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BRIGETTE WEISENBURGER + DR. DAVID MERXBAUER + VILLAGE BOWL + LU'S PIZZA

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

PHEASANT PHEVER

ABERDEEN PREPS FOR THE 2017 ROOSTER RUSH

FREE ISSUE!


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AUNT MAUDE’S SOUTHWESTERN CHILI Ingredients • • • • • • • • • • •

½ C Butter ¾ C Chopped Red Onion ¾ C Chopped Red Sweet Pepper ¾ C Chopped Celery 14 Oz can Diced Green Chilies 1 Jalapeno Pepper, Seeded and Chopped 2 Cloves Minced Garlic 5 Tsps Crushed Oregano ¼ C Flour 4 ½ Tsps Chili Powder 1 ½ Tsp Coriander

• • • • • • • • • • •

1 ½ Tsp Cumin 1 Tsp Salt 1 Tsp Sugar 4 ½ C Chicken or Turkey Broth 2 15 Oz Cans Black Beans, Rinsed and Drained 1 15 Oz Can Navy Beans, Rinsed and Drained 1 14 Oz Can Diced Tomatoes 1 C Canned Crushed Tomatoes ¼ Ketchup 2 ½ C Frozen Corn, Thawed 2 C Cubed Turkey Breast

Serves 8-10

CHARLESTON CHEESE DIP

Directions

Ingredients

Directions

In Dutch Oven, melt butter; add onion, sweet pepper, celery, chiles, jalapeno pepper, garlic and oregano; cook until onion is tender. Add flour, chili powder, coriander, cumin, salt and sugar. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Add chicken broth, black beans, navy beans, undrained tomatoes, crushed tomatoes and ketchup. Bring to boiling; reduce heat and cover. Simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. In food processor, puree 2 cups of corn. Add to pot along with remaining whole corn and turkey. Return to boiling; reduce heat, uncover and simmer for 10 minutes.

• • • • • • • • •

Combine all ingredients in mixing bowl, except crackers and bacon. Transfer to shallow baking dish. Top with cracker crumbs and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. Remove and top with bacon. Serve immediately.

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½ C Mayonnaise 8 Oz Softened Cream Cheese 1 C Grated Sharp Cheddar Cheese ½ C Grated Monterey Jack Cheese 2 Finely Chopped Green Onions 1 Dash Cayenne Pepper 8 Crushed Butter Crackers (Ritz) 8 Slices Crumbled Bacon Corn Chips, Crackers or Bagel Chips (for Serving)

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Contents VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 5 • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

REGULARS 04 FROM THE EDITOR 06 THE HUB 12 CALENDAR 18 GALLERY Create! Art from the Prairie 26 RECIPE Tiger Meat is a bizarre local delicacy 44 WHERE ARE WE NOW?

FEATURES 16

A TALENT WORTH SHARING Brigette Weisenburger

18

FOCUSING ON FLAVOR AND GOOD HEALTH Aberdeen’s new Banadir Kitchen and Market introduces a new Middle East menu to the area

22

20 KEEP ON DANCING Barb Hawk's Studio B Dance Company brings unique dance classes to Aberdeen 22

18

START YOUR ENGINES Another racing season crosses the finish line at the Brown County Speedway

24 A LEGACY OF SMILES Dr. Merxbauer 28 SMOKING: GOING UP IN VAPOR? Get a better understanding of this new craze 30 INTRODUCING THE NEW K.O. LEE ABERDEEN PUBLIC LIBRARY The Lee family continues their legacy of philanthropy for Aberdeen 32

30 40

PHEASANT PHEVER Pheasant hunting is drawing near. Aberdeen pulls out all the stops to make the experience memorable for residents and visitors

36 A TRIP DOWN MEMORY LANE Friends have met and found their second home at the Village Bowl for over 50 years 40 A SLICE OF HISTORY It seems every new pizza restaurant is compared to Lu’s. Learn about this bygone era icon that people just aren’t forgetting about

2

ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

36

32


2

NIGHTS of Glow!

