entire production process of an asphalt road, and their result has been proven on lab scale. The details of the application method are being investigated.

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Polarimetry on the moon Dr. Daphne Stam

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Polarimetry can be a strong tool for investigating exoplanets. Computer models to interpret polarimeter data are required. A polarimeter on the moon observing Earth can validate these models and provide benchmark data.

HOW

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The polarisation of light that a planet reflects contains unique information about its atmosphere and surface. From the moon, our polarimeter can measure the earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spectral polarisation variations over time.

WHEN

TRL

We develop Lunar Observatory of Unresolved Polarimetry of Earth (LOUPE). Observing the earth from the moon, LOUPE will provide unique data to validate computer models to interpret future exoplanet polarisation observations.


TRANS-FORM Dr. Oded Cats | Dr. Flurin Hänseler | Ir. Menno Yap | Dr. ir. Niels van Oort

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Disruptions in public transport cause crowding and delays that propagate across the transport network. This complicates deciding what intervention would be best for the passengers. A Decision Support System (DSS) is developed to help decision makers.

HOW

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This DSS includes real-time traffic management strategies with forecasting passengers flows using smartcard data. It supports decision makers in how to respond to disruptions, aimed at improving system reliability as experienced by passengers while considering operational constraints.

WHEN

TRL

The project started at the spring of 2016 and will last until 2019. Work is being done on passenger flow analysis and real-time traffic management modelling with The Hague as the Dutch case study.

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Corrosion and protection against corrosion: awareness and expertise Dr. Arjan Mol | Dr. Yaiza Gonzalez-Garcia

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Corrosion has a huge economic impact on society and industry (adding up to about 3.5% of our GDP), affecting structures from chips to ships and from cars to aircraft, compromising health, environment and safety.

HOW

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TU Delft is unique in its corrosion research in the Netherlands and beyond, aiming to reduce avoidable costs by supporting the entire chain via knowledge dissemination and increasing the scientific understanding of safe and eco-friendly corrosion protection.

WHEN

TRL

The above is done using masterclasses, contract research and publications. Considering the high need for efficient and effective corrosion management and control, collaboration with and demand from industry and government is high.


Enhancing self-healing of mortars by built-in crystallisation modifiers Sanne Granneman MSc | Dr. Barbara Lubelli | Prof. ir. Rob van Hees

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Salts in building materials alternate between dissolved and crystalline state depending on environmental conditions and wet-dry cycles. These dissolution/crystallisation cycles cause aesthetic and/or material damage.

HOW

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Crystallisation modifiers mixed in mortar alter the crystal form or location of crystallisation. These mortars with improved resistance to salt crystallisation damage can be used for renovation/restoration works in (historic) salt loaded masonry.

WHEN

TRL

Lab scale proof of principle tests showed an increased durability of the additivated mortars to salt damage, without significant changes to fresh or hardened mortar properties which would limit their application.

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Trustchains as next-generation blockchains Dr. Johan Pouwelse

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Blockchain technology enables safe, open source, transparent, privacyrespecting peer to peer transactions of value. It will eliminate the need for costly large central organisations to distribute that value, like banks and online retailers.

HOW

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We develop the necessary blockchain concepts for this. In our architecture, each user maintains and grows its own chain and these chains gets entangled when two users perform a transaction. This makes it scalable and tamper-proof.

WHEN

TRL

We´re at the dawn of a new revolutionary generation of blockchain technology that will have a massive impact. TU Delft has over a decade of blockchain research and is part of this revolution with theory and practiceproven concepts.


Mathematical modelling of electrical drives Dr. Domenico Lahaye | Dr. ir. Henk Polinder

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Close collaboration between electrical engineers and mathematicians results in more useful modelling that enables improved design of electrical drives in the areas of energy, maritime, aerospace and more. More complex problems can be solved with more relevant and practical results.

HOW

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In their collaboration, the researchers developed an improved double winded brushless induction motor for wind energy generation. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s significantly lighter than previous prototypes while meeting the same output characteristics.

WHEN

TRL

The combination of advanced mathematic modelling and modelling relevant problems ensures results that can be translated to actual devices. As example: the improved motor design is ready for large scale validation.

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Fibre Metal Laminates for future aeronautics Dr. ir. RenĂŠ Alderliesten | Ir. Jos Sinke | Dr. Calvin Rans | Prof. dr. ir Rinze Benedictus

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We have a unique understanding of, and experience with, Fibre Metal Laminates (FML). This enables accurate calculation and simulation of its behaviour. This is a requirement to be able to design with FML and validate/ verify these designs.

HOW

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FML blur the boundary between material and structure. Their integral design (number, type and alignment of layers) can be tailored to local stresses and functionalities, and very large panels can be produced in automated production.

WHEN

TRL

Glare is one prominent example of an FML. We have been extensively involved in its development and application. Since then, this line of research has been broadened and deepened, ready to apply not just Glare but any FML.


Fungal treatment of recalcitrant organics in wastewaters Mostafa Zahmatkesh MSc | Dr. ir. Henri Spanjers | Prof. dr. ir. Jules van Lier

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White Rot Fungi (WRF) are able to degrade lignin-like recalcitrant aromatic compounds such as pharmaceuticals, humic acids, and industrial dyes. The main challenge is application of WRF under non-sterile conditions.

HOW

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By immobilizing WRF on cheap and abundant sorghum, they get a benefiting access to nutrients. This enables their application under non-sterile conditions and eliminates the need to add additional nutrients.

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TRL

A lab scale, continuous fluidized bed bioreactor has been developed, successfully removing humic acids (>70% continuous removal) from real industrial effluent under non-sterile conditions. Further scale up is now required. 103


In situ consolidation of thermoplastics Dr. ir. Sonell Shroff

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Production of composite thermoplastics currently requires consolidation in an autoclave. In situ consolidation eliminates this requirement. This reduces product size restrictions, shortens production time, increases production process flexibility, and significantly reduces energy consumption.

HOW

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A robotic arm is fitted with a laser-heater-assisted fibre placement head to locally heat and pressurise (consolidate) the composite layers. Measurement systems check the quality of the part as it is being produced.

WHEN

TRL

With experiments we characterise the effect of production process parameters and the productsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; macroscopic properties. In several years time this will lead to reliable simulation software ready for industrial application.


A smart look into your heart: miniature probes for 3D ultrasonic imaging Dr. ir. Michiel Pertijs | Zhao Chen MSc | Dr. ir. Hans Bosch | Dr. ir. Martin Verweij | Prof. dr. ir. Nico de Jong

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Real-time 3D ultrasonic imaging from an endoscope or catheter would be extremely valuable for diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, this requires the connection of >1000 ultrasonic transducer elements in a mm-size probe.

HOW

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The strategy is to integrate a chip directly behind the elements that combines and digitises the received signals and sends them to an imaging system using a small number of micro-cables.

