Page 1

Panhellenic Growth Report

Center for Campus Life TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY


CONTACT Dr. Amy Murphy Dean of Students amy.murphy@ttu.edu

Harriette Baker Panhellenic Advisor harriette.baker@ttu.edu

Cate Bibb NPC Area Advisor cate.bibb@gmail.com

Center for Campus Life 201 Student Union Building Lubbock, TX 79406 (806)742-5433


Celebrate GROWTH What an exciting time to be part of the Fraternity & Sorority community at Texas Tech University! We have an unprecedented opportunity to participate in dialogue and make critical decisions about the vision for sororities and our future growth. These discussions are well-timed as Texas Tech surpasses undergraduate enrollment goals for the past five years with additional plans for growth. Our sororities must remain vibrant contributors to the campus community offering women high-quality opportunities for leadership, service, and sisterhood. Texas Tech stands ready to support future sorority establishment. We are poised for potential growth with land reserved for Greek Circle expansion and Panhellenic Council efforts assisting with infrastructure concerns such as parking, traffic, and safety. I am particularly proud of and want to acknowledge the work of the Exploratory Committee and Panhellenic Council in these initiatives. I appreciate your time giving the options for growth serious consideration and look forward to the next era of sorority life at Texas Tech University. Strive for Honor,

Dr. Amy Murphy Dean of Students


eleven CHAPTERS

2310

PANHELLENIC WOMEN

CHAPTER TOTAL

216

Statistics AT-A-GLANCE


Enrollment

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

40,000 by 2020

As a part of Texas Tech’s strategic plan, the university has committed to steadily increase total enrollment to 40,000 students by the year 2020. With a 2.5-2.7 percent increase annually, the university is on track to reach the enrollment goal. Increasing enrollment while maintaining the same standards is challenging, but the key is to maintain relationships with prospective students and provide programs and opportunities. Fraternity & Sorority Life contribute to the traditional college experience incoming freshman are seeking out while considering colleges.

FALL 2013 GPA

3.2

2013 QUOTA

68

Projections

FIRST TIME FRESHMAN

2013

4,892

2014

5,000

2015

5,000

2016 2017

15 2013 FORMAL RECRUITMENT ENROLLMENT

PERCENT INCREASE IN PNMS PLEDGED

989


Enrollment STATISTICS

Undergradates SPRING . FALL

SPRING . FALL

Female

Female Population

2009

19,006 . 22,061

9,354 . 10,744

44%

2010

19,924 . 22,959

9,874 . 11, 333

44%

2011

20,856 . 23,453

10,545 . 11,656

45%

2012

21,388 . 23, 724

10,868 . 11,941

45%

2013

21,579 . 24,338

10,961 . 11,990

45%

Community INTEREST

The Texas Tech Panhellenic Community recognizes that the formal recruitment process is not the preferred method of joining for every student. Chapters striving to maintain maximum chapter size often offer additional opportunities to join for interested students. Even with the majority of chapters participating in Continuous Open Bidding, the current community is not able to

COB Totals SPRING . FALL

2010

--

.

27

2011

94

.

27

2012

109 .

21

2013

86

.

20

2014

90

.

--

accommodate all interested students. In Fall 2013 Fraternity & Sorority Life began collecting information from unaffiliated students seeking membership. More than 180 women responded, of which 102 were first time contacts who did not participate in the formal recruitment process.

190 + 102 292

Withdraw/Released from Recruitment Additional Women Expressing Interest Unaffiliated Women Seeking Membership


Chapter

Total is set in August each year based on average chapter size. Totals below are captured from May of each year.

Alpha Chi Omega Alpha Delta Pi Alpha Phi Chi Omega Delta Delta Delta Delta Gamma Kappa Alpha Theta Kappa Delta Kappa Kappa Gamma Pi Beta Phi Zeta Tau Alpha

TOTALS

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

167

173

186

186

212

148

184

167

179

179

162

179

185

188

216

172

170

186

200

209

176

182

192

191

210

142

161

174

182

216

164

168

189

196

219

164

182

187

194

216

164

175

192

197

213

160

179

183

174

204

163

178

186

196

216

Recruitment STATISTICS

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Registered

Pledged

Quota

Total

Unmatched

817

652

57

179

12

791

599

52

184

26

867

653

52

192

34

840

674

58

204

24

981

791

68

216

11


Extension

WHY OPEN FOR

To meet the needs of a growing campus

In fall of 2013 Texas Tech reported record enrollment for the fifth-straight year as 33,111 students took to campus in August. The increase maintains the university’s course of achieving a goal of 40,000 students by 2020. Of the total student population, 4,892 are first-time undergraduate students. Texas Tech also celebrated an 82 percent retention rate of the 2012 freshman class, the highest since 2007. For more information about the growth at Texas Tech click here.