GLOW Bowling

Friday 10pm-12am Saturday Family Session 7-9pm Saturday aturday 9pm-12am

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Dr. TJ Johnson 225-7414

Dr. Carol McFarlandKutter 397-8204

Dr. Stanley Ryman 225-3311

Dr. Anthony Skjefte 225-4099

Dr. Brittany Sutton 225-9311

go to: thevillagebowl.com

Dr. Barry J. Winkler 225-8288

Proven…Safe…Effective…Affordable! SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

3


R E H S I L Editor B PU FROM THE

VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 5 • SEPT/OCT 2017

ISSN 2378-3060 MANAGING EDITOR Coming Soon!

PUBLISHER Troy McQuillen

DESIGN

Eliot Lucas

AD SALES

Abby McQuillen abby@mcquillencreative.com

PUBLICATION OFFICE McQuillen Creative Group 423 S. Main St., Suite 1 Aberdeen SD, 57401 (605) 226-3481

PRINTING

Western Corporate Image

SUBMISSIONS

Aberdeen Magazine welcomes your input. Message us your story ideas, drop off historic photos, or stop in for a chat. Email us at: troy@mcquillencreative.com

WEBSITE

www.aberdeenmag.com

PRIVACY STATEMENT Any personal information, email addresses, or contact submitted to the editorial office or online via our Facebook page will not be sold or distributed. Aberdeen Magazine does wish to publish public comments and attitudes regarding Aberdeen, therefore written submissions and comments on our Facebook page implies permission to utilize said information in editorial content. Aberdeen Magazine is produced exclusively in Aberdeen, South Dakota. All content is copyright with all rights reserved. No content may be shared, copied, scanned, or posted online without permission. Please just ask us first. We’re pretty flexible.

www.mcquillencreative.com

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

I know it’s a bit early to be talking about Pheasant Season, but it will be here before we know it. And we can’t talk about the pheasant hunting without talking about the pheasant sandwich from the Red Cross Canteen that was served to U.S. troops as they traveled to and from WWII through Aberdeen via the Milwaukee Depot. This great legacy is going strong and has the potential to get even more popular. Aberdeen’s Convention and Visitors Bureau will once again attempt to paint the town orange as part of the state’s Rooster Rush community competition. In cooperation with Aberdeen Magazine, the CVB will be holding its first ever, pheasant sandwich contest to get even more people engaged with this unique history. See page 35 for a teaser about the Pheasant Sandwich Shootout. Plans were in the works just as this issue went to print. As you may recall, our previous issue was Becca Simon’s last contribution as managing editor and she now passes the baton to Jenny Roth, a regular

THIS ISSUE'S CONTRIBUTORS MICHAEL BOMMARITO Michael and his wife, Kate, have lived in Aberdeen for three years. Their two sons attend college out of state. He is the Chair of the Bible and Theology Department of Trinity Bible College in Ellendale, ND.

STACEY MCDONALD Stacey recently graduated from Northern State University with a BA in English. Since moving to Aberdeen, Stacey enjoys spending her free time with friends, reading, writing, and meeting new people in the community.

LAURA PTACEK Laura has been with the Aberdeen Area Convention and Visitors Bureau since June 2016. She works to promote Aberdeen through print and digital advertising, securing conventions and events and helps coordinate meetings of the Aberdeen Hotel Alliance. She spends her free time with her husband and two daughters, Ashley and Emmy, trying to find (and not step on) their twopound Yorkie, Phoenix.

contributor to the magazine. Becca was kind enough to help a great deal with this issue from her new residence in Portland, ME. Thanks, Becca! And welcome Jenny! Instead of direct mailing the magazine to Aberdeen and Brown County households, we decided to put the last two issues in area businesses for more exposure. In total, we left stacks of magazines at over 100 places in town for people to pick up for free. We also handed out nearly 300 copies at the Brown County Fair. Subscribers got their magazines in their mailbox, as usual. If you want to guarantee that you get each issue in your mailbox, feel free to subscribe. Aberdeen Magazine is a passion of mine that directly reflects my passion for a vibrant, welcoming, positive community. I want to thank our advertisers, readers, and contributors for continuing to support this magazine!

TROY MCQUILLEN Publisher

PATRICK GALLAGHER Pat never met a pizza he didn’t like. He is a regular contributor commenting on Aberdeen’s personality, food options, and history.

CODY PAPKE Cody has been practicing photography for 15 years and has been the track photographer at Brown County Speedway since 2003. He is also the track photographer at Jamestown Speedway in Jamestown, ND and Casino Speedway in Watertown. He has taken photos at over 40 dirt tracks around the Midwest.