WHEN

TRL

While a first generation of analogue chips makes its way into commercial endoscope-based probes, we are developing innovative integrated electronics that will allow full digitisation and further probe-miniaturisation for catheters and intra-vascular imaging. 105


Smart adaptive fluorescence microscopy Dean Wilding MRes | Dr. Paolo Pozzi | Prof. dr. ir. Michel Verhaegen | Dr. Oleg Soloviev MSc | Prof. dr. Gleb Vdovin

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Confocal fluorescence microscopy is a common imaging technique in biological research. Aberrations cause imperfections in the imaging process, limiting its resolution and sensitivity. Smart adaptive optics can correct these aberrations.

HOW

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We develop hard- and software to create a cost-effective, user-friendly, realtime adaptive microscopy system. The system enables imaging in thicker samples and has a superior resolution.

WHEN

TRL

A successful proof of concept system has been constructed and validated, already allowing for seamless image optimisation without intervention of the user. In the next years an open source system will be developed.


Cutting-edge solar cell technology: from idea to fabrication Dr. Olindo Isabella | Prof. dr. Miro Zeman | Prof. dr. Arno Smets | Prof. dr. Arthur Weeber | Dr. RenĂŠ van Swaaij

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In-house fabrication of lab-scale photovoltaic devices enables prototyping of cutting edge research, leading to world class results. It enables demonstrations and furthers innovations well beyond proof of principle to a (semi-)industrial baseline.

HOW

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Unique among Dutch universities, TU Delft has in-house solar cell fabrication and characterisation facilities for solar cells based on wafer-based crystalline silicon, thin-film silicon and other thin-film technologies.

WHEN

TRL

Innovations are ongoing in close collaboration with industrial partners. In 2017, among others, > 23% conversion efficiency in c-Si solar cells and first attempts of hybrid multi-junction solar cells are expected.

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Geopolymer concrete systems for production of environmentally friendly building materials Marija Nedeljković MSc | Yibing Zuo MSc | Dr. Kamel Arbi | Dr. Guang Ye

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Ordinary Portland Cement based concrete involves “virgin” resources and an energy-intensive production process. Geopolymer concrete uses industrial by-products, reducing CO2 footprint significantly while offering improved mechanical properties. Still, its durability is unknown.

HOW

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The TU Delft Geopolymer team has developed concrete mixtures and is performing experimental and numerical investigation of the various degradation mechanisms. The ultimate goal is to bring the geopolymer concrete to a level where it can be tested in real life applications

WHEN

TRL

In the end of this project, industry will be able to use optimized mixtures in structural applications, with provided recommendations for in situ testing. Regarding that, by-products will get added value through sustainable and durable building, reduced CO2 footprint and energy consumption.


Improving the atmospheric NO2 satellite measurements in presence of fine particles Julien Chimot MSc | Dr. Tim Vlemmix | Prof. dr. Pepijn Veefkind | Prof. dr. Pieternel Levelt

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Fine particles (aerosols) largely affect our ability to measure from satellites the concentration of atmospheric NO2 gas, a key element in air quality released by human activities. Their influence must be corrected to improve our knowledge about the spatial and temporal variability of this pollutant.

HOW

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Different algorithms are developed and assessed in order to 1) detect when aerosols are present in the air, 2) characterize their effects on the satellite measurements, 3) improve the reliability of the quantified atmospheric NO2 concentrations over the world.

WHEN

TRL

The algorithms are expected to be tested at the end of 2016 - beginning of 2017. They are important for the improvements of processing chains of current (Dutch-Finnish OMI project), but also future satellite missions (e.g. the new Dutch TROPOMI satellite, to be launched in October 2016). 109


A Governance Handbook on smart mobility Dr. Haiko van der Voort | Dr. Wijnand Veeneman | Dr. Bram Klievink

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Gathering, using and enriching large amounts of data from a multitude of public and private sources poses - often ignored - governance related challenges. This Governance Handbook gives insight into these challenges.

HOW

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The handbook deals with challenges in the context of smart-mobility around data property, geographical differences and problem ownership. It indicates challenges, solutions and their consequences for smart cities, their partners, and their clients.

WHEN

TRL

The handbook is currently being developed under the EU project PETRA, and will be finished by the end of 2016.


Diatoms as building blocks for new materials Dr. Santiago Garcia | Ir. Paul Denissen

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Diatoms are silica micro-sized exoskeletons which have various nano/micro porous architectures that can be used as sustainable and cost-effective carriers for the controlled release of active substances.

HOW

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The exoskeletonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability to store and subsequently release substances can be used in for instance self-healing anti-corrosion coatings, building materials, the food industry, and controlled internal drug delivery.

WHEN

TRL

The next step in this research is to explore how the species-dependent diatom architecture influences the release kinetics, and how the architecture and surface of the exoskeletons can be adjusted to influence these release kinetics. 111


Lightweight powered knee prostheses Dr. ir. Heike Vallery | Ir. Joost van der Weijde

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A light powered knee prosthesis enables the user to perform more active motions, such as climbing stairs in a physiological way.

HOW

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An ANGle-dependent ELAstic Actuator (ANGELAA) can be the mechatronic principle to achieve this. Profiles of knee stiffness and moment requirement as function of knee angle (instead of maximum values) are used as design requirements, and matched by a nonlinear series (visco-) elastic actuator.

WHEN

TRL

A pilot experiment with an amputee subject showed the feasibility of the approach. While weight and power consumption have not yet been optimized in the prototype, the mechatronic principles and control were proven successful.


A national 3D Geoinformation dataset for urban applications Dr. Hugo Ledoux | Prof. dr. Jantien Stoter

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3D Geoinformation is in practice currently developed, if at all, in a case-bycase basis for specific projects and uses. This significantly affects quality, applicability and cost-effectiveness, and limits its potential.

HOW

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Standards are developed and existing datasets are linked to create a nationwide 3D dataset. The challenges involve defining application-specific levels of detail and content, 3D space subdivision and storing/updating/ disseminating the massive dataset.

WHEN

TRL

Municipalities are already investing in creating and using 3D datasets. For The Netherlands a first crude nationwide 3D model has been developed and published as open source data. The next steps are to build a 3D infrastructure that makes application-specific 3D data readily available. 113


Chemo enzymatical production of styrene oxide Dr. Jia Jia Dong | Dr. Elena Fernรกndez-Fueyo | Dr. Frank Hollmann

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Vanadium chloroperoxidase (VCPO) as enzyme for chemo enzymatical production offers a practical, cheap and environmental friendly alternative to chemical synthesis of the bulk chemical styrene oxide.

HOW

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We show how VCPO can be used in industrial chemo enzymatical production processes. The enzyme enables a room temperature water-based process, compared to the current one in toxic organic solvents at freezing or high temperature.

WHEN

TRL

Successful and promising lab scale proof of concept experiments have been conducted, and important process parameters have been investigated. The technology is ready for larger scale validation.


