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elegant Ayers house

NATIONAL TRUST

Australia

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20 broad arrow bricks

26  remendous t tunnellers

koalas in crisis


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Summer

at the National Gallery of Australia

Summer

exhibitions Carol Jerrems Until 28 January Free entry 14 December 2012 to 2 April 2013 | Book now: ticketek.com.au PRINCIPAL PARTNERS

EXHIBITION PARTNER

Abstract Expressionism Until 24 February Free entry Kastom: Arts of Vanuatu 8 February 2013 – 16 June 2013 Free entry

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Queen of Pleasure [Reine de Joie] 1892 (detail), colour lithograph, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, purchased with the assistance of Mary Peabody 2011

nga.gov.au

Parkes Place, Canberra | 10 am – 5 pm daily | Enquiries: (02) 6240 6502

Jesse Traill 16 February 2013 – 23 June 2013 Free entry


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Simply click on the featured photo within the contents page to link you to the start of that article. Click again on the Contents bookmark ribbon to return to the contents.

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Inside 4

The Cascades Female Factor

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An elegant mid-Victorian survivor

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School’s out on the Terrace

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The Broad Arrow Bricks

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New perspectives on Northwest cultural landscapes

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Right on Q

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Getting to know the Curtins in Cottesloe

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The Fabric of Society: Australia’s Heritage Quilts

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Tunnellers Net

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A chamber of delight for Sydney architects

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A Master Plan for the Old Farm

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In the firing line

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War on Pests at Miss Porter’s House

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Future for South Australian Riverland nature reserves

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Goulbourn Anniversary

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National Trust Way Holiday Tours

ISSN: 1835-2316

my W o r d

Vol 5 No 11 2012 Trust News is published quarterly for National Trust members and subscribers in February, May, August and November.

with editor Gina Pickerin g

Publication is coordinated by the National Trust of Australia (WA) on behalf of the National Trusts of Australia and supported by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. National Trust of Australia (WA) ABN 83 697 381 616 PO Box 1162 West Perth WA 6872 T: 08 9321 6088 F: 08 9324 1571 W:www.ntwa.com.au Editor: Gina Pickering gina.pickering@ntwa.com.au T: 08 9321 6088 Advertising: For advertising rates, contact the Editor. Design: Dessein Graphics Cover: A wild koala undergoes a health assessment prior to release. Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary. Next Issue: February 2013 Copy deadline:10 November 2012

November - January 2013 Greetings, In this edition, a preview of breathtaking conservation works at the oldest Executive Council Chamber in Australia and a million dollar facelift for Perth’s only surviving 19th Century stone building. South Australian treasures revealed in the Ayers House Museum Collection and convict work in clay defines changes in style and form. The National Trust also supports an Australian icon in the firing line as the community rallies with vital support. Enjoy

Please help us to save our environment and circulate this magazine as widely as possible. This magazine is printed on recyclable paper and packed in 100% degradable wrap. The views expressed in Trust News are not necessarily those of the National Trusts or the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. The articles in this magazine are subject to copyright. No article may be used without the consent of the National Trust and the author.

Gina Pickering | Editor

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Sustaining Australia’s World Heritage Tony Burke | Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities

I am delighted that over the past couple of months I have been able to announce significant funding for two world heritage listed places.

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t the World Heritage Listed Cascades Female Factory in Tasmania I announced $374,000 in funding to improve the visitor experience as part of a conservation and interpretation project funded by the Your Community Heritage program. The yards of the Cascades Female Factory are filled with the footprints of the convict buildings that housed over 1000 convict women and children who were once held and worked there. Heritage is fundamental to our national identity and informs us about where we have come from and who we are. The Cascades Female Factory played an important role in Australia’s history and this funding will ensure that it is able to continue telling that story.

Above Left   Royal

The factory opened in 1828 and operated as a prison and place of punishment for re-offending female convicts, a female labour hiring depot, a hospital, a nursery, a place for pregnant convicts and a workplace. As one of the only places of early female imprisonment with intact remains, it is one of the most significant sites of convict heritage in the world. In addition to the support for the Cascade Female Factory I also recently announced an injection of $20 million for important works to Melbourne’s iconic Royal Exhibition Building and Carlton Gardens. The funding will assist with conservation works for the building and promotional and interpretive activities.

Exhibition Building and Carlton Gardens. DSEWPaC Female Factory. DSEWPaC

Above right  Cascades

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The magnificent building is a great treasure of international importance. The funds will help Museum Victoria uphold the values that led to the site’s inscription on the World Heritage List in 2004. The Royal Exhibition Building was built for the 1880 Melbourne International Exhibition as an opportunity to promote Australia’s technological innovations to the world. The building also hosted the opening of the first Federal Parliament in 1901. It is part of our story as a nation and is a special place for all Australians. I am pleased that two significant heritage places are receiving the recognition and funding needed to assist in protection, promotion and the sharing of their story.


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An elegant mid-Victorian survivor Janine Hook | Ayers House Museum Manager

Ayers House stands today not only as the last surviving mansion of its era on the southern side of North Terrace, it also interprets the life of a leading South Australian family of the 19th Century.

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ir Henry Ayers came from England as a young man with little schooling and went on to become Premier of South Australia and Secretary of the Burra Copper Mine. In 1858 he commissioned the conversion of an early nineroomed brick house which was to become the forty roomed mansion present today. Architect Sir George Strickland Kingston (1807-1880) produced what was by then a conservative, regency-style masterpiece. By the time Sir Henry’s North Terrace House was completed in 1876 the interior had been handstencilled room by room and the magnificent Lyon and Cottier designed formal dining room ceiling is regarded as among the most significant hand-painted ceilings in the country. The National Trust of South Australia’s fine collection in the house is displayed to highlight original Ayers family pieces.

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Grand Staircase - access to the Guest Wing of the house and today access to the upstairs section of the Museum. The plush red carpets indicate that this staircase was used by the family and invited guests – not the staff of the house. G Gillman bottom External view of Ayers House. G Gillman right  The Saratoga Trunk. J Hook

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Family Dining Room – the small dining room located behind the front verandah where the family would have dined together. G Gillman

Between the lines Henry Ayers: The Man Who Became a Rock Author: Jason Shute Publisher: IB Taurus & Co, London 2011 Reviewer: Marcus Beresford National Trust (SA) Councilor

Recent preparations for South Australia’s museum reaccreditation, have revealed some previously hidden treasures in the Ayers House Museum collection. These items include South Australia Illustrated volumes of watercolours by George French Angas (son of founding chairman of the South Australian Company George Fife Angas) which give insight into how early settlers saw the environment, Indigenous families and lifestyles. Another special find is a “Saratoga Trunk”, in this case fitted internally as a ladies travel companion with glove drawers and stationery compartments. The costume collection has been extended due to these finds as well. In the next year (with the installation of a new storage system courtesy of funding from History South Australia’s Community Museums Program) the upstairs Guest Wing will be rearranged to include a Ladies Dressing Room and stand alone Gentlemen’s bedroom. The introduction of the Ladies Dressing Room will allow a proper and more contextually relevant interpretation of costumes on a rotational basis. Using reflections on social history, visitors to the property are introduced to how life may have been for both the Ayers family and those “below stairs”.

