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Tryon Daily Bulletin

The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Vol. 86 / No. 70

Tryon, N.C. 28782

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Only 50 cents

TES courtyard pavers for sale

The rain just won’t leave Red Fox Country Club and the Thermal Belt Tennis Association alone. The groups had to reschedule an open house and tennis clinic, originally scheduled for this past weekend, until this coming Saturday, May 11. For more information, contact Jim Greene at 864-9058224 or Darlene McFarland at 828-817-2737. Here’s a list of upcoming meetings and events for area nonprofit community and governmental organizations:

Today

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit Wednesdays, Fire Department in Green Creek, 7 a.m. - noon. Saluda Planning Board meets the second Wednesday of each month at the Saluda Library. The Meeting Place Senior Center, Wednesday activities include Tai Chi, 9 a.m.; ceramics, 9:30 a.m.; Wacky Wednes(Continued on page 2)

Tryon Elementary School plans to remodel its courtyard this summer to alleviate drainage issues and beautify the school. Construction is scheduled to begin June 10 and is estimated to take four-six weeks. To help with project costs, the school is selling personalized brick pavers. Once completed, the courtyard will be used as a reading garden, tutoring alcove, science center and more. (photo submitted by Sue Heston)

Commissioners commit to replace county’s agricultural economic development director Over 100 attend joint workshop by Leah Justice

Polk County Commissioners said Monday, May 6 that they are committed to replacing the

agriculture economic development director following his resignation and that’s exactly what the crowd of more than 100 came to hear. Commissioners made the declaration during a joint workshop held with the soil and water district and farmland preservation boards at the

Mill Spring Agricultural Center. Thirteen residents who spoke during citizen comments all endorsed the county continuing to have an agriculture economic development director following (Continued on page 3)

Serving Polk County and Upper Spartanburg and Greenville Counties

For treatment of chronic, non-healing wounds Rutherford Wound Care & Hyperbarics

located at 112 Sparks Drive in Forest City * 828-351-6000 MyRutherfordRegional.com/WoundCare


2 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Calendar (continued from page 1)

day and senior fitness, 10 a.m.; bingo and bridge, 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Free confidential dementia assessment St. Luke’s Hospital’s Center of Behavioral Medicine will provide free, confidential screenings to detect dementia on Wednesday, May 8, from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., at 56 Hospital Drive, Suite 4A, Columbus, located in the St. Luke’s Hospital Medical Park. An appointment is necessary, please call 894-2408. Green Creek Community Center quilters’ group, Wednesdays, 10 - 11:30 a.m. Saluda Center, Wednesday activities, Trash Train, 10 a.m.; gentle Yin Yoga 12:30 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www. saluda.com. Changing Lives MOMS Group Program, Wednesdays, April 24 - May 22 from 10:30 a.m. to noon. at Harmon Field cabin in Tryon. Tryon Seventh-day Adventist Church has developed a new concept for local moms to improve their overall health and well-being. To learn more or to register for the Changing Lives MOMS Group, find the group on Facebook at Changing Lives MOMS Group, contact them via email at ChangingLivesMomsGroup@hotmail.com or call 386481-8215.

How To Reach Us

Main number, classifieds and subscriptions: 828-859-9151 FAX: 828-859-5575 e-mail: news@tryondailybulletin.com Founded Jan. 31, 1928 by Seth M. Vining. (Consolidated with the Polk County News 1955) Betty Ramsey, Publisher

THE TRYON DAILY BULLETIN (USPS 643-360) is published daily except Saturdays and Sundays for $60 per year by Tryon Newsmedia LLC, 16 N. Trade St., Tryon, NC 287826656. Periodicals postage paid at Tryon, North Carolina 28782. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tryon Newsmedia LLC., 16 N Trade St., Tryon, NC 28782-6656. www.tryondailybulletin.com

Tryon Kiwanis Club, meets Wednesdays, noon, Congregational Church, 210 Melrose Ave., Tryon. Female Domestic Abuse Intervention Program Wednesdays 6-7:30 p.m., Steps to HOPE. 894-2340. Alcoholics Anonymous Tryon 12 and 12 Wednesdays, 6:30 - 7:30 p.m., Tryon Coffeehouse, 90 Trade Street.

Thursday

Polk County Mobile Recycling Unit, Thursdays, 7 a.m. - noon, corner of Hampton Court and Hwy 108. “Strut Your Style,” The Friendship Circle, a women’s committee benefitting Hospice House of the Carolina Foothills, is preparing for their spring luncheon/fashion show on May 9. It will again be held at the Piedmont Club in Spartanburg. Saluda Center, Thursday activities: knitting group, 9:30 a.m.; gentle Yin Yoga, 5:30 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www. saluda.com. The Meeting Place Senior Center Thursday activities include medication assistance, 9 a.m.-noon; ceramics, 9:30 a.m.; devotions, 10 a.m.; bingo or movie, 12:30 p.m.; grocery shopping, 1 p.m.; yoga, 6 p.m. 828894-0001. House of Flags Museum, open Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Landrum Library, Lap Babies, 10 a.m., 20- 25 minute session for young children and care givers includes music, nursery rhymes, action poems and short books. Storytime at 10:30 a.m. for preschoolers includes books, music and fingerplays. Call 828457-2218. Polk County Historical Association Museum open Thursdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. AA open discussion meeting, Happy, Joyous and Free, noon on Thursdays, Columbus United Methodist Church, 76 N. Peak Street, across from Stearns gym. Rotary Club of Tryon, meets every Thursday at noon at Tryon

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

LOCAL WEATHER Forecast:

Today

Tomorrow

Moon Phase

To d a y : S c a t t e r e d t storms, with 30 percent chance of rain. High 75, low 54.

T-storms Partly cloudy Thursday: Par tly cloudy, with a 20 percent chance of rain. High 79, low 58. Monday’s weather was: High 65, low 46, no rain.

Presbyterian Church on Harmon Field Rd. Tryon Tailgate Market, every Thursday, 4-6:30 p.m., until November. All items are grown or made in Polk County. Al-Anon: Foothills Come to Believe Thursdays, 7 p.m., Polk Wellness Center, 155 W. Mills St., Suite 202, Columbus. Green Creek Community Center Zumba exercise class, Thursdays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m., in gym. Mill Spring VFW Post 10349 bingo, Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. (year round). 828-894-5098. NAMI support group, Thursdays, 7 - 8 p.m. in the blue room of Tryon Presbyterian Church, located on Harmon Field Road in Tryon. The group, sponsored by the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI), is for anyone feeling anxious or depressed and those with a diagnosis of a mental illness. All conversations are confidential. No charge. 828817-0382. Republican General Member Meeting Republican headquarters, 33 Peak S., Columbus. 7 p.m. 828-894-2520. Alcoholics Anonymous Thursdays, 8 p.m., CooperRiis, Mill Spring. 828-859-7099.

Friday

Saluda Center, Friday events: chair exercise, 9:30 a.m.; Trash Train, 10 a.m.; NA Meeting, 8 p.m. For more activities, email saludacenter@hotmail.com or visit www.saluda.com. Sculpture 2013, Tryon Fine Arts Center (TFAC) announces Sculpture 2013, a juried regional sculpture exhibition and sale,

open from May 3 - 30. The Meeting Place Senior Center Friday activities include movie matinee or drumming at 10 a.m. (every third Friday) and bingo or movie at 12:30 p.m. 828-894-0001. Saluda Tailgate Market, every Friday, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., until November. All items are grown or made in Polk County. Tryon Presbyterian’s annual Strawberry Social The Presbyterian Women of Tryon Presbyterian Church will hold the church’s annual Strawberry Social on Friday, May 10 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. American Legion Post 250 weekly bingo games, Fridays, 7 p.m., 43 Depot St., Tryon. Doors open 5:30 p.m. Smoke-free. Narcotics Anon., Saluda Senior Center, Friday, 8 p.m.

Saturday

Landrum Farmers’ Market meets on North Trade St. from 7-11 a.m. near the depot. For information, contact Joe Cunningham at 864-457-6585. Columbus Tailgate Market, every Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon, until November. All items are grown or made in Polk County. Western Regional Track Meet Qualifying Polk Wolverines will compete Saturday, May 11 at the Western Regional Meet in Bunker Hill, N.C. Green Creek Community Center, Zumba class, Saturdays, 9 a.m. Grassroots Art Project, holds art classes to benefit Lennie’s Fund and the Humane Society, Saturdays from 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. (Continued on page xx)


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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• Ag director (continued from page 1)

current director Lynn Sprague’s resignation. Perhaps the most personal endorsement of hiring a director came from Paige Paris, who was the last speaker and said she thought commissioners should hear from a “young Polk County farmer.” Paris said that Sprague came to her and her husband Christopher a week after they moved here and put the couple in touch with people he knew needed the skills they had. “Christopher and I pruned an entire muscadine vineyard by ourselves because Lynn put us in touch with someone who needed that done,” Paris said. “I don’t know how to make it more clear how badly we young farmers need someone in this county to put us in touch with the elders … so we can grow into the community we all came here to support.” Paris said there are many people in Polk County that hold land and would love to see it produced.

