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MADISON new jersey

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 3

Welcome To Madison

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Madison Area Chamber Of Commerce

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Important Contacts

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Downtown Development Commission

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Location & Transportation

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Madison History

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Madison Government

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Shopping & Dining

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Recreation

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Arts & Entertainment

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Education

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Campus Life

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Corporate & Professional

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Worship

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Residential Living

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Health & Wellness

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Advertiser Index

This is a Town Square Publication created and produced for the The Borough of Madison Downtown Development Commission 50 Kings Rd., Madison, NJ 07940 (973) 593-3042 | www.rosenet.org CopyrightŠ 2018 Town Square Publications 155 E. Algonquin Rd., Arlington Heights, IL 60005 www.townsquarepublications.com Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The Borough of Madison Downtown Development Commission and Town Square assume no responsibility for misinformation. Please contact The Borough of Madison Downtown Development Commission with any additions or corrections. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of The Borough of Madison Downtown Development Commission and Town Square is prohibited. Chairman, CEO and Publisher | Douglas K. Ray President and Chief Operating Officer | Scott Stone Vice President / Director | Scott Ray Production Manager | Joseph Nugara Editor and Graphic Designer | Gail Gaboda Senior Project Manager | Stefanie Nugara Lead Sales Coordinator | Tiffany Hogan Directory Coordinator | Michael Sumrak Acquisition and Sales Manager | Patrick McGranaghan

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WELCOME TO MADISON

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“ Th e R o s e C i t y ”

adison is home to a thriving retail/commercial district, which runs the length of Main Street (Route 124). The district runs the gamut from car dealerships and grocery stores to the east, quaint local shops and restaurants nestled in the downtown and major corporations on the western border. The Downtown Development Commission and the Madison Area Chamber of Commerce support the district. The Madison Civic Commercial Historic District, which includes much of “downtown” as well as Borough Hall and the train station, is on the State Register of Historic Places.

Madison beckons visitors to explore its rich history and unique architecture. A classic suburban community, located less than 25 miles from Manhattan, Madison offers a quiet sophistication. Home to Shanghai Jazz, ranked as one of the top jazz clubs; the renowned Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey; and the Museum of Early Crafts & Trades, Madison wows visitors with its diverse cultural offerings. If you are hungry, look no further! Multicultural and delicious, Madison has over 50 food establishments within its four square miles. Madison also offers a full calendar of community events for natives and newcomers alike. Madison has a unique character generated by an ethnically diverse

population, a wide range of housing types, the influence of local universities and its unique historical development. Consistently ranked as one of the safest communities in the United States, Madison is the epitome of a familyfriendly, walkable and safe community.

Just to the west of the town center is the picturesque wooded campus of Drew University. Farther north lies the Florham Campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University, bridging the towns of Florham Park and Madison. The campus consists of 178 acres, part of Florham, a former country estate of early 20th-century socialites Florence Vanderbilt and Hamilton Twombly. Less than a mile farther west lies the campus of the College of Saint Elizabeth in Convent Station. Madison is served by Morris and Essex Morristown Line trains of NJ Transit direct to Penn Station in New York City. It also provides service to Hoboken (with connections to lower New York City by the Hudson Tubes). In addition, NJ Transit provides local bus service. NJ State Route 124 passes through Madison. From a distance, access by auto is easiest from the NJ Route 24 freeway. If traveling west, use Exit 7A and then follow Route 124 through Chatham to Madison. If traveling east, use Exit 2A, turn right off the ramp and take the first left onto Park Avenue. Follow Park Avenue into Madison.

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MADISON AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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Serv ing t he b u si ne s s communi t y f or ov er 7 5 y e ar s

he Madison Area Chamber of Commerce, Inc. is the local nonprofit organization that works to promote the economic interests of its dues-paying members and Madison as a whole.

Citizens eager to provide outstanding customer service and civic-minded dedication to the community founded the Chamber in 1943 in the midst of World War II as an independent, non-partisan business league. The Chamber seeks to preserve Madison and the surrounding area as an outstanding place in which to live, work and do business.

Membership benefits include a listing on the Chamber website, business-to-business networking, new business ribbon cuttings, group advertising opportunities and lectures. Program topics have included fraud prevention, social media, online advertising, search engine optimization, motivational speaking and sustainability.

To maintain communication with the membership, the Chamber holds bi-monthly Focus meetings; monthly meetings of the Chamber Board of Directors; monthly networking breakfasts; and monthly happy hours. Information about business, events, resources, charitable and social opportunities are provided via email and social media.

The Chamber produces the popular Madison Loyalty Rewards Card Program, which offers special discounts and incentives from Chamber businesses. The Chamber also offers discount programs for seniors and students. The Chamber produces the Nautilus Diner Advertising Placemat every June and December. The Madison Gift Check program

keeps vital dollars in the local economy and invites the community support their neighborhood businesses.

The Chamber sponsors many programs and activities: Easter Fun Fest; Taste of Madison; Madison Home Show; Ladies Night Out; Fire Extinguisher Inspections; Madison Car Show; Scarecrows on Waverly; Halloween Parade & Magic Show; Holiday Window Painting; and Rosie the Rose City Reindeer Scavenger Hunt along with other holiday shopping promotions. The Chamber also hosts a members-only Holiday Party in January and the Annual Awards Dinner in June.

The Chamber actively collaborates with many other community organizations, including the Borough of Madison, the Madison Downtown Development Commission, the Rotary Club of Madison and the Madison P.B.A. 92. For more information about the activities, programs and meeting schedules of the Madison Area Chamber of Commerce, please visit our website at MadisonNJChamber. org; write to P.O. Box 152, Madison, NJ 07940; call (973) 377-7830; or email us at MadisonChamber@gmail.com.