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Mining magnates are topical and this book brings to life Australia’s first mining magnate, Sir Henry Ayers, a key player in the great copper boom at Burra, South Australia in 1845. Ayers was inaugural President of the Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. From humble carpentry beginnings in Portsmouth England, Ayers first worked in SA legal offices, then became secretary of the SA Mining Association which exploited the “Monster Mine” at Burra. He also managed the financial affairs of big investors in that mine and went on to become Premier of South Australia seven times and President of the Legislative Council for 12 years. Uluru was named after him, but that legacy is fading. As to Ayers’ other legacies, these are not entirely obvious apart from Ayers House, the supremely elegant mansion on North Terrace, Adelaide, now a Museum of the National Trust of South Australia. Ayers was leader of the South Australian government at the time of both the settlement of the Northern Territory and construction of the Overland Telegraph (a major development for Australia giving rapid communication with Britain and other centres for the first time), but this book suggests that he may not have been pivotal in such developments. The reader gets the impression that Ayers was more the facilitator than initiator. In other areas he “set the scene” for later initiatives, without pushing things to a new level. These included women’s property rights after marriage, public education, eight hour work-days, unionism, and inter-colonial conferences. However, he appears to have been fiscally conservative and private enterprise orientated. Ayers became a member of the Unitarian Church, a religion advocating freedom from formal dogma or doctrines (and which embraced people like Catherine Spence, author and electoral reformer). He appears to have been quite patriotic about his new country, realising it had much to offer to people of his background. Unlike many other early Australian colonists who “made good”, he long delayed returning to England. The book contains an extraordinary amount of detail about Ayers’ life in South Australia including his relationship with his wife Annie, and in turn reveals much about life in the colony generally. Of particular interest is Ayers’ relationship with Henry Rymill, a younger man who worked under him initially but later became antagonistic. The suggestion is that Ayers and Rymill were very alike and that there was an intergenerational struggle. Shute’s book is a significant contribution to Australian history and hopefully the first of books analysing this important figure in depth. Available from  mostlybooks@internode.on.net

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School’s out on the Terrace Gina Pickering | Editor National Trust (WA)

Old Perth Boys’ School located in the hubbub of St Georges Terrace business throng is both elegant and eye-catching.

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ts style (Gothic Revival), refreshed limestone facade and new tuckpointing identify it as something special in the city’s heart - and it is. Old Perth Boys’ School is the only mid 19th century stone building surviving in Perth Central Business. More than a million dollars worth of conservation work has recently been pumped into Perth’s first purpose-built public school. It’s become part of shining gateway to the headquarters of industry giant BHP. Some say it’s a landscape of David and Goliath proportions in which Old Perth Boys’ School is confidently holding its own. The conservation of Old Perth Boys’ School has been a major commitment of the National Trust over the past two years and is unique in many ways. Brookfield Multiplex’s new City Square Development features a 45 level office block, shops, cafes and a heritage precinct which includes Newspaper House, Perth Technical College, WA Trustees, Royal Union as well as Old Perth Boys’ School.

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fresh face of Old Perth Boys’ School. G Pickering / NTWA ABOVE  An enhanced public space is an outcome of the National Trust (WA) commitment to conservation work. G Pickering / NTWA RIGHT  An interpretive element reflects the West Australian Times. G Pickering / NTWA

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Old Perth Boys’ School is a heritage survivor on Perth’s St Georges Terrace. Vested in the National Trust’s care since 1979, it was the Trust’s headquarters through to 1986. The recent program of works is unique in many ways. Finding funds for conservation works is always a challenge and the National Trust took a bold, innovative approach in order to complete the external conservation works to Old Perth Boys’ School. Through the sale of plot ratio (commonly known as “airspace”) to the developer, Brookfield Multiplex, some $960,000 was secured. National Trust CEO Tom Perrigo said the approach illustrates a National Trust ethos and commitment to innovative sustainable outcomes. “In addition, the National Trust (WA) has also contributed an additional $340,000 to project management and architectural services to deliver an enhanced city centre location that’s now available for lease,” he said. National Trust Conservation and Landscape Architects provided guidance for this project which had a set of unique conditions and required stringent meshing with the Brookfield Multiplex requirements. The challenges associated with the project included extensive works adjacent to and within the conservation site. According to National Trust conservation architect Caroline Stokes the extensive use of cement mortar in former conservation of the building was one of the biggest issues of the project. “We ensured all the cement mortar and cement repairs discovered during our exploration

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of the site received appropriate attention,” Ms Stokes said. “The presence of cement mortar leads to sacrifice of the limestone and so it was a priority for us to ensure it was removed,” she said. The face of Old Perth Boys’ School which greets the city community was scrubbed with soap and water and the new tuck pointing has provided a refreshed finish. Eric Hancock, Conservation Project Officer who was responsible for the extensive stoneworks, said the project offered some real surprises. “One of the highlights was discovering original tuck pointing of the stone work at the back of the building,” Mr Hancock said. “Our archaeological consultants revealed part of the life of Old Perth Boys’ School turning up a collection of pencils, buttons, inkwells and even some long lost marbles,” he said. It is one of a group of heritage buildings which has undergone conservation and adaptive reuse after remaining dormant for many years. Old Perth Boys’ School has links with education dating back to the early days of the Swan Colony and which continued into the 20th century as part of the Perth Technical School.

above National

Even one of the principal consultant architects - Alan Kelsall - was a former Perth Technical School student. National Trust Landscape Architect Phil Palmer said research did not reveal any evidence of original ground treatments for Old Perth Boys’ School and a decision was made to finish the forecourt with high quality granite because of its attractive and durable qualities. “A natural granite material with soft earthy tones has been used to pave the surface and complement the limestone,” Mr Palmer said. Old Perth Boys’ School is a survivor. A classroom to many of Western Australia’s most prominent citizens and a significant legacy listed on Western Australia’s Heritage Register. “We have had an opportunity to conserve this truly important heritage place and contribute to the contemporary development in the heart of Perth,” Ms Stokes said.

The National Trust worked with a team of consultants from Kelsall-Binet Architects and Wood & Grieve Engineers. Works includes: • • • •

A new rainwater and drainage system Storm water collection Paint finishes Structural issues

Trust (WA) conservation team including (L-R) Eric Hancock, Conservation Project Officer, Caroline Stokes, Conservation Architect and Phil Palmer, Landscape Architect. G Pickering / NTWA

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The Broad Arrow Bricks Allan Hackett

The broad arrow originated in England in 1698. It was an identification mark introduced to prevent the pilfering of Government property. Hence bricks, axes, shovels and other items were marked with the broad arrow. In New South Wales this practice of identification is usually accepted as commencing after 1819 when Commissioner Bigge arrived in Sydney to investigate the state of the colony. His reports were extremely critical of Governor Macquarie for his lenient treatment of convicts.

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owever, I believe there is evidence that the broad arrow appeared prior to 1819. Archaeological excavations were carried out at the site of the Westfield shopping centre at Parramatta. Bricks which were thought to be unmarked or “clean skins” by the archaeologist were unearthed and a sample of four bricks were made available for examination. These bricks were recovered from one of the nineteen allotments on the site which was occupied by a private settler in 1810. However, examination of these bricks has revealed that they were in fact marked. In this instance the marking took the form of a series of dots and interestingly the dots are arranged in the form of two broad arrows. These may be the first government broad arrow bricks made in NSW. In addition, shell mortar is associated with the bricks and all measure the standard English size of 100cm x 21.5cm x60cm. The dot markings were impressed in the brick surface with nailheads protruding from the kick of the stockboard as the clay was pressed into the mould. Further evidence of the broad arrow predating 1819 has been provided by excavations at the site of the third old Parramatta hospital. The hospital was built in 1818. Double arrow bricks were found on site in the wall footings and can still be seen today covered by a glass floored building. For more information   visit www.turnofthefirstclay.com or contact Allan Hackett at brickyone@bigpond.com

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Between the lines Farewell, Dear People Author: Ross McMullin Publisher: Scribe Publications Reviewer: Robert Mitchell