Audience members applaud and stand after commissioners say they do plan to maintain the agricultural economic development director position after Lynn Sprague’s departure. (photo by Leah Justice)

“There are young people out there begging for your help to help our entire community, so please make sure this is on top of your list,” Paris said, “ because without Lynn, Chris and I could not have

made it until May.” Polk County Board of Commissioner Chair Michael Gage opened the meeting, held at the Mill Spring Agricultural Center, by saying it’s not his board’s intention to recreate

the wheel. “On behalf of the board of commissioners it is our intent to gain a better understanding of where (Continued on page 4)


4 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Ag director (continued from page 3)

Lance Smith tells commissioners the county is getting agricultural economic development at a bargain for the $144,258 spent last year. (photo by Leah Justice)

agriculture in Polk County is now and where your boards see it going in the future,” said Gage. “We greatly seek and appreciate your wisdom and experience, as we work toward a partnership of trust and understanding of each other. It is not this board’s intention to recreate the wheel, but instead we wish to take that wheel and build upon it - creating a stronger agriculture industry in Polk County.” The meeting included presentations from the Polk Soil and Water Conservation District and the Polk Farmland Preservation Board, including discussions on where those boards see agriculture in Polk County’s future. Current agricultural economic development director Sprague resigned recently after serving as the department’s first director for the past five years. Sprague has been credited with creating an agriculture momentum in Polk County that has become a model throughout the state. Farmland preservation board chair Doug Harmon said from the start, the whole program in Polk County was like plowing new ground. “Lynn Sprague hit on all different avenues and got people involved,” Harmon said. “I think we’ve got a momentum going and we need to keep that going in some shape or form. People feel like they have an input in where their food is coming from.” Commissioner Keith Holbert asked Harmon what direction the farmland preservation board is going to give the new agriculture economic development director. Commissioner Ray Gasperson said he liked the way Holbert phrased the question. He said it implies that the county needs to move forward with advertising. Commissioners agreed to put advertising for a new director on its next meeting agenda, scheduled for May 20, after determining that they wouldn’t make any decisions during a work session. Commissioner Ted Owens said the position is still in the budget and has never been taken out, so

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

there’s no question the county is going to have the position. “That’s a simple fact,” Owens said. “We may want to advertise at the next meeting or we may want to wait until the first of June.” JoAnn Miksa-Blackwell said she couldn’t tell the board how happy she was to hear they want to move forward with a new director. Blackwell is the rural director for Mountain BizWorks, which serves 40 counties. She said years ago she would go to the state and Polk County was not even represented. Now, she said, not only is Polk represented, but Polk is a state model. “We need money but in addition to that we need leadership and that’s what Lynn Sprague brought,” said Blackwell. “And he helped us see our collective vision and that’s what we want to make sure continues.” Lance Smith said when he first came to the county he taught school and knew well the fractures the county had. He said there was the Tryon folk, the Columbus folk, the Green Creek folk and the Sunny View folk. He said agriculture and the farmers markets have changed that mentality and increased opportunities for people who are not farmers. “It’s a resource that if we don’t take care of, just like our people, we’re not going to have, it’s gone,” Smith said. He said the $144,258 annual budget for the agricultural economic development department “is a bargain.” “Agriculture is where we’re unified,” Smith said. “That’s what’s held the people here.” Mary Hardvall said the ag center and Lynn Sprague brought awareness to her. She said she used to by what she needed at the grocery store and never thought about where it came from. Once the farmers markets came, she said she started talking to the farmers. “The bottom line is it brings us together,” Hardvall said. “Somebody said this is by the community for the community and I think that’s what we need to continue to nurture.”


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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6 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Ellen Hanckels and Scott Derks admire irises being sold by Luann Rossow of Flatlanders Peak Flower Farm at Friday’s Saluda Tailgate Market. (photos by Mark Schmerling)

Saluda tailgate market open weekly through October by Mark Schmerling

“Nothing builds a local economy like food,” is what farmer Lee Mink tells students and agriculture officials. Mink, who owns and operates Leap Farm in Mill Spring, was one of the many local growers displaying and selling produce, plants and other products raised or created locally at Friday, May 3’s opener of the Saluda Tailgate Market. The market is held Fridays from 4:30-6:30 p.m. near the Route 176 bridge toward the west end of town, from May through October. It is one of three such markets held in Polk County with the purpose of connecting residents with local farmers and their products. The others are in Columbus and Tryon. This year’s opener boasted 24 vendors, nine more than last year’s, said Shelley DeKay, Saluda Business Association’s tailgate market coordinator. The Saluda Business Association sponsors and manages the enterprise for the City of

Want to go? What: Saluda Farmers Market When: Fridays, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Where: Parking lot near bridge on Route 176 Saluda and Polk County Agricultural Development. “I think it was a great market for a cold, cloudy Friday,” said DeKay. “The reason we can keep the caliber of vendors we have is the community support.” She noted that the market’s ongoing success involves “finding the right balance in the number of vendors. I think they all had a good market.” On Friday, growers and producers set up rapidly, anticipating the eventual rush of enthusiastic customers. Would you like pastured chickens that eat a natural diet, (Continued on page 7)


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Federal funds to support early intervention Each year District One Schools receives federal money that supports training, staff development, class size reduction and instructional programs. These include Title I, Title II, Title III, IDEA and Pre-School Disabled Funds. Next year,

Greg Carter, owner of Deep Woods Mushrooms, Mills River, displays a prized shiitake mushroom, part of the selection of cultivated and local wild mushrooms he offers at the Saluda Tailgate Market.

• Market

(continued from page 6)

(Chickens are not vegetarian)? Maybe you’d care to plant organically raised heirloom tomato plants, and treat yourself and friends to the luscious fruit. How about naturallyderived soaps and remedies? Don’t forget kale, chard, and other organically grown greens, as well as shiitake mushrooms. Those, and more, are offered by local growers and producers from Polk and Henderson counties. You can also find irises and value-added products. In all, Saluda’s Tailgate Market is about a special aspect of western North Carolina — fresh and naturally-raised food that benefits both consumers and the local economy. “I hope we continue to get support from the county,” said DeKay. “I think sustainable economy involves agriculture.” As Mink says, “You build a local economy by building local food.” It’s about “neighbors putting money into your neighbor’s pocket.”

Title I funds will be used to support early intervention programs in the six elementary schools. Title II funds will be used to supplement other funds that are used to reduce class size in first grade. Title III funds will be used to support instruction for English

Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). IDEA and Pre-School Disability funds are spent on special education students in the district to cover teacher salaries and instructional materials. – article submitted by Paula Brooks


8 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Opinion

8

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Ours

Polk County leaders heralded a victory for the area’s heritage Monday night when commissioners, during a meeting at the Mill Spring Agricultural Center, committed their support he economic development director to maintaining an agricultural position. olunTeers Rumor mills in the community just months ago had residents shuddering with concern that commissioners might eliminate made the barbecue. the position during the Blue budget Ridge process. According to commissioners theSo speculation was just that, and the budget many, in so many ways. always included room for someone to step into the vital role Lynn The gathering stories of Sprague heldBulletin for almostisfive years. Monday night commissioners acknowledged the important volunteers and their contributions. steps the county has taken in the promotion of farming since your stories ofdevelopment outstanding creatingSend the agricultural economic position. In just a few short years, Polk County has gained a statebarbecue volunteers to: wide reputation for its efforts to revive farming as a viable way of life. Favorite Volunteers, Small family were once the county’s primary industry; Thefarms Tryon Daily Bulletin, the backbone of Polk County. In the 1940s and 50s those farms 16 N.forTrade St., Tryon, NC land. 28782. accounted up to 80 percent of the county’s While the area likely will never return to quite that heyday of agribusiness, agriculture’s value to area residents only intensifies as community2x3 awareness spreads forth from the presence of farmers markets, workshops and mentoring of burgeoning farmers. 6/27;7/1,3,7,9,11 What is the promotion of farmers worth? Lance Smith spoke at the meeting Monday night to say that $144, 258 was a bargain for the benefit this area receives from the department of agricultural economic development. He’s right. This total yearly budget amounts to an investment of $7.12 for each person living in Polk County. You can’t really buy a gallon of milk, a loaf of bread and a dozen eggs for that amount. We thank the commissioners for vocally stating a commitment to a movement many Polk County residents obviously feel very passionate about supporting. We may not know what came first – the chicken or the egg – but at least in Polk County we know where they both were raised.