IMPORTANT CONTACTS Number s to K now

Borough Administrator (973) 593‑3038

Communication (973) 408‑8789

Fire Department (973) 593‑3021

Property Assessor (973) 593‑3067

Chief Financial Officer & Assistant Borough Administrator (973) 593‑8496

Join Municipal Court (Violations Bureau) (973) 593‑3026

Health Department (973) 593‑3079

Purchasing (973) 593‑3037

Madison Public Library (973) 377‑0722

Public Works (973) 593‑3088

Mayor (Office of the) (973) 593‑3038

Recreation (973) 593‑3097

Electric/Water Billing (973) 593‑3045

Personnel (973) 593‑3036

Senior Services (973) 593‑3095

Engineering/Planning and Zoning (973) 593‑3060

Police Department (973) 593‑3000

Tax Collector (973) 593‑3056

Borough Clerk (973) 593‑3041 Building Department (973) 593‑3064 Business Development (973) 245‑3493

Electric/Water Utility (Answered 24/7/365 for outages) (973) 933‑7330

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DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION B e t t er To g e t h er

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hat do you get when you combine rich history, a strong sense of community, and arts and culture? Madison, NJ. The Downtown Development Commission (DDC) has committed the last 30 years to branding and promoting downtown Madison so that everyone who lives, works or visits here has an enjoyable and memorable experience.

vendors. All proceeds raised by these events are used to enhance Madison’s public spaces, parks, lots and the historic district.

The DDC thrives on partnerships with almost every organization in Madison. In what is perhaps the strongest and most productive partnership, the DDC collaborates with the Madison Area Chamber of Commerce on programing and events. One of the most creative collaborations has been with the Madison Arts & Cultural Alliance. In addition, the DDC collaborates with other organizations including Museum of Early Trades & Crafts, Madison Music & Arts, Madison Volunteer Ambulance Corps and Drew University.

The DDC consists of 19 mayorappointed volunteer commissioners representing a balanced cross section of public officials, business owners, property owners, residents and representatives from the local colleges, news media, merchants, nonprofits, senior centers and corporations. Commissioners include the Madison Mayor, the editor of the Madison Eagle, the president of the Madison Board of Education, a staff representative Drew University and prominent members of the community.

In an effort to bring people and attention to downtown Madison, the DDC coordinates several events and fund-raisers that either take place in the center of town, or raise funds that benefit downtown. In March, we host the Taste of Madison, in collaboration with the Chamber of Commerce and The Rotary Club. The DDC runs the Madison Farmers Market, located off Main Street

The DDC also has a role in the area of economic development through various promotional campaigns and social media outlets and the Madison Magazine produced bi-annually with Town Square Publications. In 2016-17, the DDC collaborated with the Madison Borough Council on new Downtown Revitalization Study conducted by the consulting group Urbanomics.

every Thursday from late May to October. In addition, the DDC sponsors and coordinates May Day in Madison, a day of volunteerism that recruits close to 900 people to clean up the town. The DDC also hosts Bottle Hill Day, a street fair on the first Saturday of October with amusements, live music, food, crafts and

For more information, visit the DDC webpage at www.rosenet.org or contact the DDC at ddc@rosenet.org or (973) 245-3493.

LOCATION & TRANSPORTATION

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Ge t t i ng A r o und Tow n

he Borough of Madison is located in Morris County, New Jersey, about 22 miles due west of New York City. Madison is surrounded by the Townships of Harding, Morris and Chatham and by the Boroughs of Florham Park and Chatham. Morristown, Summit and Millburn are minutes away. Madison is easily accessible to Interstate highway Routes 78, 287, 80 and 280, as well as by New Jersey Route 24.

There are multiple options in Madison via bus and train to get around New Jersey and into New York City. The NJ Transit Morris and Essex Rail Line serves Madison, with direct service to New York’s Penn Station and to Hoboken. With the new Secaucus transfer station, NJ Transit trains from Madison can connect to other NJ Transit lines, the shuttle to Newark Airport and the Amtrak rail line. The 873 NJ

Transit bus line route includes neighboring towns, office parks, local malls and the nearby hospital.

Newark-Liberty International Airport, with direct flights throughout the world, is about 15 miles from Madison. Nearby Morristown Municipal Airport provides corporate and individual private flight services.

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MADISON HISTORY Vis ion and Gener o s i t y

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he Presbyterian Church from 1747 anchored the community, and the earliest settlers were typically Presbyterians of Anglo-American stock who migrated into the area from Long Island, Elizabethtown and Newark, seeking land, commercial opportunities and political autonomy. By the early 19th century, Bottle Hill had a Catholic church as well, founded by French-speaking immigrants, and an academy, or private school, to promote the education of the area’s young men.

The school was called the Madison Academy, after James Madison, the fourth president of the United States and a man of considerable learning and erudition. Locals began to chafe at the intemperate and rustic-sounding name “Bottle Hill” and a movement to rename the community “Madison” for both the former president and the academy was successful by 1834.

Almost as momentous as the change of name to something more genteel was the construction of the Morris and Essex Railroad, and the opening of a railroad station in Madison in 1837. Railroads were the new technology of the day, and the notion of a “commuter” – someone who lived in the country but made their living by daily work in the commercial centers of the city – was a brand new one. With the arrival of the railroad, Madison changed from being a village outside the county seat of Morristown to a vibrant commuter suburb of Newark and New York. Madison’s natural beauty, with low rolling hills combined with access to a railroad link to the metropolis, brought an evolution to a residentially oriented, suburbanstyle development from the mid-19th century onward. Commercial development

the time of Madison’s incorporation as a Borough in 1889, the community became known informally as “The Rose City” for the millions of cut roses sent by train to New York throughout the year. The nickname remains in use, and can be seen in the town’s logo, and in street names like “Rose Avenue” and “Greenhouse Lane” but the last commercial greenhouses closed in the 1970s as airfreight made flowers from warmer climates more economical than those grown locally.

concentrated near the railroad station, defining a core downtown, and large-scale industry never took hold here as it did in many other New Jersey communities. The tight concentration of surviving buildings from the 19th century reflects the fact of the pedestrianorientation of the town, with neighborhoods established within easy walking distance to the town center and the railroad station. Spread out from the core were the great estates that characterized the Madison-Morristown area at the turn of the 20th century. These were often one residence of many owned by titans of industry who were focused on business in New York City, and spent weekends or a season in a “country house” in Morris County.