To meet the demands of growing interest from students

Following Fall Formal Recruitment in 2013, Texas Tech Panhellenic began collecting a database of women who had an interest in Sorority Life. In addition to the more than 180 women who withdrew from the formal recruitment process, 102 women formally expressed interest in membership opportunities for spring 2014.

Increased opportunities for interested women to be placed

The extension process is unique and often draws students that would not have otherwise been interested in the currently established chapters and/or the formal recruitment process. The opportunity to be a founding member, seek early leadership opportunities and be a part of a new legacy on campus is a major selling point for women who are on the fence about sorority life. New chapters continue to thrive as they are able to offer members a chance to shape the future and traditions of the chapter.

To invigorate the community

The Texas Tech Panhellenic Council has not invited an additional NPC organization into our community in almost 30 years. On many campuses, the addition of a new chapter invigorates and unifies the existing panhellenic community. As an institution with an established level of success, an additional chapter could potentially elevate each of our groups to excel at an even higher standard.

To maintain manageable chapter size

Maintaining a manageable chapter size is an important factor when trying to provide a valuable and safe sorority environment. Chapter leaders who are tasked with coordinating mega-chapters will encounter limitations as they attempt to program a meaningful experience. While extension is not a guaranteed method to reduce chapter total or quota, it is a proactive approach to anticipating a continuing growth and interest.


1

Exploratory Committee & Data Collection

2

Panhellenic Vote

3

Application

4

Presentations & Selection

5

Colonization

The first step is to investigate extension possibilities in a deliberate and thorough manner. The committee should analyze statistics with regard to enrollment and recruitment and also assess the needs of the campus. It is helpful to look at trends and statistics over a five-year period. The committee should compile an official report and include a recommendation as to whether to extend or not extend at this time. The official report should be submitted to the College Panhellenic Council and shared with the Panhellenic delegates in order for thoughtful discussion and debate to occur.

It is critical that the College Panhellenic officers set the stage for the official vote on whether to extend or not extend at this time. The report prepared by the extension exploration committee should be distributed to the Panhellenic delegates two weeks prior to the official vote. At this point, communication becomes critical to ensure a smooth setting for the official vote. Delegates are expected to communicate with inter/national headquarters, NPC delegates and members of the Panhellenic community. Per Texas Tech Panhellenic Council bylaws, the motion requires a 2/3, majority vote to pass.

Should the motion pass, we would then announce our extension opportunities in the NPC Extension Bulletin, distributed to all 26 NPC groups. The bulletin includes brief descriptions of campus enrollment and the campus setting. Interested groups would then have the opportunity to submit applications for the consideration of the Texas Tech Extension Committee. Based on the responses the committee would decide which NPC groups to invite to campus for presentations.

Presentations would be scheduled on an individual basis with the selected sororities. Organizations selected would send national officer, staff members and volunteers to campus on their designated day to tour, meeting with university officials and providing a presentation to the extension committee. Following the last presentation, the extension committee would deliberate and decide on a final recommendation for which organization to invite to colonize. Panhellenic delegates would cast the final vote to approve the recommendation. Per Texas Tech Panhellenic Council bylaws, the motion requires a 2/3, majority vote to pass.

Staff members and volunteers from the chosen organization would then begin making plans to facilitate membership recruitment process following formal recruitment during the semester in which they wish to colonize. Panhellenic Council would supply positive support and furnish ongoing assistance to the colony (new chapter).

Process OVERVIEW


EXPLORATORY COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Febuary/March 2014

MOTION TO OPEN FOR EXTENSION

March 2014

Approved

BY 2/3 MAJORITY

Deferred

REVISITED AUG. 2014

MOTION TO OPEN FOR EXTENSION

August 2014

APPLICATIONS COLLECTED

Summer 2014

Approved

BY 2/3 MAJORITY

APPLICATIONS COLLECTED

September 2014

Why the process is important

EXPLORATORY COMMITTEE MEETINGS

September 2014

It is important to understand the extension process and associated timeline. Coordination between the university and the national organizations participating can make-or-break the success of the future chapter. Allowing enough time for the committee to make a decision they are confident in allows the established community to generate support and resources necassary to welcome a new organization to campus. Selected organizations will then carefully plan and coordinate the efforts needed to make a strong transition on to campus.


Extension TIMELINE Select

CHAPTERS TO PRESENT

SORORITY PRESENATIONS

October/November 2014 Recommend

CHAPTER TO COLONIZE

DELEGATES APPROVE RECOMMENDATION

December 2014

Colonization Planning SPRING 2015

Colonization FALL 2015


Center for Campus Life TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

Panhellenic Growth Report  

Information about Texas Tech's Panhellenic Growth and Extension Opportunity.