ABOVE left  Governor

Lachlan Macquarie’s building regime occurred at the same time the single arrow appeared in Sydney. Early bricks were of English size but changed to 10cm x 23.5cm x 7cm in the late 1820s. A Hackett left  Brickmakers sent to the penal colony at Port Macquarie from 1821, produced bricks on a quota system. Gangs assisted the brickmakers and each had their own identification mark. A Hackett ABOVE  Dot markings form broad arrows in bricks from the Westfield site in Parramatta, NSW. A Hackett BELOW  Brickmakers sent to the penal colony at Port Macquarie, from 1821 produced bricks on a quota system. Gangs assisted the brickmakers - each had their own identification mark. A Hackett

National Trust members taking advantage of reciprocal privileges with the National Trust for Scotland and the National Trust in the remainder of Britain may be aware the role of death and taxes in the transfer of many country houses and estates to National Trust stewardship. While the imposition of death duties was a primary cause, the death of “heirs male” during the Great War 1914 – 1919 was often an important factor. While the national sacrifice and community loss was widespread, the line of succession for many family estates was extinguished in the mud of Flanders and elsewhere. The collective impact of the national loss was also reflected in “government by the second eleven” a phrase describing the lack of depth of political leadership in Britain between 1919 and 1939. In Australia the focus of commemoration of the Great War has been on service and sacrifice and battlefield accomplishments. Biographies, unit histories and memoirs continue these themes. As the centenary of the Great War approaches new publications are allowing us to re-examine the impact of the War on Australia and to present previously untold stories. The 60,000 soldiers lost in death to a young nation with a relatively small population was both devastating and politically potent as in the famous interaction between Prime Minister Billie Hughes and US President Woodrow Wilson over the League of Nations’ mandate for New Guinea demonstrated. Sometimes forgotten within the remembrance of the magnitude of loss are the individual stories of extraordinary Australians and what they might have contributed had they lived. Farewell, Dear People by Ross McMullin contains ten extended biographies of young men who exemplified Australia’s gifted lost generation of World War I. This book seeks to retrieve their stories and to fill the gaps in the nation’s collective memory. It shows how their deaths were a loss to Australia and part of the lasting legacy of the Great War. Although each biography culminates in death, these are not narratives of military history but rather a rich portrayal of Australia and Australians from the 1870s and into the 1930s. I entirely agree with Michael McKernan of the Canberra Times who characterised the narrative as a deeply felt engagement with lost lives, and a superb union of research and writing. I also agree with Peter Cochrane in his review in The Australian, that sometimes McMullin’s empathy for his selected individuals draws a long bow and loses historical context including the conjecture that General Sir John Monash could have replaced Field Marshall Sir Douglas Haig as Commander in Chief in France. Overall however the book is a compelling read with many links to heritage places like Woodbridge in Western Australia which is under National Trust of Australia stewardship. Available from info@scribepub.com.au

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New perspectives on Northwest cultural landscapes Dr Kate Gregory | Special Project Historian National Trust (WA)

Crossing the floodplains of the Harding River in the Shire of Roebourne, barefoot with cool soft mud between our toes and behind us the spectacular Table Hill, Cooya Pooya Station finally comes into view. It is like entering an abandoned world and our efforts to access the site are rewarded for although much degraded, this heritage site is rich with revelations about the past.

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he station dates from the 1870s although, like many Pilbara pastoral stations, destructive cyclones necessitated successive rebuilding campaigns. Labour

ABOVEâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Cooya

history, the work of Aboriginal station hands and domestic workers, and shearing life are clearly evident in the collection of buildings, characterised by

ingenious use of concrete to combat cyclones and termites. Rocky outcrops overlooking the complex are a picture gallery of ancient and contact rock art.

Pooya Station with remains of shearing shed and view of Table Hill, Shire of Roebourne. K Gregory/NTWA

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The history revealed is of a complex and contested multicultural environment around the earliest European settlement of the Northwest

New research into the history and combined material culture of the site is being developed through a partnership between the National Trust of Australia (WA) and the University of Western Australia, as part of a review of the Shire of Roebourne’s Municipal Heritage Inventory. Fieldtrips to review sites already on the inventory, assess new sites for inclusion, and meet with the community to find out about places of local heritage significance have recently been undertaken with Professor Alistair Paterson from the University of Western Australia and Dr Kate Gregory from the National Trust.

above  Contact top­  Recording

The history revealed is of a complex and contested multicultural environment around the earliest European settlement of the Northwest; striving mercantile trade reliant on a network of ports and landings; a long history of resources extraction through pastoralism, pearling and mining; evidence of frontier violence; labour histories from forced labour to imported labour; adaptation to the environment and design innovation; and rich social histories emerging out of a diversified community. Cossack and Roebourne are amongst the State’s most significant heritage areas in a region rapidly expanding as a consequence of the mining boom. Yet still there are discoveries of overlooked and forgotten heritage sites. Nestled atop spinifex covered hills between Cossack and Roebourne we recorded a site of amongst the earliest European stone structures in the Northwest. A series of stone stock yards, shelters and lookouts well camouflaged within the natural rocky outcrops, would likely have been built by the first parties of European settlers. The site is largely intact and was probably only used in the first few years of European settlement. With strategic views of both the landscape and the ocean, the sense of uncertainty and encounter is palpable, with the need for security paramount. New research into the complex heritage of the region will develop understanding and help ensure the unique heritage of the area is valued within this changing landscape.

rock art at Cooya Pooya Station, clay pipe engraving visible. K Gregory/NTWA stone stock yards near the upper landing Cossack, with Dr Kate Gregory and Professor Alistair Paterson. E Wright

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Right on Q Louise O’Flynn and Cath Snelgrove | NSW National Parks & Wildlife

One of Sydney’s outstanding heritage landscapes is offering visitors a unique experience based on history and environmental values while fulfilling stringent monitoring of its conservation and management program.

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uarantine Station is of outstanding cultural significance and listed on the NSW State Heritage Register, while the whole of North Head in registered on the National Heritage List. In February 1833, the site was dedicated as a place of quarantine to protect the colony from deadly ship-borne diseases, which included typhus fever, yellow fever, smallpox and bubonic plague. For 140 years its use ebbed and flowed as modes of transport changed and new epidemics brought new threats. Over the decades, development of the 27 hectare site grew to include 67 buildings which represent fine examples of architecture, as well as evidence of changes to social values including lifestyle and medical practice in the control of disease. The site contains around 12,000 movable objects and is also home to the Little Penguin and the locally endangered Long Nosed Bandicoot. It also contains significant remnants of Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub. Ownership of Quarantine Station was transferred from the Commonwealth Government to

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the NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS) in March 1984, and while the Service consistently carried out basic repairs as far as budget allowed, it was clear that a massive injection of funds would be needed to conserve and present the site to its full potential. The leasing of Quarantine Station on Sydney’s North Head to a private company in the late 1990s was a controversial period in the history of the Station, prompting heated debate. The NSW National Trust was concerned about the potential threat to Quarantine Station’s fragile and complex significance posed by commercial involvement. In 2000, a conditional lease was signed with the Mawland Group which proposed re-use of existing buildings to provide onsite accommodation, conference and other facilities. Supporting the interpretation of Quarantine Station and reflecting its significant history, the plan also detailed revenue raising options to protect it for the future. The National Trust expressed concern about the length of the proposed lease and the possible conflict between the need to make a profit and keeping the integrity of the site.

buildings have been meticulously conserved. C Shain

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The reuse project has been conspicuously successful in achieving environmental and cultural objectives, restoring and managing the natural landscape, while stabilising and restoring historic buildings

