Tú Magazine September 2020

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September 2020

no. 5

TĂş The 'No Frills' Women's Magazine

Women in Business | Wellness | Food & Drink | Fashion | Creative | Education | Technology | Culture | Home & Garden


Editor's Note

Hello Autumn EDITOR

ELKE

O'MAHONY

Can you believe it - September has arrived with the hue of autumn and shorter evenings. We are living in weird times, restrictions are still widely in place and patience is running low. We are all in it together seems like a broken record. So it is even more important to look after ourselves, maintain a healthy balance and try to see the positive side of things. You will see that our wellness pages have increased this month with guest writers Avril writing about Forrest Bathing and Elaine is looking into sustainability. Our famous foot whisperer is showing us how to look after our Vagus nerve and Bethan explains how our upbringing still influences us today. Mel B is sharing her autumn fashion tips while Jacqui shows us easy stenciling ideas around the house. With schools back again, we share some quick and tasty recipes for quick after school snacks and with the days getting colder, we look at bringing plants into the house. Again, I like to thank the amazing team behind Tú who step up every month and creating the positive content for this magazine. As always, we welcome any feedback you like to share. Elke & the Team

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EDITORIAL

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TABLE

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CONTENT

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Editor's Note

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The Team

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Business

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Wellness

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Food & Drink

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Creative

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Shop

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Culture

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Fashion

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Home & Garden

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Travel

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Tú Time

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The Last Page

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Our Team Elke is a food writer, event manager, business consultant for the food & tourism industry, recipe developer and trainer for Social Media for Business, Time Managment, Microsoft Office, PR & Marketing amongst others. She has worked with corporates as well as artisan producers and start up companies. When she doesn't write or talk about food she can be seen in her attic craft room creating gifts for friends. www.biasasta.ie

Bethan is the Counsellor & Psychotherapist at the Blarney Wellness Centre and has over 15 years experience working closely with people to make and sustain changes in their lives. Bethan also facilitates Understanding Children Courses and offers Parenting Support - a safe place to work through how best to support children, their emotions and behaviours. http://blarneywellnesscentre.ie/

Judy Wilkins is the General Manager of the award-winning Rising Sons Brewery. She has over 30 years experience in the hospitality industry and has a particular interest in beer - from its history to its production. Judy has hosted many successful food & beer pairing events. Her motto: If you dont like beer, you just haven't found the right one yet. www.risingsonsbrewery.com

Hi, I’m Jacqui. I’m originally from Wexford and living in Cork for the past six years. The move from my home county to the rebel county was exciting, stressful, expensive but very much worth it. I turned my hand to upcycling to ease stress initially, then discovered it is a very economical and fun way to really make your home your own. I am now an avid upcycler and would love to share my experiences with you.

Imelda loves fashion but doesn't follow trends, creating her own unique style. She is known to be always dressed for the occasion as her credit card bill can attest to. In her fashion column she shares her style with, creating outfits for today's women from leisure to gala as well as wardrobe staples to create your unique look.

Pat is a clinical reflexologist, yoga & meditation teacher at Blarney Wellness Centre. She has over 22 years experience working with all ages from babies to the elderly, utilizing proven therapies and techniques to help with anything from stress to sleep issues, fertility, pregnancy and so much more. She’s passionate about the power of the mind/body connection and our ability to heal ourselves. http://blarneywellnesscentre.ie/

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Meet:

Photo Credit:Anna Groniecka

Kate Ryan - Flavour.ie Your Business: Flavour.ie – I am a food writer and creator of food adventures Tell us about you: I’m originally from Bristol in South West England, moved to West Cork in 2005 with my Irish husband.Originally I had plans to be a lawyer and attended one of the best law schools in the UK, but a lawyering life in the end wasn’t for me and didn’t pursue it as a career after my studies. For many years after that I really was in the career wilderness, until I put my two lifelong loves of food and writing together and began a food blog in 2013 called Flavour.ie along with a Supper Club I hosted in my home. In 2017, I left my full time salaried job to work on Flavour.ie full time. The business now encompasses freelance food writing for a number of Irish publications, food tours and events which I like to refer to as Food Adventures. Business had been growing steadily year on year, but like many businesses, 2020 has given things a pretty good shakedown. Food Adventures are on hold for 2020, but the hope is that we will return bigger and better in 2021! How long have you been in business: Although I started blogging in 2013, I always feel as though the business only became a real thing in April 2014 when I launched my flagship Clonakilty Walking Food Tour. 2020 would have been its sixth season, and I am sad it cannot go ahead this year. During the six years, I created a successful Supper Club experience which morphed into Flavour.ie Presents when it all got too big to host at home and was commissioned to write The Artisan Food Guide to West Cork by A Taste of West Cork Food Festival. I also create bespoke food tour and dining