The presence of Millionaire’s Row, as Madison Avenue between Madison and Morristown was called in the latter 19th century required not only wealthy owners but legions of staff to run the houses. Immigrants, particularly from Italy, were attracted to Madison for the opportunities to ply traditional skills in landscape gardening and masonry at the estates. They clustered in Madison and in other nearby towns, adding a vibrant new cultural overlay to the town.

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Gardening was of course a way of life for many people, but the estates introduced the idea of greenhouses and hothouses as a way to extend the growing season, and of flowers as a culture and a cash crop. Madison became a center for greenhouse cultivation of flowers for the New York florist’s trade. Roses were particularly valued. By

The wealthy and prominent were not disinterested in the activities of the little town of Madison, and in many ways they promoted ideals of the Progressive Movement through direct political influence or philanthropic gifts. The downtown of Madison in particular reflects a strong tradition of local philanthropy. This generosity, reflected in the donation of land in 1877, allowed for the expansion of Waverly Place to the wide, gracious street it is today. Also of note, the gift of the architecturally beautiful Webb Chapel, helped re-locate the Presbyterian congregation to the center of the downtown in 1887 and the gift of a free public library and park by D. Willis James in 1900. Perhaps the most significant of gifts, the Hartley Dodge Memorial (Town Hall) by Geraldine Rockefeller Dodge in 1935.

Suburban development in the 20th century paralleled the increasing use of the automobile. Land previously farmed or used for greenhouse production of roses became increasingly valuable as the setting for middle and uppermiddle-class single-family houses. Many of the 19th century estates were subdivided into housing tracts in this era. The presence of an estate wall or specimen trees or a street name is the only reminder of the former use of the property. As a mature, built-out community, Madison needs to balance preservation of the past with the necessary development for the future. Almost any new construction will involve demolishing existing structures and sites. Private homeowners have largely been respectful of the architectural traditions of the building stock in town, and there are many well-preserved structures reflecting 18th, 19th, and 20th century styles.

The Historic Preservation Commission, along with the Downtown Development Commission, the Sign and Façade Committee and other groups within town, have worked together to help preserve the character, use and appearance of the vibrant downtown that gives Madison a unique identity in the region.

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MADISON GOVERNMENT

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R eady to s erv e yo u

adison was incorporated on Dec. 27, 1889, under the Borough form of government. A mayor serves a four-year term and six council members are elected at large to three-year terms. The terms are staggered so that two council members are elected each year. Both the mayor and council members are part-time positions that serve without compensation. A full-time administrator is appointed to handle the day-to-day management of the government.

The municipal government’s mission is to build a friendly, attractive, safe and well-maintained community where businesses prosper, public services and educational opportunities excel, history is preserved and citizens live in good health and harmony. There are 10 departments and three independent agencies that work to accomplish this mission. The departments include Administration, Finance, Police, Fire, Public Works, Land Use Services, Electric Utility, Municipal Court, Senior Services and Recreation. Local independent agencies include the Madison Public Library, the Board of Health and the Madison Housing Authority.

The Department of Administration includes the administrator’s office, municipal clerk, purchasing, personnel and public information. This department coordinates the overall activities of government and helps the other departments do their job more effectively. The director of business development is also a part of administration and acts as a liaison to the Downtown Development Commission (DDC) and to Madison businesses.

From May through October, the Downtown Development Commission organizes a Farmers’ Market held Thursdays from 2 to 7 p.m. The DDC also organizes the annual volunteer May Day cleanup of downtown areas and the Bottle Hill Day celebration in October, as well as a plethora of additional programs.

The Housing Authority builds, rehabilitates, maintains and operates safe, clean, aesthetically pleasing housing for low-income residents. There is an 80-unit housing complex for senior citizens on Chateau Thierry Avenue and 53 well-maintained, scattered-site, low-income units throughout town. For more information, visit www.rosenet.org or follow the Borough of Madison on social media:

Facebook: The Borough of Madison New Jersey Twitter: @MadisonNJ_ gov

The police department has 28 sworn officers and is responsible for the safety and protection of citizens. The department is composed of a Patrol Division, Investigation Division, Drug Education Unit and Traffic Safety Unit. The fire department has 14 highly trained, paid firefighters and 20 well-trained volunteers. The combination departments provides Madison with a quick and effective response time. Public Works maintains the roads, parks, buildings, sewer, storm water and drinking water systems of the Borough, including water quality problems. Land Use Services includes historic preservation, engineering, planning, zoning and construction code enforcement.

The Borough is one of only nine municipalities in the state that owns its own electric utility. Electric power purchased wholesale then sold to residents at rates lower than surrounding utilities. Madison electric service also has fewer outages and faster restoration of power when an outage occurs than surrounding utilities. Based on a recent national survey, Madison scored in the top 10 percent most reliable utilities in the country. The Senior Center and Recreation Departments provides and support social and recreational activities for residents of all ages throughout the year.

The Board of Health, housed at 28 Walnut St., protects our community from environmental hazards, housing and food establishment concerns, property maintenance issues, and animal control. The Board of Health also provides these inspection services on a contract basis to other communities.

The Madison Public Library enriches the Madison community by providing access to ideas, information, learning and connections, to link Madison’s past, present and future.

Explore early New Jersey history and discover connections to the people who lived and worked here hundreds of years ago. METC offers visitors of all ages fascinating exhibits, educational programming, lectures, field trips, special events and so much more. Visit our museum, housed in an historic building, to learn more about the stories of New Jersey.