T

– Editorial staff, Tryon Daily Bulletin 2x2

The Tryon Daily Bulletin The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper Betty Ramsey, Publisher Editor Designer Reporter

Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Yours

Victory for agriculture, county’s rural heritage

V

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Samantha Hurst Gwen Ring Leah Justice

To the editor: I have really been enjoying your monthly “Life in our Foothills” magazine! The full color photographs of so many of my friends coupled with those of places in Our Area just make for delight after delight. I was tempted to frame that cover photo of Eleanor and Carroll Rog- Letter ers . . . she laughs at to the my jokes, and while Editor he has retired his motorcycle, we can still talk of flying airplanes in our day. If you enjoyed reading about those carrying on the century-old businesses in the current issue, perhaps you would also enjoy reading first-hand stories about the founders featured in the first book of my “Remember When” columns. “A Boy in the Amen Corner” is available in local book stores and libraries or from me, and tells of my associations with Seth Vining Sr, John Cowan (whose weekly double-page ads in the Bulletin went a long way

to sustain two generations of Vinings!), Elbert Arledge, and all three generations of Bradys, including Holland Jr. I went to school with friend Cindy Walker’s mom and her siblings, and wrote about her uncle Ben Cromer, who danced with all the girls and who would play Chopin’s “Minute Waltz” for us if begged. The others were ahead of me in Tryon School, but I knew them all. I have not eaten at Wards many times because the place is always full, with people waiting outside at lunch time! It is still like an old country store inside, but without the fly-paper strips that used to hang all around . . . They leave stacks of the magazine lying around everywhere, so go ahead and pick one up. You will be glad you did. And you can subscribe if you want to be sure of getting every issue. –Garland Goodwin, Columbus

We Get Letters… TDB Communications Policy • The Tryon Daily Bulletin welcomes your letters of 600 words or less. Please include your name, address and daytime phone number for verification. Unsigned letters will not be printed. • All letters are subject to editing. We edit letters for length, grammar and clarity and will reject letters that contain personal attacks or material we deem unsuitable for publication. • We reserve the right to limit each letter writer to two letters per month. • "Thank you" letters are considered paid advertisements. • Typewritten letters are preferred, but neatly handwritten letters are acceptable. Letters may be emailed to news@tryondailybulletin.com or brought in digitally in .doc or .txt format are best. Printed copy must accompany digital submissions. • Letters will appear when space is available, based on the size of the letter, not strictly in the order they are received.


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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Pacolet Area Conservancy preps for native plant rescue The Pacolet Area Conservancy (PAC) and the Tryon Garden Club are teaming up to rescue native plants again. On Friday, May 10, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., volunteers are asked to come out to Pearson’s Falls and help rescue native plants and reestablish them in another location at Pearson’s Falls. Those interested can volunteer for as long as they would like during the four hour work day. Plant rescuers are asked to wear appropriate clothing and footwear, bring your own tools (shovels, work gloves, etc.), and bring a bag lunch and/ or snack and plenty of water. Volunteers can park in the parking lot at Pearson’s Falls. Just tell the gate keeper that you are there with the plant rescue group. For the past 24 years, PAC has served as the local land trust for Polk County and surrounding areas in North Carolina and upstate South Carolina. The 501(c)(3) non-profit, grass roots organization is dedicated to protecting and conserving the area’s precious natural resources (PAC’s mission). PAC’s vision is a community living and growing in harmony with our natural resources and the goal is to provide a legacy that will endure and be valued by generations to come. PAC works with area landowners to ensure the long-term protection of their property through voluntary con-

Mary Savard, Carole Bartol, and Gretchen Morris are shown working hard to rescue native plants. (photo submitted by Donna Southworth)

servation easements. To date the organization has helped to protect over 8,400 acres of land in the area, and it has the support of over 1,500 community members. PAC works diligently to provide leadership to encourage conservation and provide education programs emphasizing responsible land use practices to help – save the places you love. To find out more about PAC, please visit www. pacolet.org.

The Tryon Garden Club is the fourth oldest garden club in North Carolina, celebrating its 85th anniversary this year. A 501(c) (3) organization, members are active in preserving, protecting, and treasuring Pearson’s Falls, contributing to the beautification of Tryon, educating members and the community, and collaborating with others, fulfilling the organization’s mission to foster awareness and appreciation of the

natural world. For more information about the Tryon Garden Club and Pearson’s Falls, visit www. pearsonsfalls.org. If you are interested in helping with the native plant rescue at Pearson’s Falls, please contact the PAC office by phone at 828-859-5060 or email Pam Torlina at landprotection@ pacolet.org. - article submitted by Pam Torlina


10 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work … With Your Neighbors!

ANNOUNCEMENTS Natures Storehouse Blood Screening 10-12 on 5-9-13. Call for appointment. 828-859-6356

Need to find the right employee?

WE CAN HELP. Reach the county market for less using the classifieds. Need a quick quote? Call 828.859.9151.

PHOTOGRAPHY PhotoBlankets andMore.com Turn favorite photos into a woven collage blanket. Great gift! (828) 817-4790

GARAGE SALES (5) Family Yard Sale May 10 & 11th 8AM-2PM Antiques, Furniture, Professional Toolbox , plus lots more. 711 Thermal View Drive, Tryon

EDUCATION Lake Lure Classical Busing from Columbus Green Creek, Mill Spring Free public school option Now enrolling K-10 Info at 828.625.9292

ARTS & CRAFTS Bead Knitting Class Tues 5/21, Kniticality in Saluda. Seating is limited. Reserve yours now! Call 828-749-3640

SITTING SERVICE Want to go on vacation & not worry about your furry friends? I will farm sit while you are away. 864-266-8964 or www.not myfarm. weebly.com “It’s not my farm, but I will treat it like it is."

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

DRIVERS/ DELIVERY/OTR

Office Space Available Join a growing team A-CDL Drivers in Historic Building offering stability and OTR & Regional 250 to 600 sq ft spaces - positions available. Due to growth opportunity! $325 to $375 per month expanded business we Mill Spring Agricultural are seeking Professional Center & Farm Store Drivers to join our team. Open Mon - Sat 1 yr. recent verifiable LEANING featuring Local Food experience needed. ERVICES Call 828-894-2281 or Our Drivers Enjoy: www.polkcountyfarms.org * Excellent Home Time Deserie's Cleaning, 3 hr Now Seeking exceptional * No Touch Freight min. You DESERVE A talent in the Rutherfordton * Repetitive delivery Tile Specialties BREAK 1 million bonded and Tryon Areas routes & insured. www.deseries Large selection come see Part Time & Substitute * Drop & Hook Freight our new showroom at cleaning.com 888 - 846 Developmental Specialists Family Atmosphere. 202 E Mills Street or call 4094, 828 229 3014, or To work with individuals Apply online at (828) 894-7058 828 - 429 - 1390 www.shiptruckservice.com with IDD, MH and SA. or call 800-968-8552 & MINIMUM REQUIRETommy's join our team of MENTS Home Improvement Professional Drivers. HS Diploma/GED and Roofs, renovations, siding, ERVICES Truck Service Inc. valid NC driver’s license carpentry, decks, winForest City, NC. required. dows, screening. All Home Pet boarding, grooming Experience is preferred, Repairs. FREE Est. and daycare. Large suites, Raise your but not required. Home: (828) 859 - 5608. playgrounds, vet on call, BENEFITS hand if you Cell: (828) 817 - 0436. friendly staff. Hideaway Competitive salary, Comwant your Hills 828-685-9500 Your flooring Specials! pany paid training, paid Mimosa Carpet, Inc business to holidays, major medical Saluda Construction: 1161 South Trade Street and life insurance coverGrading, driveways, land make LESS Tryon, NC 28782 age available for positions clearing, underbrushing, money next working 20 hours or more additions, new homes, Looking for year. 401(K) Retirement Plan metal roofs, licensed, for all employees. insured, bonded. We didn’t think you a home? APPLY G. Eargle 828- 243-4300 would. Do you need

C S

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We didn’t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DON’T WAIT! Call TODAY 828.859.9151

SERVICES/ REPAIRS Driveway Work. Call Robby 828-894-8705

TREE SERVICE TOTAL TREECARE, BOBCAT SERVICE, STUMP GRINDING

JB TREES LLC 864 497-8511

Look in our classifieds section and learn of great deals for you and your family.

to successfully market on a tight budget? Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

CABINETS

DON’T WAIT!

Custom Cabinets Countertops, Complete Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels. 28 yrs. exp. Free Est. Senior Discount.

JG’s: 864-316-3596, 578-4100, 292-0104

LAWN CARE FINE Cut Mulch Delivered for $14.00 per yard. Also have organic, clay, free top soil, aged cow manure, gravel & other items. Everything can be picked up in your own truck also. 828-863-4453

Call TODAY 828.859.9151

HELP WANTED FREELANCE WRITERS The Tryon Daily Bulletin currently has opportunities for freelance writers who love this community and have a desire to tell great stories. Contact Samantha Hurst, editor, at 859-9151 or by email at samantha.hurst@tryondailybulletin.com for more information.

INTERNS WANTED Discover if journalism, marketing or graphic design interests you. The Tryon Daily Bulletin seeks AINTING enthusiastic and hard working high school or colFor a Fine Paint Job lege students who want to Call Dan Steiner Painting get experience in the field High Quality - Low Prices of journalism. Contact Professional Pressure Samantha Hurst, editor, at Washing, Gutter Cleaning, 859-9151 or by email at Minor Repairs. samantha.hurst@tryon828-817-0539 / 894-6183 dailybulletin.com for more information. SENIOR DISCOUNT

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Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year.

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

online at www.MonarchNC.org Equal Opportunity Employer

James Tool Machine & Engineering, Inc. is seeking qualified employees for both our Columbus & Morganton, North Carolina Plants. James Tools offers competitive pay and benefits. We are looking for a min. 5+ years experience in the following positions.

