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a student newspaper of the university of tulsa

Young Hurricane pulls historic comeback

march 4, 2013 issue 19 ~ volume 98

Faculty senate approves new grading system Friday faculty senate voted that TU professors will be able to give plus and minus grades beginning fall 2014. Kyle Walker Managing Editor

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Logan Miller / Collegian

Forward Kauri Black makes a shot in the Golden Hurricane’s 12-point victory over Tulane. For more on the game, see page 2.

SA to run out of event allocation funds Declaring current event sponsorship rates “unsustainable,” SA has requested that all further events be submitted before spring break. Oscar Ho Staff Writer

Steven Buchele Student Writer

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ast week, student organization leaders received an e-mail from the University of Tulsa Student Association asking that all funding applications for student events to be turned in by March 18. As of Feb. 27, the SA event sponsorship fund had just under 10 percent of the original $180,000. “The rate we’re spending at is unsustainable,” SA Treasurer Katlyn McGouran said. While she said that this is “not a crisis,” McGouran called it “an interesting problem to have.” “I don’t think this has ever happened before,” McGouran added. SA is asking that all organizations submit their applications for funding early so that SA can look at their programing and evaluate the costs. “The budget crunch has prompted Senate to ask if we are being good stewards. I think the answer is yes, but I also think this is good so that we can ask that question,” said McGouran. SA has three major accounts. Cabinet has its own budget, which is used to pay for Springfest and

Homecoming. There is the Contingency Fund, which is mostly used for travel allocations, and the event sponsorship fund. Both Cabinet’s account and the Contingency Fund seem to be at adequate levels. The contingency fund has 36 percent of its funds remaining “which is right on track,” McGouran said. Ben Chong, Event Sponsorship Committee Chairman, said that event sponsorship has been a problem, though it may be temporarily alleviated: “We are adding $25,000 to (the fund) to take account of the student activity fees that were paid this semester.” “However,” Chong said, “the reality is that some organizations

will have to fund projects themselves or turn elsewhere for it.” Since SA is funded by student fees, SA has increased its overall budget because of the University of Tulsa’s record-breaking enrollment this year. However, McGouran said, “(SA doesn’t) increase event sponsorship in proportion to the number of students. At the end of last year the event sponsorship fund had a $10,000 surplus, and even then we increased the budget, so it was a bit of a surprise when it was depleted this quickly.” “I attribute this (budget crunch) to the increase in volume of the

See Funds page 4

Graphic by Jill Graves / Collegian

SA has just under ten percent of its annual event allocations funds remaining (represented by the orange portion of the pie chart).

n a nearly unanimous voice vote, the University of Tulsa’s faculty senate passed a recommendation Thursday that will allow TU faculty the option of assigning students grades with grade modifiers—pluses and minuses—starting in the fall of 2014. President Steadman Upham has already approved the senate’s recommendation, sources say. Dr. Robert Donaldson, professor of political science and president emeritus, has been, according to one professor, the “prime mover” behind the effort for this change. “This is something I’ve been trying to accomplish,” Donaldson said, “since I came to TU in 1990. This is the first time the faculty senate actually passed it.” Donaldson has brought this suggestion to the faculty senate before, and on one occasion the Student Association asked the faculty senate to consider the measure. But in both instances the recommendation was either never debated or voted down. The new grading system gives faculty access to a more finegrained evaluative scale. Donaldson pointed out that, under the current system, a student who makes an 89.4 and a student who makes a 79.6 earn the same grade—a B. Allowing grade modifiers lets faculty give students a more “precise measure of just what their performance is,” Donaldson said. Dr. Jacob Howland, professor of philosophy, agrees. “We don’t grade our papers and exams using a crude A, B, C, D metric,” he said. “So why shouldn’t the final grades for the course reflect the same level of specificity in assessment?” As part of his efforts to accomplish this change, Donaldson looked at grading systems used by other universities, especially TU’s peer schools (Tulane, Wake Forest, Baylor, Rice, Southern Methodist and Texas Christian) and aspirant (Washington University, Vanderbilt and Duke) institutions, as well as schools ranked in the top 50 by U.S. News and World. “This is the first time we’ve looked at what the high-quality universities are doing,” Donaldson said. He found that the only peer or aspirant institution not to use a full grade modifier system was Baylor, which uses only positive grade-modifiers on only B and C grades. He also found that of the U.S. News and World top 50, 44 use the system recommended by the faculty senate. According to Dr. Lara Foley, professor of sociology and president of the faculty senate, this was one of “the most compelling arguments.” She also noted that “this

TU’s new plus/minus grading system will assign the following values to each letter grade: A 4.00 A3.67 B+ 3.33 B 3.00 B2.67 C+ 2.33 C 2.00 C1.67 D+ 1.33 D 1.00 D0.67 F 0.00 time a lot of research went into” determining the best path for the university. In addition to research presented by Donaldson, the faculty senate sought the assistance of the University Leadership Council (ULC), a component of the Advisory Board Company based in Washington, D.C. The ULC compiled a 17-page report detailing the results of changing to a grade-modifier system at six universities where such a change occurred within the last eight years. According to Jerry McCoy, professor of physics, the faculty senate postponed discussion of the system change until the ULC provided its report. One of the most common concerns among students at the ULC contact institutions was that the use of grade modifiers would negatively affect GPAs overall. But the ULC found that “the addition of grade modifiers does not raise or lower overall institutional grade point averages,” but also found that “some high-performing students may experience a decline in their GPA,” according to its report. Sophomore Devin Stranford opposes grade modifier systems on these grounds and feels that being weighted down by A-minuses ought to be balanced out by providing a bonus for A-pluses—a feature not currently part of the faculty senate recommendation. Freshman Gunner Jensen, however, feels that the new system will produce grades that are “representative of what the student earned.” Faculty are “going to give you the grade you deserve,” he said. “So it’s up to the student really.” The new system has some builtin safeguards as a result of other specific concerns. For instance, the use of grade modifiers is entirely optional—faculty are free to choose which system they want to use. However, this variability introduces its own problems for some. Stranford voiced opposition to this measure on the grounds that certain classes would end up “being graded differently than the others,” sowing confusion and irritation. Additionally, overall grade point averages will remain capped at 4.0. McCoy explained why. “As soon as a graduate school sees that

See Grades page 4

Medicine Wheel Award The Medicine Wheel Award is given out annually to a faculty member, staff member, student, and organization/team for meritorious service to the community. Nomination forms may be picked up in the Housing Office, Registration, McFarlin Library, Collins Fitness Center, Student Affairs, and the TBN Volunteer Center or email kathy-shelton@utulsa.edu for an electronic form. Junior Achievement Junior Achievement is a non-profit organization partnering with volunteers from the community to teach elementary students about their roles as individuals, workers and consumers. 12 volunteers are needed who can commit 1 hour a week for 5 weeks and the initial 90 min. training. Campus Wide-Baby Shower This is the first ever True Blue and Pink Campus Wide Baby Shower. Collection tubs will be placed across campus to collect items for infants and children, birth to 5-years-old. Clothing and items such as car seats, strollers, or high-chairs may be gently used, clean items. Other needs will be sent out in an email and also on Campus Connection, Facebook, and Twitter updates.


4 March 2013

Sports

the Collegian : 2

Basketball rebounds from 22-point lag The University of Tulsa was able to come back from a disadvantage of 22 points, delighting its Harlem-shaking fans with a 12-point victory over the Tulane Green Wave.

Sam Morton Student Writer

Does anyone remember mad libs? If you never got the thrill of a mad lib, they were these books that would ask you to pick random nouns, verbs and adjectives and insert them into a template to get a short, funny story. The template would be serious, but your words would never fit, so you would end up with sentences like “Gerald walked into the green toilet,” and that would be the bees’ knees if you were in fourth grade. Anyway, this next headline sounds like somebody was messing around with mad libs and accidentally leaked it to the press. Get this: “Dennis Rodman, Kim Jong Un, and the Harlem Globetrotters enjoy sushi in Pyongyang.” That’s not a real thing is it? Please tell me it ain’t so! Oh, it’s a real thing alright. Just last week, perhaps the most unstable basketball player/professional wrestler we have ever seen met with the leader of arguably the most unstable country in today’s world to watch some basketball. By my estimation, this should have ended in World War III, but somehow things went swimmingly. After the game, Kim Jong Un invited Rodman and a few Globetrotters back to his place for some chow. Rodman made a nice speech telling Kim, “You have a friend for life.”

Amanda Schenk Student Writer

After a demoralizing first half, the Tulsa Golden Hurricane came back to defeat the Tulane Green Wave Saturday afternoon in a game for the record book. Tulsa overcame a 22-point deficit with a gain of 55 points in the second half to win the game by 12, with a final score of 78–66. This constituted was the largest comeback in Tulsa history and the second largest in Conference USA history, just behind Rice, which survived a 24-point deficit against Houston in 2007. Before tip-off, the Golden Hurricane was 14–13 overall and 6–6 in C-USA play, while the Green Wave was 18–10 overall and 6–7 in C-USA. Both teams were tied with UAB for sixth place in league standings. Given that the fifth-place team will receive a bye in the first round of the C-USA Championship, Saturday’s game was crucial for both teams. This was the 15th time the two teams have met, and, while Tulsa led the series 9–5 prior to Saturday, Tulane had won the most recent game 75–72 on Jan. 19 of this year. Coach Danny Manning said, “Tulane came out in the first half and dictated tempo and got whatever they wanted.” This was certainly evident in the scoring, as Tulsa was closed down in the first half 43–23 by Tulane. Sixteen of those 23 points came from Tulsa’s bench, and scoring was led by freshmen Brandon Swannegan, who scored seven points in the first half, and Rashad Ray, who added six. Senior Scottie Haralson, who has averaged 9.9 points and 3.7 rebounds per game this season, led the team’s second-half turnaround. Despite only scoring three points in the first half, Haralson added 13 in the second. Junior Pat Swilling and freshman James Woodard combined for an additional 26 points (14 points and 12 points, respectively). Tulane’s largest lead, the 22-point deficit, was a score of 47–25 with 18:17 left in the game. Tulsa proceeded to go on a 29-8

Xiaowen Li / Collegian

Guard James Woodard and forward D’Andre Wright, both freshmen for the Hurricane, reach for one of the many rebounds that helped bring the Hurricane back in the game during the second half.

scoring run to reduce Tulane’s lead to one point, at 55–54, with 7:44 remaining. Tulane retained its lead at 63–62 with only 3:49 left in the half, but after Haralson was fouled while sinking a basket, resulting in a 3-point play, Tulsa gained a lead at 65–63 and never looked back. The end came with a 14–3 scoring run in favor of the Golden Hurricane. “They scrapped and battled and to come back from down 20 points says a lot about them,” Manning said, “I am really proud of the young men in our locker room.” The victory pushed Tulsa ahead of Tulane in the C-USA standings, but now East Caro-

lina, UAB and Tulsa all have a 7–7 record in conference play. Tulane is the next-closest opponent in the standings, with 6–8 C-USA record after the loss to Tulsa. Only two games are left in the regular season for Tulsa, first against SMU and then against Rice and both will be important in determining the final standings. ECU’s remaining games will be against Tulane and Marshall, while UAB’s final opponents are UCF and Memphis. Before closing out the season at Rice, Tulsa will play its final home game at 7:05 p.m. this Wednesday, March 6, in the Donald W. Reynolds Center

Photo courtesy Rotoinfo

Kim Jong Un and Dennis Rodman enjoy a Harlem Globetrotters game in North Korea.