experiences for private groups, as well as the scheduled summer tour in my adopted home town of Clonakilty. I write for a number of independent publications, most frequently for The Echo, The Examiner and The Opinion Magazine. Was it a start-up:Very much so. For the first 3, nearly four years, I was bootstrapping – this is where you use income from a salaried job to kick start a business. It’s still a team of one, but thankfully in West Cork there is no shortage of exceptionally talented people that I can work with and outsource any of the aspects of my business I am no good at, such as video production, design, branding etc. I’m a big fan of collaborative working, and working in this way means that I can achieve bigger and more ambitious things than if I was truly on my own. Your ideal client/customer: Someone who can talk for hours about all the different aspects of food and not nod off! A lot of people think food writing is restaurant reviewing, but that is just one type of food writing. I have always been most interested in produce and the stories of the people who produce incredible things for us to eat. I am also a food activist and like getting in amongst the geo-political issues of food. Such issues go deep, but are made accessible by movements such as Slow Food, Locavore and GIY. Biggest challenge for you: Fitting everything into a day whilst maintaining a good balance at home. I always must find time for doing things that enrich my soul: cooking, gardening, walking my dog Buddy, spending time with my husband, family and friends. If I don’t fill up my own cup with things I feel gratitude for, then I won’t give the best of myself in promoting the work and skills of those who I admire. Biggest Reward for you: Even after all this time, I get a buzz from seeing my writing in print! Best Tip: If something feels right, then go for it. Trust your gut! Best habit to have: The Rule of Three Things! Some days it can feel as though there are a million things to do and not enough time to do them in. Everyday I pick three things that are the absolute priority and focus on completing them. No-one ever gets to the bottom of a to-do list, but three things a day is achievable and helps to feel like each day you are making progress. It keeps me calm to avoid looking at the wall to just focus on three bricks! How do you relax: Walking is my exercise and my meditation. I walk every day with Buddy, and always try to find time in the day for it, even if it’s just a quick half an hour. Walking helps to clear my head, order my thoughts and calm me down. I have definitely had some of my best ideas while on my daily walk! Future Plans: Because the future is so uncertain around hosting tours and events, I’ve chosen to focus on writing. Lockdown gave me time to fall back in love with my blog, The Flavour Files, and in my downtime I have been experimenting with writing short stories and non-fiction that isn’t about food. As a writer, I am always challenging myself to go outside of my comfort zone, write from a position of openness and frankness. It’s not easy – you have to be prepared to be a little bit vulnerable, but it helps to grow as a writer and better develop my own individual voice and writing style.In late September, I’ll be heading back to College to complete the last year of a Diploma in Irish Food Culture at UCC. It’s the first course of it’s kind in Ireland, held over two years and is trans-disciplinary in nature meaning the learning experience is holistic in approach and multi-dimensional. Year one blew my mind, so I can’t even imagine what year two will be like. All I know for sure is that the schedule is hectic and there is always a lot of work to get through each week! It’s brilliant, but pretty relentless too! Any advice for fellow Women in Business: 1. Be a Person in Business. I am a firm believe that sex, gender and gender identity should not define a person’s own philosophy about what they can and cannot achieve within those biological, social and cultural parameters. Decide what it is you want to achieve in your business and/or personal life and set your mind to achieve it. Choose a positive and empowering self-fulfilling prophecy. 2. Don’t be afraid to fail – it’s just a learning experience and happens to everyone at some point. And generally no-one notices, despite what you might tell yourself. 3. Know that what you do today doesn’t define what you will do tomorrow. It’s OK to change your mind. What would you be if not this: I’ve always believed I would end up working for myself at some point. But if I wasn’t doing this, I’d probably be a small holder! I’ve always had this dream of being as self-sufficient as possible, living off the land as much as humanly possible. Imagine the stories I’d collect…

Feel the fear! And do it anyway!!!! Susan Jeffers 05|

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Website: www.flavour.ie Email: kate@flavour.ie


Social Media for Business Part 1 Is Facebook really dead?

Elke O'Mahony

Social Media is part of our daily lives, especially so in business. Since the first marketing manager discovered Facebook as a tool, we have been relying on getting our brand and message out in the public domain. But with the arrival of so many new platforms, it can be a daunting task to find the right channels.

The age profile of Facebook users is between 27 and 54, making it the age group with the most disposal income. The majority of users is female and most users claim to be using the platform to find humorous content with personal sharing of photos etc a close second.

You might think being on every platform will give you the best chances of being seen. Maybe - but why waste time and effort on a platform if your ideal customer isn't on it. To decide on the correct platform for you, you will need to know where your customer is. In this series, we will be covering the major platforms, starting with Facebook.

For a brand to stand out, it needs to be strong and focused to the needs of their followers. Using Facebook insights will give marketing managers a clear overview on what posts worked etc. Don't get hung up on likes alone - always check the reach and engagement rate. Engage - engage - engage and you will be heard.

Experts have predicted the death of Facebook many times in the past - yet it is still the biggest network with 72% or Irish adults logging on regularly. Instagram (also owned by Facebook) ranks second with 40% according to Octave Digital (stats from 2019). The high percentage of users make it almost mandatory for any business to have a presence on Facebook. Creating a page is easy enough as step by step instructions are given on the platform's website. Here are a few tips on do's and don'ts: Don't use Facebook (or any social media platform) as a sales channel. It is not a sales tool but a way of informing and connecting with existing and potential customers

Facebook is making it slightly harder for brands to get content out for free, so check out Facebook Ads which can be a good way of gaining followers or to promote an events etc. Facebook advertising is not as expensive as you might fear with budget settings starting from â‚Ź5. For more insight into Facebook Marketing, check out your Local Enterprise Office for their training schedule or contact the author for upcoming classes.