* Toolmaker * CNC Machinist * Prototrack Mill/ Lathe Machinist To be considered for an interview you must submit your resume to pcook@jamestool.com or jobs@jamestool.com You can also fax your resume to 828-584-8779. Interviews will only be given to those who are qualified. EOE

HELP WANTED - MEDICAL / DENTAL

Autumn Care of Saluda Is looking for the following positions. available jobs? 7a.m to 3p.m RN Shift Call 828.859.9151 to let Supervisor and others know about job 3rd Shift LPN or RN. opportunities at your busiEOE ness. Please contact Tisha Davis @ 828-749-2261 Do you have

Bayada Home Health Care Join the Global Flooring Leader! Weaver Assistant Mohawk, the world’s largest manufacturer, is continuing to grow bigger and better and we are seeking a Weaver Assistant to join us for the night shift (12-hour rotational, 8pm - 8am) in our Landrum, SC location. 3-5 years weaving experience and/or 5+ years manufacturing experience preferred. Mohawk offers a competitive compensation & benefits package. For detailed information and to apply visit www.mohawk careers.com EOE•AA•M/F/D/V

Needs a skilled LPN to work with a total care patient. Full time position available. Please call 828-696-1900. Hospice of the Carolina Foothills has the following openings: -FT Weekend Adm Nurse -PT Chaplain -PT Cashier (Thrift Barn) -PRN RN and PRN CNA (Home Care) To apply, please visit our website at: www.hocf.org EOE

ROOM TO RENT

REAL ESTATE Convenience with a view $ 185,000. 210 Forestwd Court, Nice end unit with wooded view, 2BR 2BA, w/sunroom. 828-693-7800

Multi-Use Rental Property Flexible Space, AC & Gas. 3 Phase Power avail., 3,600 sq. ft., 2 small offices, & storage space. Parking. Lease negotiable, will consider partial lease. 336.510.9858 or 828.894.2665 gvgaal@gmail.com

Polk County Land For Sale 7 Acres w/Creek. Borders Walnut Creek Preserve. 1 storage/carport building, electric, septic & well $78,000 Call 828-817-5845

Need to find the right employee?

WE CAN HELP. Reach the county market for less using the classifieds. Need a quick quote? Call 828.859.9151.

CABINS Owner Must Sell 2bd/2ba NC MTN cabin on 1.87acs $132,900. Stone fireplace, new well septic & appl, pvt wooded setting w/mtn view, paved drive 866-738-5522

HOUSES FOR SALE ONE TIME

Looking for a room mate. SPECIAL OFFER! Our best selling $350 per month. 3BR/2BA house. Extra storage, w/d. 3 bd / 2 ba singlewide with designer decor Lake Lanier area. Contact Please call 828-684-4874 828-817-9566.


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Buy, Sell, Trade, Work … With Your Neighbors! HOUSES FOR RENT

2 BDRM 2BA on 1/2 acre 1 mile from downtown Tryon quiet, roomy, no smoking, Lease Referances. Required 9AM to 9PM 828- 696-5175 550.00 per month utilities plus security deposit.

Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year. We didn’t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DON’T WAIT! Call TODAY 828.859.9151

VACATION RENTALS Myrtle Beach Spacious 3br/2bath condo in the heart of Myrtle Beach, 1 block off the ocean. Newly remodeled condo with 2 private balconies with Ocean, skywheel, and Boulevard Views- Still available 4th of July and Bike Week. Contact Misty @ Atlantis802@yahoo.com or 843-267-8085

LAND & ACREAGE

GOOD THINGS TO EAT “Let's Wine A Bit”

Parker-Binns Vineyard 7382 Highway 108 E Mill Spring, NC (828) 894-0154 Like Us On Facebook PAPA JOHN’S PIZZA Better Ingredients. Better Pizza. Order at papajohns.com or call 864-457-3005

Need to find the right employee?

WE CAN HELP. Reach the county market for less using the classifieds. Need a quick quote? Call 828.859.9151.

LAWN & GARDEN 42 local artists, teak furn, pottery, wtr features, bird houses, Pawleys Island Hammocks, Thompson Garden Gallery 828-859-3135

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Antique Parlor Grand Piano. Walnut. Excellent condition. Will sell for $1500 or best offer & you haul it. If interested please call 828-817-5934

BOATS & SUPPLIES

Horse Farm Potential 13.1 Rolling Acres, estab2001 Chaparral lished fescue, mountain 200 LE Ski boat, Merc view. Directions from Cruiser. 5.0 Liter End Stott’s Corner, Jackson Board motor. 20 ft long, Grove Rd, 5.5 miles into with all aluminum trailer. SC, property on right. $140,000 call 864-680- Tandum axle. Real nice. $15,000.00 Call 6309 or 864-590-1906 828-243-3967

OFFICE SPACE

Selling your home? Advertise here and sell it faster. Call Classifieds at 828.859.9151.

Offices and possible retail space available in downANTED O town Columbus. Ample parking and one of the UY EHICLES highest daily traffic counts WE BUY in Polk County. Particularly interested in com- Cheap running cars and puter related business and junk cars. Up to $1000.00. Come to your location. willing to trade portions of FAST SERVICE. rent in exchange for services. 828 817-1068 (828) 289 - 4938

B

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DB Let T d Ads sie ! Clas for you work

WANTED

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

I am looking PT or FT Caregiver work. I have great references. Call 864804-0413

payment of the indebtedness secured thereby and failure to carry out and perform the stipulations and agreements contained therein and, pursuant to demand of the holder of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will place for sale, at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash at the usual place of sale at Polk County Courthouse, Columbus, North Carolina on May 16, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. that parcel of land, including improvements thereon, situated, lying and being in the County of Polk, State of North Carolina, and being more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of Trust.

the sale confirmation to remit the balance of his/her bid to the Trustee. In the sole discretion of the Trustee, an extension may be granted, but in that instance, if required by the noteholder or loan servicer, the bidder shall be required to pay per diem interest at the current rate on the note secured by the deed of trust described herein until the day he/she remits the balance of his/her bid to the Trustee.

ditional rights pursuant to Title VII of 5.896 - Protecting Tenants as Foreclosure Act which became effective on May 20, 2009.

AUTOMOTIVE For Sale 1942 GMC Tuck All OEM . Serious inquiries only 1- 828 749-3721 Used SUV For Sale 06 Mercury Mountaineer, 4x4 AWD, luxury package, dual air controls, leather seats 3rd row seating, towing package, 91K miles, in mint condition, new tires, garaged. Asking $9350. Must see to appre ciate. 828-859-0314

Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year. We didn’t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DON’T WAIT! Call TODAY 828.859.9151

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE 13 SP 21 AMENDED NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power and authority contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Bright's Creek Holdings, LLC, dated July 27, 2006 and recorded on July 27, 2006, in Book No. 343, at Page 2176 in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Polk County, North Carolina; and because of default in the

Address of property: 3495 Summer Rd., Hendersonville, NC 28792 Tax Parcel ID: P27-2 Present Record Owners: Par Investments, LLC

If for any reason the Trustee is unable to convey title to this property or the sale is set aside, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Furthermore, if the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the Trustee, in its sole discretion, if it believes the challenge to have merit, may declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. In either event the purchase will have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, the Mortgagee's attorney or the Trustee.

The terms of the sale are that the real property hereinbefore described will be sold for cash to the highest bidder. A deposit of five percent (5%) Additional Notice Where of the amount of the bid the Real Property is Resior Seven Hundred Fifty dential With Less Than Dollars ($750.00), which- 15 Rental Units: ever is greater, is required and must be ten- An order for possession dered in the form of certi- of the property may be isfied funds at the time of sued pursuant to G. S. the sale. In the event 45-21.29 in favor of the that the Owner and purchaser and against Holder or its intended as- the party or parties in signee is exempt from possession by the clerk paying the same, the suc- of superior court of the cessful bidder shall be re- county in which the propquired to pay revenue erty is sold. Any person stamps on the Trustee's who occupies the propDeed, and any Land erty pursuant to a rental agreement entered into Transfer Tax. or renewed on or after The real property herein- October 1, 2007, may, afabove described is being ter receiving the notice of offered for sale “AS IS, sale, terminate the rental WHERE IS” and will be agreement upon 10 days' sold subject to all supe- written notice to the landrior liens, unpaid taxes, lord. Upon termination of and special assessments. a rental agreement, the Other conditions will be tenant is liable for rent announced at the sale. due under the rental The sale will be held agreement prorated to open for ten (10) days for the effective date of the upset bids as by law re- termination. quired. If a third party is the high bidder at the Any person who occutime of sale confirmation, pies the property pursuthe third party will have ant to a bona fide lease fifteen (15) days following or tenancy may have ad-

This, the 24th day of April, 2013. James W. Lee III, Substitute Trustee Hogan & Brewer, PLLC 229 N. Main St. Hendersonville, NC 28792 Telephone: (828) 697-2422 Facsimile: (828) 696-8320 Tryon Daily Bulletin May 8 and 15, 2013 FC/BRIGHT’S CREEK LEGAL NOTICE 13 SP 20 AMENDED NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power and authority contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Bright's Creek Holdings, LLC, dated October 23, 2007 and recorded on October 31, 2007, in Book No. 359, at Page 1626 in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Polk County, North Carolina; and because of default in the payment of the indebtedness secured thereby and failure to carry out and perform the stipulations and agreements contained therein and, pursuant to demand of the holder of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will place for sale, at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash at the usual place of sale at Polk County Courthouse, Columbus, North Carolina on May 16, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. that parcel of land, including improvements thereon, situated, lying and being in the County of Polk, State of North Carolina, and being more particularly described in the above referenced