Kim was then invited back to the United States sometime to continue the goodwill, and they all shared a good laugh on that one. I think that President Obama and the Department of Defense are just as baffled as I am, because both parties decided against making any sort of serious comment on the issue.

Winter Olympics inspire Tulsa Curling Club

WIll Bramlett / Collegian

Members of teams in the Tulsa Curling Club sweep in front of their “rock,” creating a smooth surface to guide it into a point-scoring position.

The Tulsa Curling Club began over a year ago, inspired by the interest in the sport fostered by the Winter Olympic games, and continues to grow. Will Bramlett Student Writer

A group of Tulsa residents led by Eric Vardeman began the Tulsa Curling Club in February of 2012. Vardeman, like many in the club, became interested in the sport after seeing it during the Winter Olympics. A few members are Canadians who have been curling for years. Those unfamiliar with curling might begin by imagining shuffleboard on ice. Rather than using a stick to push a puck toward a triangle across the board, curlers set up on starting blocks similar to those in track. Curlers launch off the blocks, pushing a large, polished piece of granite, which looks similar to a wheel of cheese with a handle. The curlers then release the granite “rock” toward the “house,” a target made of four rings painted under the ice. Two other players use “brooms,” which look more like mops, to sweep just ahead of the rock without touching the rock as it moves down the sheet. The friction from the sweeping causes a small layer of water to form, over which the rock can slide. The sweepers use their brooms to influence the speed and direction of the rock. When the puck reaches the house, the

fourth team member joins in with a broom direct the rock. If the rock reaches halfway through the circle, a member of the opposing team can begin sweeping in order to bring it away from the center. Teams take turns sending rocks down the ice. After an inning, the team whose rock is closer to the center of the house receives a point. The team with the most points following 10 innings wins the game. If the game is still tied after ten, like baseball, rounds are added until one team can earn more points to win. When the league started last year, Vardeman said he was looking to find seven other people, so the league could have two teams. Participation far exceeded his expectations, with enough players to comprise 14 teams in the first season, a number which, according to Vardeman, has been “fluctuating up and down” since then. In the current season, there are eight teams participating. “People just kind of came out and tried. Decided they liked (it) and kept playing,” Vardeman said. “We’re just trying to make it to next year when the Olympics hit.” He predicts a spike in interest following the 2014 Winter Olympics, and hopes to get newcomers hooked, as they have been in the past. The current season is four weeks into the ten-week season, and meets on Saturday nights from 6 to 9 p.m. Vardeman says that there will be a shorter and cheaper miniseason soon, with more information coming later this month on TulsaCurlingClub.com.


Sports

the Collegian : 3

4 March 2013

Hurricane may find refuge in “Conference of Misfit Teams”

This year’s dramatically unfolding conference realignment has left the University of Tulsa with few appealing prospects for the upcoming years.

J. Christopher Proctor Foreign Correspondent

Tulsa sports trivia: can you name the members of the Conference USA in 2013? How about 2014? What about the Big East? Don’t worry if you are not able to rattle off each of these lists without cheating. The plague of conference realignment that has marred the college athletics landscape has been particularly harsh to Tulsa’s current home—C-USA—and has been brutal for the Big East—the conference that seems to be the next logical destination for the Golden Hurricane. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First we need to take a (really) quick look at the madness that has put Tulane in the Big East and Old Dominion in the C-USA. Go west, young man As the Big East was raided by the bigger leagues throughout the past two years, the conference forsook the region of its namesake and instead turned to the west, in the apparent attempt to create Eastern and Western divisions. This 2013

C-USA

Show me the money! What could possibly have driven these crazy changes, ripping apart old rivalries and making cross country trips a weekly reality for over two dozen teams? You guessed it, money. Before this nonsense started, the Big East’s television contract brought in about $40 million a year and paid a little over $3

million a school. The C-USA received $14 million a year, about a million a school. With numbers like these—and rumors of a contract in the $100-$150 million-a-year range right around the corner for the Big East—it is easy to see how cash-strapped mid-major programs could find it hard to refuse a massive influx of cash. (For reference, the Big 12, Big 10, ACC, SEC and PAC 12 all make over $200 million a year via television rights.) Unfortunately for the defectors, their presence has devalued the conference, and the Big East’s most recent TV contract will pay out only $20 million a year, leaving most of the programs hardly better off than they had been in the C-USA. While there is still the hefty bonus from the conference’s guaranteed spot in a BCS bowl to look forward to, this boon will almost certainly disappear after next season when the BCS restructures to accommodate a four-team playoff. What’s new, pussycat? But, if all this silliness has been going on for over a year, why write about it now? Two reasons: first, the Big East is about to lose the rights to its name, and second, Tulsa seems poised to enter the ill-fated conference.

2014

UTSA

new/staying

UTSA

returnee/staying

ODU

new/staying

ODU

returnee/staying

North Texas

new/staying

North Texas

returnee/staying

MTSU

new/staying

MTSU

returnee/staying

Louisiana Tech

new/staying

Louisiana Tech

returnee/staying

FIU

new/staying

FIU

returnee/staying

Florida Atlantic

new/staying

Florida Atlantic

returnee/staying

Tulsa

returnee/staying

Tulsa

returnee/staying

UTEP

returnee/staying

UTEP

returnee/staying

Rice

returnee/staying

Rice

returnee/staying

Marshall

returnee/staying

Marshall

returnee/staying

*SMU

returnee/leaving

East Carolina

returnee/leaving

*UCF

returnee/leaving

Tulane

returnee/leaving

*East Carolina

returnee/staying

Southern Miss

returnee/staying

*Houston

returnee/leaving

UAB

returnee/staying

*Memphis

returnee/leaving

Charlotte

returnee/staying

*Tulane

returnee/staying

Southern Miss

returnee/staying

UAB

returnee/staying

Charlotte

new/staying

*South Florida

returnee/leaving

Marquette

returnee/staying

Marquette

returnee/staying

DePaul

returnee/staying

Louisville

returnee/leaving

Villanova

returnee/staying

DePaul

returnee/staying

Seton Hall

returnee/staying

Cincinnati

returnee/leaving

St. John’s

returnee/staying

Notre Dame

returnee/leaving

Providence

returnee/staying

Temple

newcomer/leaving

Georgetown

returnee/staying

*Rutgers

returnee/leaving

VIllarova

returnee/staying

St. John’s

returnee/staying

Providence

returnee/staying

Georgetown

returnee/staying

Connecticut

returnee/leaving

Seton Hall

returnee/staying

2013

Big East

included the initial acquisitions of Mountain West members Boise State and San Diego State, and the later poaching of Houston, Southern Methodist, Central Florida and Memphis out of the C-USA. While Boise and San Diego have since changed their minds and returned to the mountains, the original C-USA defectors have remained vigilant and have been joined by Tulane and East Carolina. This means the easterly conference now contains only one original member from 1979— Connecticut—two members from 2005—Cincinnati and South Florida—the six new C-USA members, Temple from the MAC, and former independent Navy. To replace the six defectors, the C-USA has seemingly added anything with a pulse (and a TV market), creating an odd grab-bag of schools, many of whom came from the perpetually underachieving Sun Belt.

Beate Hall Staff Writer

On Feb. 27, the No. 19-ranked Tulsa men’s tennis team defeated No. 21 Michigan, 5–2 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Rallying after a loss in the first set, but not the matches, in five of six singles matches, the Golden Hurricane won. This match, the Hurricane’s third win against a Big 10 squad, brings the season to 6–5 for the Tulsa men. Head Coach Vince Westbrook said “This was a better showing than we had at Texas A&M last week.” The men’s team dropped two places in the rankings after last week’s loss. In doubles play, junior Clifford Marsland and sophomore Alejandro Espejo lost to No. 30 Evan King and Alex Buzzi, 8–3, during the first round of doubles. During No. 2 doubles, seniors Grant Ive and Tristan Jackson bested Barrett Franks and Shuan Bernstein, 8–4.

round 12. And who could possibly be that number 12? Well, while nothing is set in stone yet, it is looking more and more likely that Tulsa will receive the invitation to join our old C-USA brethren in the West division of the Conference of Misfit Teams. There are rumors that TU already turned down an invitation to the Big East last year when the conference added Tulane and East Carolina, but now that the C-USA is effectively the Sun Belt and Friends, it is hard to see the Hurricane shunning a chance to play with rivals SMU and Houston and receive the additional revenue the switch would bring. While Tulsa will certainly play in a weakened C-USA next year, there is a very strong chance that this will be the school’s last year in the remade conference. While Conference USA has been a great home for the Hurricane since it left the WAC in 2005, the conference has changed beyond recognition. A move to the Conference of Misfit Teams may not be the sexiest option, as it hardly represents much more than preserving the status quo before realignment, but at this point it may be Tulsa’s only real option. Let’s just hope we haven’t missed our chance to get in on the craziness of the experiment that is the Big East.

Tigers subdued, but Blazers prevail

Of twenty schools, only six in the 2015 conference will have been members of the 2013 conference.

2014

Though all of its losses are being suffered in 2013, it is noteworthy that all schools remaining in 2014 will be non-football members. *These are the expected members of 2014’s “Conference of Misfit Teams”

Wins for men’s and women’s tennis

Tulsa’s tennis teams pulled out a pair of wins last week over the Michigan Wolverines and the Oklahoma State Lady Cowboys.