Cleaning water effectively with sunlight

HOW

TRL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Polluted water is a problem especially in developing countries, prompting a need for a cheap water cleaning device. Photocatalysts could enable the application of household scale photoreactors for this purpose. Current photoreactors/catalysts do not perform well enough for practical application. We use nanostructuring, with gas phase deposition technology, to tune and enhance the characteristics of photocatalytic materials. The improved photocatalysts will be fixated on a substrate and incorporated in an improved prototype photoreactor.

WHEN

WHY

Dominik Benz MSc | Prof. dr. ir. Ruud van Ommen

Field-tests in Vietnam are due in 2019. Further collaborations with companies active in developing countries are sought.

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The sustainable value-chain: wastewater to advanced biobased materials Prof. dr. ir. Mark van Loosdrecht | Prof. dr. Stephen Picken | Ir. Jure Zlopasa

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Sludge from NeredaÂŽ wastewater treatment systems contains 20-30 % alginate like-exopolymers (ALE) and forms an alternative to alginate derived from seaweed. Its negative value and much wider availability allows the exploration and development of an impressive range of new applications.

HOW

1

Advanced separation methods to extract ALE from the granular sludge are being investigated. ALE-based functional biomaterials provide a wide range of applications like sorbents, non-flammable materials, and coatings.

WHEN

TRL

The separation methods are primarily at lab scale proof-of-principle, ready for larger scale application. Research efforts focus on characterisation of the material to enable optimal processing and production of designer nanomaterials.


Controlling supramolecular hydrogel properties Dr. Rienk Eelkema

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Supramolecular hydrogels are networks of small molecules formed by self-assembly. Spontaneous self-assembly from simple soluble molecular building blocks and easy customisation of the final materials properties enables a vast range of applications.

HOW

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We can functionalise the hydrogels with almost any molecular group, tailor their mechanical properties, and control the density and spatial distribution of their network.

WHEN

TRL

Hydrogels are already used in many commercial applications. Because of the ease of the customisation, the time from idea to test substance is much shorter than for alternatives. We are eager to develop demonstrators for such application ideas. 117


Cell-free phospholipid biosynthesis

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TRL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Lipids are interesting for science and industry (e.g. for cosmetics, drug delivery, emulsifiers). Producing lipids in vitro rather than inside living organisms (in vivo) provides a versatile lipid synthesis platform. This research is key to building a minimalistic cell whose lipid compartment can grow and divide. Cell-free gene expression is used to synthesize, in a micrometre-sized vesicle, the protein machinery needed to produce important phospholipids from simple precursors.

WHEN

WHY

Duco Blanken MSc | Dr. Christophe Danelon

The proof of concept reconstitution of the phospholipid synthesis machinery has already resulted in a moderate yield. The current aim is to increase this yield by for instance using different precursors and improving molecular transport across the vesicle membrane.


Mini-ORC turbogenerator for zero-energy buildings Prof. dr. Piero Colonna | Sebastian Bahamonde MSc | Adam Head MSc | Antonio Rubino MSc | Lucia Azzini MSc | Salvatore Vitale MSc

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A small concentrated solar power system based on the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with a turbo generator enables household-scale co-generation of electricity, heat and cooling with an unprecedented efficiency and utilization factor.

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The 10-15 kWe system would operate at the relatively low Tmax of 300°C, with >20% electric and ~85% overall efficiency. The main challenges are miniaturisation of the turbo generator and selection or design of the working fluid.

WHEN

TRL

The study and experiments will lead to a proof-of-concept turbine prototype and a validated software tool for mini-ORC turbine design. Market implementation is expected in several years.

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Real-time quality assurance of high precision proton therapy using prompt gamma imaging Dr. ir. Dennis Schaart | Dr. Eelco Lens

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In proton therapy, the radiation dose is delivered at a specific location (the Bragg peak). This location is sensitive to small anatomical changes and therefore real-time quality assurance of the delivered dose is paramount.

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Protons undergo nuclear interactions that result in emission of prompt gamma rays. These can be detected and give insight in the delivered dose distribution. This research investigates how to translate this signal into a dose.

WHEN

TRL

HollandPTC plans to commence treatment of patients before the end of 2017. Prompt gamma imaging will be developed and validated at HollandPTC within the next few years. Thereafter, commercial development will be pursued in collaboration with Varian Medical Systems.


Electrochemical recycling of rare earth elements from electronic waste Prakash Venkatesan MSc | Dr. Yongxiang Yang | Prof. dr. ir. Jilt Sietsma

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Rare Earth Elements (REEs) are listed by the European Union as the most critical metals due to high supply risk and increasing demand. Mining of these metals adversely affects the environment. Recovering REEs from waste is therefore imperative.

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REEs are selectively extracted from magnet waste at room temperature without net acid consumption. The process is an environmentally friendly alternative to high temperature roasting and unselective leaching processes.

WHEN

TRL

Lab scale demonstrations have been successfully completed. Legislators could reduce dependency on foreign industries by initiating dedicated collection of scrap magnets and funding further research.

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Optical ring resonator sensors for IntraVascular Photoacoustic Imaging

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TRL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 IntraVascular Photoacoustic Imaging uses ultrasound to image lipids on artery walls. In contrast to current piezoelectric ultrasound sensors, integrated-photonics ring resonator ultrasound sensors are mass producible and MRI-compatible, while being cheaper and more sensitive. A ring resonator is located on a silicon membrane that is excited by the ultrasound. This deforms the ring and thereby modulates the resonance wavelength of the ring resonator, which can be detected and translated into an ultrasound intensity.

WHEN

WHY

Dr. Jaap Caro | Boling Ouyang MSc

We develop the individual sensors, an array of sensors, and readout of the array with an interrogator that is compatible with the final photoacoustic imaging. We are interested in getting into contact with end users of the resulting catheter.


Autonomous shipping for smart logistics Dr. Rudy Negenborn | Dr. ir. Robert Hekkenberg | Ir. Klaas Visser | Dr. ir. Milinko Godjevac

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Autonomous shipping has the potential to significantly lower the cost of shipping, solve anticipated crew shortages, increase safety, improve working conditions and better integrate shipping in the transport system.

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We investigate how to design efficient, reliable and safe autonomous ships. This includes onboard ship control-and-operation intelligence as well as smart coordination among ships, terminals, infrastructure and logistic systems.

WHEN

TRL

The first well-developed concepts for autonomous/unmanned cargo ships are expected by 2020. The theoretical basis has been developed and is now being translated to practice. Scaled demonstrators are foreseen in 2018, with extended coordinated platoons of vessels following soon. 123


Graphene squeeze-film pressure sensor Ir. Robin Dolleman | Dr. ir. Sten Vollebregt | Prof. dr. Peter Steeneken

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Further miniaturisation of MEMS-based pressure sensors is practically impossible because of size and brittleness of the membrane. This graphene based sensor is 45x more responsive and 25x smaller than state-of-the-art MEMS-based alternatives.