11

LEGALS Deed of Trust. Address of property: No address assigned Tax Parcel ID: P27-4 Present Record Owners: Par Investments, LLC The terms of the sale are that the real property hereinbefore described will be sold for cash to the highest bidder. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the amount of the bid or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, is required and must be tendered in the form of certified funds at the time of the sale. In the event that the Owner and Holder or its intended assignee is exempt from paying the same, the successful bidder shall be required to pay revenue stamps on the Trustee's Deed, and any Land Transfer Tax. The real property hereinabove described is being offered for sale “AS IS, WHERE IS” and will be sold subject to all superior liens, unpaid taxes, and special assessments. Other conditions will be announced at the sale. The sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bids as by law required. If a third party is the high bidder at the time of sale confirmation, the third party will have fifteen (15) days following the sale confirmation to remit the balance of his/her bid to the Trustee. In the sole discretion of the Trustee, an extension may be granted, but in that instance, if required by the noteholder or loan servicer, the bidder shall be required to pay per diem interest at the current rate on the note secured by the deed of trust described herein until the day he/she remits the balance of his/her bid to the Trustee. If for any reason the Trustee is unable to convey title to this property or the sale is set aside, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Furthermore, if the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the Trustee, in its sole


12 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

DB Let T d Ads Buy, Sell, Trade, Work … Know what's going on in the community! Classifeor you! With Your Neighbors! ork Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin for up-to-date coverage on w LEGALS discretion, if it believes the challenge to have merit, may declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. In either event the purchase will have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, the Mortgagee's attorney or the Trustee.

news, events,LEGALS sports, and more! LEGALS LEGALS

LEGALS

purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of Additional Notice Where sale, terminate the rental the Real Property is Resi- agreement upon 10 days' dential With Less Than written notice to the land15 Rental Units: lord. Upon termination of a rental agreement, the An order for possession tenant is liable for rent of the property may be is- due under the rental sued pursuant to G. S. agreement prorated to 45-21.29 in favor of the the effective date of the

828-859-9151

termination. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a bona fide lease or tenancy may have additional rights pursuant to Title VII of 5.896 - Protecting Tenants as Foreclosure Act which became effective on May 20, 2009.

all persons, firms, and corporations having claims against said Es( 8 2 8 ) tate to present them, duly verified, to the undersigned at Hull & Chandler, P.A., c/o Nathan M. Tryon Daily Bulletin Hull, 521 E. Morehead May 8 and 15, 2013 Street, Suite 101, CharFC/BRIGHT’S CREEK 2 lotte, North Carolina, 28202, on or before the 8th day of August, 2013, or this notice will be NOTICE TO pleaded in bar of their reCREDITORS covery. All persons inHaving qualified as Ex- debted to said Estate will ecutor of the Estate of please make immediate Janet Marie Schultz settlement with the unBrothers Ivey, deceased, dersigned. late of Polk County, North This the 8th day of May, Carolina, this is to notify 2013.

28792 Telephone: 697-2422 Facsimile: 696-8320

(828)

LEGALS Nathan M. Hull, Executor of the Estate of Janet Marie Schultz Brothers Ivey

Know what's going on in the community!

Tryon Daily Bulletin May 8, 15, 22 and 25, 2013

Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin for up-to-date coverage on Looking for news, events, sports, and more! a home? 828-859-9151 This, the 24th day of April, 2013.

James W. Lee III, Substitute Trustee Hogan & Brewer, PLLC 229 N. Main St. Hendersonville, NC

EST/IVEY, J.

Look in our classifieds section and learn of great deals for you and your family.

Know what's going on in the community!

Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin for up-to-date coverage on news, events, sports, and more! 828-859-9151

Know what's going on in the community!

Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin for up-to-date coverage on news, events, sports, and more! 828-859-9151

Know what's going on in the community!

Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin for up-to-date coverage on news, events, sports, and more! 828-859-9151

TDBPROMO - page 72

LEGALS Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year. We didn’t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DON’T WAIT! Call TODAY 828.859.9151


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

13

“Stars of Tomorrow” perform for Foothills Music Club, Inc. Members and guests of Foothills Music Club (FMC) were entertained and impressed when five of their 2013 scholarship winners performed for them at their April meeting. Member Elaine Jenkins was the hostess. Stephen Stimac played “Concertino,” by Leroy Ostransky, on his trumpet. Katherine Riedy, soprano, sang “O mio babbino caro” by Puccini, and ”Vergebliches Ständchen,” Op. 84, no. 4 (The Vain Suit), by Johannes Brahms. She was accompanied on the piano by Pam McNeil. On her alto saxophone, Katherine Barker performed Gustavo Rossari’s “Etude 23.” Paulina Ray-Zorick played two preludes by Debussy: “La fille aux cheveux de lin,” and “La sérénade interrompue.”

Lastly, Rachel Richards performed on her cello J. S. Bach’s “Sarabande” and “Minuet” from Unaccompanied Suite, no. 1. FMC is proud of these students to whom it presented scholarships this year. They are among the many qualified students to whom, since 1994, the Foothills Music Club Inc. has awarded more than $38,000 in scholarships. FMC appreciates very much the support it receives from the surrounding community, enabling it to administer a strong scholarship program, which identifies students such as these featured in the “Stars of Tomorrow” performance. FMC is now a 501(c)3 designated organization, and all contributions are tax deductible. – article submitted by Ellen Harvey Zipf

Pictured clockwise from back row are Katherine Riedy, Paulina RayZorick, Stephen Stimac, Katherine Barker and Rachel Richards. (photo submitted)

Rosenberg Bone & Joint

will be open in a NEW location Monday, May 6. Find us at 89 W. Mills St., Columbus Call 894-3718 to make an appointment!

Exceptional Care, Close to Home www.SaintLukesHospital.com


14 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Exhibits & Events Ferullo Fine Art Studio, 140 Pacolet St., Tryon. 828-8593177. During Gallery Trot Saturday, May 11 from 5-8 p.m., a selection of older work will be offered at a reduced price to make room for new sculpture and paintings by Dom and new watercolors and acrylics by Pat. Now featuring selected paintings by members of the Thursday Expressive Watercolor class. Call 828-859-3177 or e-mail patdomferul@windstream. net for information on classes, workshops and gallery hours by appointment. Honking Tonkers Gallery, 78 East Main St., Saluda. 828-7491070. Offering mandala classes every Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. There is a small fee for the class. Kathleen’s Gallery, 66 E. Main St., Saluda. 828-749-2640. Gallery hours are Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. For more information, call 828-859-8316. New View Realty, 285 N. Trade St., Tryon. 866-498-0088. Showing works of Jim Shackelford and Linda Page Hudgins. Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Skyuka Fine Art, 133 N Trade St., Tryon. 828-817-3783. Painting From Afar show runs until May 11. For more information, email rich@richnelson.com or call 828-859-0318. Thompson Garden Gallery and Outdoor Living, 83 Palmer St., Tryon. 828-859-3185. Showcasing local artists and craftsmen. Gallery and showroom hours 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday - Saturday. For more information, call 828-859-3185. Tryon Arts & Crafts School, 373 Harmon Field Rd., Tryon. 373 Harmon Field Rd. Tryon. 828-859-8323. Now-May 17 “New Beginnings” gallery show. Ann Gleason will lead a new hand building pottery class on Mondays. Shoebox art fund raiser call for artists, visit www.tryonartsandcrafts.org for more information. May 11 and 12, Exploring Enameling Techniques with Landen Gailey. Call 828-859-8323 for information about new classes and schedules. Tryon Fine Arts Center, 34 Melrose Ave., Tryon. 828-8598322. May 3-30, Exhibit: Sculpture 2013. Billy Jonas performs, May 12 at 3 p.m. Kindermusik, Saturdays, now - May 11. Oil painting, Saturdays, now - May 18. Tryon Gallery Trot, Downtown Tryon. Saturday, May 11 from 5-8 p.m. for the second monthly Gallery Trot of 2013. Tryon Painters & Sculptors, 26 Maple St., Tryon. 828-8590141. May 11 – June 22, “Inspired By Matisse” show. www. tryonpaintersandsculptors.com. Gallery and gift shop hours are Thursday - Saturday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Upstairs Artspace, 49 South Trade St., Tryon. 828-859-2828. Art Trek Tryon runs until May 25. The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 828-859-2828, frontdesk@ upstairsartspace.org, www.upstairsartspace.org.


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Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Live Music THURSDAY, May 9

Purple Onion Gigi Dover & The Big Love, 7:30 p.m. Zenzera Marc Yaxley, 6:30 p.m. FRIDAY, May 10

Kyoto Jim Peterman Band, 8 p.m. Purple Onion Fred Whiskin, 7:30 p.m. Saluda Grade Café Old time fiddle and banjo tunes, 7 p.m. Zenzera Loaded Toad, 8 p.m.

SATURDAY, May 11

Party Place and Event Center Crimson Rose, 8 p.m. Purple Onion The Carpenter Ants, 8 p.m. Saluda Wine Cellar Carolina Bound, 8 p.m. Zenzera Eric Wieler, 8 p.m.