A few months ago, the seven non-football members of the Big East—known as the Catholic 7— decided they were going to bail from the sinking conference and start their own, basketball-centric conference. With basketball powerhouses like Georgetown, Marquette and Villanova among those leaving, the departures dealt a pretty serious blow to the struggling Big East. This week, to further the pain, the Catholic 7 announced they would be taking the name ‘Big East’ with them, forcing the remaining schools to find a new name. While all the details have yet to be worked out by the lawyers, this will certainly be costly for the conference formerly known as the Big East, and may create an incentive for fringe teams to consider bolting for a more stable home. And, into this mess enters our lovable Golden Hurricane. If you happened to do the math, you may have noticed that there are currently 11 teams slated to be members of the conference formerly known as the Big East in 2014—from this point on I’ll call them the Conference of Misfit Teams. Eleven is a pretty bad number for scheduling, and all signs point to the conference trying to add one more to make a

In No. 3 doubles, also known as round three, junior Japie De Klerk and freshman Carlos Bautista defeated their opponents 8–5 solidifying the point for Tulsa. “I play with Jappi, he’s the number one,” said Bautista. In singles play, Michigan won the first two singles matches. No. 84 Marsland was defeated by No. 17 King, 6–4, 6–2. Jackson was defeated in No. 5 singles to Franks, 7–5, 6–4. These two losses gave the Wolverines a 2–1 lead. After the first set of the next several matches, three losses had prospects looking bleak, but then the TU men started to win. No. 52 De Klerk defeated No. 67 Vlad Stefan 7–5, 6–2. Bautista bested Justin Rossi, 6–0, 6–2, after a loss of 7–5. Espejo defeated Alex Petrone 3–6, 6–2, 6–4. Ive won against Michael Zhu 4–6, 6–3, 6–4. The team next plays Mar. 8 against Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. “When we get a lot of people that come to watch that’s great; it makes it so much easier” said Hurrricane player Matthew Kirby. The next home game for men’s tennis is March 10th at noon at the Michael D. Case Tennis Center. On Mar. 1, the Tulsa women

also had a winning night. After defeating No. 27 Oklahoma State 6–1, the No. 28 Tulsa women are now 8–4 for the season and have a perfect 5–0 playing at home. Head Coach Dean Orford said “It was a big win for us.” In doubles play, freshman Renata Kuricova and junior Maria Sant’Anna defeated Maria Alverez and Lorena Gheroghe, 8–2. Junior Samantha Vickers and No. 19 sophomore Isaura Enrique bested Malika Rose and Kanypat Narattana, 8–3. In singles, No. 59 Vickers defeated No. 58 Malika Rose, 6–3, 6–2. This is Vickers ninth individual win in singles play this spring season. Sant’Anna defeated Narattana 7–6, 6–1 putting TU ahead 3–0. The next three wins all happened over the course of about ten minutes. Senior Michelle Farley won against C.C. Sardinha 6–3, 3–6, 6–0 in a close match. Kuricova then defeated Kayrn Guttormsen, 7–5, 6–3. Saana Saarteinen took down Maria Alvarez 6–2, 6–3 providing a 6–0 lead for Tulsa. The only Hurricane loss was when Meghan Blevins of OSU bested Enrique, 6–7 (4–7), 6–3, 11–9. The TU women next play South Alabama at home in Michael D. Case.

Logan Miller / Collegian

The Tulsa women’s basketball team outreached the Memphis Tigers at The Reynolds Center last Thursday to garner a valuable win.

A strong win against the Memphis Tigers was followed by a loss to the University of Alabama-Birmingham for Tulsa women’s basketball this week. Victoria McGouran Staff Writer

The University of Tulsa women’s basketball team rebounded from their disappointing loss at Tulane by solidly defeating conference opponent Memphis 79–68 at the Donald W. Reynolds Center on the Feb. 28. This was the first win for the Golden Hurricane over the Tigers since the 2007–2008 season, marking the first time any current TU player has earned a victory over Memphis. Tulsa moved to 12–15 on the season and 7–7 in Conference USA, while the Tigers fell to 16–12 overall and 7–7 in the league. “We knew we had to get this one. In order for us to move up and for us to have a chance at one of the top four seeds, we knew we had to come in and take care of business,” Head Coach Matilda Mossman said. “I am really proud of our effort, proud of how we played and the fact that we found a way to win.” The 49-percent shooting from Tulsa included four of players scoring in the double digits, including Taleya Mayberry, who had a team-leading 17 points, six assists and three steals in 37 minutes of play. Kelsee Grovey scored 16 points, Tiffani Couisnard added 14 points, a team-best nine rebounds and three steals, and Mariah Turner tallied 11 points. “The thing I am most pleased

with is how we shot the ball,” Mossman said. The Hurricane was out-rebounded 44–32, but had a 15–9 advantage in assists, a 13–9 lead in steals and only 15 turnovers to Memphis’ 21. Tulsa shot 40 percent from the field, 35 percent from behind the arc and 69 percent from the charity stripe, and scored 38 points in the paint, 22 points off the bench and 19 points off turnovers. In the first half, the Hurricane shot 51 percent from the field and had seven steals, but did not perform as well on the boards, initially trailing the Tigers 23–14. Grovey and Turner each had seven points, which helped Tulsa towards a 40–34 halftime lead. TU managed to maintain the lead during the entire second half, climbing to a game-best 14-point advantage with 6:19 on the clock, and ended the contest with an 11-point victory. Memphis was led by Ariel Hearn with 18 points, Bilqis Abdul-Qaadir with 14 points and Nicole Dickson with 11 points. Asianna Fuqua-Bey pulled down nine rebounds, Dickson had two blocks, and Abdul-Qaadir and Hearn each had four steals. The Hurricane’s next bout, against the University of AlabamaBirmingham on Sunday, resulted in a 59–45 loss for Tulsa, moving it to 12–16 for the season overall and 7–8 in conference play. “It was obvious that it meant something to UAB, because they were playing like it mattered,” Mossman said. “Our kids weren’t playing like it mattered.” Tulsa will be put to the test again on the March 7 when it takes on conference foe Houston at home in the Reynolds Center.


NEWS

4 march 2013

the Collegian : 4

Film festival includes Hinton adaptations Author S.E. Hinton herself guided adaptations of her short stories, a few of the shorts at this year’s Spring Film Festival. Witt Womack Student Writer

On Feb. 25, scores of film lovers braved the biting rain to attend the 2013 TU Spring Film Festival at the Lorton Performance Center. The annual event showcases the work of current students in the film studies department as well as alumni, but Monday saw a few surprises. “This year was special in that we were able to include pieces of TU Film Studies past, present and future,” said Associate Professor of Film Studies Jeff Van Hanken. “We featured current work, several strong alumni efforts and for the first time we had a project where we collaborated with A-list professionals,” said Hanken. World-renowned local author S. E. Hinton, famed for her novel “The Outsiders,” was among these professionals. Hinton, who graduated from Tulsa University, approached the film department with the idea after sitting in on a few screen-

writing classes. “She was interested in producing a series of films based on her short story collection, ‘Some of Tim’s Stories,’ and thankfully she entrusted our students with that task,” Van Hanken said. “The students all worked as crew members under Hollywood directors (Ed Ornelas and Tim Hunter) who came to Tulsa to direct the films,” noted Dr. Joseph Rivers, the chair of film studies. “We were thrilled that we could get the kids that kind of experience,” Hinton said. “Tim was so pleased with the way they picked up on everything.” The Hinton films were the icing on this festival’s cake, but attendees were first treated to screenings of seven student films spanning every kind of genre and offering a wide emotional range. The segment kicked off with “Pink Mist” by Chad and Cory Watson, a fast-paced thriller chronicling the adventure of a lone sniper on a dangerous mission. Anna Bennett’s “The Crowning” followed, wordlessly bringing a mood of fantasy, romance and tragedy to the screen. The next film, “Infatuation” by Bailey Ardies, told the story of a young man enthralled by books in a world where they are forbidden to all but a few.

From Funds on cover crunch,” but when finances are concerned it

events applying for funding, and I hope that’s because it is simpler to apply,” she said. Last February the cabinet and the Event Sponsorship Committee reviewed and streamlined the process by which events are sponsored. SA policy was changed so that applicants requesting less than $500 did not have to appear before the Senate and applicants requesting less than $200 could conduct the ESC interview via e-mail. John Patterson, treasurer of the Student Investment Fund said, “I believe it is relatively easy to apply for SA funding, provided you know where to locate the documents on their website.” Andrew Barry of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists said “the time and energy required to request funds was adequate and proportional to the funds” his organization received. McGouran noted the new active organizations that SA has chartered in the last year, “like the cricket club. I think it’s just kind of amazing what they’ve managed to do even though they’re so new.” While the new organizations may have had some effect on the budget, they do not explain the increase in events, McGourin said, “A lot of the already-established organizations are hosting more events too.” Graduate student Amber Teachnor agrees that the number of organizations has increased since she was a freshman. Citing the growth of TU Abolitionists, Reformed University Fellowship, Phi Mu Alpha and Sigma Alpha Iota over the past few years, Teachnor said that existing organizations are more active now than before. She reasoned that the rapid growth and increase in activity of these and other groups may well be adding pressure on SA resources. “Maybe more organizations are becoming more active, which is a good thing,” Chong said. He reiterated that all students are a part of SA, which makes an increase of student activity a good sign. SA requires events be open to all students and advertised effectively. “All students pay student fees, and those go to SA, so really every student has already paid to sponsor every event.” McGouran said. Deliberate misuse of funds through such factors as egregious overestimation of attendance or a failure to advertise is not believed to be a major factor in the “budget