Be personal - people want to know the person behind the business. Use good quality photos (clean the lens before taking a photo so many times photos are not clear due to a dirty lens on the camera or phone). Smartphones have really good cameras these days - use them to 'action-shots'. Mind your spelling and grammar. I can't emphasize this enough. If posting from your computer or phone, there are spell checks included. If unsure, use an App like Grammarly - the free version is pretty good. Don't promise/claim something you can't prove which could also have legal implications Don't argue with your customers online - take the conversation offline. Even if you think you are right - don't do it. Reply or even just like a comment - your followers need to know that they are reaching you. Don't post long paragraphs - not many people like to read long paragraphs on the phone (and the majority of people are checking in on mobile devices) Use your branding whenever you can Post if you have something to say - some marketeers will tell you to post five times a day. Don't unless you have something to say each time. News outlets, live updates etc can post as often as they can but in general we will get bored soon with too many posts.

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Elke O'Mahony is running Bia Sasta, a Food Event Management, Consultation and Food PR & Marketing company. She gives regular training on PR, Social Media for Business, Microsoft Office, Time Management and Interview Skills and CV preparation. elke@biasasta.ie www.biasasta.ie


NOT YOUR FAULT!

Wellness

by Bethan O'Riordan

What do you mean it’s not my fault?

"I TRAVEL NOT TO GO ANYWHERE, BUT TO GO. I TRAVEL FOR TRAVEL’S SAKE"

When I meet people in the therapy room in Blarney, we often work through a person’s feelings of guilt and shame for having emotions and behaviours that they find difficult. I often hear “I felt so bad” or “I was so embarrassed when I did/said (that)”. This is a really common part of being human. We all have regrets or wish that we had done things differently. And today I’d like to write a little about how that is not your fault, but you can take responsibility for it.

Robert Louis Stevenson

The person you are today is mostly the combination of two things: 1. Your genes 2. Your early childhood environment

In other words, the development of your brain was created by two things you could not control – the family that you were born into and your childhood experiences. We could say that your brain was created for you not by you and it has formed in a way that was out of your control. In terms of our emotions, they have been formed based on situations we found ourselves in when we were younger. This is called our emotional memories. Is your thinking more prone to be in high alert in certain situations or with certain types of people? We all have triggers that really have evolved with us since we were little. And often a situation in the here and now is triggering a feeling, though or memory from the past; your emotional memory. Strange isn’t it? When we are talking about parts of ourselves that we don’t like or find difficult, therapy helps us take responsibility for them rather than those parts running the show and being our defining qualities. Therapy does this by putting together the pieces of your unique puzzle and helps us understand “how did I get to become the person I was today?”, and “how much of that was my fault or created by the family and environment in which I grew up?”. So celebrate! It’s not your fault the way your brain has been designed by evolution. And it’s not your fault that your brain was created by things out of your control. When we can say “this is the reason I am who I am”, we can then begin to make the changes we are hoping for.

“Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive.”

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DALAI LAMA

Have you been affected by the current situation? Talking can help - Bethan is offering sessions to suit most timetables. Blarney Counseling & Psychotherapy is now fully open again. Sessions can be face-toface, by Zoom/Skype of phone. Email: bethan@blarneycounselling.ie Website: www.blarneycounselling.ie Phone: 083 313 0446


Take care of You

by Pat Murphy.

ACTIVATING THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN THE VAGUS NERVE. I’d like to let you in on a little known secret to health and wellness and the sometimes quirky ways to activate it. The vagus nerve is a cranial nerve, hence “jewel in the crown” and it’s hugely powerful and usually completely overlooked except in my chosen therapy Reflexology. The vagus nerve is the Las Vagus (see what I did there) of nerves, in that it effects mood, digestion, reproductive and emotional wellbeing and here’s a 6step point plan to help activate this wonderful inbuilt powerhouse. Have a cold shower! “Too much” you may shout, then just turn down the heat just a bit or better still blast the cold water at the very end. Move! Movement is essential here, whether that’s walking, running, tai chi, yoga, cycling or whatever floats your boat. Move and move often to prevent energetic stagnation. Use it or lose it. Gargling! I kid you not people, gargling activates your vava-voom vagus nerve so gargle often and gargle with conviction.

By Henry Vandyke Carter - Henry Gray (1918) Anatomy of the Human Body

Humming and singing. Belt out an old favourite and you’ll feel so much better, I promise you. “But Pat, I don’t have a note in my head”. Worry not, sing in the cold shower and then gargle. Job done. Meditate and breathe deeply. Those of you who’ve read my previous articles will have seen my obsession with mindful and deep breathing. Sit or lie down in a cosy comfortable position, turn off the phone first though and just breathe as deeply as possible. Breathe in for a count of 4 and out for a count of 5 or 6 and build that up over time. If you’re normally functioning in a fight or flight stress mode, your lungs and diaphragm may resist, pushing against your efforts but please persist because your breath will transform you. I promise. Reflexology! There’s a surprise folks. Regular treatments will soothe and calm your body & mind, be consistent and you’ll feel so much better. You know where I am. Thank you for reading. Pat