2006 Cedar Creek 5th Wheel

$24,90 0

SUNDAY, May 12

Larkin’s in Columbus Fred Whiskin, 11:30 a.m. TUESDAY, May 14

Zenzera Open mic, 7:30 p.m.

Movies

The World’s smallesT daily NeWspaper

page

3

Tryon Theater, 45 S. Trade St., Tryon.

Hump Day Happy Hour at May 8-12 G.I. Joe: Retaliation May 13-14 The Company You Keep May 15-19 42

EvEry WEdnEsday • 4-8 pm

Drink specials Music Venues Complimentary Hors D'oeuvres

Entertainment: Kenny Parker & Lady Red

Hare and Hound - 101 E. Rutherford St., Landrum, 828-457-3232 Full St., Menu for Dinner – Kyoto’s - 112 N. Trade Tryon, 828-859-9043 Larkin’s - 155 W. Mills St., Columbus, 828-894-8800 The Little Hat Tavern - 22349 Asheville Hwy, Landrum, 864-457-4215 Melrose Inn - 55 Melrose Ave., Tryon, 828-859-0234 by Purple Onion - 16 Main St., Saluda, 828-749-1179 Party Place & Event Center - Friendship Rd., Saluda, 828-749-3676 New Winter Hours Saluda Grade Café - 40 Main St., Saluda, 828-749-5854 mon. Wed.: 2 p.m. 12 midnight Saluda Inn & Wine Cellar - 229 Greenville St., Saluda, 828-749-9698 Thurs. & Fri.: 2 p.m. 2 a.m.828-859-8322 Tryon Fine Arts Center - 34 Melrose Ave., Tryon, 2 Rutherford p.m. - 12 St., midnight Closed Zenzera sat.: - 208 E. Landrum,• sun.: 864-457-4554

Karaoke Tue, Thurs, and Sat.

now

r the ning

Friday: KaraoKe KEnny parKEr

Ventures, Inc.

asheville Hwy, Top of Bird mountain • 864-457-2250

Celt-039619

ounty Fire olph, Chief photo

3x4 Small groups exploring world of birds and natural history Want your the news in fast?

d the Pine, esenrvice rked ears. uded

11/23

Model 30LSTS • Central Vac-3 Slides • Upgraded Chairs Entertainment System Local 1 Owner • Very clean

Send it by email to news@tryondailybulletin.com. Electronic subCelt-039621 missions get processed faster than hard copy and handwritten items.


16 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Buy, Sell, Trade…? Let TDB Classifieds Work for You!

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Jonas brings a blast to TFAC on Mother’s Day

Call us at 828-859-9151 or email classifieds@tryondailybulletin.com

Billy Jonas, known for creating percussion instruments from recycled materials, will perform with Ashley Jo Farmer at Tryon Fine Arts Center on Sunday, May 12 at 3 p.m. Jonas’ original songs ranging from knock-knock jokes to fireworks to spontaneous improvised songs developed from audience input, entertain moms, dads and children of any age all over the United States. Aoki Landscape and Design is the sponsor of this event. Tickets are specially priced for families and are available by calling the box office at 828-859-8322 or visiting at www.tryonarts.org. (photo submitted by Marianne Carruth)


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Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

A Special Gift for Mother’s Day & Graduation

Southern Gates Sterling Silver Collection Newest styles have now arrived.

Bill’s Jewelers 55 S. Trade St., Tryon Open Tues.- Fri. at 10:00 AM 828-859-6255


18 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

GIFTS FOR ALL AGES

MOTHER’S DAY

Come see our lovely selection of gifts for your special Mom, including summer shawls, Silver Forest earrings, mini easy-care terrariums, Thymes lotions, and much much more... Shops of Tryon

Tues-Sat 10-5

828-859-7039


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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20 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Enjoy deals from these merchants

Happy Mother’s Day

Now Open

Fridays Music: “Ian Harrod” Saturdays Music: “The Trophy Husbands” 22349 Asheville Hwy. Landrum (on State Line)

864-457-4215

FREE Chili Wednesdays FREE Taco Fridays (5:30 to 7, with Alcohol/Beer Purchase)

“Take a little break at The Little Hat”


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

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22 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Hogback and Glassy Mountains headwater four rivers in Dark Corner The earliest settlers to the this river was called Checheroa upper Spartanburg District of by the Cherokees. South Carolina and Cherokee NaThe North Saluda River flows tion territory, now known as the in Greenville County and joins northeastern corner of present- with the main Saluda River day Greenville County (Dark through Pickens, Anderson, LauCorner), discovered four major rens and Greenwood Counties, rivers. feeding into The two Lake GreenTwice-told wood. largest mountains, Hogback Tales of the The Midand Glassy, d l e Ty g e r Dark Corner provide the River continheadwaters of ues into Sparby Dean Campbell these rivers. tanburg and Branches Union Counfrom the north side of Hogback ties before flowing into the Broad flow together to form the North River. Pacolet River. Water from the The same is true for the South back and east sides of Glassy, Pacolet River. along with water from the south The North Pacolet River flows and southeast sides of Hogback, into North Carolina before it joins are the beginning of the South the South Pacolet River on its Pacolet River. journey to the Broad River. Water from the south (front) The rich bottom lands of side of Glassy forms the Sink- these four rivers have produced hole fork of the Middle TygerNews? hundreds of thousands, perhaps Got River. Glassy Rock, half-mileemail us aat: news@tryondailybulletin.com millions, of bushels of corn and high rock formation atop Glassy other vegetable crops through Mountain overlooks land drained more than 200 years. by this Sinkhole fork Had of the river. a Baby? Waters of these rivers provide Tell news@tryondailybulletin.com Water from theus! northwest side potable water for city and county of Hogback, along with water utilities, as well as agricultural from the north and northwest and industrial uses, from GreenTaken Trip? sides of Glassy form the North aville and Spartanburg to other Share it with us! news@tryondailybulletin. Saluda River. areas of the state all the way to When the first settlers arrived,com Charleston.

em

Getting Married? Share your good news! news@tryondailybulletin.com

em

Local Visitors?

email us at: news@tryondailybulletin.com

Gone Fishin’?

Sh

Share the Tall Tale with us! news@tryondailybulletin.com

Get An Award?

We want to be proud of you! email us at: news@tryondailybulletin.com

em

Home for the Summer?

H

Welcome back! Tell your friends! email us at: news@tryondailybulletin.com

em

TDBPROMO - page 1


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Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Parsons to lead talk on Enneagram Personality System at ICC Dr. Lynne Parsons will give a free introductory talk on the Enneagram Personality System on May 17 at 7 p.m. at ICC Polk campus. This will be followed the next day by an all day workshop May 18 on the Enneagram at Morning Glory Farm in Mill Spring sponsored by ICC. The Enneagram, meaning nine-pointed graph in Greek is an ancient personality system that is designed to help us recognize

“Intentions Time” by Jamison To think about what Must be done on Any given day, Prioritize you must, It can be no other way A dance of destiny Begins at dawn, for Some who then arise; Agendas are pre-planned, Important notes apprise. For others caught back In the past, they rework And review – Creating frowns upon The face, concluding What is true. But it gets worse When you’re down in bed, With all the guilt from What’s not done Running through Your head. Alas, to we who suffer Intention’s time and toll; It will or won’t be Manifest, what starts Out as a goal. – Janet Jamison, written Feb. 16, 2013

ourselves through our habits of attention. Or, where our mind goes automatically when we aren’t focusing it deliberately. It is a system that has been used in spiritual programs. The first book written about the Enneagram in the U.S.A. was written by a Catholic priest. However the system has very ancient roots dating back to obscure monasteries. It is a system designed for people to use self-observation of

their habits of mind to gain greater self-compassion and also leads to deeper understanding of others, especially loved ones. Dr. Parsons was certified to teach the Enneagram by Helen Palmer and David Daniels a decade ago and has since taught it in many states as well as locally. Her teaching uses what is known as the Oral Tradition, or interviewing people about their habits of attention as a way of illustrating the nine positions. It

will be a workshop where everyone is involved. That might sound scary but in fact, it happens in a way that people go away grateful for the sense of how we are all in the same boat, we all have strengths and what we generally regard as weaknesses. Since the Enneagram is a map, it helps us navigate this territory of personality gently and with humor. - article submitted by Dr. Lynne Parsons


24 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Wolverines gear up for Friday’s baseball playoff opener by Mark Schmerling

This Friday would be a great time for Polk County High School varsity baseball players to show their real hitting strength, as the Wolverines begin playoff action at home against Bunker Hill. First pitch is set for 7 p.m. Ty Stott has coached Polk for 18 years. In that time, “we’ve always had some very good players,” Stott recalled. Since 2000, the Wolverines have captured five conference championships, and from 2007 through 2010, advanced to at least the third round of the playoffs. On occasion, Polk hitters have exploded with hard and timely hits, but Stott is concerned that in three of the past four games, that hasn’t happened. “We just have to get some Daniel Painter pulls back to throw into home plate. Painter and the Wolverines will need to play smartly, Coach Ty Stott said, to come out strong in the playoff opener Friday night. (photo by Mark Schmerling)

(Continued on page 25)