Delta Sigma Theta's Philanthropy Week is March 4th through the 8th March 4th is Kappa Delta's Philanthropy dinner at the KD house starting at 5 p.m. March 7th is KD football for their philanthropy

is an issue that must be considered. “We try to put as much scrutiny into the process as we can, asking questions on what exactly the money is going towards. That way we are fair to each organization,” Chong explained. According to Chong, SA officers normally inspect its past dealings with organizations as part of its condition of granting funds. A track record of providing accurate estimates and using funds as stipulated helps in the application process. Sometimes, there is not much that SA can inspect. New organizations do not have a “track record.” In the end, “there is obviously a certain level of trust that you have to put in every person that approaches us for funding,” he said. SA is allowed to do an audit on organization it suspects has misused funds, but “so far,” Chong said, “that has not been necessary.” SA’s procedures for disbursing money involve the Business Office to ensure clean accounting. To receive SA funds, organizations must present the Business Office with receipts. Organizations may not receive more than the sum of their expenditures or the amount of SA’s appropriation, whichever is less. If not all the money is used by the end of the fiscal year, the money returns to the SA budget. As for the immediate problem, the money is due to run out, and little can be done now about it. Chong said that some events are supported by academic schools and departments or receive aid from donors or grants from outside the University of Tulsa. However, the reality is that some organizations will have to fund projects themselves or turn elsewhere for assistance. “It is unfortunate that some organizations will have to handle expenses out-of-pocket,” Chong said. However, he emphasized the good health of the rest of SA’s budget, such as the fund travel expenses, which is not expected to run out. He also expects SA to begin discussing what changes must be made to appropriations guidelines. “I expect that future presidents may wish to allocate more funds toward the Event Sponsorship line-item ... now that we’re seeing an uptick in funds requested,” said SA President John Lepine, who said he is pleased with the increasing number of quality events this year. There is potential that presidential line-item veto may be used to influence spending, which falls under the Senate’s jurisdiction. The president’s power of lineitem veto was recently tested and upheld in SA Judicial proceedings. In the future, this ruling could allow the president to impose much more influence over monetary policy, including event sponsorships. SA Vice President Natalie Stompoly expressed concern that line-item veto may be a means for the president to intrude on Senate business. The opinion of the Senate, she said, was that “line-item veto would interfere with the legislative body’s power, because it would give the president power to edit bills already passed by the Senate as a whole.” Though the line-item veto could cause friction in SA, the Senate is not concerned that it would affect event sponsorships and other budgetary issues. “Line-item veto could be used as a tool to prevent over-spending, but then so could a regular presidential veto, … the treasurer’s denial … and the senate trimming the bill in committee or during discussion at the regular Senate meeting,” Stompoly said. “We have multiple tools in place already, with or without … line-item veto.”

“Infatuation” was runner-up for the night’s best film. Then came Alex Iskander’s “#Meta,” a fast-paced mockumentary of itself which straddled fiction and reality and comically confounded its viewers all at once. The laughs didn’t stop as Elliot Ridgeway’s “Slender,” a manic take on the indie video game “Slender: The Eight Pages,” fol-

Courtesy of University of Tulsa

Student Stephen King’s action parody “Hard Felt” a romance by Best Film, Audience’s Choice and Best Score at this year’s Spring Film Festival.

lowed. In the subsequent “The Perfect Bench” by Patrick D’Hoostelaere, the audience got a taste of romance as they witnessed the relationship of two strangers unfold over many conversations at the eponymous park bench. Concluding the student film segment was Stephen King’s “Hard Felt” which was awarded Best Film and Audience’s Choice, and earned Steven McDonald the Best Score nod. The film presents itself as a Hollywood action movie, but with a surprise protagonist whose mission to rescue his girlfriend

was met with uproarious laughter throughout its Lorton debut. The films represented the culmination of countless hours of writing, rewriting, producing and editing that go into a student film. Students work with faculty for advice, but increasingly rely on their fellow students “On the early projects, a lot of guidance goes into the projects,” Van Hanken said. “As the student becomes comfortable with the technology and the organizational structure,” Hanken continued, “hopefully his or her voice begins to emerge and the faculty act more as a sounding board.” “The making of a film is, by nature, extremely collaborative,” Van Hanken added. Students composed the film scores, designed the graphics and worked the crews of each film. “There really isn’t a major that we can’t work with,” he said. After the student films, the audience was shown the work of TU alum Daniel Tarr, “Sherman and Pacifico.” The black-and-white short film, narrated by the adventurous jellyfish Pacifico, told the story of the eponymous duo’s meeting and subsequent relationship. “The quality of films is higher that it ever has been,” Rivers said. The student films shown at the festival can be seen on the TU Film Studies website, orgs.utulsa.edu/filmstudies. More student films will be screened at the senior film night May 10.

Law Student wins Mrs. Oklahoma Julie Pittman is using her victory in the state-wide pageant to advocate for child abuse victims. Beate Hall Staff Writer

Julie Pittman, a second-year law student at the University of Tulsa Law School, was recently crowned Mrs. Oklahoma. “Mrs. Oklahoma allows married women to be a spokeswoman for an issue in your state and you compete in Mrs. America,” Pittman said. Unlike the Miss America competition, which gives its winner a $50,000 scholarship, Mrs. Oklahoma provides no scholarship opportunity. “You are a representative of women in Oklahoma,” Pittman said. “I like to just call it a pageant, without the word ‘beauty,’” Pittman said, “many pageants stand for different things.” The competition still includes a swimsuit and evening gown portion, but the personal interview accounts for half the score for any contestant. “My favorite part of competing is showcasing who you are,” Pittman said. “Whether I am in interview talking about child abuse awareness or in an evening gown in my favorite color, it is fun showcasing your individualism.” Originally from Owasso, Okla., Pittman received her undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Central Oklahoma. During her time there, Pittman represented her school as Miss University of Central Oklahoma in the Miss Oklahoma pageant. At TU, Pittman is working to become a lawyer. “(I) came to law school to advocate for the safety of children,” Pittman said. “Child abuse is an issue dear to my heart because there is no excuse for child abuse. As the innocents of society, we should strive to protect them.” Spencer Pittman, her husband, has been supportive of her endeavors. “He was my personal trainer for Mrs. Oklahoma and is my number one fan,” Pittman said. “He likes being called ‘Mr. Oklahoma.’” Mr. Pittman is also a TU Law student.

From Grades on cover someone has something over a 4.0, they immediately normalize the grades,” he said. By capping GPAs at 4.0, the university can prevent its graduates from facing an unfair penalty when applying to graduate school. But some concerns remain. Donaldson said that one historic argument against the use of grade modifiers has been that doing so will make TU students less competitive when seeking national scholarships. “My response to that is that sells our students short,” Donaldson said. “I think our best students are just as good as the students at the 44 of the 50 universities that use (grade modifiers).” The ULC report states that “few (institutions surveyed) believe that grade modifiers have harmed scholarship students.” With President Upham’s signature, the

As reigning Mrs. Oklahoma, Pittman will be expected to speak at a number of public events. “In trial skills, I have grown as a public speaker and a better advocate for my client,” she said. Pittman will serve as a spokeswoman for several organizations and work throughout the state to raise awareness and advocate for critical issues affecting Oklahoma citizens. For her time as Mrs. Oklahoma, Pittman has chosen raising awareness about child abuse as her primary mission. “Child abuse

Courtesy of Julie Pittman

Julie Pittman won the Mrs. Oklahoma, a pageant for married women.

includes sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse and neglect,” she said. According to a study from the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (DHS), one in eight foster children are abused. A report entitled “Oklahoma’s Children 2012” states that there were 64,793 reported cases of abuse or neglect in Oklahoma and 13,796 of those cases were referred for further investigation. “Child abuse is a serious issue in Oklahoma affecting children from rich, poor, uneducated and educated homes,” Pittman said, “if a child tells you they are being abused, listen to them.” only thing that remains is to implement the new system. This entails changes in Registrar’s office, which has already had some impact on the form of the faculty senate recommendation. Initially, the recommendation included a clause to avoid changing the grading system on current students. However, the complexities involved in tracking two separate groups of students—those whose grades would be subject to grade modifiers and those whose grades would not—were found to be prohibitive. As things currently stand, the change will take place in the fall of 2014 and will affect all students after that point. SA has said that it will survey students to gauge their reaction to the new system. “We will be letting administration know how the students feel about this issue based on the results we receive from the survey,” an SA spokesperson said.


the Collegian : 5

Eye on the world:

NEWS

4 march 2013

tourist are now stable. Both are thought to have jumped from a relatively low height to escape the flames, but both were severely burned. The crash is expected to put a damper on tourism in the region, especially after Egypt grounded all of its hot air balloons in response to what is now the deadliest hot air balloon accident in history. North America MEXICO

Witt Womack Student Writer

The Middle East EGYPT Tragedy struck the skies above Luxor, Egypt last Tuesday morning. As a hot-air balloon full of tourists began to descend

from a thousand feet following a sightseeing flight, something on board exploded and the balloon caught fire. As the balloon came crashing down, some of the passengers tried a last-second bail from dizzying heights. 17 of the 20 passengers lay dead in the aftermath. Of the three survivors, one would die later of his injuries. Only the Egyptian pilot and a British

Biology professor discovers “virgin birth snakes� Snakes born with two sets of their mother’s genes may not be an anomaly, according to Dr. Warren Booth. Kimberly Poff Student Writer

Step aside, Mary, you are no longer the only virgin mother in town: snakes can do it too. In fairness, there are many species which have long been known to reproduce asexually, but these are mostly invertebrates or small lizards that always reproduce asexually. Dr. Warren Booth, an assistant professor of biology who joined the University of Tulsa this year, has recorded several instances of “parthenogenesis,� or reproduction without fertilization, in several species of larger snakes that also reproduce sexually. The pythons, boas, rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, copperheads and stacks of sundry other reptiles awaiting genetic analysis in the freezers of 315 Oliphant Hall reproduce using two copies of one half of their genetic code. Their invertebrate counterparts, on the other hand, reproduce essentially by cloning themselves. As many students learned in high school health or biology, humans receive half of their chromosomes from their mother and half from their father. Clones are exact copies of the entire set of genes. The snakes in question however, have two sets of their mother’s half of the chromosomes and none from their father—hence they are not clones. Previously, this phenomenon has been recorded in only a few instances, let alone species, and only in captivity or through artificial processes in a lab. It has been regarded as an evolutionary novelty and irrelevant to current genetic study. Booth’s discovery of virgin births in wild snakes and in snakes which have produced sexually in the past indicates that two percent of cottonmouths and five percent of copperheads are the result of virgin births. This frequency of occurrence indicates that there must be some genetic basis for the ability. “The most exciting part is that we are changing paradigms with our research,�

Booth said. “(Parthenogenesis) is a common event and therefore must have evolutionary reasons� for being so. Booth first began exploring parthenogenesis while doing post-doctoral work at North Carolina University. He was asked by a local Boa constrictor breeder to check the paternity on a particularly expensive litter of offspring in the hopes of reproducing his success. It turned out that, of the five possible fathers, not one was a genetic match to the offspring. The paper Booth published in the UK Royal Society’s “Biology Letters� was then picked up by 1400 news agencies and featured in the science journal “Nature.� While studying virgin births, Booth has come across several other oddities. For instance, some female snakes are able to store sperm for extended periods of time within their bodies and use that sperm to reproduce years later. This is much more efficient than the tanks of liquid nitrogen currently used in laboratories for sperm preservation. Booth expects his research will provide a better understanding, or perhaps a completely new understanding, of the evolution of sex as a mechanism for reproduction. Additionally, if certain individuals of a population can be identified as being capable of parthenogenesis, endangered populations can be perhaps rehabilitated or invasive ones targeted. This summer Booth will be traveling to Indonesia and Vietnam to pinpoint the origins of the Burmese pythons which are troubling southern swamps of the United States. The widespread belief that the invasion of these snakes is caused by pet owners releasing them into the wild has made it a felony to carry snakes across state lines. Booth seeks to prove however, that the snakes are the result of a single release into the wild and seeks to appeal restrictive laws based on “the sensationalist fears of the legislators and bad science.� The population genetics necessary for this research can also extend to endangered species and disrupted habitats. Certain species may be able to be used as indicators of the full restoration of a previously destroyed environment.