9 Main Street, Madison, NJ 07940 (973) 377-2982 • www.metc.org www.rosenet.org 7

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SHOPPING & DINING

Lov e Madi s on, S hop Madi s on

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adison’s quaint and charming historic downtown business district, which features 52 buildings on the New Jersey and national registers of historic places, is home to 16,000 residents and three colleges – Drew University, Fairleigh Dickinson University and the College of Saint Elizabeth.

Serving and supporting Madison since 1903 • delivery • ear piercing • immunizations • adherence packaging • cards and gifts

Due to its manicured facades, inviting wide sidewalks, ample free parking and welcoming merchants, Madison is a wonderful place in which to live and to shop.

It is always rewarding to stroll along the rustic downtown sidewalk pavers and enjoy shopping and dining in Madison on any day of the year. Madison boosts a unique range of shopping opportunities: fashionable adult and children’s apparel boutiques; jewelry and gifts; hair, beauty and spa; home furnishings; computers and electronics; antiques; consignment; pharmacies; bookstores and much more. Major retailers are located in the east-end business district, which begins just beyond historic downtown at the intersection of Prospect Street and

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Greenwood Avenue. Gary’s Wine & Marketplace, Stop & Shop, Dunkin Donuts, Whole Foods, Five Guys, Madison Honda, Jaguar, Karl’s Appliance, Staples and Starbucks are all a short distance from home, work or play. A multicultural delight, Madison offers a deep assortment of some of the best restaurants in the area. Diners can chose from a wide selection of tastes whether it be Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Mediterranean style, Indian, Mexican or classic American. Madison is also well stocked with wine shops, haute cuisine, delicatessens, gourmet coffee shops, diners and pizzerias. Every year Madison hosts one of New Jersey’s premier food events, the Taste of Madison. All Taste proceeds help fund charitable causes, business development and civic improvements in Madison.

Art galleries, the Museum of Early Trades & Crafts, world-class jazz at Shanghai Jazz, the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey and Playwrights Theatre are within our historic downtown. Our New Jersey Transit train station, which has been beautifully restored and offers easy access to New York City, is in the heart of town and it is just across from our historic borough hall, the Hartley Dodge Memorial building. New Jersey Transit bus service is also available along Route 124/Main Street. Madison businesses owners and retail merchants, many who have been a big part of Madison’s progress and prosperity for generations, emphasize friendly service and always provide welcoming shopping and dining experiences. Parking is free on our streets and in municipal shoppers’ lots. Bicycle racks are located at the train station and at many other places across town. At four square miles in size, Madison is made for walking to and from the business district for errands or just plain fun.

For more information on Madison, its shops, restaurants, parking and other information, visit www.rosenet.org or www.MadisonNJChamber. org.

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RECREATION Joi n t h e f un!

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adison offers many convenient fitness and recreation options for residents of all ages, including Madison parks and fields, sidewalks, bikeways, connections to two major Morris County Park/path systems, access to the Giralda Farms perimeter walking/ jogging path, access to Drew University campus and access to the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. In addition, the Madison Recreation Center (MRC), a complex that includes multi-use turf fields as well as community gardens and hiking trails, is tremendous community asset. Madison’s facilities also include playgrounds and outdoor tennis and basketball courts, outdoor swimming at the Madison Community Pool and indoor swimming at the YMCA. There is one golf course in Madison, the private, nine-hole Madison Golf Club, and five other courses (both private and public) in the immediate area.

The Borough of Madison Recreation provides youth recreation programs; For more information on available programs, visit www.rosenet.org/784/ Program-Info-Registration. Seasonal offerings are as follows: Fall: Football, Soccer, Field Hockey, Cross Country; Winter: Basketball, Ice Hockey, Wrestling, Ski Club; Spring: Boys Lacrosse, Girls Lacrosse, Baseball, Softball, Track; Summer: Nature Nuts, Drama and Musical Theater In addition, there are camps offered through some of the recognized programs and through US Sports Institute throughout the year. Madison is a walking, biking and running community. Accessible sheltered, scenic walking and biking trails through Loantaka Park, connect Madison to Green Village and Madison to Morristown.

COMMUNITY IS OUR CAUSE

Madison has two State and National Register Historic Districts – the Bottle Hill Historic District that runs from Park Avenue north to 105 Ridgedale Ave. and has homes pre-dating the American Revolutionary War, and the Civic & Commercial Historic District that encompasses 52 buildings in the downtown. A walking tour and architectural guide to the downtown district is available free at Borough Hall and the Madison Public Library. A map and audio version is downloadable on www. rosenet.org. A variety of bicycle routes connect schools, parks and activity centers, including the Madison Train Station, which is not only wheelchairaccessible, but its mini high-level platforms also make train access bicycle friendly. For those not taking their bike on the train to their next destination, bike racks are available at street level at both ends of the station.

Nature discovery and adventure are only a pedal away with convenient access to the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge near Madison. Two bicycle loop tours are available, as well as a three-mile side trip to Jockey Hollow to see the encampment of log huts used in the winter of 1779-80 by the Continental Army.

Financial assistance may be available.

MADISON AREA YMCA FAMILY CENTER: 111 Kings Rd, Madison, NJ • 973-822-YMCA (9622) F.M. KIRBY CHILDREN’S CENTER: 54 East St, Madison, NJ • 973-377-4945 PROJECT COMMUNITY PRIDE: 973-845-6480

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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Wor l d-Cl ass C ultur e i n a Smal l-Tow n S e t t ing

hen it comes to arts and culture, whether it be performing or visual, Madison may well be the biggest little town in New Jersey. Madison is home to two of New Jersey’s five professional live theater companies designated by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts as “Major Arts Institutions.” The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey, which offers its main stage productions at the Kirby Theatre on the campus of Drew University, is one of the leading Shakespeare theaters in the nation. Writers Theatre has been devoted to the development and presentation of new American plays for 25 years.