HOW

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A 10 nm graphene layer is used as membrane. This thinness improves the responsivity, and enables a different design of the sensor (i.e. squeeze-film pressure sensor). This design enables absolute air pressure measurement and does not require a reference pressure.

WHEN

TRL

A 5 Îźm prototype is being developed in collaboration with pressure sensor manufacturers. Test cases and end users are now being sought.


Computer assisted assessment of depression from behavioural cues Dr. Hamdi Dibeklioğlu | Dr. Jan van Gemert | Prof. dr. ir. Marcel Reinders

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Fast and reliable diagnosis of depression is of vital importance. Current methods to assess depression are subjective as they rely on clinical interviews and self-report scales, and are time-consuming.

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Our system supports a medical doctor in an objective and timely diagnosis. It’s based on analysing temporal dynamics of patients’ behaviour (e.g. temporal characteristics of facial expressions and movement of head) using computer vision and machine learning techniques.

WHEN

TRL

The system can already discriminate three levels of depression severity, with a 78% accuracy. At least 150 psychiatric patients and 30 healthy subjects will be observed longitudinally in this research.

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Cognitive engineering of smart cyber-physical system Prof. dr. Imre Horvรกth | Dr. Zoltรกn Rusรกk | Dr. Wilfred van der Vegte

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Smart Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) have the capability of self-awareness and self-adaptation. They can learn, reason and build their own operation and adaptation plans under changing conditions. Such systems can be distributed and pervasive. The scope of applications is limitless.

HOW

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For smart CPSs a new type of reasoning mechanism called procedural abduction is being developed and implemented as a reusable software platform. This mechanism enables finding the relative best operation strategy and making architectural and functional adaptations accordingly.

WHEN

TRL

Elements of procedural abduction have been implemented amongst others in an engagement enhancing stroke rehabilitation system and a personalised fire evacuation system. The paradigm shift to smart CPSs will significantly influence product and service development.


Autonomous exploration with pocket drones Dr. Guido de Croon | Christophe de Wagter MSc | Kimberly McGuire MSc

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Tiny drones are inherently safe and thus suitable to perform functions in areas where people are present as well. They are truly autonomous which vastly expands their range of applications.

HOW

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The complete system, including stereovision, autopilot, localisation, computing power, and power source, is included in a 20 to 50 gram drone. This is enabled by super-efficient software and clever, often bio-inspired, tricks and data processing methods.

WHEN

TRL

The first applications are foreseen in agriculture and emergency response situations. The platform is expected to be ready for commercial application in 2022.

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Excelscope: an affordable way for early infectious disease diagnosis Dr. ir. Jan-Carel Diehl | Dr. Jacky Bourgeois | Vinay Bhajantri | Karthik Mahadevan | Diana Gonzalez Sanchez | Linxi Li

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In order to decrease the workload on hospitals in developing countries and increase the quality and accessibility of disease diagnosis, we developed an affordable digital microscope. Malaria diagnosis in Uganda is our case study.

HOW

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The microscope uses a smartphoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s camera to investigate a blood sample, with a contra-lens to increase its magnification. The fully-mechanical device is designed to allow easy assembly and repair in the local context, and low production costs.

WHEN

TRL

Though additional development (increasing resolution, further development software) is necessary, the technology has been validated in field tests in Uganda and it fits existing health procedures. Rapid application is thus possible.


Designing behaviour of 3D-printed soft robots Ir. Rob Scharff | Prof. dr. Charlie Wang | Dr. Jun Wu | Prof. dr. ir. Jo Geraedt

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The benefits of soft materials in robotics (compliance, lightweight, safe) enable new robotic products with improved human-robot interaction. The behaviour of these soft robotic products can be embedded throughout their 3D-printed design.

HOW

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In soft robotics, form and function are closely intertwined: actuators and sensors can be directly 3D-printed and changes in their form and material distribution can customise their behaviour.

WHEN

TRL

A software programme that uses mathematical methods such as topology optimisation to generate designs with the desired behaviour is being develop. This enables industrial application of customised soft robotic grippers and orthotics in a couple of years. 129


Resourceful ageing Iohanna Nicenboim MSc | Prof. dr. Elisa Giaccardi | Dr. Hayley Hung | Dr. Louis Neven | Dr. Lenneke Kuijer | Dr. Ivo Maathuis | Dr. Yanxia Zhang

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We develop innovative methods that combine IoT, machine learning and ethnography in iterative loops, to design products and services that empower elderly people to live resilient, independent lives, in which they remain in control.

HOW

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These methods are developed in a Research Through Design process, which enlists as participants a community of both elderly people and the objects they ordinarily use and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;misuseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (from material artefacts to computational technologies).

WHEN

TRL

The first IoT prototypes are being deployed, which will collect data about everyday patterns of resourceful living. The data will be analysed using machine learning and used in ethnographic interviews to generate insights that can inspire designers to enable and facilitate resourceful ageing.


PBIM: PV-Battery Integrated Module Victor Vega-Garita MSc | Prof. dr. eng. Pavol Bauer | Dr. Laura Ramirez-Elizondo

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WHY

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The installation cost is significant in PV-battery systems, accounting for around 21% of the total cost. This cost can be reduced by using one integrated device that is scalable and easy to install.

HOW

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This novel plug-and-play integrated device (250 W/1 kWh) reduces the installation cost by combining a PV panel, battery pack, and power electronics in one device.

WHEN

TRL

The goal is to design, build and test a full-scale prototype within 2 years. We start by finding the most appropriate battery size, battery technology, and thermal management.

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Measuring plant thirst Dr. ir. Susan Steele-Dunne

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Monitoring the amount and movement of water in plants allows us to detect when plants start to experience water stress. Tuning irrigation to this, instead of fixed irrigation schedules, avoids unnecessary irrigation and saves water.

HOW

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We investigate how short-term changes in the plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water content influence radar backscatter at different frequencies, angles, and polarisations. We use this to determine what combination of observations is needed for water stress detection and related applications.

WHEN

TRL

In the short term, our investigations enable to see how well we can do the detection with the currently available satellites, aircraft, drones or infield sensors. In the long term (20 years) we might see dedicated satellite missions.


PASSME: Personalised Airport Systems for Seamless Mobility and Experience Prof. mr. dr. ir. Sicco Santema | Prof. dr. Peter Vink | Dr. ir. Christine De Lille | Dr. ir. Katinka Bergema | Dr. ir. Suzanne Hiemstra-van Mastrigt

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The PASSME project aims to reduce door-to-door airport travel time of passengers in Europe by 60 minutes, while improving the passengersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience. TU Delft is coordinator of this EU H2020 project.

HOW

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Using a passenger-centric, industry-driven participatory design approach to produce a highly personalised experience by improving luggage processes, redesigning airport and aircraft interiors, and developing a wearable device to provide real-time information.