Under the administration of President Enrique Peùa Nieto, Mexico’s Congress has passed a law aimed at major education reform. On Tuesday the government arrested the leader of the National Education Workers’ Union, Elba Gordillo, on charges of tax evasion and corruption. The teacher’s union has held quite a sway over educational policies, and part of the President Nieto’s reform is thought to be aimed at reducing its power. New standards have been set including mandatory teacher evaluations and a nationwide census of the schools, teachers and students. Despite a very high percentage of students enrolling in primary-level education, a 2012 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development report indicated that only 42 percent of the population completed the equivalent of a high-school degree. Antarctica SOUTH GEORGIA ISLAND On the island of South Georgia, just north of the Antarctic continent, an extermination project is bound to start this Friday. The target of the culling: the Brown rat, an invasive species that has disrupted the local ecology ever since its members made port after hitching rides on 18th century sealing ships. Without any natural predators, the rats have run amok and dined on the eggs of birds endemic to the island. While they live in isolated colonies now, scientists are worried that glaciers separating them will retreat, allowing the populations to merge and destroying chances of eradicating them. Three helicopters are bound to drop millions of poison pellets with the goal of complete eradication. South America ARGENTINA

In 1994, a Jewish center in Buenos Aires was bombed, leaving 85 dead. Now, almost twenty years later, Argentine legislators are calling for an international “truth commission� to resolve the tragedy. Many Argentines have accused the Iranian government as having been involved either as coordinators or financial backers of the Islamic militant group Hezbollah, which is thought to have orchestrated the attack. The international court is part of an agreement between Iran and Argentina to ensure impartiality, but critics in Argentina are worried that Iran’s cooperation might hinder the investigation. The Middle East IRAN A new spacefarer followed in the footsteps of Ham, Gordo and Miss Baker on Thursday when Iran launched a Kavoshgar rocket 72 miles into the atmosphere crewed only by a small monkey. The use of monkey flights as tests before actual manned flights is a tried-and-true practice first performed by Americans in 1948. Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad similarly harkened back to America’s early space program when in 2010 he announced plans to get an Iranian astronaut into space by the end of the decade in 2019. The space program has been coolly observed by foreign powers due to its development of rocket technology that could be used in long-range missiles. Iran has repeatedly asserted the space program’s peaceful purpose. Updates Venezuala, Jan. 21: Hugo Chavez is receiving chemotherapy for his cancer. Brazil, Jan. 28: The official death toll for the tragic nightclub fire has now been settled at 240. Bangladesh, Feb. 18: More Jamaat-e-Islami members have been sentenced. This action led to rioting that has killed over sixty dead and a general strike. Malaysia / Phillipines, Feb. 25: Conflict between the Sulu Sultanate and Malaysia has erupted into violence. Nineteen have been confirmed dead.

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Feb 23 Feb 16 21:30 Officers were called to Fisher West for a broken window. A student reported that a friend threw a ball at his window on the third floor to get his friends attention. The student who tossed the ball hit the wrong window and busted it. Feb 17 3:20 Officers were called for a Domestic Violence in the parking lot of USW. The male student had marks on his arms from the female. Both parties were students. Feb 19 18:15 Officers took a report for a larceny of bicycle. Officers found the cut lock in the area.

5:00 Officers were called to Fisher Hall for an intoxicated male inside the wrong apartment. The suspect was a TU student and was returned to his apartment in USW. 19:05 Officers were called to John Mabee Hall for a student misconduct report. The TU student was throwing water balloons from his apartment window and underage drinking.

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4 March 2013

the Collegian : 6

Deals to be found at Tulsa’s thrifty treasure troves Interested in expanding your wardrobe but are on a tight budget? One local thrift store donates its profits to the Assistance League of Tulsa, whose main initiative is to help thousands of children. Anna Bennett Staff Writer

My top pick would have to be Bargains-A-Lot, if for no other reason than its very convenient location at 11th and Harvard. But there are plenty of other things to love about this small, volunteer-run resale shop. All of its profits go to the Assistance League of Tulsa, whose main initiative is Operation School Bell. Buyers not only get a great bargain, but they also help thousands of needy children get a brand new, practical wardrobe. Each child is given several shirts and pairs of pants in addition to a jacket, shoes, socks, underwear and a hygiene kit. Volunteer Nancy said that some of these children have never even had their own toothbrushes before. In addition to the good it does in the community, Bargains-A-Lot boasts a really impressive selection of clothing, jewelry, small house wares and even some furniture.

Clothing items generally run from $3 to $8, but the store is always running extensive promotions (right now, yellow tags are half off, and green-tag items are 50 cents). Those who may have a decent amount of time to kill can really unearth some great pieces. What really impressed me about Bargains is how they have more than just your granddad’s clothes; I’m always finding name-brand and even designer pieces for a microscopic fraction of what they would be new. Of course, there is a great deal of luck involved—just because you find those Ann Taylor pants does not mean they are in style, or even the right size. But on one particularly successful day, I scored a pair of Forever 21 skinny jeans, a pair of super comfy Aeropostle jeans and a pair of Express slacks ... all for $6. Leaving me $14 in my pocket. $5 of which went to the $1 t-shirt rack (which I am still waiting to see again). It was a beautiful day. Both the beauty and the disadvantage of shopping there is that shoppers never know what Bargains will have from day to day; this is great for those who love a shopping adventure, but not for those looking for something particular. I think the random finds— like mushroom-etched glasses

or Bill Clinton-themed birthday cards—are the best part. My two other favorites are Value Thrift on 11th and Memorial, and Quality Thrift Store on Peoria at 51st. These locations both have the added advantage of being open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. most days (as opposed to Bargains, which closes at 2 p.m. or sometimes 5). And while the atmosphere is a little less friendly at both places, their large size gives them an extensive selection. Value Thrift tends to have quite a lot of furniture and linens and such. Quality Thrift is sometimes more expensive (as thrift stores go), but it has special discounts on certain days. On Sundays, it runs a half-off special on items of a certain tag color, and on Mondays, all clothing items are 99 cents. Knowing where to shop for bargain clothing means that even college kids can pop a few tags, and feel good knowing they are living off of the excesses of consumerism, rather than buying into the cycle. For just a little extra effort, students can supplement (or nearly completely supply) their wardrobe for less money and get higher quality pieces than they would at a cheap clothing store. Good luck thrift-shopper, you will look incredible.

PlayStation 4: unifies players, falls short of current gaming PCs With new technical modifications, including a switch to PC-based architecture, the PlayStation 4 will be far superior to current-generation consoles. Elliot Bauman Student Writer

On Feb. 20, major electronic entertainment company Sony finally addressed rumors of a next-generation console. As is turns out, not surprisingly, the speculation was true; the PlayStation 4 is indeed in development, and is currently slated for an end-of-2013 release. The news was finally dropped during a press conference reveal that took place on the evening of Feb. 20. While the physical console itself still remains elusive, Sony did unveil some of the internal hardware and design elements. According to the press conference, the major design change implemented in the PS4 is the switch to PC-based architecture, specifically the x86-64, a common platform used in numerous modern gaming PCs. For unaware readers, the x86-64 is essentially a more powerful, 64-bit, extension of the x86 instruction set architecture. The change to PC-based design will allow the PS4 to have more flexibility in component hardware. As a result, the PS4 is reported to have AMD technology in its CPU, as well as the graphics processing unit (GPU). For those unfamiliar with PC technical terms, AMD, Advanced Micro Devices, is a semiconductor company, very similar to Intel, and the CPU and GPU basically help determine how powerful a computer can be. For interested readers, the exact technical details, listed by Sony, are as follows: the PS4 was revealed to contain an eight-core AMD “Jaguar” processor, and a 1.84 TFLOPS AMD GPU. Furthermore, the PS4 will have a fair amount of memory: 8 GB of GDDR5 system memory, 2.2 GB of video memory, and an internal hard drive with 160 GB available. These technical specifications will put the PS4 vastly ahead of current-generation gaming consoles, but will also still fall short of modern high-end gaming PCs. This is not necessarily a bad thing,

Photo courtesy Sony Corporation

The new DualShock 4 controller features minor changes to both the buttons and analog sticks, as well as the addition of a touch screen on the front of the controller.

as the specifications will help keep down the cost of the PS4— rumored to be between $400 and $500. Even though the processing power of the PS4 may not measure up to high-end gaming PCs, the graphics showcased at the reveal were still extremely gorgeous. Additionally, Sony stated that the use of Blu-Ray technology will also continue with the next generation console. Details of the PS4 controller were much more concrete, as the actual device was shown at the press conference. The new DualShock 4 controller will share many similarities with its PS3 predecessor, albeit a few notable changes. Despite a few minor changes to the buttons and analog sticks, the most interesting new feature is the addition of a touch screen on the front the controller. The exact function of the touch pad remains a mystery, but it does open a door for game developers to design creative ways to employ the new option. Interestingly enough, however, Sony also mentioned a change in mentality regarding the next generation of gaming: changing the central focus from the console to the player. It is not exactly clear what this means, though Sony attempted to explain the shift with a few examples. First, the PS4 player will now have the ability to interact with the console through a number of other common electronic devices, such as smartphones, computers or tablets. Users will be able to use the PS4 for more than just gaming—they can stream a movie to a tablet, or upload a video clip to Facebook. Furthermore, the PS4 will link players together in ways previously unheard of. Gamers will now have the ability to virtually hand

over the controls of their console to another online friend, which will allow for greater collaborative efforts on things such as games, projects or video editing. It still remains unknown how else the PS4 will break down the virtual barrier dividing players. Obviously, a gaming console would be severely lacking without any available games, and Sony clearly came prepared. A number of next-generation titles were showcased at the PS4 reveal. Some of the more notable included “Killzone: Shadow Fall,” a continuation of the PlayStation exclusive series, and “Watch Dogs,” a visibly impressive and immersive game that appears to put players in control of an agent who has the ability to access and control electronic devices in order to fight crime. The trailer displayed the player’s character taking control of traffic lights and train stations in order to catch a fleeing criminal. Bungie’s highly anticipated “Destiny,” a futuristic post-apocalyptic open-world shooter, was also exhibited at the reveal. This potentially revolutionary title will supposedly allow players to have complete control of what occurs in the game; the developers will create a living world, and the players will decide its fate. While the PS4 reveal did confirm a number of big rumors, it still left plenty of mystery. There is still no official release date, price or even an image of the actual console. To make matters more interesting, there has been a suspicious silence at Microsoft, which is also reported to be working on a nextgeneration system. Interested readers should keep an eye on gaming news for what promises to be an exciting technological display of Sony and Microsoft, once again, butting heads.