In 2003, a sparkling 431-seat, state-of-theart concert hall opened on the campus of Drew University, presenting music events that draw on the talents within the university community and bring renowned professional musicians from around the world to Madison. The Concert Hall at Drew University is the only facility in New Jersey architecturally and acoustically designed as a single-use forum for the performance of live music.

For jazz, there is no better place on either side of the Hudson River than Shanghai Jazz, named by Downbeat magazine as one of the top 100 jazz clubs in the world. With a regular lineup of world-class jazz artists, fans enjoy the music while dining on outstanding Asian cuisine. Madison is also home to Harmonium Choral Society, a 100-voice auditioned community choir, which performs a diverse repertoire of musical offerings throughout the year. In addition to presenting their own music programs, they often host world-renowned artists including the American Boychoir and the Harlem Gospel Choir. The Museum of Early Trades & Crafts is a New Jersey history museum housed in a

landmark historic building in downtown Madison. With education as the heart of its mission, the museum tells the stories of the people of early New Jersey, exploring their lives and technology. Drawing from a permanent collection of over 9,000 artifacts, the museum presents educational and historical programs to thousands of visitors each year. With its central location in the downtown business district, the museum is also the Madison Visitor Center and is open to the public six days a week. Madison is also a haven for visual arts. The Korn Gallery in the Dorothy Young Center for the Arts on the campus of Drew University presents exhibitions on a regular basis. Our vibrant town is also home to many local artists and art classes are offered at Creative Hands, and Art in Progress, two studios primarily devoted to the education of young (and

sometimes not so young) artists. Madison Mud is a fine art pottery studio providing classes on the pottery wheel or in hand building. Private workshops and classes offered.

Connecting the arts and culture to the community is the primary focus of The Madison Arts & Culture Alliance, a coalition of arts organizations, cultural institutions, neighbors, colleagues and friends dedicated to encouraging collaborations among the wideranging cultural offerings in “the Rose City.” This nonprofit group coordinates local events such as the Holiday Arts Festival, music for Bottle Hill Day, the Madison Sidewalk Gallery. Through continued collaboration, the cultural alliance is dedicated to integrating the arts into daily life and are advocates for arts education in the schools, colleges and universities.

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ATTRACTIONS AND EVENTS IN MADISON The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey: One of the leading Shakespeare theaters in the nation, and New Jersey’s only professional theater company dedicated to Shakespeare’s canon and other world classics. Main Stage: F.M. Kirby Theatre, 36 Madison Ave., on the Drew University campus. (973) 408‑5600, www.ShakespeareNJ.org Writers Theatre of NJ: Professional theater devoted to the development and production of new American plays, and provider of writing programs for ages 4 to adult. 28 Walnut St., (973) 514‑1787, www.wtnj.org Shanghai Jazz: Live jazz Wednesday through Sunday evenings, with gourmet Asian cuisine. 24 Main St., (973) 822‑2899, www.shanghaijazz.com Nicole’s Broadway Dance Company: Offers all students a wide selection of performance opportunities including a competitive dance team, conventions/competitions, dance showcases, charitable promotions and events, holiday shows and year-end recitals. 32 Main St., (973) 503‑9500, www.nicbdc.com The Harmonium Choral Society: One of New Jersey’s leading choral arts organizations. Founded in 1979, the 100-member chorus and its select 20-voice Chamber Singers consist of volunteers, including many music educators, from northern New Jersey and surrounding areas. Membership by audition. Dr. Anne Matlack is artistic director. (973) 538‑6969, www.harmonium.org Grace Community Music: Dedicated to enriching the cultural life of the Madison area by presenting high-quality concerts throughout the year and related events intended to build a stronger sense of community. Tickets are available by donation at the door, or in advance for concerts sponsored by Harmonium Choral Society, Light Opera of New Jersey and Baroque Orchestra of New Jersey events. (973) 377‑0106, ext. 17, www.gracemadison.org Sidewalk Sounds: For over 20

weeks throughout the summer and early fall, local performers offer free sidewalk entertainment as you enjoy the Madison Farmers Market in the heart of downtown. Sponsored by the Downtown Development Commission. (973) 245‑3493, ddc@rosenet.org

arts studio for special needs kids offering classes in standup comedy, voiceovers, creative writing, creative movement and improvisation. 29 Main St. , www. steprightupstudio.com, jconroy@steprightupstudio.com

Museum of Early Trades & Crafts: Exhibits that explore and interpret the history of the people who lived and worked in the New Jersey area from early 18th to late 19th centuries. (973) 377‑2982, www.metc.org

Art in Progress: Children’s art studio. 2 Green Village Rd., 3rd Fl., (973) 660‑1122

Downtown Concert Series: Concerts cosponsored by the METC and DDC, held on Friday evening throughout the summer. Bring a blanket/chair, sit back and relax with a pleasant evening of music. Picnicking welcome. (973) 377‑2982, www.metc.org Madison Sidewalk Gallery and Art Gala: Outdoor exhibit featuring large, colorful art banners installed in and around downtown Madison, typically held in midautumn. Art lovers and collectors will have the opportunity to purchase one of these works of art at the Sidewalk Gallery Auction. www.madisonartsnj.org Madison Mud Clay Studio: Madison Mud Clay Studio is a fully equipped facility offering pottery wheel classes for both teens and adults as well as handbuilding vlasses for kids age 7 and up. 6 Main St., (973) 520‑8480, www.madisonmud.com

The Arts at Drew University: Gallery exhibitions, music and theatre performances. (973) 408‑3000, www.drew.edu/theatrearts Fairleigh Dickinson University: There are varieties of initiatives proven to be valuable to the community in the arts and beyond. fdu.edu/community-programs The Arts at College of Saint Elizabeth: Whether it’s the latest art show in the Maloney Art Gallery, or a musical or theatrical performance in Dolan Performance Hall or the Greek Theatre, the arts at CSE bring students, their families and the community together. www.cse.edu/about-cse/the-arts