On 26 October 2006, a lease for 21 years was granted to Mawland Quarantine Station (MQS). Within the most stringent framework of controls seen in Australia for such a project, conservation and adaptation works commenced in 2007 and have been ongoing since that time. Hotel accommodation on the site, now known as Q Station, has been in operation for three and a half years. A significant number of detailed conservation planning documents were prepared, and no less than 233 Conditions of Approval were issued, one of which required that an Independent Comprehensive Environment Audit of the project be undertaken every five years from the commencement date, for the life of the project. The recently completed second audit received a score of 96%, an exceptional level of compliance by both MQS and National Parks. The audit considered environmental performance, the adequacy of the monitoring program and the response to issues raised by the community. It concluded that the reuse project had been conspicuously successful in achieving environmental and cultural objectives, restoring and managing the natural landscape, while stabilising and restoring historic buildings. It found that the sensitive adaption of buildings to allow the successful operation of quality hotel accommodation and heritage tourism operation focused on providing guests with an experience based on the history and environmental values of the site. Movable heritage had been conserved and interpreted to both protect it and add valuable dimension to visitor understanding of the site. While the Independent Environmental Audit reflects the commitment by NPWS and Mawland Quarantine Station to protect the cultural and natural values of the site, the project itself demonstrates the vast potential community benefits offered through the detailed, sensitive and innovative conservation and management of large and complex heritage sites.

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former baggage handling station now houses a restaurant designed to leave no mark on the original fabric. C Shain

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Getting to know the Curtins in Cottesloe Elizabeth Hoff | Guest Curator

More than 360 people visited Curtin Family Home during its four week open season. The beachside residence is one of only three former prime ministerial homes open to the public.

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embers of seniors’ groups, young Perth leaders and other visitors seized the opportunity to tour the Curtin Family Home, explore the garden and take an audio tour by ‘Elsie Curtin’. A special feature of this year’s program was a series of live readings from family correspondence in the Curtins’ lounge room. Visitors were warmly welcomed and enjoyed tea and talk in the kitchen and dining room of the Curtins’ former residence as part of the National Trust program. Many commented that they were aware of a sense of intimacy, of being guests at a place that continues to evoke its past as a family home. One visitor later recalled ‘the passion, knowledge and dignity’ that had marked their visit, which was ‘a memorable introduction to the Curtin family and to John Curtin himself’. A team of National Trust volunteers assisted with the readings, which were offered as part of the 2012 National Year of Reading program that is celebrating literacy across Australia. above 

Team member Trish O’Neil found her involvement with the initiative rewarding. “Not only has my interest and understanding of Curtin, the man, been expanded but there has been a fascinating wealth of stories and memories from the people who have visited,” Ms O’Neil said. “The simple nature of the Curtin home makes it a place that so many can relate to,” she said.

This year’s season included an open day that featured activities for children, a chance to take the audio tour, and further readings in the family’s lounge room. For the first time, the Trust partnered with Deckchair Theatre in Perth during its season of The Fremantle Candidate which focused on John Curtin’s political and personal

battles. The association also led to some double takes in Jarrad St Cottesloe when actors from the production visited the former Curtin’s residence. The annual program concluded on 3 October with an evening lecture at The Grove Library, Cottesloe, from Andrew Robb AD MP, the Federal Member for Goldstein. Mr Robb spoke on mental health in public life. The Trust was recently awarded a grant to support preparatory work for the creation of a heritage trail that will expand the present interpretation of the Curtin Family Home. The trail will reveal memories of the Curtin family in Cottesloe, Cottesloe landmarks, and stories about the suburb’s development. The project’s consultant is seeking people willing to share recollections of these aspects of Curtin family and Cottesloe history in an online survey and one-onone consultations. For more information  

curtintrail@gmail.com or call 0407 161 045.

A prime ministerial pose on the front steps of the Curtin Family Home. G Pickering/NTWA of the National Trust attended a special performance of The Fremantle Candidate at PICA in Perth’s cultural heart. G Pickering/NTWA

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“The simple nature of the Curtin home makes it a place that so many can relate to.”

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members from The Fremantle Candidate visit Curtin Family Home. G Pickering/NTWA Day at Curtin Family Home with National Trust Education Officer Kim Hawkes. K Rippingale/NTWA 3 Members of the Sir Charles Court Young Leaders Program visited Curtin Family Home as part of their annual program. G Pickering/NTWA 4  Representatives from local government authorities and the Western Australian State Heritage Office visit Curtin Family Home. G Pickering/NTWA 5 Over 350 people visited the former residence of the Curtin Family Home during the National Trust’s annual program. E Hoff/ NTWA 6  (L–R) Actor Steve Turner, National Trust Chairman John Cowdell, Actor Christie Sistrunk and Conservation Architect Kelly Rippingale at the opening night of The Fremantle Candidate. G Pickering/NTWA 2 Open

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The Fabric of Society: Australia’s Heritage Quilts Dr Annette Gero FRS | Quilt Historian

Australia has a wonderful quilt heritage. The earliest ‘Australian-made’ quilts were those crafted on ships by convict women during their transportation to the Colony. The women of Newgate Prison in England, sentenced to transportation to NSW for life, were taught to make patchwork quilts by the Quaker prison reformer, Elizabeth Fry. From 1817 to 1843 Elizabeth supervised those who were to make the long voyage to Australia and supplied them with patchwork as a skill to keep them occupied. Each convict woman was provided with one Bible, two aprons, one small bag of tape, one ounce of pins, one hundred needles, nine balls of sewing cotton, twenty four hanks of coloured thread, one small bodkin, one thimble, one pair of scissors and two pounds of patchwork pieces.

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f all the patchwork quilts made by women on these voyages only one, the ‘Rajah’ quilt, has survived. Made on board the Rajah in 1841, the quilt bears an inscription in very fine cross stitch on one of its borders indicating that it was worked by the transported women. It is dated June 1841, and was presented to the ladies of the convict ship committee as a testimony of gratitude. Quilts were also made by genteel ladies, dressmakers, home makers and housewives, wealthy shop owners, WWI diggers, people who were forced off the land during the Depression, WWII Australian prisoners of war, rabbit trappers and artists’ wives.

The thread that holds this patchwork of Australian history together is that each story told includes the making of a quilt. It draws on women’s memories, diaries, their letters to relatives, official records, newspaper and magazine articles reflecting the current domestic influences and, of course, the old magazines which provided the quilt patterns. The search and documentation of old Australian quilts over the past twenty years includes all periods of Australian history. The quilts and their stories, which include the social history of countless ordinary people, are to be found in my new book, Fabric of Society: Australia’s Quilt Heritage from Convict Times to 1960.

above  Quilt right  The

of Diamonds and Hexagons Made by Frederica Mary Josephson, Sydney, c1850. NTNSW Quilt Study Group works on the replica. NTNSW

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By the 1850s the community had evolved into a wealthy pastoral society, and the women who had settled here had the time and means for patchwork as a decorative art. Fortunately many of these quilts have survived. One of the most beautiful old Australian quilts from this period was made in Sydney c1850 by Frederica Mary Josephson. The cotton and chintz quilt is a combination of stars, hexagons and tumbling blocks in striking early fabrics which would have been imported to the Colony from England. ‘“Quilt of Hexagons and Diamonds”, attributed to Frederica Josephson and made in Sydney c1850’, is in the NSW National Trust collection and was shown at an