WHEN

TRL

From June 2015 to May 2018, the research will be developing and sharing insights with the aviation community. Research includes prototyping, evaluation and demonstration at airports. Funded by European Union Horizon 2020 Programme Grant No. 636308

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New definition of the nautical bottom in muddy areas Alex Kirichek | Prof. Tiedo Vellinga | Dr. Claire Chassagne | Prof. dr. Han Winterwerp | Arie Noordijk

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By developing a more accurate and reliable definition of the nautical bottom, uncertainties in the Under Keel Clearance estimation can be reduced; ensuring safety, minimising the need for dredging, and possibly increasing port capacity.

HOW

1

Current nautical bottom definitions are based on fluid mudâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s density, while it is known that this has no conclusive relation with the safety of sailing through this mud. The new definition will be based on rheology of the mud.

WHEN

TRL

A first pilot to compare rheological and density measurements of mud has been completed. These results are a first step towards a new definition of the nautical bottom.


In situ biofunctionalisation of optical sensor surface Prof. dr. Ernst Sudholter | Ir. Bart de Boer | Mr. Duco Bosma | Prof. dr. Ron Fouchier

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WHY

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Early diagnosis of diseases is of increasing importance, requiring reliable, sensitive and selective methods. An optical micro ring resonator in a microfluidic system has been developed, enabling in situ biofunctionalisation and regeneration of the sensor.

HOW

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The resonator surface is in situ functionalised with receptors for specific recognition of the species of interest. Upon recognition the accompanying local change of refractive index is registered. After use the receptors can be easily removed and the sensor is ready for reuse.

WHEN

TRL

A lab scale proof of concept has been successfully completed, proving the high quality and reproducibility. Extension of the applicability of this method to the recognition of other species is ongoing.

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Super-resolution in an integrated correlative light and electron microscope Aditi Srinivasa Raja MSc | Dr. ir. Jacob Hoogenboom | Prof. dr. ir. Pieter Kruit

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WHY

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Using a minesweeper-like approach, this research enables super-resolution in integrated light and electron microscopy. This is especially interesting for biologists because fluorescent labels can be seen in the context of their ultrastructure with an order of magnitude higher resolution.

HOW

1

An electron beam scans a sample pixel-wise. If it hits a fluorescent label, the light microscope detects a decreased light intensity. Combining this with the known location of the electron beam indicates the exact location of the fluorescent label.

WHEN

TRL

A proof of concept achieved a 100 nm resolution. Further improvements in experimental approaches, noise reduction and data interpretation have the potential to result in a 50 nm resolution.


3D Printed porous materials for wind turbine airfoil noise reduction Dr. Francesco Avallone | Dr. Daniele Ragni | Alejandro Rubio Carpio MSc | Dr. Mirjam Snellen | Prof. Sybrand van der Zwaag

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WHY

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Aerodynamic noise of wind turbines is annoying, limiting their energy production and location, thereby increasing the cost of energy. Energy production might increase with 2 - 4% by 1 dB noise reduction.

HOW

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3D Printed rigid foams, retrofitted at the trailing edge of blades, serve as an all-in-one noise mitigation system by altering the hydrodynamic flow field, modifying the acoustic scattering and dampening the surface pressure fluctuations.

WHEN

TRL

Current research focuses on the effect of pore shape, size and distribution on the hydrodynamic/acoustic efficiency, and the effect of environmental factors (i.e. dust) on the long-term acoustic performances. A full-scale proof of concept is due in 4 years. 137


Quantifying loss of motor skills in Parkinson’s disease with a tracking ‘game’ Dr. ir. Daan Pool | Dr. ir. Johan Pel

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Key to a good treatment of Parkinson’s disease is accurate and early detection, and high-resolution quantification of the severity of loss of motor skills. We developed a tracking ‘game’ that can do just this.

HOW

1

The data recorded in the game allows for separation of different aspects of patients’ control behaviour (e.g. control gain, response delay). This provides a quantification of reflexive and sustained motor skills at a unique resolution.

WHEN

TRL

Proof of principle results show clear differences in motor skills between patients and healthy controls, as well as key differences among individual patients. Large scale validation is our next step, clinical application would be possible within several years.


Creating high-quality virtual images from surface reflection data Prof. dr. ir. Evert Slob | Prof. dr. ir. Kees Wapenaar | Dr. ir. Joost van der Neut | Dr. ir. Jan Thorbecke

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WHY

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Creating a wavefield image without reverberations holds the important promise of highly reliable virtual images that can be interpreted with improved reliability. This would reduce the risk of failures in decisions based on such images.

HOW

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In many applications, acoustic, electromagnetic and/or elastic wavefields are used to create images of an object. This method relies on reflected vibrations, but is compromised by reverberations (reflections of reflections). Marchenko imaging is a method that filters out the reverberations.

WHEN

TRL

A new method for 3D classical wavefield imaging has been developed and successfully implemented and tested on computed data. First tests on field data look promising. We are working on making the Marchenko imaging method practically applicable for real world applications. 139


Music for activities Dr. Cynthia Liem MMus | Karthik Yadati MSc | Andrew Demetriou MSc | Prof. dr. Martha Larson | Prof. dr. Alan Hanjalic

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WHY

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Current music recommendation engines focus heavily on content that users obviously like. However, when music will be consumed as part of an activity, other content relevance criteria may become necessary.

HOW

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We use interdisciplinary data science to investigate what social and contentbased features indicate appropiateness of songs for a given context or activity, and their effectiveness over time.

WHEN

TRL

We want to enable services that automatically stream songs that will support the user in a specific activity, explicity daring to look beyond a user’s expressed taste profile.


Using sunlight for wireless communication Dr. Marco Zuniga | Eric Wang MSc

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WHY

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Visible light is extremely pervasive in the modern world. Exploiting that vast amount of passive optical energy for wireless communication would be a game changing transformation.

HOW

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Instead of modulating a signal at the emitter (pulsing a LED), the signal is modulated by reflecting ambient light with an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;active barcodeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (like an e-ink surface) on a moving object.

WHEN

TRL

As the fundamental technology is being developed, the scope of application is still vastly open. Input on new possibilities of applications are sought and welcomed.

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A bio-nano approach to point-of-care testing of parasitic DNA in resource limited settings Michel Bengtson MSc | Dr. Grzegorz Pawlik | Jaco van der Torre MSc | Prof. dr. Cees Dekker

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WHY

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Disease diagnostics in developing countries is a major problem because of limited healthcare facilities. This point-of-care device could analyse a sample for an infectious disease as easy and reliable as a pregnancy test.

HOW

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The CRISPR/Cas9 system is used on a point-of-care device to detect pathogenic DNA in a drop of blood. Once it does, it initiates a chain reaction to produce a visible colour reaction.

WHEN

TRL

The aim is to develop a complete system/device. Once the correct design of the molecular machine is found, users and producers of the device will be sought to enable production of a prototype and the final product.


DNA based algorithms for complex infection diagnosis Dr. Thomas Abeel | Christine Anyansi MSc

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WHY

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Diagnostics and biological techniques for tuberculosis (TB) and other bacterial pathogens currently cannot efficiently classify complex infections. Our data-driven approach for strain identification will lead to more effective diagnosis of patients - especially those with complex multi-strain infections.