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Baseball playoffs (continued from page 24)

momentum (going into the playoffs),” he said. Recent soggy weather has also upset the hitters’ timing. “With this weather, it’s hard to get into a routine.” One definite plus for the playoff opener is this: Until last year, the Wolverines were 14-0 in home playoff games. In last year’s opener, a star pitcher and a star hitter were both out of the lineup with recent injuries. “In baseball,” observed Stott, “home field advantage is bigger than in any other sport. Among other factors, “We get to bat last.” Another factor is fan support. The Wolverines have that, and Stott expects a big crowd to turn out on Friday. Last Friday, timely hits were scarce, as Polk fell to a very good Henderson team, 5-0, in conference action. “We just couldn’t get the timely hits, and they (Henderson) made all the plays,” said Stott. Stott said his players excel at taking advantage of any of their opponents’ mistakes, but added that Henderson made none. Starter Daniel Painter got scant support, as Polk fell to 12-8 overall, and 10-2 in conference action. Polk’s make-up game against Mitchell, was to be played yesterday at Polk (switched from Mitchell). The playoffs are singleelimination through the first four rounds, so teams must play well to advance. “Fourth round is the furthest we’ve ever been,” said Stott. “That was in Single A.” With its current Double A status, Polk faces a greater challenge in the post season. “Double A is very difficult to get to the third round,” said Stott. “Our pitching is very strong. When we hit, it makes everything easier,” a thought echoed up and down every level of baseball. A further reason for optimism, Stott noted, is that many excellent teams have faced the

“What we did (in) the first 20 games, we need to get that back ... We’re going to have to be scrappy and capitalize on the other teams’ mistakes.” -- Coach Ty Stott

same schedule interruptions from rainy weather, and all will be trying to work their way back to top form. “I think we’re capable of winning a couple of (playoff) games,” said Stott. Bunker Hill is the third-seed in its conference, while Polk is first in the Western Highlands Conference. “What we did (in) the first 20 games, we need to get that back,” said Stott. “We’re going to have to be scrappy and capitalize on the other teams’ mistakes.”

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26 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Slow Food partners with Head Start in family cooking class

Polk County preschoolers and their siblings work with Slow Food Foothills volunteers and Head Start staff to prepare a special salad for their parents. (photo submitted)

With the idea of getting kids and their parents cooking together, Slow Food Foothills “Slow Food in Schools” program recently partnered with the Polk County Head Start to offer a hands-on cooking class. This interactive class was held at the cooperative extension demonstration kitchen in Columbus on Tuesday, April 9. Jimmi Buell, FCS Agent with the Polk County Cooperative Extension Service instructed the parents in preparing a home cooked meal of chicken fingers, mashed potatoes and green beans. While peeling potatoes for the meal, the adults got a comparison of the difference in the cost, time required and nutritional value of the home cooked meal versus picking up a fast food equivalent, as well as a number of helpful

“If you get them involved in the process of preparing food, they will happily eat it without any encouragement from an adult.” -- Barb Raymond

hints regarding planning meals, grocery shopping tips and meal items.  Meanwhile the preschoolers and some of their older siblings worked with Tamara Black from Polk County Head Start and a number of Slow Food in Schools volunteers to prepare “vegetapeople” salads and strawberry shortcake for dessert. The children were shown a (Continued on page 27)


Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

• Kids cooking (continued from page 26)

sample of a salad made to look like a smiling face, and were told that their job was to create a special salad for their parents and then make one for themselves. They were given a wide variety of fresh vegetable and fruit ingredients to create their salads.   With the enthusiasm and imagination of children, salad masterpieces began to appear. While many of the children were initially reluctant to try the fresh fruits and vegetables, in a short time there were as many cherry tomato halves and cucumber slices being snacked on as being used in the salads.   Once they had finished their parent’s salads, they eagerly started salads for themselves and all of the volunteers. While all of the plates were labeled with the “artist’s” name, each was unique enough to be easily identified by the child who created it. Chairperson for the Slow Food in Schools program, Barb Raymond said, “We find this repeatedly, with children of all ages. If you get them involved in the process of preparing food, they will happily eat it without any encouragement from an adult.” While one group of children created their salads, others chopped fresh strawberries with the precision of budding surgeons. When dinner was ready and the children proudly presented their parents with the hand-made salads, families and volunteers all sat down to enjoy a wonderful meal and a lot of happy chatter as the kids told their parents about their cooking adventures. At the end of the evening, families left with some new skills, helpful information and happy children. Slow Food Foothills second annual fund raiser will be held at Overmountain Winery on Sunday, May 19. Proceeds from this fund raiser will be used to support programs like children’s cooking classes.

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Carolina Junior Tennis clinics around corner

Carolina Junior Tennis will host clinics at O.P. Earle elementary on May 11 and May 18. Similar clinics will also be held at Harmon Field on May 18. Chapman High School will also host a clinic on May 18. Racquets, balls and all other equipment will be provided and children may sign up for the two clinics. Carolina Junior Tennis is an Organizational member of The United States Tennis Association and is an umbrella of The Spartanburg Area Tennis Association which help’s fund the annual events. For additional information parents can contact Cary Davenport of Carolina Junior Tennis by email at davenportcb@ windstream.net or by phone at 864-415-8775. (photo submitted)


28 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

To place a classified call 828-859-9151. www.tryondailybulletin.com

yard

sale

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

St. Luke’s welcomes new coordinator of Lean Principles St. Luke’s Hospital is pleased to announce Hans Palma has joined the staff in a new position designed to coordinate Lean improvement efforts at the hospital. Lean is a philosophy of continuous process improvement that was developed for manufacturing but has since spread to every business sector, including healthcare. Lean management was originally developed by Japanese automaker Toyota after World War II, in an effort to streamline manufacturing by eliminating waste and costly inventory. Lean has become recognized as the premier process improvement system in the world and has gained traction in healthcare resulting in significant improvements in safety, quality, lead time and financials.  As the Lean coordinator for St. Luke’s, Palma is assisting the Senior Leadership Team, department managers and hospital staff to gain a better understanding of how to use Lean principles to expose inefficiencies. While hospitals certainly don’t operate in assembly-line fashion, the healthcare industry must operate in a structured way of continuously exposing and solving problems, explained Ken Shull, chief executive officer for St. Luke’s Hospital. “The goal for Lean is to deliver value to our patients. If a patient doesn’t benefit from a part in the process, that part has no value to

Hans Palma

them and we need to assess if that part can be eliminated,” Shull said. Palma added, “Basically, we will look at various processes throughout the hospital, map them out and see what parts of the process add value in the patient’s eyes and which ones don’t. Those parts that don’t add value we will minimize or eliminate altogether. “For those used to always doing things the same way, Lean thinking is a bit of an adjustment. But so far, the majority of St. Luke’s employees I’ve spoken with have embraced the new philosophy with great interest,” Palma said. Lean thinking is not typically associated with healthcare, where wastes of time, money, supplies and good will is a common problem. But the principles of Lean management can work in healthcare in much the same way they do in other industries. Lean engages all levels of an (Continued on page 29)


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Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Foothills Duplicate Bridge players keep minds sharp: May 2 results Morning Restricted Pairs Section A North-South First - Bill Norteman - Chip Boyle; Second - George Cashau - Pat Fiol; Third - Mary Ostheim - Mariana Tarpley East-West First - Ronald Wingo - Marily Williams; Second - Mike Roemer

• Lean

(continued from page 28)

organization to eliminate wastes and add value. Wastes can include things like time spent waiting for a service or a report. Or it can mean inventory or supplies that can expire or get lost ‘in the system.’ St. Luke’s Hospital recently joined a statewide collaborative to implement Lean practices in the delivery of healthcare for efficiencies and patient satisfaction. St.

- Gordy Cwik; Third - Edward Krainer - Marcie Mack Section B North-South First - Jackie Caldwell - Rolland Rasmussen; Second - Bill Baker - Pat Rogers; Third - Joyce Atkins - Virginia C Davis; Fourth - Kris Diggs - Janice Dunn East-West Luke’s Hospital is working with Lean specialists affiliated with N.C. State University through a grant from the North Carolina Hospital Association’s Office of Rural Health. For more information about Lean management and principles, visit www.ies.ncsu.edu or www.lean.org. Shull said other hospitals in North and South Carolina undergoing this transformation with funding through the Duke Endowment are having great success with

First - Elizabeth Easley - Elaine Riley; Second/third - Marshall Edwards - Ben Woodward; Second/ third - Jean Stratford - Charlie Stratford; Fourth - John Hanskat - Patsy Hanskat

- Jim Jackson; Third - Richard Long - Curtis Ross; Fourth - Charlotte Lindsey - Chip Boyle

North-South First - Charles Cannon - Jack Williams; Second - Bill Norteman

East-West First - Carole Stuenkel - John Memory; Second - Doug Southard - Don Tucker; Third - Linda Sherer - Sheila Umlauf; Fourth Archie Hardy - H Ingram Willis Jr. – article submitted by Marily Williams

customer satisfaction, improved efficiencies and employee engagement. Palma brings enthusiasm and experience as a Lean intern and as a business analyst. He received a BA degree in business with operations management concentration from Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Mich. Prior to moving South, Palma worked at St. Mary’s Healthcare to implement a computerized system for time and attendance and gained great experience

in changing the hospital’s culture. He lives in Spartanburg where his wife attends Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine. “People here are excited about the new patient wing under construction,” Palma said. “They’re energized and ready for more positive changes that will ensure St. Luke’s Hospital will continue to provide exceptional care, close to home.” –article submitted by Kathy Woodham

Afternoon Open Pairs

For Mother’s Day, please consider a charitable gift to Outreach in her honor.