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Between the lines exhibition of Historical Australian Quilts at Old Government House, Parramatta, in 2000. Frederica Josephson was born in Sydney in 1833. On 21 July 1853 she married Emmanuel Josephson, son of the convict silversmith, Jacob Josephson, who also made his mark in Australia’s history. Frederica and Emmanuel built Riverview Cottage at Longueville, Sydney and lived there from 1853 to 1873. The estate was later sold to the Jesuits and is now St Ignatius College. In 2010, on a recommendation by NSW National Trust Collection Manager, Jennifer Palmer, the Quilt Study Group of NSW (a subcommittee of the Quilters’ Guild of NSW Inc) agreed to replicate Frederica’s quilt so that the original could ‘rest’. In the 1850s Frederica’s quilt would have taken at least two years to make, representing an extraordinary amount of work. As well as the tiny pieces of what was then highly fashionable fabric, there are hundreds of thousands of stitches, many of them probably worked in lantern light. The replica coverlet, affectionately known as ‘Frederica’, took 14 months to make and involved over 48 people who met each month to sew it together. The main challenge was to find fabrics similar to the lovely chintzes in the original quilt. It was finished and presented to the National Trust on 13 June 2012 and is a significant gift which reflects the workmanship and the beauty of the original. For enquires about the book  Fabric of Society: Australia’s Quilt Heritage from Convict Times to 1960 see www. annettegero.com or write to PO Box 398, Neutral Bay, NSW 2089.

Alexander Macleay: From Scotland to Sydney Author: Derelie Cherry Publisher: Paradise Publishers Reviewer: Brian Fletcher

Back in the early 1990s, a rather determined young lady came to see me at Sydney University and asked me to read an essay she had written. Her object was to see whether I thought her eligible to enrol as a PhD student in history. Her choice of subject was Alexander Macleay, one of that interesting group of men who did so much to advance the interests of early New South Wales. Derelie Cherry’s enthusiasm for her topic has resulted in her biography earning a doctoral degree and the recent release of a much-needed book, Alexander Macleay: From Scotland to Sydney. Derelie’s book is a colourful, entertaining work which in no way undermines its value as a scholarly resource – about a man who, until now, has somehow missed being the subject of a full-length biography. The book brings out Macleay’s role in numerous aspects of NSW history between 1826 when he arrived and 1848, the year of revolutions in Europe, when he died. He was, by any standards, a remarkable man who formed part of the Scottish diaspora which took talented Scots to the far ends of the globe in the nineteenth century. Coming to New South Wales to take up the demanding position of Colonial Secretary, he established close ties with Governor Darling and, in conjunction with Henry Dumaresq, the three men formed a triumvirate which acted as an inner cabinet. Although he later shared in Darling’s unpopularity among colonists of liberal inclination, his political career was resurrected after representative government was introduced in 1842. He was elected to the Legislative Council and became its first Speaker. Macleay stands out in the pages of history as a talented administrator and a bastion of conservatism. But, as a leading landowner, he also made his mark in the burgeoning pastoral industry which helped to transform New South Wales from penal settlement to colony. Perhaps unusual in a Scot, he did not handle his financial affairs particularly well and incurred heavy debts. He did however have well-developed intellectual and scientific interests and, while in England, was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society and the Royal Society. He built up one of the finest collections of insects in the world, was deeply interested in horticulture, served as President of the Australian Museum, vicepatron of what became the Royal Agricultural Society of New South Wales and contributed to the work of the Subscription Library. His interest, as Derelie shows, knew no bounds and exceeded those of most of his fellow colonists. He was a complex figure, however, who certainly did not appeal to everyone. Derelie faces up to these criticisms and succeeds in presenting a balanced picture of the man and a fascinating account of his family life. The important story of the Macleay women has not been neglected, including that of Fanny Macleay who was a talented botanical artist. Despite what was said about him, Macleay was undeniably a man of taste. Nothing illustrates this more than Elizabeth Bay House which he built in the 1830s, living there with was family until 1845 when he succumbed to financial pressures resulting from the collapse of the colonial economy in 1842, and his own precarious financial position. Available from  Alexander Macleay: From Scotland to Sydney by Derelie Cherry is published by Paradise Publishers and is available from all good bookshops and online www.alexandermacleay.com

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Tunnellers Net Gina Pickering | Editor

A couple of amateur researchers have embarked on a project to record the life stories of a particular group of Australians linked to the First World War.

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unnelling activities of Australian units at war is their passion, and their platform is a website that details men and missions of the Australian Mining Corps, and the battlefield units which evolved from it. The website intends to record the individual stories of the members of A.I.F. who were, for

some part of their military service, posted, assigned or allotted to the Australian Mining Corps, an Australian Tunnelling Company or the Australian Electrical and Mechanical Mining and Boring Company, and to reproduce, without comment, original accounts of incidents involving those units.

The team has so far identified 4,772 men associated with the Tunnellers including 374 who died in service and a further 252 who were individually decorated. Amongst them is my grandfather Clifford Braybon and my family has been touched by the extent to which research was undertaken on his life for the project. I am advised by the ‘Tunnellers team’ that the story of the Australian Tunnellers in World War I begins in Scotland in about 1846 when 3664 2/Cpl George Paul was born and that it ends in November 1995 with the death of 5873 Spr James Joseph Hallinan at the age of 99. Men who served with the Tunnellers also participated in the Ashantee War (1873-74); Isandhlwana (1877-79); Egypt (1882-91); Boer War (1899-1902); Russo-Jap War (1904-05); Balkan War (1912); Afghan/Russia Border; the punitive raid on Pancho Villa (Mexico 1916); World War 1 (19141920); Russian Relief (1919-20) and World War II (1939-45).

Known National Trust connections to the Tunnellers: Tunnellers Lota House – QLD Heritage Register Lt Edwin Marsden Tooth Allan Slab Hut - QLD Heritage Register 5276 Sapper John Allan Robin Boyd House - Vic Heritage Register 5 Sergeant Theodore Penleigh Boyd Walkley House – SA Heritage Register 5 Sergeant Theodore Penleigh Boyd Wooroloo Cemetery & Asylum – WA Heritage Register 12 Tunnellers buried at this location For more information  visit:

www.tunnellers.net

ABoVe right  Sapper

Clifford Braybon. Day march, Sydney, c. 1950s - photo courtesy Anne Mayoh, daughter of Lt. Karl Mayoh CdeG(Bel), 1ATC. right  The Tunnellers Net website. above  Anzac

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A chamber of delight for Sydney architects Clive Lucas | Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners, Architects

The oldest Executive Council Chamber in this country is in the northern wing of the legendry Rum Hospital built by Governor Macquarie between 1811-1816. This wing was in fact two surgeon’s residences and the room requisitioned, and redecorated by Governor Ralph Darling, for this purpose in 1829, was probably the principal surgeon’s dining room. It is in fact the largest room on the ground floor of the semi-detached houses which make up the northern wing.

above  Looking

north along the balcony of the northern wing over Macquarie Street towards Horbury Terrace and the cast iron Free Church. (photo c1860 Parliament House) restored room with its Brussels weave carpet and oak graining. The doors access the enlarged chamber added in 1843.  C Lucas right  The ‘Tutankhamun’ window is uncovered having been hidden since 1843.  C Lucas Left  The

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s architects involved with Parliament House for a number of years, one of our first tasks was to provide a new security guardhouse at the northern edge of the site. This meant that this room which for many years had been subdivided, first as a library and later for the security checking area, could be opened up to its original size and proportion. As a result the latest work has uncovered what is arguably the oldest domestic reception room in this country. In the east wall an original window

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was discovered which had been studded out and bricked up at the time of the construction of the new Legislative Council wing in 1843. This window had survived with its original oak graining and details almost completely intact. It was like opening up Tutankhamun’s tomb. The removal of various bookcases, wallpapers, partitions, false ceilings and other bits and pieces, which enclosed the room, located the chair rail and other details of this important early interior. The galleries added in 1838, and which seem almost unbelievable, were proven by the discovery of what appears to have been a doorway in the south wall giving access from the principal staircase. The room has been redecorated, putting back all the oak graining, and painting the dado in its original Trompe-l’oiel panelling. Pink distemper has been put back

on the plasterwork. The Gothic inspired chimneypiece which probably dates from 1843 has been re-marbled as originally in imitation of a black Belgian marble. The fine 1840s steel register grate has been repaired, stripped of paint and polished. The room is now used as an annexe to the Legislative Assembly Chamber next door which as stated above was originally built for the Legislative Council. The room has been fitted with an 1830s reproduction Brussels weave carpet which conforms to records of the original refurbishment of the room in 1829.