HOW

1

We develop algorithms to match genetic information from a patient sample onto a classification database built from known pathogenic strains. Specific patterns within the sampleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s genetic information can be used to identify and quantify constituent strains and their antibiotic resistances.

WHEN

TRL

Sequencing as a diagnostic tool is being adopted more widely in the clinic. Cost is the major barrier to widespread adoption, but this is rapidly dropping. Our research can immediately impact on how we tackle patients with complex infections. 143


Spong3d: an integrated 3D printed façade for thermal performance and multiple functions

Ing. Maria Valentini Sarakinioti MSc | Dr. Michela Turrin MArch | Dr. ir. Martin Tenpierik | Dr. ing. Thaleia Konstantinou MSc | Prof. dr. ing. Ulrich Knaack

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The required thermal aspects of façades (transmission, insulation, heat storage) depend on changing out- and indoor conditions and requirements. Our adaptive façade, through which fluids can move, can regulate these properties, saving energy on heating/cooling.

HOW

1

Our façade consists of a closed cell region (acting as insulation layer) sandwiched between two regions with a bio-inspired porous structure through which fluids can flow. The façade is 3D printed to allow its complex geometry and incorporation of other functions.

WHEN

TRL

In a few years, we want to have a system demonstrator and guidelines or algorithms that enable architects to design and tailor the façade panel to their specific needs.


Automated vehicles routing: impacts and opportunities for urban mobility Dr. Gonรงalo Homem de Almeida Correia | Xiao Liang MSc

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WHY

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Besides all technological challenges related to Automated Vehicles (AVs), there are as many challenges related to urban planning, vehicle routing, and social impact. This research is a first step in exploring these, starting with routing.

HOW

1

There are new degrees of freedom in routing AVs compared to routing conventional vehicles (e.g. associated to parking location, re-routing, increased use). New mobility patterns will emerge, with associated costs and benefits to society.

WHEN

TRL

This research is envisioning the algorithms that will be needed for a future with AVs. Such AVs (without even a steering wheel) are expected to come on the market around 2025.

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Optical bacteria sensor Yu Xin MSc | Prof. Paddy French | Dr. Gregory Pandraud

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WHY

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Around 10% of colorectal surgery results in leakage of colon-fluids into the abdominal cavity, leading to severe infection, sepsis or even death. Regular, easy and reliable post-surgery screening for E. coli enables timely and accurate diagnosis.

HOW

1

This research develops a plug-and-play optical sensor for this. Its waveguide is functionalised with antibodies that capture E. coli when drain fluid from a patient is applied. The captured E. coli absorb evanescent waves, by which their concentration can be detected to monitor the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condition.

WHEN

TRL

In 4 years, the sensor should be ready for medical trials. Once completed, the sensor could be modified to be able to screen on other diseases as well.


Constructive conflict in controversial energy projects Dr. ir. Eefje Cuppen | Dr. Shannon Spruit | Elisabeth van de Grift MSc | Dr. Aad CorreljĂŠ | Dr. ir. Udo Pesch | Dr. ir. Behnam Taebi

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WHY

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In decision-making procedures on controversial energy projects, formal assessment tools may fail to include all relevant values. The conflicts that arise can, if addressed well, be constructive in identifying these values.

HOW

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We conduct in-depth analysis in past and running energy projects of how initiators and developers interact with local actors, municipalities, NGOs, and residents. We study the role of formal decision-making procedures in these interactions and reflect on the legitimacy of their approaches.

WHEN

TRL

Through collaboration with partners we develop and test methods on how to use rather than avoid conflicts. These methods are being communicated and validated in several workshops and professional and academic papers.

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Optical Smart Malaria Diagnost Temitope Agbana MSc | Prof. dr. Gleb Vdovin | Prof. dr. ir. Michel Verhaegen

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WHY

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Prompt, accurate and timely malaria diagnosis reduces unnecessary treatment, drug-drug interactions, and chances on drug resistant parasites. We are developing the Optical Smart Malaria Diagnost (OSMD) for this purpose.

HOW

1

Uniquely, the OSMD uses multiple optical imaging techniques together in order to be able to distinguish the plasmodium parasites from other material in the blood. We aim for a low-cost, sufficiently sensitive and selective device, that is field-compatible and requires minimal human intervention.

WHEN

TRL

Once the multimodal approach has been validated, a prototype could be fabricated and field-tested. Though the current focus is malaria diagnosis, once developed itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relatively easy to adapt the device to other diseases.


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Building a synthetic cell Dr. Christophe Danelon | Prof. Marileen Dogterom | Prof. Cees Dekker

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WHY

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The bottom-up construction of a living cell will unveil lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundamental nature. It raises fascinating philosophical and ethical questions, and holds great promise for novel biotechnological and medical applications.

HOW

2

A minimal set of individual lifeless components are used as molecular building blocks to reconstruct life-like functions and eventually an entire synthetic cell. This project cuts across discipline boundaries between biology, chemistry and biophysics.

WHEN

TRL 1

The creation of an autonomous cell from scratch is a >10-year-long endeavour. Intermediate, shorter-term, milestones include: tailored synthesis of lipids for the industry, and a cell-free division machinery for testing antibiotics. 149


Childhood disadvantage and future life chances Dr. Tom Kleinepier | Prof. dr. Maarten van der Ham

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WHY

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Understanding socio-economic inequality and its consequences for children and young people forms the basis for sensible policies to counter it. This research follows children over their life-course to investigate these inequalities.

HOW

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We use very large datasets which include the entire populations of the Netherlands and Sweden to follow the life of individuals from the 1990â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s until now. Childhood disadvantage is studied in the contexts of the family, school, and neighbourhoods.

WHEN

TRL 1

This research (2014-2019) will yield unique insights into the impact of duration, timing, and sequencing of childhood disadvantage on various socio-economic outcomes later in life. Funded by European Union DEPRIVEDHOODS programme Grant NO. 615159


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Collective dynamics in living systems Dr. Timon Idema | Ruben van Drongelen MSc

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WHY

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From bacteria to people, individuals in a group often interact only with their neighbours. Nonetheless, the group as a whole exhibits complex behaviour that affects the life of the individuals.

HOW

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We simulate the collective dynamics of the group using local interaction rules only. We then use both global and local measures, such as density and orientation, to quantify the group behaviour.

WHEN

TRL 1

Applications of our approach and results range from the proper placement of fire exits (already possible) to the design of surfaces to facilitate or inhibit the formation of bacterial biofilms (ongoing research).

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Engineering Mathematics in the study of the vibrations of elastic structures Dr. ir. Wim van Horssen | Tugce Akkaya MSc

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WHY

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Vibrations in mechanical structures due to (a combination of) loads, wind and rain have a large influence on the design of large mechanical structures. True understanding of these vibrations yields the least ill-effects and thus the best design.