Photo courtesy ATO

James’ “Regions of Light and Sound of God” is an intoxicating thrill ride from beginning to end. The album incorporates a number of different genres so elegantly, listeners will fall into a Jim James-induced sleep.

Jim James’ latest intoxicates

My Morning Jacket’s Jim James’ solo album, “Regions of Light and Sound of God,” is a mix of funk, soul and indie, and imbibes inspiration. Zachary Patterson Student Writer

It is official, Jim James has burnt everything to the ground. “Regions of Light and Sound of God”—aptly named for its grand style—was released on Feb. 5, and is James’ premiere solo album, after having already made more than a name for himself as lead man of modern rock band My Morning Jacket. My Morning Jacket has been putting out records that have achieved critical acclaim since the late ‘90s but the Louisville, Kentucky native’s solo album is his best work yet. The album starts off with a bang in the hypnotic “State of the Art (A.E.I.O.U)”—a critique on technology and the way it has demeaned the human experience. This leads James to the rhetorical question, “(technology is) Supposed to make for better living/ are we better human beings?” The background is a slow-developing break, sprinkled with components

of gospel-imbued soul. “A New Life” is another highlight. It starts as a simple folk tune but evolves into the most danceinducing song on the album. “I want a new life,” he obsessively repeats, pleading for a chance to start over. “Exploding”—a two-minute instrumental track in the middle of the album—sounds exactly opposite what the title suggests, and features an acoustic guitar creating a soft seclusion that might make listeners fall into a happy Jim James-induced sleep. James weaves a stubborn tale of loving a person for who you think they are with the funky, rhythmic “Actress.” “Whether or not it’s true, I believe in the concept of you,” James says to emphasize his distorted view. In the trippy, Middle-Easternesque penultimate track, “All is Forgiven,” James fearfully, and longingly calls for forgiveness for the missteps of man. “I follow all the wrong dreams/ Lost in man’s schemes.” It is difficult to classify “Regions of Light and Sound of God” as one genre. It is a lofty mix of funk, soul, ambiance, indie and simplicity. Overall the album is intoxicating from start to finish, with the highlight coming on the very first track. Some fans of My Morning Jacket may be disappointed by James’ move away from rock music, but the rest of the music world will be crooning along “Regions of Light and Sound of God.”

By Anna Bennett

Ways to Freak Out Your Roommate Want to get yourself a single without having to pay more? Want to make sure your random roommate doesn’t try to be friends? Want to give some poor freshman a few great stories to tell? Take these as some sources of inspiration ... 1. Have all your friends show up to your place in cloaks— Huddle up and converse in whispers, then get real quiet when your roommate walks in. 2. Start keeping canned cat food in the fridge—Every so often, open a can and throw some out, then return the can to the fridge. Keep doing this for a while. Your roommate will either think you’re hiding a cat, or you’ve developed a taste for cat food. 3. Start doodling strange symbols on notebook paper and hang them strategically all over the apartment. 4. Draw a portrait of your roommate based on a Facebook photo. Give it to them one morning and say you did it while they were sleeping (remember to draw their eyes closed).

5. Fix yourself a sandwich, put it on a plate, then set it in the middle of the floor. Just leave it there. See how the roommate reacts. Get really mad when they move it—say you were hungry, and you couldn’t find your sandwich. 6. Play German opera music at very loud volumes from your room. Pretend to develop a taste for expressionistic film and dance, and play some anytime your roommate is around. 7. Get your friends to dress like prostitutes and visit your apartment at odd hours (even/ especially if you’re a girl). 8. Pretend to be taking a nap on the dining room table when your roommate gets home. 9. Hang all of the posters and pictures in the dorm/ apartment sideways. Bonus points if you also start cocking your head accordingly. 10. Wear a different mask, hat or wig when you leave the house every morning (take it off before you get to class; you don’t want anyone else to think you’re weird).


the Collegian : 7

4 March 2013

What belongs in the science classroom? House Bill 1674 is a veiled attempt to have creationism taught in public science classrooms, where it does not belong.

Walker Womack

Student Writer

House Bill 1674, known as the Scientific Education and Academic Freedom Act and currently pending in the Oklahoma Legislature, has been lampooned by critics and Establishment Clause watchdogs as the “Creationism Bill” since its inception. The bill itself claims that it “shall only protect the teaching of scientific information,” further maintaining that it “shall endeavor to create an environment within public elementary and secondary schools that encourages students to explore scientific questions.” Despite its good intentions, however, I find myself doubtful that the bill will be utilized in a constructive manner. It is not the bill’s provisions that worry me, but rather reading in between its lines. The writers of the bill claim that “the teaching of some scientific concepts … in the areas of biology, chemistry, meteorology, bioethics and physics can cause controversy.” Said writers further assert “that some teachers may be unsure of the expectations concerning ... information on ... biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, global warming, and human cloning.” The bill stipulates, then, that those scientific concepts that “can cause controversy” are to be censured at a teacher’s discretion. In effect, the bill politicizes scientific inquiry; it withholds the power of research and experimentation and places it not purely on observable means but rather on the personal whims of the instructor. Now, I will concede that science and the scientific method is not the end-all of human knowledge. There are other important steps to uncovering Truth than solely by pure empiricism. Experimentation is not infallible, and, indeed, in many subfields of biology, physics, chemistry and the like, research is still in its beginning stages, and conjecture reigns supreme. But I think it can be accurately said that two goals exist in every ordinary, public school biology classroom, namely that one, students are taught the basic steps of experimentation within the scientific method and, two, that students be brought up to date to the current understanding of the natural world. As such, we are often taught theories that were later proved false. No one now claims that J. J. Thompson’s Plum Pudding Model of the atom is accurate, but then no one claims that it was useless in the advancement of human understanding. Today’s theories are just the same. They are not necessarily the final culmination of science. They are falsifiable. That is the essence of scientific study. And while the bill-

holders are trying to paint theories derived from the scientific method as nonreligious doctrine, and thus the teaching of it in public schools as a sort of religious promotion in violation of the Establishment Clause, there is a fundamental difference between methodology and doctrine. The scientific method is an important skill to learn, and it is equally important that students learn of current theories because they, as the next generation of scientists, will use the basic methodology learned in high school classrooms to further support or else alter the current modes of scientific understanding. And while the wording of the bill seems innocent enough, there seems to be a clear agenda hidden between the lines. The very mention of exact subjects—biological evolution, chemical origins of life, global warming—shows how targeted and short-sighted the goals of the bill are. The bill seems a way to gloss over these controversial topics rather than promote the study of them. Even though the bill claims its measures will protect both sides of the various arguments, I think the protection will only serve to further delineate the two sides instead of furthering intelligent discussion, debate and reformulation. If students are allowed to adhere like dis-

House Bill 1674 is an attempt by the OK legislature to keep our classrooms academically honest by letting different ideas come into play.

Oscar Ho

Staff Writer

Ancient Greeks used the city’s marketplace, called the agora, as a commercial hub and as a place for public debate. Anyone could stand and talk about whatever he wanted. This practice of public declamation and debate continued into Roman times, when it was called the forum. This concept of unhindered but responsible academic investigation has lasted to this day. In fact, it is still called the forum. It’s the fundamental thought behind “There is no such thing as a stupid question” wisdom that many teachers teach. That is, until someone asks a stupid question. When a student questions generally accepted theories, they are essen-

Graphic by Caroline Kohlhagen

ciples to the various theories and are protected in this by law, then scientific methodology really does become dogma. It is not in cowering behind ideological principles that discoveries in medicine, ecology and other fields have been made, but rather in the active testing of those principles through contention. Allowing teachers and students to back off from issues will only further create a culture of taboo around topics that would better serve humanity. As to the point of this bill being a “Creationism Bill,” I certainly don’t see anything wrong with tenets of that theory being taught in schools. But there’s an appropriate place. In science courses, we are taught the methodology of the scientific method, in mathematics and philosophy, we are taught reason, and in history, critical thinking. Those philosophical elements of creationism should be taught in philosophy classes, and those more religious tenets taught in a world religions classroom setting.