Madison Public Library: Concerts, art exhibits, lectures. (973) 377‑0722 www.madisonnjlibrary.org Visual & Performing Arts Department, Madison Public Schools: A comprehensive curriculum from grades K-12 with offerings in music, theater and the visual arts. Exhibits and productions of student and faculty work presented throughout the year. (973) 593‑3117, ext. 8954, www.madisonpublicschools.org Madison Arts and Culture Alliance: Coordinates many programs in Madison that promote cultural events in town. www.madisonartsnj.org, info@madisonartsnj.org

“If you’ve never seen a production by The Shakespeare Theatre, whose consistent excellence has become a byword – then now’s the time.” THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Short Stories Bookshop & Community Hub: Features monthly exhibits by local crafts people and fine artists. Art gallery displays works for sale. The open community space showcases leading authors and fosters local talent through community events, music jams, open mics, classes, workshops and book clubs. 23 Main St., (973) 845‑6086, www.shortstoriesnj.com Creative Hands Art Studio and Atelier Gallery: Art exhibits and professional instruction in drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics and pottery wheel for students from ages three to adult. 14 Kings Rd., (973) 377‑2848 www.creativehandsartstudio.com Step Right Up Studio: A creative

THE SHAKESPEARE THEATRE OF NEW JERSEY 36 Madison Avenue, Madison, NJ 973-408-5600 | ShakespeareNJ.org Photo credit: Jerry Dalia, 2017.

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EDUCATION

A Fo undat ion of Exc el l enc e

M

adison Public Schools is a progressive educational institution with a rich tradition of academic, co-curricular and athletic excellence. They take pride in their thoughtful and reflective student population, an innovative and collaborative staff and an engaged parent population and school community. This unique combination creates a school environment in which students can become the best version of themselves through the unwavering supportive of those around them. The foundation of the Madison Public Schools is their three elementary schools, which serve students from preschool through fifth grade.

Learning at this level is designed to support a wide variety of backgrounds and learning styles through inquiry and collaborative conversations. STEAM classes and enrichment programs allow students to design, create and explore areas of their own interest and character education is highlighted to ensure that students understand the power of kindness and community. During their time at Madison Junior School and Madison High School, district students have the opportunity to take dozens of exciting courses at a range of academic levels. A robust mix of strong core academic programs and award winning arts and elective programs

allows students to sample a varied range of classes. State-of-the-art STEM facilities at both schools ensure that all students can interact with the design process, robotics, 3-D printing, and a variety of technologies as they move into higher-level content. Throughout the year, students represent Madison Public Schools in community, state and national forums in areas as diverse as musical theater, art exhibits, technology tournaments, athletics championships and academic team competitions. Madison High School also includes students from the neighboring Harding Township through a send/receive relationship after eighth grade.

With these amazing opportunities and the continual supports they receive, Madison students gain acceptance into many of the best colleges and universities around the globe and their success helps place Madison Public Schools as a top educational institution in the state.

Beyond the public schools, the Borough of Madison also contains a number of private nursery schools, Montessori preschools and kindergartens, and a parochial elementary school, St. Vincent Martyr School. Three public colleges, Drew University, Fairleigh Dickinson University, and the College of St. Elizabeth also operate within the borough. Additional educational offerings are available through the Adult School of Madison, Chatham and Florham Park and through the Madison Public Library, which offers a wide range of programming for students of all ages.

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CAMPUS LIFE

Thr ee Sc ho ols, One C ommon Goal

M

adison uniquely blessed, has three outstanding universities all with a common goal: Student success. In order for students to achieve greatness, Drew University, College of Saint Elizabeth and Fairleigh Dickinson University pride themselves in their students’ eagerness for volunteerism. Students who attend these colleges have a passion for learning and a deep value of service. Personal growth and academic achievement are undeniable benefits of attending any of these prestigious institutions. All three universities provide their students with many opportunities to volunteer locally, nationally and abroad. Fairleigh Dickinson encourages students to get involved around town and even out of state. Their Community

Service Resource Center fosters leadership and community engagement through service learning. At Drew University, the Center for Civic Engagement sponsors the Civic Scholar Program. This select group of students must complete an internship, create their own service project, and most importantly, find the importance in every project they complete. College of Saint Elizabeth empowers students to develop into civic-minded adults through participation in programs such as Culture & Community Weekends, Food Bank of New Jersey, Morristown Neighborhood House, and Spring Break service trips to New Orleans, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Just as Madison encourages the students

from these three universities to become a part of the local community, all three graciously welcome residents to attend athletic, lecture and arts events on their campuses. The benefits of having access to higher education expands Madison’s borders culturally, civically and, of course, educationally. FOR MORE INFORMATION � Drew University drew.edu/about � Fairleigh Dickinson University fdu.edu/florham � College of Saint Elizabeth cse.edu

Drew University prepares students for the real world in the real world.

—President MaryAnn Baenninger

• Dedicated to exceptional faculty mentorship. • Committed to connecting our campus with our community. • Focused on hands-on experiential learning. • Lowered tuition by 20% for fall 2018. • Bachelor’s degrees in more than 30 fields of study. • 94% of Drew undergraduates employed or in graduate school 6 months after graduation. • Graduate degrees in teaching, finance and divinity. • Graduate certificates in conflict resolution, English as a second language and teaching students with disabilities.

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CORPORATE & PROFESSIONAL S t r ong r o ot s and v i s ion f or t h e f utur e

M

adison’s major businesses include Merck Animal Health, Allergan, Pfizer Consumer Health Care, Prudential and Realogy. Other major employers include Drew University and the Madison Area YMCA. All major corporate residents, except Realogy, are located in the Giralda Farms Corporate Campus, a 310-acre property located near Madison’s western edge. Giralda Farms, part of the estate of the late Geraldine Rockefeller Dodge, offers its corporate residents a serene, picturesque

landscape with easy access to local amenities and international travel.

Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, one of the country’s leading real estate investment trusts, purchased three of the existing buildings (Giralda, 1, 3 and 7) in 2017. The Giralda Farms corporate campus is located within the larger Route 24-Corridorsub-market, which extends from Short Hills to Madison and included Chatham and Florham Park. This market, is widely considered one of the most desirable in New Jersey, known for the highest quality real estate. In May 2018, Atlantic Health System and Kindred Healthcare broke ground on a new Atlantic Rehabilitation Institute at the Giralda Farms corporate park on Madison Avenue. The new facility will offer New Jersey best-in-class inpatient rehabilitation in a modern, state-of-the-art setting in Madison. In addition to Mack-Cali, Lincoln Equities, PGIM Real Estate and Realogy all either own property and/or have corporate offices in Madison.

PROBLEMS

Madison is also a large banking center, with branches of Chase, Investors, Provident, Lakeland, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Fulton, ConnectOne, PNC and Haven Savings lining Main Street and surrounding locations. In addition, BNY Mellon Wealth Management and FDU Credit Union have offices in town.

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The Chief Executive Council for Madison was created in 2012 as an association of Madison’s local business, government and education

We’re the “actually-in-your-neighborhood” neighborhood bank. That means your community is ours, too. And when we get a chance to help make our community stronger, we don’t think twice. It’s just one more way you know we’re committed to you. w w w. P r o v i d e n t . B a n k

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leaders. Created to promote collaboration, corporate assistance and educational leadership, the Council is a program unique to Madison. The mission is to connect local corporate chief executives living in or leading businesses in Madison for:

� Civic engagement: Networking and exploring ways to help each other and our community. � Corporate impact: Collaborating to achieve collective community impact. � Education leadership: Fostering the next generation of Madison leaders.

Throughout the year, the Council hosts a variety of programs aimed at fulfilling its mission. In the first semester, a Speed Networking event is held on the Drew Campus. This concept created by Professor Jennifer Kohn, director of Drew University’s Business Program, introduces executives to students in a fast-paced environment. Students are given eight to 10 minutes with each executive to give their “elevator pitch” and ask about the interview process or other career advice. After their time is up, a bell rings and the students move on to the next executive.

In the second semester, a networking event called “Skills and Success: An Evening Conversation” is held annually on the Drew University Campus. Students meet with multiple panels of executives as they rotate from

classroom to classroom. Executives speak with a classroom full of students for 30 minutes at a time.

Every year, Council executives visit Madison High School to talk with 35-50 students in an event called the “Emerging Leaders Lunch Series”. It is a great opportunity for students to hear stories from successful CEOs and get advice as they head off to take their next steps after high school. The event typically has two Council executives with a representative from Junior Achievement as moderator. The Annual Chief Executive Council for Madison Cocktail and Networking Event, held annually in the spring, provides a great opportunity for Council members to come together for informal networking and to reflect on the year’s accomplishments and plans for the future. For more information, contact the Borough’s Director of Business Development, (973) 245-3493 or email: business@rosenet.org.

WORSHIP

M

Keepi ng t h e Fai t h

adison and the immediate area offer many places of worship that also offer community-based youth and outreach programs. Several of the oldest churches are an easy walk from downtown and include St. Vincent Martyr Church, The Presbyterian Church of Madison, First Baptist Church of Madison, Grace Episcopal Church, Bethel AME Church, Chabad of SE Morris County and United Methodist Church. An equal number are located in residential areas or near the Borough boundaries including New Life Fellowship Church, Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Morristown Unitarian Fellowship, and Congregation Beth Torah in Florham Park. Many of the community’s local religious organizations participate in The Interfaith Council of Madison–Florham Park, a cooperative organization that brings together leaders and lay representatives from the area’s religious organizations and affiliated service organizations. The churches and synagogues in Madison and Florham Park, along with Grace Counseling Center, Drew University and the Madison Area YMCA, represent the Interfaith Council.

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RESIDENTIAL LIVING Home Sw ee t H om e

DO NOT THROW YOUR SOFA OR CHAIR OUT!!! Call us for All Reupholstery & Restorations

973-822-0190 • info@reuph.com Madison’s nickname, “The Rose City,” remains today as it celebrates the cultural roots and ethnic diversity that still define many of the Madison neighborhoods.

Older neighborhoods, rich in texture and character, boast an eclectic architectural collection of homes. A wide variety in housing sizes and styles are available, including picturesque pre-Revolutionary War cottages, Industrial period homes, Gilded Age mansions, turn-of-the-century Arts & Crafts bungalows, post-World War II garden apartments and neo-Colonial construction. There is a tree-lined, well-manicured Madison neighborhood to suit any taste.

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Expert Craftsmanship • Re-Upholstery • Restoration & Repairs • Furniture Refinishing • Custom Made Headboards & Benches • Slip Covers & Bedspreads • Custom Made Draperies

Madison’s centrally situated historic downtown business district and train station emphasize an ambiance that tells the first-time visitor that this is a livable, friendly and walkable community. Most downtown structures support ground-floor retail space with residential living and office space above. Residents find they can walk to their neighbors, stores, church, school, cultural venues, parks and public transportation. In recent years, there has been an increased focus on transit-oriented design and thus an increase in development of residential units downtown. The recently completed development on the former Green Village Road School property is a prime example. The KRE Group built 100 luxury rental apartments (Rose Hall) and Mark Built Homes built 35 luxury for-sale condominiums (Madison Place).

Regardless of your current lifestyle, there is a tree-lined, well-manicured Madison neighborhood to suit any taste.

Conveniently Located at: The corner of Main St. & Central Ave. in the Historic Freight Station Building #2 Central Ave. Madison, NJ 07940 Visit Our Website:

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

T

Car i ng C ommuni t y

wo of the finest, and ever-expanding, medical facilities in New Jersey conveniently services Madison – Morristown Medical Center and Overlook Medical Center, part of Atlantic Health System.