The room has been redecorated, putting back all the oak graining, and painting the dado in its original Trompe-l’oiel panelling. above  ‘Elevation of the General Hospital at Sydney AD 1811’. The Council Chamber is the most left hand ground floor room of the left hand wing. (P.R.O. London, Bigge Papers) above Left Opening by Governor Gipps of the new Legislative Council Chamber on 3rd August1843 (Illustrated Sydney News) right  The uncovered original window with its reveal shutters and its 1829 oak graining which provided the sample for graining the other joinery. A master painter repaints the Trompe-l’oiel dado.  C Lucas

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The room is now used as an annexe to the Legislative Assembly Chamber next door which was originally built for the Legislative Council.

TOP  The

regrained oak joinery to an original window embrasure facing Macquarie Street. C Lucas ABOVE  The wooden 1843 chimneypiece with steel grate, painted in imitation of Belgian marble and the plaster dado painted in Trompe-l’oiel.  C Lucas background  ‘A.A.A.A. Proposed Addition to the present Council Chamber for the New Council Hall’.  An early sketch proposal for adding a full size chamber to the northern wing.  The room is here described as ‘Present Council Chamber 25 x 24’.  It housed a council of 15. (Colonial Architect’s Report 1843)

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A Master Plan for the Old Farm Sarah Murphy | Director, Conservation and Stewardship

Old Farm, Strawberry Hill has all the elements needed to provide an outstanding tourist and community facility based on a place of national significance. In the National Trust’s golden jubilee year an indicative site masterplan was developed to express the vision for future development of the place. In 2011, a grant from the Commonwealth Government boosted the National Trust’s financial ability to commission a detailed, costed masterplan for this very important heritage place.

Above: Members

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here is no doubt the place is of exceptional heritage significance. It was the first farm in Western Australia commencing in 1827 within a few months of establishment of the Military settlement of King George Sound. Stock was kept there and vegetables grown for the survival of soldiers and later the early settlers. A wattle and daub, thatched roof cottage was constructed in 1831 and was destroyed by fire in 1870. The two storey granite extension was built in 1836 and is what visitors see today. At one time the farm extended over 52 hectares. Today only approximately 1.7 hectares remain containing the main house building (1836), a cottage built pre 1889 and extensive grounds with some early plantings. In 1964 Old Farm, Strawberry Hill became the first property acquired by the National Trust of Australia in Western Australia.

of the consultancy team discuss proposals for the master plan at a site meeting with National Trust staff. L-R National Trust Landscape Architect Phil Palmer, National Trust Interpretation Manager Anne Brake, Anthony Coupe, National Trust Director Conservation and Stewardship Sarah Murphy and Paul Kloeden. E Paech/Mulloway Studio top:  An overview from the Old Farm Strawberry Hill Master Plan.

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image courtesy Bird Family Collection, NTWA The main house as viewed from the south-east during the Bird family’s period of ownership and today. Below:  The shoulder of this silver teapot is engraved with the words: “LUNIVERSITA DELLE QUATTRO CITTA DI MALTA AL MERITO DEL S. TEN. RICCAR. SPENSER D”, which roughly translates as having been given to (Sir) Richard Spencer by the University of the Four Cities of Malta. It is on display at Old Farm, Strawberry Hill. S Murphy/National Trust bottom:  Contemporary image of Old Farm Strawberry Hill. S Murphy/NTWA

The recently completed masterplan articulates a vision in which Old Farm becomes a key destination in Western Australia for both locals and visitors providing a platform for one of the most significant heritage experiences in Australia. Once the plan is implemented it is anticipated there will be an increase in visitors, greater utilisation by the local community and enhanced financial sustainability. The intent of the masterplan was to ensure all future works and activities at Old Farm contribute to and enhance the appreciation and understanding of its State and National heritage values. Importantly, it provides a means by which conservation, interpretation and enhanced access can be guaranteed through achievable and sustainable outcomes. Currently costed at $5 million, the project incorporates conservation works to the heritage buildings and grounds worth an estimated $3 million and the construction of an entry building in which to house a cafe, retail space, volunteer facilities, school and group visitor spaces, theatrette and areas for interpretation.

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In many ways the landscape strategies provide the most significant shift from the current presentation of the place. With reference to its significance as a farm, and with a desire to provide active public programs, the main strategies include a focus on productive gardening. Several areas will be planted with heritage variety plants taking the form of crops and orchards. The main drive is particularly evocative of the Bird period and its distinct character will be restored and enhanced through subtle interpretive elements and plantings. The main house is a focal point of the plan. It was built under the instruction of Sir Richard Spencer and is a very evocative tool in telling the stories of the occupants

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of Old Farm, Strawberry Hill. The house will continue to be central for interpretation within the site. It is intended that in the future visitors will enter the rooms and engage with interactive and immerse displays, while provenanced artifacts will be exhibited in a more interpretive context. The master plan will form the basis of future funding applications from Federal and State bodies supplemented by self generated funds from the National Trust over the next two years. It is highly desirable that the project is carried out within a defined timeframe so as to maintain momentum, minimise disruption to the site and to maximise opportunities for income generation.


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In the firing line Sue Finnigan | National Trust QLD

Staff at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital on the Gold Coast deal with the koala’s plight first-hand.

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isease and trauma caused by dog attacks and car strikes, have contributed to a 400 percent rise in koala rescues in the Gold Coast region in just three years. Within three months (August to October last year), the Sanctuary took in and treated seventy injured koalas in seventy days. In mid-2011 the Federal government declared the koala to be ‘vulnerable’ on the threatened species list, announcing that koala numbers had dropped dramatically by one third in New South Wales and by forty percent in Queensland over the last 20 years. Currumbin Wildlife Hospital’s dedicated veterinarian of 10 years, Michael Pyne called for community responsibility - for people to slow down, lockup their dogs in at night and cover their pools. “We are struggling to keep up. At the rate the koalas are declining on the Gold Coast they will soon be critically endangered,” he said. Last year the Currumbin Wildlife hospital treated 6,726 injured animals from as far afield as right  Vet

Lismore in New South Wales and north to Brisbane. “ “Each year this number is increasing by about 1,000 animals and we are struggling to find the estimated $450,000 required to keep running at its current level,” Dr Pyne said. Funding issues reached a critical point and the Gold Coast community responded. It was then that the help started coming in. A grade one teacher from a local school organised a charity dinner at a local restaurant and raised around $1,000 for the hospital. The Gold Coast District RSL donated $5,000. The black tie gala dinner fundraiser for the newly created Currumbin Wildlife Hospital Foundation raised a record $22,000 thanks to the generosity of all those that attended. Queensland X-Ray, Fuji Film and Voyager Imaging donated a state of the art second hand X-ray machine which has been invaluable. This has allowed staff to wade through their ever increasing workload more quickly and at a reduced