HOW

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Analytical analysis provides understanding of the parameters involved rather than the outcome for a specific case. This enables resonance frequency calculations and detection of bifurcations.

WHEN

TRL 1

The TU Delft is one of the leaders in the field of analytical approaches of mathematical modelling of physical phenomena. Analytical tools are constantly being developed in close collaboration with researchers in all kinds of research areas.


Modular Solar Home System for low-income households in developing nations Nishant Narayan MSc | Prof. dr. eng. Pavol Bauer | Dr. ir. Jan-Carel Diehl

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WHY

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Solar Home Systems (SHS) for developing countries are usually designed for moderate (< 100 Wp) and present loads. In time the peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy needs increase, rapidly outgrowing the installed SHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peak capacity.

HOW

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Therefore, a modular SHS is proposed, which can enable scaling up of the system within a household, while households can also be connected together into a bottom-up micro-grid. This will support an increased peak capacity.

WHEN

TRL 1

First step is to develop the modular architecture that can support the scaleup, along with the associated power electronics that enable increased and variable capacity and power sharing. A first field test is expected in 2018.

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Drive into the future: the use of shared automated vehicles Dr. ir. Theresia van Essen | Dr. ir. Gonรงalo Homem de Almeida Correia

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WHY

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Routing shared automated vehicles is very complex. Advanced heuristics will be developed to make good decisions for selecting a car, determining the route, combining trips, etcetera. This will improve efficiency.

HOW

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We distill advanced heuristics from exact solutions of small datasets. These advanced heuristics are than applied to approximately solve reallife datasets. Exact solutions are practically impossible because of their complexity.

WHEN

TRL 1

Car/user matching algorithms are being developed. The resulting routing software would be applicable to many more routing problems, such as routing traditional public transport and taxis.


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Education Projects In Delft University of Technology we engage our students as much as possible in the knowledge generating process, since education is the passport to the future. And with lifelong learning we also teach those who want to update their knowledge everywhere we can.

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iGEM 2015 Biolayer printer Ing. Esengül Yildirim | Michelle Post | Max van ‘t Hof | Stefan Marsden | Tudor Vlas | Samantha Basalo Vazquez | Hector Sanguesa Ferrer | Liana Uilecan | Marit van der Does | Anne Rodenburg

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WHY

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Biofilm research often uses artificial biofilms, which production is time consuming and difficult to control and reproduce. The 2015 iGEM team has developed the Biolinker that enables biofilm production in a reproducible, controlled, efficient and scalable way.

HOW

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The Biolinker is a 3D printer for E. coli based biofilms. After printing, the genetically modified E. coli will only form biofilms after prompting with rhamnose. Until then, the ink forms a hydrogel that provides a preliminary structure for the biofilm.

WHEN

TRL

The Biolinker and the ink it uses have been developed for the 2015 iGEM competition, winning first overall prize. In line with iGEM’s goals, the results have been made publicly available.


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iGEM 2016 Biolasers and biolenses Ing. Esengül Yildirim | Charlotte Koster | Lara van der Woude | Carmen Berends | Giannis Papazoglou | Lycka Kamoen | María Vázquez Vitali | Tessa Vergroesen | Liza de Wilde | Iris de Vries | Célina Reuvers

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Fluorescence microscopy is essential in biological research, but is limited by the amount of light it can observe. The aim of this project is to improve fluorescence microscopy using genetically modified ‘biolaser’ and ‘biolens’ bacteria.

HOW

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E. coli is modified so it produces silicatein, which coats the cell wall with a layer of biological glass. The result is an environmentally friendly, easy-toproduce microlens. Co-expressing fluorescent proteins enables the ‘biolens’ bacteria to also function as laser.

WHEN

TRL

This iGEM project won several prizes in the 2016 competition. The microlenses have been proven to work on a lab-scale, and experts in the imaging field indicate they have great potential.

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Delft Extension School: online learning for professionals Jan Henk van der Werff MSc

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With our portfolio of online engineering, design, and science education we bring science to society. We aim to share our knowledge with people all around the world, and positively impact their lives and careers.

HOW

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The online education portfolio contains multiple Professional Educational Courses, over 50 free courses, and nearly 20 MSc and BSc courses. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique in volume and quality, ranging from free 8-week courses for all to specialised short courses for professionals.

WHEN

TRL

We have a vast experience in online education and continuously implement improvements, driven by course evaluations and data analysis to enhance the learning experience. Courses start regularly during the year.


Collaborative PhD tracks Dr. Ellen Sjoer | Sabine Terheijden

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A collaborative PhD, where professionals in industry or government get their doctorate at the TU Delft, fosters close collaboration and quick application of insights and results. It directly benefits all parties involved.

HOW

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We have a track with science-based customisations that accommodate a professionalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skills, knowledge, daily schedule, challenges and desires, that differ from those of full-time PhDs.

WHEN

TRL

Collaborative PhD tracks are part of the Graduate School of TU Delft. Those interested in a collaborative PhD track can contact us now.

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Research Facilities At Delft University of Technology we have a lot research facilities that are not always open to the public. Using these facilities could be of interest for your business and hence a fruitful collaboration.

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Train and rail test facilities

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WHY

Dutch railway lines are intensively used. The catenary/pantograph and wheel/rail interfaces are critical areas where wear and fatigue occur. Innovations are necessary, but can only be applied after extensive and realistic testing. Our unique test facilities enable this.

HOW

Joris van Dijk MSc | Prof. dr. ir. Rolf Dollevoet

Besides an actual test-train, we have a 1:7 scale circular track over which 4 wheels are driven, simulating train behaviour with speeds up to 280 km/h, monitored with high precision. Another full-scale setup simulates the effect of the pantograph on the catenary for an existing or newly designed section of railway.


Particle Image Velocimetry in large-scale wind tunnels

WHY

Wind tunnels are important for aerodynamic measurements on wind tunnel models. The use of the largest wind tunnel of TU Delft in combination with the Particle Image Velocimetry technique provides much more detailed results with improved scalability to actual sized objects.

HOW

Dr. Andrea Sciacchitano | Wouter Terra MSc | Prof. dr. Fulvio Scarano

Aerospace engineering has a laboratory with 10 wind tunnels with maximum wind speeds from 120 km/h to 13000 km/h (<MACH 1 to MACH 11). Test section dimensions vary accordingly. The 3 x 3 m test section of the Open Jet Facility is the largest, enabling large scale test objects such as a cyclist.

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Hexapod for multi-axial fatigue testing

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WHY

This hexapod enables superior physical simulation of multi-axial fatigue in metal structures, enhancing model certainty and thus improve design quality. This increases safety and enables optimisation of maintenance and repair, ultimately reducing costs, downtime and risks.

HOW

Ir. Paula van Lieshout | Prof. dr. ir. Mirek Kaminski | Dr. ir. Henk den Besten

The unique hexapod is able to apply multiaxial and non-proportional loading of up to 1 MN on a test piece of 1 m3. Forces can be applied with a frequency of up to 30 Hz, simulating a typical 20 year service lifespan of structures in one month.