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Pat Murphy is currently holding her yoga classes via Skype every Tuesday & Thursday at 7:30pm. Check out all offers at Blarney Wellness Centre


Sustain - Ability by Elaine Butler Sustainability is a buzz word at the moment;sustainable fashion, sustainable food, sustainable travel. But what does it all mean? What exactly is sustainability? For me the best definition is 'a way of living that meets the needs of all life on earth without compromising those of future generations'. Sounds simple, yes? But how do we achieve it? Sustainability is a single word describing a complex issue. Life on earth is currently being threatened by many factors; the climate crisis, biodiversity loss, degradation of soil and the pollution of our water ways with nitrogen and phosphorus. It sounds overwhelming but with simple changes we can collectively change the trajectory we're on. Let's start with the climate crisis. When we burn materials, either for heat or energy, we put carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. These gases, envelope the earth preventing heat from escaping into space, causing the earth to heat up, which leads to more extreme weather. Also as the earth heats up the polar ice-caps, glaciers and permafrost melt into the rivers and seas, raising the sea level. If we keep global warming under 1.5 degrees we'll be able to keep this sea rise to less than 1.5 metres, any more and low-lying cities and countries around the world will go under water. Heating up the planet also means some land will cease to be inhabitable or suitable for farming. How do we stop this? By using less energy. Using less energy looks different for everyone; it might be walking and not driving, it might be limiting yourself to one flight a year, it might be putting a jumper on instead of turning the heat on, or it might be curbing your shopping habits. Every time we buy something we set off a chain of events that involve the burning of energy to extract, transport, process, package and deliver the item we've ordered. By making do, borrowing, repairing or buying second-hand we can prevent carbon from new goods from being put into the atmosphere. It also saves you a tonne of money.

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Secondly lets consider biodiversity loss. A report from the World Wildlife Foundation stated that 60% of all birds, mammals, insects and fish have become extinct since 1970. Thankfully there is a lot we can do a lot to reverse this trend at a local level including; giving up ALL chemicals in the garden, switching to homemade or eco-friendly cleaning products, letting part of your garden go wild, creating a pond in your garden, not cutting hedges in the summer, avoiding motorboats or jet skis, limiting use of outdoor lighting, and donating to your local wildlife charity. We can take the third and fourth threats together because they're interconnected. The pollution of our waterways and degradation of our soil is generally caused by intensive farming and overuse of agricultural fertilisers and weedkillers. By switching to as much organic food as you can afford you can help to address this. If it all possible it's best if this organic food is also locally-grown, package-free and seasonal organic. Not only will this help our planet it will also support our economy, and the farmers that share our values, it also helps reduce carbon emissions from transportation, refrigeration and packaging. Similarly minimising your food and water waste helps reduce pressure on land and water resources. The suggestions above might sound like I believe it's up to individuals to fix the mess we're in. I don't. I believe policy is the easiest way to achieve a sustainable future but politicians listen to voters and they'll only move in that direction if they see that's where the votes are heading. So take that first step and use your actions to inspire others to do likewise.

Elaine Butler publishes the sustainable living guide Living Lightly in Ireland. This website has all the information you need to live more sustainably in Ireland; from where to shop, to what to cook. In order to maintain objectivity she doesn't do sponsored posts and the website is funded by readers. As well as being a mum and a wife she's a designer, and is currently studying for a Masters in Product Design for the Circular Economy in NCAD, which is being funded by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. For more information please go to www.livinglightlyinireland. com for tips & resources


Forrest Forrest Bathing Bathing by Avril Allshire-Howe Family, work, voluntary interests, social engagements, shopping & the list goes on. Don’t forget eating & sleeping. It all takes energy & somewhere along the way I feel permanently exhausted. I need to step aside; take time out; give myself permission to do nothing but that doesn’t help other than giving me a sense of guilt because I wasn’t ‘doing something to make myself better to return to the quickening treadmill’. I was never any good at juggling! I wonder if as you read this, you can see glimpses of your lifestyle. Perhaps I’m the only one, but I don’t think so. Growing up on a farm now seems idyllic but it was hard work with few outside distractions. Family, school, sport when the day’s work was complete or on a Sunday afternoon & church. I never remember too much discussion about nature other than my father saying that the land was in trust for the next generation (whatever that meant). And yet, I remember walking quietly with him in our 5 acre wood with an occasional few words as he pointed out a fox run; bird nest; badger sett: tree seedlings etc or even sitting silently watching the birds flitting between trees. I didn’t know why he would sometimes take a solitary walk to those woods but now I think I have a glimmer of understanding. Forest Bathing is a chance to re-calibrate; to reconnect with nature. Writers with far greater talent & expertise than I have written much, but when people accompany me on an Experience, I tend to begin with the simplicity of no targets, no prescribed connection or results; this is each person’s time to slow down; to wander as a child & allow time to wonder, to explore, to see afresh what we tend to overlook. This is neither a hike nor a nature walk nor is there any nudity despite the name! Forest Bathing is actually a direct translation from Japanese Shinrin-Yoku. In Japan it is a recognised therapy since the 1980’s & there are centres where medical assessments are carried out prior to and after an experience.I am a Forest Bathing Guide trained by international expert & practitioner, Shirley Gleeson, & a member of Forest Bathing West Cork & Cork. Through a series of invitations & gentle practical exercises, we guide people to become attuned to their senses by focusing on each in their turn & tuning into trees & all of nature in the place where we are having the experience.