Nurse Patricia Smith with a Currumbin Patient. Currumbin Wildlife Hospital

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cost. Zarraffa’s Coffee announced they would donate about $70,000 in products and machinery, enabling the Sanctuary to create ongoing revenue. The annual Palm Beach ‘Christmas by the Sea’ event chose the Wildlife Hospital to be the recipient of their 2011 charity fundraiser and the donations from individuals and groups far and wide have been gratefully received. In response to community’s concerns, the Gold Coast City Council has promised $120,000 per annum for the next three years which will provide a foundation for the long term future of this vital community service. National Trust members can support native wildlife by visiting Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary while at the Gold Coast. Every member’s discounted entry fee assists the Sanctuary in its day to day running. If you wish to donate directly, visit the Currumbin Wildlife Hospital Foundation at www.savingyourwildlife.org.au


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War on Pests at Miss Porter’s House Dr Roland Bannister | National Trust (NSW)

Miss Porter’s House in Newcastle West is a free-standing, Edwardian house that contains family history spanning a century. Its extraordinary collection of furniture, clothes, needlework, millinery and household goods were used daily from 1910 to 1997 by Florence Porter and the two daughters she raised on her own, Ella and Hazel, following the untimely death of her husband, Herbert, in 1919. Ella and Hazel both remained single, living in the house until they died.

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heir home reflects the women’s interests and activities such as sewing, tending the garden, taking tea together and with friends, attending local cultural events and caring for the possessions which, after the death of Hazel in 1997, were bequeathed with the property to the National Trust. Two years ago, a pest inspection identified threats to Miss Porter’s House from household pests. Fortunately the danger was potential, rather than actual although there was some evidence of silverfish, moth, cockroaches, carpet beetles and mould. An ‘Integrated Pest Management’ strategy has been implemented to conquer the issues by the Miss Porter’s House Management Committee (MPH),and some heritage hard-hitters including the National Trust’s Jennifer Palmer (Collection Manager) and Stephen Buckland (Properties and Facilities Manager), Tamara Lavrencic (former Manager of Collections at the Historic Houses Trust) and Alex Roach (Principal of Heritage Pest Management). First up, the House and

Collection Sub-committee and other volunteers washed all washable textiles replaced paper and cardboard containers with plastic bins, archival quality storage boxes and Mylar sleeves. Then an intriguing series of treatments was undertaken to maximise results. Freezing: Certain organic items including cloth, clothes, shoes, hats, books and documents, were taken to Carrington Cold Storage for three weeks of freezing at minus 17 degrees celcius. Smaller objects were packed into labelled and sealed 55 litre plastic tubs. Plastic bags were fashioned with the help of a heater sealer to contain larger individual objects. Oxygen deprivation: Small organic objects were sealed in plastic bags with oxygen scavengers and packed into tubs, while larger items - a wooden ladder for example - were packed in individual sealed plastic bags with oxygen scavengers. These tubs and objects were stored at Kennard’s, or remained in the House. Alex Roach set up a large plastic bubble made from a high-barrier film in the parlour to house the lounge suite,

cushions and books. The oxygen was displaced by nitrogen and the bubble sealed. The room was heated to 30 degrees celcius and left for a total of four weeks. Bactigas: A low toxin, volatile Tea Tree Oil spray was directed at areas affected by mould. Spraying for museum pests: A small amount of toxic spray was directed to places where pests might congregate. More than 150 tubs and objects were taken off-site during the process and while the House was relatively empty, the interior was painted and professionally cleaned. The NSW National Trust contributed about $25,000 to the project, while volunteer initiated museum grants from Museums and Galleries NSW contributed $1,500 (last year) and $1,350 (this year) to help pay for archival storage products. The House now looks fresher, the bugs have met their doom, and the Trust’s volunteers have succeeded in a project of considerable magnitude and satisfaction.

Left & centre  The lounge suite and other organic items including paper ephemera were subjected to oxygen deprivation in a large sealed plastic bubble in a heated room for a month. C Shain right  Items of clothing were sealed in individual plastic bags and frozen for three weeks. C Shain

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Future for South Australian Riverland nature reserves Marcus Beresford | Councilor National Trust (SA)

Government proposals for the Murray Darling Basin Plan include 2,750GL of extra water for the environment. It is uncertain whether this additional flow will sustain environmental assets in the South Australian portion of the Basin as previous advice showed an extra 7,600GL was required for good environmental outcomes.

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he future of the National Trust of South Australia’s twelve nature reserves in the Murray Basin is directly linked to government decisions about water. For some, like Woolmer Reserve, a superb but tiny area (2 ha) of remnant Mallee vegetation, the outcome looks positive because of the species adaptation to arid conditions. The future is also looking bright for larger areas like DB Mack Reserve (265 ha), with its nationally endangered Mallee Fowl population.

ABOVE  Cave

Other reserves inland from the river also look sustainable. Loveday Reserve (5.2 ha) which contains particularly dense and untouched native vegetation, conserves eight bird species classified as

Cliffs Reserve showing dieback on flats. M Beresford/NTSA Reserve Acacia ligulata. M Beresford/NTSA

insert  Cadell

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vulnerable, rare or uncommon in South Australia including Regent Parrots. However, the future of riverside reserves is less certain. Beautiful Margaret Dowling Reserve (26 ha) with its wetlands and interesting early woodcutter’s bridge, is already under stress from four wheel drive vehicle access, and the impact of houseboat access which has resulted in barren riverbank camping areas. Joint management arrangements with an adjacent government Conservation Park are being explored.


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Similarly already under some pressure is the iconic Overland Corner Reserve (283 ha) with the historic Trust-owned Overland Corner Hotel (1858) - a stopping point for early coaches and stock drovers, and adjacent Heron’s Bend Reserve (17 ha), with its spectacular riverside cliffs rich with 15 million year old fossils. There are 132 indigenous plant species within the reserve including five classified rare in South Australia. However conditions are perilous. Drought and insufficient water releases have seen the death of hundreds of huge River Red Gums in these reserves. Fortunately young saplings are emerging from the devastated landscape. Meantime, Cave Cliffs Reserve (17.7 ha) with its important Aboriginal heritage cave, canoetree and middens, plus spectacular cliff views, faces other threats including salinity and stock intrusions. On a recent visit by the National Trust of South Australia’s Natural Heritage Committee, Bery Bery Reserve (16 ha) could not be accessed due to the high river, while a rare population of Prickly Bottlebrush Callistemon brachyandrus was identified during the same visit at riverside Cadell Reserve (8.7 ha). The possibility of joint management of Bery Bery and Cave Cliffs is to be explored with the local Aboriginal Lands Trust.

Goulburn Anniversary Goulburn, NSW, will celebrate 150 years since Queen Victoria declared it a city by Letters Patent in March 2013.

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s part of the celebrations the Goulburn & District Historical Society will hold two exhibitions of architectural drawings by Edmund Cooper Manfred, architect of Goulburn. One Exhibition, in the Goulburn Regional Art Gallery will feature architectural drawings of the CBD from 1880 – 1920 including the Town Hall, Fire Station, Mechanics’ Institute, Band Pavilion, shops and commercial premises. The second Exhibition at St Clair, the Archives of the Goulburn & District Historical Society will feature drawings of residences from tiny cottages to two storey villas which are included in two self-guided Walks. The Historical Society was recently awarded a grant in excess of $10,000 for the preservation of some of the collection by the National Library of Australia -such a sizeable grant is rarely awarded, indicating the significance of the collection. Enquiries  contact

Daphne Penalver penalver@goulburn.net.au

Above  West

End -- architectural drawings of residences from tiny cottages to grand villas. St Clair, 318 Sloane St, Goulburn, from 24 February to late June, 2013. Above right  Proposal for Town Hall, Auburn St, Goulburn – 1887. Goulburn and Districts Historical Society.