Morristown Medical Center was named the top hospital in the state by U.S News & World Report, and one of America’s 50 best Hospitals by Healthgrades. Its cardiology & heart surgery program is ranked top in the state by U.S. News & World Report. The Carol G. Simon Cancer Center offers a team of nationally recognized, tumor-specific oncologists, and has received the American College of Surgeons Outstanding Achievement Award for cancer care, which is awarded to fewer than 15 percent of hospitals in the country and the Goryeb Children’s Hospital provides unparalleled pediatric care and access to over 100 pediatric subspecialistists. Atlantic Health System’s Overlook Medical Center is home to the Atlantic Neuroscience Institute, a recognized leader in neuroscience care, offering a broad range of advanced neurological, neurosurgical and neurodiagnostic services. This includes NJ’s first statedesignated Comprehensive Stroke Center – the first in the country to initiate In-Transit TeleStroke technology, the Gerald J. Glasser Brain Tumor Center and the largest and most experienced CyberKnife program in New Jersey. Overlook performs more brain tumor surgeries than any other hospital in the state, and attracts nationally-recognized physicians who perform groundbreaking research, medical trials and treatments. Overlook is also certified as a Level IV Epilepsy Center. In May 2018, Atlantic Health System and Kindred Healthcare broke ground on a new Atlantic Rehabilitation Institute at the Giralda Farms corporate park on Madison Avenue. The new facility will offer New Jersey best-in-class inpatient rehabilitation in a modern, state-ofthe-art setting in Madison. When completed, the two-story, 38-bed rehabilitation facility will provide patientfocused rehabilitation dedicated to the treatment and recovery of individuals through intensive specialized rehabilitation services

for patients who have experienced a loss of function from an injury or illness.

Madison also has a number of established professional medical, mental health, dental and physical therapy providers located within its borders. Project Community Pride and the Project Community Pride of the Madison Area YMCA is an important extension of youth development services for children, teens and their families throughout the Madison Area YMCA’s service area. This program was made possible through the collaboration of community leaders and a partnership with the municipalities and school districts of the Chatham’s, Florham Park and Madison.

The Madison Alliance Addressing Substance Abuse is a community-based coalition dedicated to preventing and reducing the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Focusing on children and adolescents, their goal to promote a drug and alcoholfree environment for them and to encourage responsible use by adults. In addition, the Madison Chatham Coalition created in 2015, is now under the umbrella of the Madison Area YMCA. The mission of this organization is to prevent and reduce youth substance use and abuse in the communities of Madison, Chatham Borough and Chatham Township through collaboration, education and community-wide change. Varied, accessible and innovative fitness programs provided by the Madison Area

YMCA and numerous private studios serve children and adults alike. In addition, the strong, volunteer-based Mayor’s Wellness Committee serves Madison in its quest for optimal health and wellness. The mission of the Mayors Wellness Campaign is to equip mayors and other key leaders with the tools to develop and implement active-living initiatives in their communities with the ultimate goal of improving health and reducing the skyrocketing health care costs that come with the obesity problem in New Jersey.

Madison Senior Services offers a wide variety of programs and activities the benefit Madison’s senior population. In addition, the Tri-Town 55+ Coalition (www.tritown55plus. org), created in 2016, is a nonprofit 501c3 community organization that collaborates with representatives of business, civic and public agencies to address the quality of life and diverse needs and interests of older adults and their families in the communities of Chatham Borough, Chatham Township and Madison. The Madison Health Department services the needs of town residents through educational offerings, health screenings and immunization programs.

Alternative medicine well represented as chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage therapy businesses flourish in town. Madison also has a wide variety of assisted-living centers and nursing homes that service the needs of residents.

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ADVERTISER INDEX Adams Dental. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Carter Smile, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Central Avenue Laundromat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Donna Mattina, ABR, SRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Drew University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Gary’s Wine & Marketplace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Hickory Tree Landscaping LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

K9 Resorts Daycare & Luxury Hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Madison Area YMCA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Madison Television. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Museum of Early Trades & Crafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 PC Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Provident Bank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Re-Upholstery Restoration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Rocco’s Tuscany Bar & Grill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Rod’s Steak & Seafood Grille/GK’s Red Dog Tavern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Sam Romano, DMD, FAGD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 24

Stacy Russo – Certified Public Accountant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Madison Hotel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

The Madison Pharmacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY & ORTHODONTICS

Snoring can be a sign of a more serious underlying condition called Sleep Apnea. CPAP therapy is often the recommended treatment, but many find it intolerable. To learn more about FDA approved oral appliances, or if you are interested in an at home sleep study, please call (973) 377-7088.

Sam Romano, dmd

Sedation • Family Dentistry •Implants

120 Park Ave. • Madison, NJ 07940 973-377-7088 • Fax 973-377-4722 www.DrSamRomano.com

Welcome to Carter Smile, where helping children achieve optimal oral health is our passion. Located in Morristown, NJ, we are committed to providing comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents and strive to create a fun-filled environment where children feel at home!

(973)540-1666 www.cartersmilellc.com 290 Madison Ave. Building 5, Morristown, NJ 07960 Between Rod's and Friendly's

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XXXXX XXXX

Throughout his 35 years of devotion to dentistry, Dr. Romano has built a lifetime of relationships with his patients. These connections are fostered through his compassionate approach and demonstrated care for each and every one of his patients. Dr. Romano’s office is a state of the art facility where his mission of providing exceptional dental care is shared by his staff through clear communication and clinical excellence.

Sam Romano, dmd, fagd FELLOW 24 www.rosenet.org

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Sedation • Family Dentistry •Implants www.drsamromano.com 973-377-7088 • Madison NJ

11/29/2018 12:00:00 PM

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