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It’s not a course but each time a person takes a Forest Bathing Experience, there will be something experienced, noticed in nature, learnt about oneself. Yes, it can be learnt through reading & study; however taking the time to be led by an experienced guide will make all the difference. I know because that’s how I started to use Forest Bathing personally on our farm at Caherbeg, Rosscarbery, where we have 50 acres of trees on a 58 acre farm. (I’m one of the farmers involved in West Cork Farm Tours) Where I failed is that I didn’t understand the usefulness & discipline of the method. I was picking & choosing but not even completing any part in my haste to finish. It’s not a race & yet we will not spend more than 2 hours in a session. Subsequent reading will bring more clarity & everyone can build a library of quotes/phrases/mantras/poetry to use from the vast library of resources available but sharing parts of the experience with a Guide & others enriches the Experience for all. In Forest Bathing West Cork & Cork, the Guides have different professions which has been a wonderful resource for all of us as we trained together; practiced with each other, explored our different sites. and developed our business from our initial training to First Aid training to adapting our Experiences to be safe while COVID-19 is a concern for all.This includes reducing the numbers on any Experience from a maximum of 15 to 8 including the Guide. I have been enriched by this number

reduction as there is more time to share; to wander; to spend time & be. I can sit just looking at a tree from the canopy of leaves above me and allowing my eye to meander down to the ground. This isn’t study as the bark shape or colour catches my eye; the insects flying about on their own business; the incredible feeling of being cocooned in my own world under that canopy; the strength of the tree as it supports my back when I sit against it; the confidence I feel standing under the tree knowing that the network of roots under my feet helps to ensure that the ground won’t shift with my weight or movement. There are times when I’m so aware of the transfer of energy - the tree takes in my carbon dioxide and breathes out pure oxygen for me to breathe. The trees don’t move but they communicate through their root network, for example some tree species need shelter while their root network digs deep into the ground and other species provide that.I can walk the same track on a daily basis and be aware of something new on each occasion. This is what I and the other members of Forest Bathing West Cork & Cork want to share during an Experience. We are developing our calendar and the advent of COVID-19 put a severe dent in our plans but hasn’t stopped us from planning & organising Experiences for the rest of 2020. Enquiries are very welcome to info@forestbathingwestcork.com; or message Facebook: Forest Bathing West Cork & Cork.


Food & Drink Food News

Products we love IFEX 2020 has been postponed until 2022

Alternative bread company We love the sourdough hazelnut bread of the Alternative Bread Company in the English Market. A slight flavour of sourdough with the sweetness & nuttiness of the hazelnut is a perfect combination. All is needed is good Irish butter

The government has set aside â‚Ź26m Adaptation Fund in support of the Irish Tourism & Hospitality industry. Applications are now open. Graham Norton's wine business is set to reach its 10 million bottle milestone this year.

Cornude Popcorn

Made in Dublin by Ruth Ormiston, this artisan luxury popcorn is perfect for the longer evenings in autumn. Triskel Arts Centre is inviting Snuggle in with a blanket and a bowl of this delicious sea-salted caramel expression of interest to popcorn. It's not by accident that they run the cafe. Deadline is took Gold in the 2019 Blan na hEireann 5pm, Friday, 4th Sept. by awards in Dingle. email to www.cornude.ie

tenders@triskelartscentre.ie A new NeighbourFood market is opening in An Tulach, Connemara Ballymaloe House has teamed up with Blacks Distillery Kinsale to create the Ballymaloe Garden Gin

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Clare's Homemade Hummus Why make hummus at home when you can get Clare's homemade hummus in selected SuperValu branches. Her hummus (we tried natural and beetroot) is smooth, subtle and very tasty. Nothing added but natrual ingredients. Check out her range at SuperValu 2020


Tasty - Quick - Easy

Lunch Time

With children due back to school this month, we thought we share some quick and tasty ideas for lunch. They are so quick and easy that you might even get a helping hand - children will try food if they have been included in the process. Lunch is served in no time and you can spend some quality time together.

Mushrooms on Toast 4 slices of bread (sourdough is fantastic with mushrooms), sliced 500g mushrooms (button or a mix of wild) 1 tbsp butter 2 tbsp olive oil 3 garlic cloves (finely chopped or minced) 2 tbsp fresh chives, chopped seasoning to taste 50ml cream cream cheese (optional) Heat the butter and oil in a frying pan over a medium heat. Add the mushrooms and fry until they start to caramelise (you might need to turn up the heat a bit), stirring. Add the garlic and sautee until the garlic is slightly cooked. Add the chives, seasoning and cream. Cook until the cream starts to thicken. While cooking the mushrooms, toast the bread. Place the toasted bread on platter, spread with cream cheese if using and top with the mushrooms. Sprinkle extra chives over it for presentation.