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NEW ZEALAND’S SOUTH ISLAND COUNTRY ESTATE AND LANDSCAPE TOUR 13-22 April 2013 In conjunction with Homestead Tours this is a rare chance for National Trust members to visit private high country stations and historic homesteads, wine makers and local artists; to explore this beautiful area of the Southern Lakes of New Zealand’s South Island and to experience the generous hospitality of our hosts. We have chosen April as the autumn colours will be at their peak and the roses and late summer flowers still in bloom - a most magical time of year to visit. From Christchurch to Queenstown unparalleled scenic beauty awaits as we travel via Lake Tekapo, Lake Wanaka, Lake Dunstan and Lake Hawea. With mostly two or three night stays we have daily visits to private properties, historic homesteads, towns and villages. This tour is full of surprises as we experience highlights of New Zealand’s spectacular South Island. Cost per person twin share: $4,790 Single room supplement: $950 Note: Costs do not include airfares Expressions of interest: David Smith, Travelscene on Capri P: 1800 679 066 License No: TA1091 Leader: Jill Bunning T: 02 9798 8914

NORFOLK ISLAND 15-22 April 2013 Visiting Norfolk Island is a unique experience. Rich in history, it is blessed with a temperate climate. It was first settled by Governor Arthur Phillip as a penal settlement and later became home to the Pitcairn settlers, survivors of the Mutiny on the Bounty, and their families, descendants of whom still live there today. Visit historic Kingston, Cascade and Longridge. See and hear about the famous convict buildings, beautiful beaches and golf course. Tour of the Museums and cemetery and sites of the First and Second settlements will provide you with a unique and truly memorable experience. Visit the Pittcairn Settlers Village and learn about the colourful history of Norfolk

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Holiday Tours

Island’s most recent settlement - the Pittcairners and their descendants, on one of the last few remaining original settler’s properties. The dramatic show “Mutiny on the Bounty” involves scores of the descendants of the mutineers, who bring the story of the Mutiny alive. Dining is also a unique experience on the picturesque island with fresh fish and traditional island food. Cost per person twin share: $3,690 Single room supplement: $990 Note: Cost include airfares ex Sydney, 7 nights accommodation at the Governors Lodge and most meals Enquiries: David Smith, Travelscene on Capri P: 1800 679 066 License No: TA1091 Leader: Lorraine Collins T: 0439 947 479

above Unmistakably

French; the streets of

Provence

PROVENCE 24 April - 7 May 2013 From its herb-scented hills to its spectacular coastline, no other region of France fires the imagination as strongly as Provence. Unpack only twice on this delightful tour in spring. After a few days exploring the French Riviera we move to the heart of Provence to a comfortable hotel in Les Baux-de-Provence for leisurely daily excursions to the surrounding area. Visit the splendid gardens of Villa Ephrussi-de-Rothschild, the artist Cezanne’s studio and the exciting new museum with works by Pierre Bonnard. Walk through beautiful villages such as Gordes, St Paul-de-Vence and Rousillon and see UNESCO world heritage sites including the historic centre of Avignon, the Roman and Romanesque monuments of Arles and the Pont-duGard aqueduct. Early bookings are

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highly recommended as we will only be taking a group of maximum 15 people. Cost per person twin share: $5,290 Single room supplement: $980 Note: Costs do not include airfares Expressions of interest: David Smith, Travelscene on Capri P: 1800 679 066 License No: TA1091 Leader: Loma Priddle T: 02 9412 2875

NORTHERN ITALY: LAKES, MOUNTAINS & THE RIVIERA 14-26 September 2013 This exciting new itinerary has been tailor made for National Trust members in conjunction with Ugo and Barbara Mariotti, who have been conducting enjoyable Trust tours in Italy over the past 10 years. Unpack only twice as we stay in centrally located hotels first in the town of Como, set in an idyllic landscape of mountains on the lake of the same name, then in the resort town of Santa Margherita Ligure in the heart of the Italian Riviera. Visit the spectacular gardens of Villa Carlotta and Villa Melzi; Bellagio, known as the ‘Pearl of Lake Como’; the Swiss town of Lugano and the gloriously decorated Certosa di Pavia. Leisurely daily excursions on the Italian Riviera include Portofino, the famous villages of the ‘Cinque Terre’ coastline and the heritage listed small port of Porto Venere. A day tour to Lucca, one of the most beautiful towns in northern Tuscany, is also included. Cost per person twin share: $6,190 Single room supplement: $990 Note: Costs do not include airfares Expressions of interest: David Smith, Travelscene on Capri P: 1800 679 066 License No: TA1091 Leader: Jill Bunning T: 02 9798 8914

above  Bellagio on Lake Como. Courtesy Italian Tourist Office


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QUILT Y TOURS - 2013 -

F L IN DE R S R A N G E S

12 days

Adelaide to Sydney

$4,475

27 April to 8 May

(twin share)**

OU T BACK AUST R A L I A (including Lake Eyre)

Award winning design SINCE 1987

14 days

Sydney to Sydney

$5,475

25 May to 7 June

(twin share**

Heritage in the making

R E M OT E QUE E NSL A N D & B EYON D

18 days

Sydney to Sydney

$6,950

19 July to 5 August

(twin share)**

C

elebrating its 25th anniversary in 2012, Perth-based graphic design studio Dessein has provided design services to the National Trust since 1990 making it the company’s oldest continuous client. Dessein’s creative team shapes Trust News Australia, Trust News WA and Heritage Living for the National Trust (SA) and has developed the National Trust’s new interactive magazines available online. Dessein is internationally recognised for its design concepts. Thanks for your commitment to the National Trust.

For full details of these tours go to

www.quiltytours.com.au

Like to see what dessein can do?  

visit www.dessein.com.au

OR Contact Richard Quilty personally on

0418 201 677

** Single Supplements are available

31

Trust News Australia november 2012


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Magnificent Australia

Heritage Air Tour 2013 2 depa r t u r es

July 16 & August 21

15 days s 17 seat e pa per d

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e

National Trust Members Price Exclusive Substantial Discount on published fare With 25 years of exploratory air touring throughout the continent, Flight Through The Spectacular Land Of The Dreamtime Pty Limited has created for National Trust members an extraordinary itinerary of remote Australia and the founder and director of these tours, David Marks has been acknowledged as the pioneer of modern day air touring in Australia. During the â&#x20AC;&#x153;dry seasonâ&#x20AC;? - July and August 2013, two only departures will realize lifelong ambitions to experience a vast expanse of Australia, visiting destinations of world importance for wilderness and cultural heritage. The diverse and exciting itinerary includes specially arranged visits to ancient rock art sites in the Kimberley and in stone country of western Arnhemland. Also included is a rare opportunity for cultural exchange with Aboriginal saltwater people in remote eastern Arnhemland. Extensive surface touring by vehicle and boat on inland waterways is provided with expert or informed commentary. National Trust members wanting to join either of the two departures are urged to apply without delay to avoid disappointment, as each departure is limited to 17 passengers.

Enquiries and Brochure: Flight Through The Spectacular Land of the Dreamtime Pty Limited Level 57, MLC Centre, Martin Place, Sydney, NSW, Australia 2000

Phone: (02) 9230 7070 Fax: (02) 9238 7633 Email: info@dreamtimebyair.com.au

www.dreamtimebyair.com.au

Trust News November 2012  

The National magazine of the National Trust movement in Australia - For our collective cultural heritage

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