tially answered with silence, a correction or a change of topic. In the case of climate change, teachers are especially limited in what they are permitted to say. This problem exists nationwide, and Tulsa area public school districts are no exception. Teachers can be reluctant both to investigate alternative ideas and to discuss their reluctance. Academic discipline requires that truth be taught as truth and falsity be taught as falsity, and that is a very good thing. The problem lies with conflicting ideas, in which both sides have scientific merit. Ideas outside generally accepted theories are suppressed by today’s unhealthy education culture. Oklahoma House Bill 1674 by Representative Gus Blackwell and Senator Josh Brecheen will allow teachers to discuss alternative theories in the classroom. Also known as the Scientific Education and Academic Freedom Act, HB 1674 seeks to codify free inquiry in Oklahoma schools. It will grant teachers permission to dis-

cuss alternative theories with their classes while encouraging school administrators to help them. HB 1674’s intent is “to create an environment in which both the teacher and students can openly and objectively discuss the facts and observations of science, and the assumptions that underlie their interpretation.” The result of this legislation is that students should be able “to explore scientific questions … and respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues,” according to the bill. Free inquiry is one of the core values of the University of Tulsa. Although imperfect in maintaining it, the education culture at TU is comparatively accepting of the many conflicting opinions. In many primary and secondary schools, free inquiry is almost never prioritized, to detrimental effect. An absence of academic freedom has historically had bad consequences. Galileo was forced to recant his findings, findings that might have brought Europe out of the Dark Ages sooner. In the previous decade, a study commissioned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to prove global warming was caught doctoring its sums when data did not agree with the ideal it was supposed to prove. The scientists involved were later somehow cleared of wrongdoing, but clouds still hang over the validity of their findings. Several years ago at Tulsa Zoo, a proposed display on six-day creationism was rejected because of its contradiction of the widely accepted evolutionary model of the origins of life. In all three cases, the pressure to conform to mainstream theory was too great. The Scientific Education and Academic Freedom Act is primarily designed to protect academic freedoms. Critics of the bill may claim that it is a ploy by religious conservatives to have the creationist model taught as fact in public schools, particularly since the bill’s authors are self-proclaimed Christians. However, HB 1674 has no religious bias in it, surprising as it may seem. Subsection D of Section 2 emphasizes that this new law may not be used to move the standard of education whatsoever. Subsection E then reads: “The provisions of (this Bill) shall only protect the teaching of scientific information, and shall not be construed to promote any religious or nonreligious doctrine, promote discrimination for or against a particular set of religious beliefs or non-beliefs or promote discrimination for or against religion or nonreligion.” Mainstream scientists and alternative researchers should have no reservations in backing this bill. Nothing in it favors one of them over the other. It actually establishes academic responsibility and free inquiry in law. We know that the modern world could never have happened if scientists had not challenged the reasoning of their day. From a geocentric universe to poisonous tomatoes, scientific theory has often needed correction, clarification or vindication. HB 1674 will help Oklahoma students pursue scientific excellence. Sometimes, we make mistakes, but that is exactly why we should value our opportunities to get things right.

Stopping gun control discussion disingenuous A law designed to stop discussion about gun control is a travesty that stifles the American process.

Will Bramlett

Student Writer

A Missouri state representative proposed a new bill which would actually make it a Class D felony for any member to propose gun control legislation. A class D felony carries a maximum sentence of no more than four years. The legislation, House Bill 633, comes from Rep. Mike Leara in response to the talk of stronger gun control legislation on the national and state level. One such bill is Missouri House Bill 545, which was proposed by Missouri House Democrats a few weeks earlier. HB 545 would ban high

capacity magazines and “assault weapons,” which the bill defines as a “semi-automatic rifle” with the ability to “accept a detachable magazine” and at least one of four extra features. All assault weapons must either be turned into the proper authorities, disabled or taken out of the state within 90 days of the legislation being turned into law. Many on the right view this type of legislation, if passed and signed into law, as infringing on the rights under the Second Amendment. The conservative media, including blogs like Breitbart.com, radio shows like “The Dana Show” and several commentators on Fox News, had a field day with this legislation. Yet when a Republican, Rep. Mike Leara, proposed legislation which would infringe on legislators’ First Amendment rights, very few on the right vocally stood up against this mess of legislation. Most of those concerned with the bill were to the left, but some on the right came out against the bill too. Republican Rep. Kevin Engler of Farmington, Mo. said, “Everybody should have a right to introduce bills, even bad ones.” Those on the right against

the HB 633 could not raise their collective voices to the same volume as many on the right had done after HB 545 was proposed. Leara released this statement defending his bill: “I have no illusions about the bill making it through the legislative process, but I want it to be clear that the Missouri House will stand in defense of the people’s constitutional right to keep and bear arms.” Because Leara knew this bill would never pass the Missouri Legislature, his defenders say that the legislation is nothing about which we should get upset. The Democrats’ legislation attempts to ban certain guns while permitting others, in order to make our nation safer. Leara’s bill only makes our nation safer if one believes that the federal government, and President Obama in particular, is attempting to become tyrannical. That world is fictional. The most obnoxious bit about this defense is that I am positive the Democrats knew their bill would not pass either. Both Houses of the Missouri legislature are controlled by Republicans with a veto-proof majority in both chambers over the Democratic governor, who tries to avoid conflict. I would claim that the Democrats simply wanted to

state their position, just as Leara wanted to make sure his position was known. The conservative media decided that it was better to exaggerate the extent of the Democrats’ bill with headlines and talk implying that all guns would be confiscated (some even suggesting the bill had passed) while letting Leara get off easily. It is not because they care about the Constitution, but because the attacks on the left help their political goals and positions. Many of the right like to hide their actions behind defending the Constitution and their love for America. The Second Amendment is in the Constitution, and a change would be needed before stricter laws could be created. The Constitution and our rights as humans are always evolving. Our courts and legislators have shown time and again that rights can be changed, removed or added to better protect that nation as a whole. I hope that at some point as many conservatives will be as outraged by similar actions from both parties. Until then, I will continue to be outraged by the spin, inaccuracy and inconsistency coming out of a large number of people on the right.


Opinion

4 March 2013

the Collegian : 8

Contraception bill favors man over women State Bill 452 reduces the ability of two million women to make their own reproductive choice, all due to one man’s claims. Anna Benett

Staff Writer

There is currently a bill bouncing around the Oklahoma State Senate, SB 452, which would allow employers to opt out of providing insurance coverage for contraceptive care to its employees. This would work directly against the stipulations of the Affordable Care Act, which requires insurance providers to cover birth control. I am not at all surprised that this new bill is being considered. I have lived in Oklahoma long enough to expect no less. What really puzzles me is how the bill came to be. Its sponsor, Sen. Clark Jolley (R-Edmond), says that this measure was introduced at the behest of a constituent. That’s right, one person. That person in question is

Dr. Dominic Pedulla, a cardiologist living in Oklahoma City. Pedulla, as a self-proclaimed expert on women’s health, says that birth control “poisons” women’s bodies and suppresses their identities. According to the doctor, “Part of (a woman’s) identity is the potential to be a mother. They are being asked to suppress and radically contradict part of their own identity, and if that wasn’t bad enough, they are being asked to poison their bodies.” Because a hormone already present within the body is obviously poisonous, and it’s not as if the FDA recommended it be available without a prescription because of how safe it is, and it’s not like many countries are already doing just that. Wait... And who is this Pedulla, or anyone for that matter, to tell anyone—male or female—what constitutes an important part of their identity? For many women, the choice to not become mothers until they feel emotionally mature and financially stable enough is a pretty big part of their identity. And for those women who do consider “potential motherhood” a part their identity, they can continue to not take contraceptive

pills. That’s great too. I have no issue with anyone’s personal choice. My issue is that an individual with scientifically unsound opinions is being given the power to enforce his choices on others. Choices, I may superfluously add, that he is not even making for his own body. Sometimes, it feels like conservative lawmakers are playing a childish and dangerous game with the women in this country, and the object is simply to keep them from progressing anywhere. The game is in a constant check-

Maybe you should just go make more money. Don’t have time to work more or get a degree because you’re too busy raising kids? That’s just too bad. If this isn’t a form of institutionalized sexism, maybe I should be institutionalized. For a political group that claims to be concerned with cutting government spending and preventing abortions, many conservatives seem to be oddly opposed to a very simple solution for both these ends. Even if they are morally op-

“An individual with scientifically unsound opinions is being given the power to enforce his choices on others” mate. Can’t afford birth control? That’s your fault for not making enough money. Oh, you got pregnant? Well, looks like the only affordable option is to carry to term. So now you have to raise a child you cannot afford without a family or partner.

posed to oral contraceptives, these benefits should be worth consideration. Unintended pregnancies cost taxpayers about $11 billion a year nationally, and giving women access to affordable contraceptives drastically reduces the number of unplanned pregnancies that occur.

This both saves taxpayer money, and drastically reduces the number of abortions being sought. Everyone wins, and everyone still makes money. Nobody is forcing women to take oral contraceptives against their will, thus giving up their feminine, motherly identities. Nobody is forcing Dr. Pedulla to give up his lovely little small group insurance plan and find an even more expensive one just so he can feel self-righteous about his family’s morality. The fact that this bill even exists is first and foremost an alarming red flag about our state’s legislative process. Some doctor who claims to be an expert on family planning just calls up his senator, and boom, now there’s a bill going through the Senate that could affect the lives of 2 million constituents? Proponents of the whole federalist idea would tell me that I really can’t complain—I can get up and leave Oklahoma if I don’t like it, after all. But not everyone has that privilege and that freedom; not everyone can afford to leave their jobs or their homes to get away from the jurisdiction of a morally selfimposing legislature.

Donors should not dictate reported news Political foundations have been donating money to news corporations, which taints their ability to report objectively.

Beate Hall

Student Writer

New technology has made ethics in journalism an ever-evolving topic. Now, Internet media have made it harder to track down news sources’ funding. In recent years, there has been a trend toward anonymous funding for digital news outlets. It is impossible to track this financing

without digging deeply into the money trail between large, politically motivated corporations, the trusts and foundations through which the money is being anonymously funneled, and the news outlets themselves. Since it is tax-free (because it is given to non-profit foundations) there are no IRS records. This funding poses a hazard to journalistic integrity, because it can affect how news is written. Popular sites and blogs depend on corporate sponsorship, but sponsored sites are unlikely to run negative reviews or news about sponsors’ products. It is generally considered bad business to bite the hands that feed you, but if people can see where the funding is coming from, at least they can make their own decisions about trusting the information.

Ideally, all news should be mostly unbiased. The unvarnished facts may be difficult to present, but it is possible. When the motives of a corporation, group or individual are unclear, the news being provided is untrustworthy. This is not always obvious, but

given tax-free by the Koch brothers to Donors Trust, but the public have not been informed about where the money is going. It all appears to be going to institutes and foundations, but portions have been used to pass laws regarding the “right to work” and other conservative aims.

“If the news were reliably unbiased the source of the money would be less of an issue” it is important. If the money being funneled into news sites comes from hidden sources, the sites will continue to report with bias, even going to extremes in what they choose to report. Around $400 million has been

Once the money passes into the hands of Donors Trust, it can be spent almost anywhere. The Tides Foundation works in much the same way—anonymous donations are passed to organizations—but their organizations of

choice include the American Civil Liberties Union. On both sides of the political spectrum, money is changing hands without anyone officially tracking it. While no one should be able to funnel money to political groups without reporting it in their taxes, the potential ramifications are more serious when it comes to journalism. No one should be calling monetarily-influenced opinions news. Neither political side is in the clear, because both are using these groups to promote their causes in a way that is not illegal, but not quite ethical. If the news were reliably unbiased, or if it was accurately labeled as opinion, the source of the money would be less of an issue. As this is not the case, the money is important to follow. Money talks, and it demands attention.