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Frittata If you have eggs in the house, you have a meal. Feel free to experiment with other fillings 5 eggs, slightly beaten 1/2 onion, finely chopped 200g mushrooms, sliced (or use a mix of peppers or leftover vegetables from a previous meal) 100g feta, crumbled roughly 2 tbsp mixed herbs 1 tsp Dijon mustard seasoning to taste olive oil

Heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Add the mushrooms & onions and fry until they start to caramelise. Add the herbs and seasoning, stir to combine. Now add the eggs, feta and mustard. Stir carefully to ensure that the eggs drip to the bottom of the pan. Sautee until the bottom is cooked the the side are solid. Using a plate, cover the pan and turn the frittata onto the plate. Slip the frittata back into the pan and cook until fully cooked. Serve sliced with a salad.


Tasty - Quick - Easy

Lunch Time

Grilled Cheese Sandwich Who doesn't love a gooey grilled cheese sandwich. The secret is in good cheese and a tasty relish

8 slices of bread (we love sourdough), makes 4 sandwiches Butter 200g Irish Farmhouse Cheddar, sliced 2 tomatoes sliced (optional) Spread the butter on one side of each bread slice. With the butter side down, top half of the slices with the cheese and tomatoes if using). Top each one with the 4 other bread slices, butter side on the outside. Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. When hot, add the sandwiches and press slightly down with a spatula. When golden brown on the bottom, turn each sandwich over and grill until also golden brown - the cheese will start to ooze out. Serve with a side salad and a lovely relish.

Why not try this sandwich with mozzarella and pesto for an Italian twist.

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Mixed Rice Pan Here, we are using a Turkish sausage called Sucuk. It is widely available in spice shops. This recipe is perfect if you have leftover rice.

400g cooked rice 2-4 Turkish Sausages Sucuk, skin removed and sliced 150g peas, defrosted if frozen 150g sweetcorn 40g garlic butter Heat a frying pan over a medium heat. Add the sausage slices (if using a different type sausage, you will need to add some fat at this stage). Fry until the meat begins to brown slightly. Add the peas and sweetcorn and cook for 3-4 minutes. Add the rice and cook until the rice is hot again. Add the garlic butter and stir until combined. Serve in bowls and top with an extra slice of garlic butter. This dish doesn't need much seasoning as the sausage is well spiced and the garlic butter adds a nice flavour.


COCKTAIL BAR RECI PES, TEXT, PHOTOS BY BI A SASTA Rosemary Lemonade Rosemary gives a lovely aromatic note to any drink. Use the syrup in cocktails 100g caster sugar 100ml water 4-5 sprigs of rosemary 2 lemons, juice only Sparkling water In a saucepan, over a medium heat, dissolve the sugar in the water. Bring to a boil and simmer until the mix thickens and becomes syrupy. Add the rosemary, stir well and simmer for about 2 more mins. Take off the heat and leave to cool. When cold, remove the rosemary.

Blackcurrant Liquor Leaving the liquor infuse for several month ensures a darker colour and intense flavour 400g blackcurrants 1 litre rum (vodka will work as well) 1 vanilla pod (optional) 300g caster sugar Place the blackcurrants, sugar and vanilla in a sterilized Kilner Jar. Top up with the rum, close the lid tight and shake to dissolve the sugar.

In a jug, pour in the syrup, lemon juice and top up with the sparkling water.

Place in a dark and cool place. For the first week, shake the jar daily to ensure that the sugar doesn't settle in the bottom. The longer the rum infuses, the more darker the colour becomes and the flavour intensifies beautifully.

The rosemary syrup is also delicious with gin

Drink on its own or with Prosecco.


ive t a e r C

Upcycling with Jacqui

My favourite part of upcycling is stenciling. You name it, and I’ll stencil it.There is such a diverse range of stencils to choose from out there, the world really is your oyster. In fact I'm sure there is a stencil of an oyster somewhere out there. In Cork city, Vibes and Scribes, Cork Art supplies and Woodies stock a fairly decent and diverse line of stencils. Also, there is an ocean of stencil shops online, my absolute favourite online shop is Stencil 1(www.stencil1.com) - you can order through Etsy (www.etsy.com). They have such quirky and funky stencils and a massive selection. Because they are an American company, it can take a while for them to arrive, but that is their only downside. You can use stenciling instead of tiles on the floor , instead of wallpaper and it looks gorgeous on your newly upcycled furniture (see my article in the August edition). I do advise to practise first before you attempt your project. What you will need: Stencil brushes Very easy to source, they are small brushes that have a short fat handle and a thick blunt bristle top, a bit like a make up brush only the bristles are stiff not soft. These are quite cheap and you can get them in Art supply shops and craft shops. Paint You will not need a lot of paint in fact less is definitely more when it comes to stenciling , so test pots are a great size because the paint really goes a long way. Powder Frenchic do a beautiful range of metallic powders that you can mix with their finishing varnish and it comes really beautiful. The brand is available in selected stores in Ireland. Please check frenchicpaint.co.uk for stockists. Wooden Board to practise on

To start, secure your stencil down with some masking tape. Get a saucer and pour a small amount of paint onto it. Get your brush and dip the head into the paint to cover all of the brush head evenly . Do not be tempted to thin out paint , thicker paint is better. Then when your brush head is full, dab it onto the kitchen paper to take off any excess. Paint in your stencil. The thicker your paint, the more even your pattern will be but if you want an old worn look, keeping dabbing off the paint until most of it is gone then paint in your stencil. It will take a bit of practice to see what effect you like best . If there is too much paint on the brush your stencil may bleed and become messy. This also happens if the paint is too watery, so always ensure your brush is bone dry before you start. Leave to dry and carefully peel off masking tape and remove stencil. It does take a while to get the hang of it but once you have it there will be no stopping your creativity.