 

Your gift will be used to help Polk County families and children living in crisis. Together we bring hope. Together we make a difference. Thermal Belt Outreach Ministry P.O. Box 834, Columbus, NC 28722 (828) 894-2988 www.tboutreach.org


30 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Bob Holycross named to Second Wind Hall of Fame Bob Holycross thought he was attending a typical St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Board meeting, but for the longtime community volunteer, it became a date to remember. In a surprise ceremony held in the St. Luke’s Hospital boardroom, Holycross was awarded membership into the Second Wind Hall of Fame. The Second Wind Hall of Fame honors retirees for outstanding service to their community. To be nominated for Second Wind membership, a person must be retired, at least 60 years old and have volunteered in three different Thermal Belt organizations for at least three years. With a framed award from the Second Wind Hall of Fame, members of the St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary celebrated while Ken Shull, St. Luke’s Hospital (Continued on page 31)

Bob Holycross is joined by St. Luke’s Auxiliary Board members and Second Wind Hall of Fame recipients. Pictured: Virginia Clark, St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Treasurer and Second Wind Hall of Fame member; Dr. Bob Lair, Chaplain and Second Wind Hall of Fame member, Bob Holycross; Wendy Field, St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary President; Jane Janke, St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary Board member and Second Wind Hall of Fame member. (photo submitted)


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Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

TR&HC accepts entries for Charity Jumper Challenge The TR&HC Charity Horse Show, with sponsorship of Ariat and the Farmhouse, will present the $5,000 Charity Jumper Challenge for the third consecutive year in 2013. Created from the suggestion of Show Chair Jennifer Smith and modeled after the FTI Great Charity Challenge in Wellington, Fla., any Polk or Landrum area non-profit is eligible to submit an application to be included in the event. Out of the 23 groups who applied last year, eight were chosen to be represented in the class. The eight non-profits selected for this year’s edition will be randomly paired with a team of two riders to represent them in the Jumper Challenge to create an equal chance for winning. Each pair of riders completes the course ‘relay-style’ providing an exciting competition for the charity members and spectators in attendance. All of the organizations receive a portion of the prize money with first place receiving a prize of $1,500. The riders, who are volunteering their time and skills to participate in this event, will receive special awards in thanks for their participation. The unique multi-charity approach has also allowed the event to assemble a diverse portfolio of charities cover-

ing animal rescue, children’s causes, family care, medical support, equestrians, education, the arts and the environment among others. TR&HC is proud to have Ariat and the Farmhouse as partners in this event once again in 2013, and hope to expand the number of teams as well as increase the prize money offered in future years. Deadline for receiving applications is May 24. They are available at www.trhcevents. org or by calling the office, 828-863-0480.

• Holycross

also helps at the St. Luke’s Thrift Shop in Tryon, assists with the set-up of various luncheons and banquets, and is always eager to assist with special projects. Holycross can be counted on to assist in any way he is needed. “Bob is so deserving of this award and acknowledgement,” said Gayle Cook, St. Luke’s Hospital Volunteer Coordinator. “We are so fortunate to have him as a member of our community and a part of our volunteer team.”

(continued from page 30)

CEO, presented the award. “Bob has given countless hours, 7,250 to be exact, to St. Luke’s Hospital,” said Shull. “St. Luke’s is delighted to honor this kind of community service from Bob.” Holycross serves as Chair of Wings, a group of volunteers who deliver inter-departmental mail daily. In addition to the mail delivery two days a week, he

2011 winners

First – Thermal Belt Outreach Ministries (Motlow Creek Equestrian Center – Lincoln Russell and Tommy Frick) Second – Polk Equine Emergency Rescue (Lone Oak Farm – Lincoln Russell and Ashley Conkle) Third – Tryon Arts and Crafts (Still Creek Farm – Holli Adams and Sara Ketcham) Fourth – Big Brothers Big Sisters of Polk County (LyNard Hills Farm – Vick Russell and Lily Hahn) Fifth – Columbus Fire Department (Block House Stables – Mike and Emily Kocher) Sixth – Tryon Elementary School PTA (Clearview Farm – Jeanne Smith and Hannah Siegel) Seventh – Carolina Foothills

Chamber of Commerce Foundation (Green River Farm – Jennifer and Roger Smith) Eighth – Children’s Theater Festival (Block House Stables – Kelly and Susie Kocher) 2012 winners

First – Kiwanis Foundation (Lone Oak Farm – Lincoln Russell and Camryn Hulsey) Second – Tryon Arts and Crafts School (Little Orchard Farm – Ben Rosichan and Lily Hahn Rosichan) Third – Foothills Equestrian Nature Center (Block House Stables – Kelly Kocher and Carolina Villaneuva-Suarez) Fourth – St Luke’s Hospital Foundation (Block House Stables – Kelly Kocher and Carolina Villaneuva-Suarez) Fifth – Tryon Elementary School PTA (Block House Stables – Kelly Kocher and Carolina Villaneuva-Suarez) Sixth – Big Brothers Big Sisters of Polk County (Still Creek Farm – Megan Millon and Sydney Johnson) Seventh – Foothills Humane Society (Hobby Horse Farm – Beth Perkins and Amy Barrington) Eighth – Children’s Theater Festival (Clearview Farm – Jeanne Smith and Hannah Seigel) – article submitted by Laura Weicker

“Bob is so deserving of this award and acknowledgement ...We are so fortunate to have him as a member of our community and a part of our volunteer team.” -- Gayle Cook

– article submitted by Jennifer Wilson

• Calendar (continued from page 2)

There is no fee for the class and all materials will be provided. Classes are held at the Holy Cross Episcopal Church on Melrose Ave. in Tryon. Call 828-899-0673 for more information. House of Flags Museum, open Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 33 Gibson Street, Columbus. Polk County Historical Association Museum open Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., 60 Walker St., Columbus, lower level. Free. Tryon Fine Arts Center, Oil painting class for teens with Margaret Curtis, Saturdays, noon - 3 p.m. Tryon’s Second Saturday Gallery Trots invite art enthusiasts to peruse through the town’s various art galleries and shops where local, regional and national artists will be featured from 5-8 p.m. every second Saturday of the month. The evenings will also be filled with live entertainment and refreshments. Find Tryon Gallery Trot on facebook or email skyukafineart.com for more information.

Sunday

Billy Jonas performs at TFAC, Billy Jonas, Parents Choice Award-winning performer, will be presented on Sunday, May 12 at 3 p.m. as part of Tryon Fine Arts Centers Family Series. Ticket prices for this event do not cover the cost of the event and TFAC’s ability to offer quality performances for the community depends on donations to the annual fund. For information or to donate, call 828-859-8322 or visit www. tryonarts.org. Submit Curb Reporter items at least two days prior to publication. Items must include a name and telephone number. Items will be printed as space allows.


32 Tryon Daily Bulletin  / The World’s Smallest Daily Newspaper

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

TO THE

TRYON DAILY BULLETIN Call: 828-859-9151

“Slow Down Saluda School Zone” by Saluda artist Jim Carson. Carson will host a plein air workshop May 30-June 1. (artwork submitted)

be held at three different outdoor but convenient, locations. It is open to all levels, from beginners to advanced. A detailed list of supplies and materials will be sent after registration. There will be demonstrations by the artist, and lots of one on one easel time. In case of rain, there is

ample space in Carson’s studio. The price of the workshop includes lunch brought to the site each day by the Saluda Grade Café. For more information, call 828 7493702, email jimcarson@tds. net, or visit www.jimcarson.net. – article submitted by Jim Carson

Community invited to Pound the Pavement race May 17 With spring in full swing and the weather beginning to warm up, now is the perfect time to take to the outdoors for some fun and exercise. The Unity in the Community Organization invites you to join them at Pound the Pavement, a day of fun and fitness. There are some who may not be able to afford a gym membership and there are those may be intimated, embarrassed, or simply just don’t like the gym atmosphere. One option is to exercise while enjoying the great

outdoors this spring and summer. Unlike the other organized races, Pound the Pavement is unofficial and designed simply to encourage everyone to exercise, while incorporating friendly competition. A medal will be awarded to the top three of each age category who walks the most laps on the track, within a 3.5hour period. The age categories are 0-14, 15-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70-plus. Although, the race will be the main event, there will be other

activities which include kickball, obstacle course, kickboxing demonstration, Zumba, pick-up basketball and children inflatables. This event will be held on Friday May 17 at Harmon Field, in Tryon from 4 – 8 p.m. Pound the Pavement is sponsored by the Unity in The Community Organization, and Funded by the Polk County Community Foundation and the Healthy Polk County Grant. – article submitted by David Staley

Cover up…

Jim Carson, Saluda artist, will offer a plein air (outdoor) workshop in Saluda Thursday Saturday, May 30 - June 1 titled “Fresh Paint.” The focus of the workshop will be to simplify your paintings, while learning to apply the paint quickly and confidently. The workshop will

this ad with a mailing label. Subscribe to the Tryon Daily Bulletin.

Carson invites budding artists to paint outdoors


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