Affordable birth control available at Planned Parenthood health centers nationwide. Make an appointment today.

1.855.841.7526 www.ppheartland.org

The Collegian is the independent student newspaper of the University of Tulsa. It is distributed Mondays during the fall and spring semesters except during holidays and final exam weeks. The University of Tulsa does not discriminate on the basis of personal status or group characteristics including but not limited to the classes protected under federal and state law in its programs, services, aids, or benefits. Inquiries regarding implementation of this policy may be addressed to the Office of Human Resources, 800 South Tucker Drive, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104-9700, 918-631-2616. Requests for accommodation of disabilities may be addressed to the University’s 504 Coordinator, Dr. Tawny Taylor, 918-631-3814. To ensure availability of an interpreter, five to seven days notice is needed; 48 hours is recommended for all other accommodations. Advertising Policy: Advertising appearing in this publication does not imply approval or endorsement by the University of Tulsa or The Collegian for the products or services advertised. For advertising information, email The Collegian at collegian@utulsa.edu or elizabeth-cohen@utulsa.edu. The deadline for advertising is 5 p.m. on the Thursday prior to the publication. Editing Policy: The Collegian reserves the right to edit all copy submitted by all writers. This editing may take place in many forms, including grammar corrections, changes in paragraph structure or even the addition or removal of sections of content. Editorial Policy: Columnists are solely responsible for the content of their columns. Opinions expressed in columns may not represent the opinions of the entire Collegian staff, the administrative policies of the University of Tulsa, the views of the student body or our advertisers. Letter Policy: Letters to the editor must be less than 500 words. While we do not require it, letters sent via e-mail to the Collegian are encouraged. Under no circumstances will anonymous letters be published. The name of the person submitting the letter must be published with the letter. We reserve the right to edit or reject all letters. The deadline for letters is 5 p.m. on the Saturday prior to publication.

editor-in-chief—Kalen Petersen managing editor—Kyle Walker news editor—Conor Fellin sports editor—Aubry Midkiff variety editor—Stephanie Hice opinion editor—Patrick Creedon satire editor—Tim Nissen photo & graphics editor—Jill Graves staff writers—Anna Bennett, Beate Hall, Oscar Ho, Victoria McGouran, Zhenya Yevtushenko business & advertising manager—Liz Cohen distribution manager—Tyler Magill web editor—Mary Carol Franko adviser—Kendra Blevins


4 March 2013

the

the state-run media

State-Run media Winning hearts, policing minds.

ORU turns TU fountains to blood

In other news: Contaminated test fraternity brothers

bank

poisons

30

Two TU shuttle buses collide, only student on board suffers concussion Harvard Department of Psychology study finds everyone to be an ass Fourteen Presidential Scholars, two friends gravely injured in Library Café explosion

Graphic by Jill Graves

Oral Roberts University’s latest prayerist attack turned the water in the Genave King Rogers Fountains to blood. Despite the stench and the coagulated blood blocking the water pipes, King John I remains determined to continue TU’s “War on Prayerism.” Objectors to the war assert that ORU’s god has hardened King John’s heart, and that continuing the war will end in destruction.

GOP resists Obama brain research initiative, pushes heart research Patrick Creedon

Has the heart of an elephant During this year’s State of the Union, President Obama paid special attention to the area of neuroscience research, saying, “Now is not the time to gut these job-creating investments in science and innovation (in brain research).” Some researchers have argued that pouring more money into neuroscience and other brainy areas will take money away from important basic science research; however, the GOP has taken its own stance, claiming that the biological and medical communities should be focusing not the mind—but on the heart. Speaker of the House John

Boehner told the House floor Wednesday that “Obama’s cold neuro-focus would be the end of us all ... it is only through the warmth and integrity of the heart that we are truly made human.” Other House Republicans were seen crying in their seats, presumably moved in their hearts, convicted that a new focus on cardiac science was truly the right thing to do. In an unexpected turn of events, Swedish pop duo Roxette came to the GOP’s defense, interrupting the debate to assert that “You all should listen to your heart / when it’s calling for you!” Roxette refused to respond to allegations that this was simply a PR grab for their current world

Graphic by Jill Graves

GOP pundit Rush Limbaugh, well-known for his fiery temper and prescription drug abuse, whose fat-encrusted heart stands to benefit if funds are redirected from brain research initiatives proposed by “heartless socialist robot” Barack Obama.

tour, after being out of the limelight in the U.S. for some time. Member Marie Fredricksson said that she knew not “where U.S. policy was going or why,” but that she knew that the precious moments of life would be lost if more attention was not paid to the declining amount of cardiology research in American universities. Conservative pundit Rush Limbaugh has also been quite vocal in his support of increased funding for heart research. Calling the brain a “communist device,” he claimed during one of his trademark tirades that “the American health system only supports those who think with their brain, an organ we can never hope to understand, since we’re using our brains to try and figure it out.” He then paused for 78 seconds and quite audibly gasped over the microphone. Investigative digging has since discovered that Limbaugh recently had a sextuple coronary artery bypass and has several million dollars invested in SynCardia, a firm that focuses on artificial hearts research and development. When pressed for information about his heart problems, Limbaugh, after gasping incomprehensibly about “socialists” for several minutes, closed his show with tears in his eyes, saying that “the heart wants what the hearts wants.”

Six steps to being a better roommate Nick Blandino Roommate expert

I’ve been in college for decades, so of course I know what it means to be the perfect roommate. I’ve roomed with every different kind of individual imaginable … okay you caught me. I haven’t roomed with a girl, but we both know that cooties are not something to mess around with. Since I am your only source of decent advice around these parts, I’m here to make sure that your roommate loves you more than his or her girlfriend loves Downton Abbey. A lot of my readers have already gone through the initial stage of meeting their current roommates. I’m sure that for most of you, this stage was very awkward because you forgot about the three L’s:

First, you must make sure that you Laugh at everything your new roommate says. Cat died. Forgot to wear pants to class. Failed every test. Seriously: everything they say. Secondly, showing him/her your Litter box is a must. No, you do not own a cat, you just like to have quick access to a bathroom. And having multiple bathrooms eases stress during the early-morning rush. Finally, it’s Laundry time. Ensure your roommate that they will be doing all your laundry for the year. They will love that you considerate enough to think about them. Now, in order to keep a strong bond with your roomie, you must follow a few more (equally simple) rules: 1. Always come back to the

room after midnight, and if you feel lonely, make sure to jump into bed with your roomie or turn on the light and Skype someone across the hall. 2. A clean room is a boring room. If your undies aren’t on your roommate’s bed, than he/she won’t know that you like to share. 3. Pillow talk! This is beyond essential, because you must know the most intimate secrets of your roomie, for blackmail purposes or for creating TU confessions on their behalf. If their life is boring, then be sure to talk exclusively about your own problems. These rules should keep your new or old roomie docile for a while. And I really cannot stress this enough: no roommate can resist some good late-night snuggling.

Date eager to describe herself as “really sarcastic” Chinese hackers breach Collegian security, find nothing important Campus police officer hops curb on bike See page 11 for more

Oscar Pistorius to be tried as a cyborg

Photo courtesy of Oakley, friends of the State-Run Media

Oscar Pistorius, the South African Olympic sprinter and double amputee recently charged with the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, will be tried as a cyborg. Pistorius’ defense attorney explained to the State-Run Media that Pistorius should not be tried as an adult, as Pistorius is “not capable of criminal intent” because he is “more machine now than man.”

Roommate reports hair growing quicker these days Victoria McGouran Staff reporter

LORTON VILLAGE – An area resident reportedly told friends in the Hut Cantina during dinner on March 1st, that his roommate of four years and best friend since eighth grade had recently achieved hair growth that neither of them considered possible. “I’ve known him for a long time” stated the roommate, “and we just never thought that his hair could grow this quickly, it really caught us off guard.” According to reports, the roommate received his customary haircut four weeks prior to March 1st and already needs another. When trying to explain this phenomenon, the roommate revealed that he recently made a slight alteration to his vitamin regimen and was unsure “whether or not it changed things.” “I’d been pretty unhappy with the overall health of my hair,” he said, “I was wanting to try something different and I guess it worked, but now my hair just keeps growing.” He explained that, other than

changing multivitamin brands, he had made no changes to his diet. Exercise has also remained consistent, though he has been running less during the winter months. “But that couldn’t do it, right?” the roommate asked for what is allegedly the fifth time. The roommate was reported as saying that the amount of hair growth he experienced was so notable that he and his best friend had multiple in-depth conversations about the unexpected growth and had even gone so far as to keep a Google Doc charting his hair growth. Ultimately, neither of the roommates could pinpoint exactly when his hair growth became truly distinct from years previous. A source close to both men revealed that the event had “not really affected their friendship,” but that “they still continued to talk about it,” with conversations purportedly occurring in “both public and private” settings. At press time, sources confirmed that both roommates continued to prattle on about inane trivialities but that the friendship remained strong.


the collegian: 10

25 february 2013

HOUSING SELECTION FOR 2013-14

Housing lottery is approaching.

Are you ready?

 Determine who has the best lottery date and time.  Go or send a proxy on your earliest selection date to the Student Activity Center in Mayo Village.

TUCKER DRIVE

MAYO VILLAGE

S. DELAWARE

 Get together with your future roommates. (Roommate finder is available at canelink.utulsa.edu)

TUCKER DRIVE

E. 8TH STREET

E. 11TH STREET

STUDENT ACTIVITY CENTER

Selection is here!

 Go to canelink.utulsa.edu to check out the new 2013-14

Housing Availability link to see your all your housing options before your lottery time!

It’s so easy to make friends on campus, either through Greek life or campus events. Hurricane

. k n i l e n a c / / : s p htt u d e . a s l u ut

Thursdays are really good for that. - Clarissa Dunn

It is not too late: You can log on to complete a license.



For more information, visit canelink.utulsa.edu       

2.Collegian Ad, Selection in Coming TU#13019.indd 1

2/28/13 2:22 PM

4 March 2013 Issue of The Collegian  

Issue 19, Vol. 98 of The Collegian Newspaper

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