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Seashell Wreath Did you collect seashells during the summer and not sure what to do with it? Here is a great idea for a wreath, perfect for the garden or even indoors You will need: a styrofoam ring with a flat back, paint (optional), seashells (obviously), old jewellery, beads etc, a glue gun and some wire or ribbon to hang the wreath up

01

If using paint, colour the wreath (depending on how dense you attach the seashells), you will see the colour.

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When the paint is dry, start attaching the larger seashells with the hot glue, trying to cover as much of the surface as possible, leaving the flat part of the ring free

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Now, add the smaller shells, building up the layers of the wreath. In between gaps add beads, old jewellery etc.

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Add a strong wire or ribbon to the wreath and choose a nice space on a wall to hang on.

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Styrofoam ring, beads etc is available in craft shops. We got our materials in Vibes & Scribes in Cork

check out https://make-ire.com/ for more tutorials 16|

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TĂş Shop Pat Murphy of Blarney Wellness Centre is offering foot reflexology in her practice in Blarney. Pat is a certified practitioner with many years of experience. Please call 087-9721149 for details and to book an appointment. Read our article on page 8 on the importance to look after your feet.

During lockdown, the Rising Sons Brewery offered home 5l kegs of their award winning beers. Although open again, kegs can still be ordered from the brewery. Orders need to be placed by midnight Tuesdays for pick up on Fridays. Please email you order to risingsonscork@gmail.com.

Handmade masks are available from Blarney Artsy Craftsy. Each masks is made by hand from 100% cotton with space for filters and elastic for easy wear. Masks can be posted or delivered within the Blarney area (time permitting). Please call 087-9721149 or follow Blarney Artsy Craftsy on Facebook.

Coming Soon Bia Sasta will be opening an online shop shortly with handmade items like these recipe collecting journals & planners. Email Elke at elke@biasasta.ie to be added to the mailing list to be one of the first to know about the shop going live or check www.biasasta.ie 17|

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Customised Mandalas can be ordered from our creative team member, Jacqui Murphy. Mandalas represent wholeness and are said to focus the mind. The famous psychologist Carl Jung has used mandalas in his therapies, believing that it can balance of the psyche. In other terms, it can look fantastic on your wall. Please contact Jacqui on


Culture

Book of the Month

Milk by John & Sally McKenna and available from early October, the book looks at the history of Irish milk through farmers, history, healthfulness, & culture The book also includes recipes.

Available from October

Film of the Month

Enola While searching for her missing mother, intrepid teen Enola Holmes uses her sleuthing skills to outsmart big brother Sherlock and help a runaway lord. Release September 2020

Available on Netflix Music of the Month

Under the Bridge Meghan Ali is inviting musicians to join her Under the Bridge Sessions to submit a song for their chosen charity.

Listen on meghanali.com

Details taken from McKenna Guide, Netflix and Meghan Ali's Website Please email elke@biasasta.ie for submissions for future editions of Tu


Fashion with Mel B Slán go Samhraidh Well Cáilíni, hope you have had a good Summer and are ready to embrace the Autumn styles. Our weather recently has left me wondering if it has been many seasons in one day and the need for wellies, coats and umbrellas was almost a necessary fashion accessory when leaving the house. So is our outfit choices dictated by the weather? Well for me it's a one of the key factors in my decision making when I am choosing what to wear on a daily basis. I am hoping I will not be packing away the Summer styles just yet and be able to still wear them by

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being a little creative with footwear and an extra layer when necessary. I notice this year mustard is a very popular colour and is very easy to coordinate with various looks and also adds a fabulous splash of colour to any outfit. Of course the staple Browns and Berry colours will always be with us and they give a warm and cozy feeling to any ensemble as well as being so stylish.So, till next time Cáilini stay safe and happy shopping for your new season wardrobe. Love

Mel B

2020


Home & Garden BRING NATURE INDOORS by Elke O'Mahony

With the days getting shorter, we tend to spend more time indoors again and fresh air is at a premium. Studies have proven that indoor plants are beneficial to our health and wellbeing yet most of us only have a few pots of herbs on the windowsill in the kitchen. Indoor plants are said to interact with your body, mind and home in ways that enhance the quality of life. Benefits include: boost mood reduce stress reduce fatique clean indoor air increase creativity reduce noise level

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Apart from the wellbeing benefits, indoor plants can also be used to add accents to a room, act as a divider between areas and add a splash of colour, especially if you are not allowed to paint walls etc. Decorative plant pots can add as much to a room as the plant itself - garden centres have always a great selection but also check out salvage places for some vintage ones. Arrange plants together with the same care requirements to ensure that looking after the plants is easier. Garden centres will be able to give clear instructions on how to care for plants - supermarket plants normally include care instructions as well. Know the condition of your home to be able to

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choose the right plants - some need drier conditions while others thrive in damp environments. If you are absent a lot, buying plants that need regular watering might not be the best idea. Check out Griffin Garden Centre , Drispy Cork Woodies, nationwide


Free Food September normally announces autumn with its abundance in nature and our domestic gardens. When you walk now the farm lanes (ask permission from the farmer) you will see blackberries, rosehips and wild raspberries are showing their rich autumn reds and purples. If you are lucky, you might even find some early hawthorns and sloes. When foraging, stay clear of busy roadsides to avoid the exhaust fumes in plants. When walking farms, always ask the farmer for permission to forage. Nature knows best - autumn fruit is rich in vitamin C, setting our immune system up for the coming colder months.