SML: Structures and Materials Laboratory

WHY

The facilities cover the entire range from synthesis of new polymer materials to the testing of substructures. This brings research results closer to application in industry. Also, because students are able to experience this complete range, they become better engineers.

HOW

Ir. Jos Sinke

The laboratory contains among others a Kuka robot for composite research; a laser for surface treatment and cutting materials; a new characterisation laboratory; a test laboratory for mechanical tests, and more.

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Flood Proof Holland

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WHY

Flood Proof Holland is a test and showcase location for semi-full-scale temporary innovative modular and flexible flood defences. It enables testing and optimisation of the innovation. It also increases reliability, which is key because these flood defences are to be applied in emergencies.

HOW

Prof. dr. ir. Bas Jonkman | Dr. ir. Myron van Damme | Friso Vos de Wael MSc

In various open air basins, temporary, modular and flexible flood defences can be built. Floods can be simulated in each basin to test the strength of the innovation. Obstacles can be placed to simulate urban situations.


Water, Geo and Structural Engineering labs

WHY

Civil Engineering and Applied Earth Sciences often rely on digital modelling of phenomena. To be able to create and validate these models, large scale experiments are required. Our laboratories offer a vast range of unique experimental setups for just that. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re available for contract and scientific research.

HOW

Karlijn Spoor | Ramona Groenewegen

The setups include Meccano-like test rigs (to test concrete and glass structures to breaking point), complete riverbed simulators, a full-scale house on a shaking table for earthquake research, a liquefaction tank for river bank stability measurements and more.

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Else Kooi Laboratory

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WHY

The Else Kooi Laboratory operates a unique cleanroom that supports semiconductor technology-driven approaches aimed at fulfilling societal needs. Our realisation of semiconductor research objects in an industry-compatible way is the basis for experimentation and proof of concept fabrication, and a research topic in itself.

HOW

Casper Juffermans MSc

The Else Kooi Laboratory tool set allows proof of concept fabrication as well as small-scale manufacturing, facilitating the first step to market introduction. Because of the industry based manufacturing approach, results are relatively easy to scale up and relevant/meaningful for industrial partners.


SIMONA research simulator

WHY

SIMONA is a flexible test platform, able to realistically simulate vehicles from cars to aircraft and helicopters. It bridges the fidelity gap between theoretical studies and in-flight tests. Research focuses on advanced simulation technology and improving human-machine interaction in vehicles.

HOW

Ir. Olaf Stroosma

Most hardware and software has been developed at the TU Delft, enabling easy modification for new applications. The movable cabin accommodates two crew members and is fitted with a wide-field-of-view outside visual system, programmable glass cockpit and active flight controls.

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Boeing 737-500 aircraft fuselage for experiments

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WHY

The boarding process of airplanes is not profitable (loss of flying time) and uncomfortable for passengers (luggage, boarding order, etc.). The full scale aircraft fuselage at the TU Delft enables realistic experiments to improve this process.

HOW

Prof. dr. Peter Vink

The fuselage contains 122 passenger seats. Its operating room enables researchers to monitor the boarding process and perform measurements. Besides the boarding, other aircraft innovations related to passengers/ passenger experience (such as mood lights and in-seat games) can be investigated.


VLLAIR: Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory for Advanced Imaging Research

WHY

The new laboratory brings together a wide range of imaging techniques into one transparent space. It enables cutting edge imaging physics research and stimulates cooperation between developers, scientific users and commercial producers of such instruments.

HOW

Prof. dr. ir. Pieter Kruit | Dr. ir. Jacob Hoogenboom | Prof. dr. Bernd Rieger

The new laboratory has glass walls and is situated around a central service area. Most of the instruments in the laboratory (electron microscopes, super-resolution fluorescence microscopes, high resolution ultrasound imagers) are prototypes with unique functionalities.

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Highlights of the 3mE faculty

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Our diverse and extensive set of research facilities enable generation and application of fundamental knowledge in the fields of mechanical, maritime and materials engineering. Our aim is to solve tomorrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challenges.

HOW

Prof. dr. Theun Baller

We have production facilities for nanometre- to metre-scale objects, and experimental setups to test and characterise these objects. Examples of such facilities are the vast range of 3D printers, the hexapod, a towing tank, and an experimental industrial plant.


Reactor Institute Delft

WHY

The nuclear research reactor is a source of positrons and neutrons for an array of world-class research instruments. These are able to look deep inside the structure of matter, enabling investigation of thin films, soft condensed matter, magnetism, chemical speciation and more.

HOW

Dr. Menno Blaauw

The reactor is one of a kind in the Netherlands, enabling industry and academia to look inside materials from a very small, atomic scale up to a macroscopic scale of centimetres, without damaging the material. Typical areas of research are health, sustainable energy and materials.

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About DIG-it! DIG-it! is the innovation stimulating and supporting initiative within the Delft University of Technology powered by its Valorisation Centre. All year round we facilitate TU Delft scientists to make their ideas more tangible and visible. With this support we aim to enhance collaboration with external partners and its chance for successful implementation in the market or society. Xplore, Xplain, Xpose DIG-it! works according to the following three principles: Xplore, Xplain & Xpose. The thought behind these principles is that by translating their ideas into something more concrete scientist will be more able to share the idea with his/her nonpeer community. This allows for the creation of synergy at an early stage to develop the ideas further.

Research project

For more information about the presented projects please check: www.dig-it.tudelft.nl More information about DIG-it! and the Research Exhibition Susanne Sleenhoff Project manager +31 (0)15 278 83078 DIG-it@tudelft.nl www.tudelft.nl/exhibition

Research projects

Research project

Research project

We dig..

Where does the name come from? With the DIG-it! process we actively dig for ideas and support them in such a way that it is easier for others to understand them. The name DIGit! originates form the Gaelic “tigim”, meaning I understand and led to the phrase ‘Can you dig it’ which means ‘I understand’, or ‘Wow! That is awesome’.

..map out..

..polish..

.. & exhibit ..TU Delft Research Projects

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Colophon

June 2017

Production: TU Delft | Valorisation Centre Text and Editing: Susanne Sleenhoff Susan Penninks Robbert van Leeuwen Cartoons: CVIII Ontwerpers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Erwin Suvaal Photo Karel Luyben: Kim Liong van Dam Design: Dorien van Alphen Dolores Hilhorst Layout: Debby van Vondelen Print: Van der Heym Special thanks: The DIG-it! Team would like to thank all the researchers and staff who participated in the Research Exhibition of 6,7 and 8 June 2017.

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Notes

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Notes

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Research at the Delft University of Technology is characterised because of its interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary thinking spread across science, engineering and design disciplines. With ground breaking research we intend to make significant contributions to a sustainable society. Aiming to enhance collaboration with external partners this booklet presents a small selection of ideas that are being developed in Delft. www.tudelft.nl/en/technology-transfer 180

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