JENNY ROTH Jenny Roth is a mother of three daughters, farmer's wife, and writer living in Roscoe, SD.

BECCA SIMON Readers will recognize Becca as the former Managing Editor of Aberdeen Magazine. While she can't be with us physically, she will always call Aberdeen home, no matter how far she travels.


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YOU R SO U RCE FO R WHAT’S HA PPENI NG I N ABERDE EN

 Derek Miller and Tyler Stone outfitted the former Webb Shoe store with hardcore workout equipment and machines.

CROSSFIT EROSION TAKES SHAPE ON MAIN STREET WHEN TYLER STONE AND DEREK MILLER found the right location for their new CrossFit training center, they didn’t waste any time in rolling up their sleeves and working to get CrossFit Erosion open for business. They converted the former Webb Shoe Building at 315 S. Main St. into an operating CrossFit gym in less than four weeks and have been hosting workouts there since July 1. “We really love the vibe downtown,” Tyler said. CrossFit classes can include everything from traditional weight lifting, jumping rope, running, bicycling, throwing, gymnastics, and more. Tyler explained that the goal of CrossFit Erosion is to make a healthy lifestyle fun and accessible for anyone willing to put in the work. “We chose the name CrossFit Erosion because the principles of erosion require consistency over a long period of

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

time. We don’t sell any short fixes or quick weight loss.” He added, “What we’re focused on is CrossFit training as a mode for getting fit, not for competing, so all the classes we do are scalable to your level of fitness. We want to share the gift of a healthy lifestyle with as many people as possible.” Members pay $135 a month and can participate in any of the classes that Tyler and Derek lead at various times throughout the week as well as open gym on Sundays. Tyler said the benefit of having these coached classes is that no one has to come in and feel out of place or like they are doing the workouts incorrectly. “That’s what we’re here for.” // — JENNY ROTH  FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CROSSFIT EROSION, STOP BY THE GYM IN PERSON, EMAIL CROSSFITEROSION@ GMAIL.COM, OR FIND THEM ON FACEBOOK.

A YEAR AGO, DR. ELIZABETH SCHWAB and Carla Glynn started planning for Aberdeen’s first Celebrate Sound event. Soon, that plan will be put into action. On Saturday, September 23, Celebrate Sound will be hosting a 1-Mile Walk and 5K Run to help fundraise, raise awareness, and promote hearing health. The 1-Mile Walk and 5K Run will both begin at 10:00 AM at Wylie Park, with check-in being at 9:30 AM. Celebrate Sound is a national awareness and fundraising event that was created to help promote hearing health in the community. Half of the proceeds from this event will be used by the Aberdeen Sertoma Club’s “Hearing Assistance for Families in Need” program. The other half of the proceeds will help fund Sertoma’s national hearing health mission projects, including college scholarships for hard-of-hearing and deaf students, scholarships for those pursuing graduate studies in speech-language pathology or audiology, grants to local non-profits providing hearing healthcare in communities across the nation, a Sound Investment campaign to promote better public accessibility for people using assistive hearing devices, and SAFEEars! an awareness program for the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss. Celebrate Sound and the Aberdeen Sertoma Club are excited to raise awareness for hearing health. Come out to Wylie Park on Saturday, September 23 and support a great cause! // – STACEY MCDONALD  TO DONATE OR REGISTER (INDIVIDUAL OR AS A

TEAM) GO TO WWW.MYCELEBRATESOUND.ORG AND ENTER 57401 AS THE ZIP CODE. THE REGISTRATION FEE IS $20. ON THE DAY OF THE EVENT, EACH PARTICIPANT WILL RECEIVE A T-SHIRT, A PAIR OF EARPLUGS, A WRISTBAND, AND A HAND-HELD FAN. THIS FAMILY-FRIENDLY EVENT IS WELCOME TO ALL AGES.

Illustration by Eliot Lucas

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BUZZ

PROPANE: NOT JUST FOR BBQS

 North Star Energy’s Gary Goeller fueling his propane powered pick up at North Star’s self-serve fueling station. Propane is 3-5% less efficient than gasoline, however, it is typically 30% less costly.

lot of popularity with commercial vehicle fleets and we can even install custom fueling systems at company headquarters,” says Gary Goeller, North Star’s autogas conversion specialist. The conversion and fuel is ideal for fleet vehicles traveling over 25,000 miles per year and has the potential to save 30-50% when compared to gasoline costs.