Things to do in September

Preserve Nature

Now is the busiest month in the garden with the majority of crops being ready to be harvested.

Now is the perfect time to preserve some of your produce from the garden and stock up on jam sugar, pectin and vinegars.

When pulling vegetables from the ground, prepare the ground by removing weeds you might do a sowing of clover to help keep the weeds down before you dig over the soil. Now is the perfect time to save some seeds - the easiest seeds are peppers, chillis. If you potatoes are disease free, keep some back for seed potatoes There is still life left in polytunnels - why not sow some winter leaves You could now sow spring onions and spring cabbage to give the seeds a headstart in the spring.

Plant seeds of kindness harvest a garden of Love UNKNOWN

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Jams, relishes, chutneys and pickles are not only tasty but fermented food is good for the overall health. Imagine your delight when you spread some of your homemade jam on a warm buttered slice of toast. The ICA is a great resource for recipes - check out your local group on www.ica.ie


Travel King of the Castle Take a step back in time by visiting one or more of the amazing and beautiful castles on our doorstep. With travel restrictions still in place, splash out and get treated like a king and queen Visitors to Ireland have long loved the many castles in Ireland - a view back in time when legends were made. Failte Ireland has promoted Ancient East to foreign visitors interested in history but with travel restrictions still in place, the domestic market is in for a treat with many special offers available this year.

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Many castles are located on large estates enabling guests to wander fields and woodlands, throw a fishing rod into a stream or even saddle a horse for a ride along quite country roads. Lay down your head on comfy 4-poster beds, dine in style and sip tea in the drawing room

Dromoland Castle Set within a 450acre estate, the 16th century castle offers something for everyone. Newmarket on Fergus Co. Clare Tel. 061 368144

Waterford Castle Located on its own island on the River Suir, you can enjoy excellent food, golf, walks and more. The Island, Ballinakill, Co. Waterford Tel. 051 878 203

Adare Manor Reopened after extensive renovations, a visit to Adare Manor in Co. Limerick is a must. Adare Co. Limerick Tel. 061 605 200

Kinnitty Castle Located in Birr, Co. Offaly, and close to Slieve Bloom Mountains, the views alone will entice visitors to stay. Kinnitty Birr, Co. Offaly Tel. 057 9137318

Ballynahinch Castle Set in a private 700 acre estate of woodland, rivers and walks in the heart of Connemara, famous for salmon fishing Connemara, Co. Galway Tel. 095 31006

Tullaun Castle Stay overnight in a castle with one bedroom - couple Sonya & Kevin are restoring the castle beautifully to its former glory. Co Tipperary Tel. 086 0593803

2020


TÚ TIME WHAT HAVE WE BEEN UP TO

JUDY

When Judy is not busy running a great pub and looking after the Tú team, she raids her mum's garden for beautiful flowers

ELKE Elke is becoming a hermit in her craftroom with several projects on the go. Watch her upcoming shop soon

BETHAN

PAT

Bethan is tipping her feet into homemade remidies - we are forming an orderly queue

Foot Whisperer Pat got a new sewing machine and can stock up on her sought after masks.

JACQUI

MEL B

Jacqui's latest hobby is hill walking. At weekends she can be seen tipping light-footed up the hills of Cork and surrounding counties.

Mel B is starting to organise her summer wardrobe and is embracing the autumn colour palette

Love from the Tú team

PAT IS HAPPY WITH HER NEW SEWING MACHINE

BETHAN AND HER SOAKING CALENDULA

IMELDA IS GETTING READY FOR AUTUMN

JUDY RAIDING HER MUM'S FLOWER GARDEN


The Last Page Thank you Tú would not have been possible without the support of some amazing women who have contributed their expertise and feedback. Thank you to all these amazing women Love Elke

Disclaimer

The magazine has been created by a team of volunteering writers. All pieces have been researched thoroughly but we can't guarantee accuracy. All articles are opinion pieces.

Contact us We welcome submissions but don't guarantee inclusions. Please email your submission to elke@biasasta.ie We are open to advertising but reserve the right on final decisions. Please contact the editor elke@biasasta.ie

Next issue out 1st October 2020

with more wellness, gardening, recipes, business, crafts & everything in between

Tú (You) is a monthly online magazine for women by women, published by Bia Sásta Editor: Elke O'Mahony elke@biasasta.ie Photos by: Judy Wilkins, Jacqui Murphy, Imelda Barrett, Elke O'Mahony, websites of featured businesses. Stockphotos by GraphicStock. Created with Canva using elements within