Conversions have been made to police vehicles, taxis, and farm trucks. Once a vehicle is converted, the ICOM technology allows the car or truck to still be used with gasoline. // – TROY MCQUILLEN  FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL GARY AT NORTH

STAR ENERGY 225-6383. THEY ARE LOCATED AT 721 S. STATE STREET IN ABERDEEN.

B A L L E T // TA P // J A Z Z // M O D E R N

REGISTER FOR ARCC DANCE CLASSES!

Attention Hunters!

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Register over the phone: (605) 626-7081

Classes for ages 2 – Adult HIP-HOP // RHYTHMIC GYMNASTICS // CLOGGING

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

S OU T H S HOR E DR I VE • R ICH MOND L A K E

Mon- Thu: 4–10PM, Fri: 4–Close Sat: 11–Close, Sun: 11AM–10PM

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Photo by Troy McQuillen

PROPANE POWERED VEHICLES ARE NOT a new phenomenon, however the way the fuel is being marketed now stands to increase the number of vehicles on our roads using propane. Aberdeen’s North Star Energy has been in the propane business for years. Recently they aligned with ICOM Alternative Fuel Systems to offer turnkey solutions for converting vehicles for propane use. Propane is typically less expensive per gallon than gasoline, which makes the savings and recouping of the conversion investment very attractive. Currently it is the third most popular fuel in the world. Propane fuel, or autogas, when compared to gasoline and diesel, is safer, less flammable, and less toxic to the point that many school districts contract for autogas on an annual basis for buses. “We see a


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BUZZ

DIESEL DEGREE DEVELOPED

2 0 1 7 - 2 0 1 8

S E A S O N

 The Chamber of Commerce was on hand to officially open the Diesel Classroom. Shane Swenson, Lake Area Tech Business Partner Specialist, welcomes the crowd (at right).

Corporation staff and board of directors, Chamber members, and other community leaders. The new “diesel classroom” still needs to be outfitted with the appropriate equipment, but Michael Bockorny, ADC’s Chief Executive Officer, says that’s all in the works. Training is scheduled to begin this November while LATI plans to kick off their first two-year program in August 2018 from the Aberdeen location. // – TROY MCQUILLEN

Photos by Troy McQuillen

ONE KEY TO SUSTAINING GROWING businesses in Aberdeen is to sustain an educated workforce. Our state’s technical colleges play a significant role in developing skilled labor to address the needs of businesses. Unfortunately, the closet trade school to Aberdeen is Lake Area Technical Institute (LATI) in Watertown. But due to a significant grant from the South Dakota Department of Education of $250,000, the Aberdeen Development Corporation (ADC) has partnered with LATI to create a diesel technology program here in the Industrial Park. On August 10, the Aberdeen Chamber was on hand to do a ribbon cutting to officially open the new facility. Those in attendance were officials from LATI, area machinery and implement businesses, Aberdeen Development

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

11


CALENDAR

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER SEPTEMBER

15 SEPTEMBER

21 SEPTEMBER

23 SEPTEMBER

30 OCTOBER

1 12

NORTHEAST SOUTH DAKOTA CELTIC FAIRE AND GAMES WHEN: September 15 - September 16 6:30 - 10:30 Fri., 9:00 AM - 10:00 PM Sat. WHERE: Brown County Fairgrounds COST: Friday - $5, Saturday - 13 and under free, 13-18 $5, 18+ $10 Come join this two-day celebration of Celtic culture and its impact on our society with a variety of sporting events, storytelling, concerts, performances, heritage arts demonstrations, and more.

SOUTH DAKOTA FILM FESTIVAL WHEN: September 21 - September 23 - 5:00 PM WHERE: Capitol Theatre COST: Call the Capital Cinema box office for admission options at 226-5494. The 2017 South Dakota Film Festival will feature a selection of great films made by independent filmmakers across the Great Plains.

CELEBRATE SOUND WHEN: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM WHERE: Wylie Park and Storybook Land COST: $20 Get active while raising awareness for hearing health in this fundraiser sponsored by the Aberdeen Sertoma Club. Funds will provide scholarships to the deaf or hard of hearing children, as well as those pursuing graduate studies in speech-language pathology or audiology.

GYPSY DAY PARADE WHEN: 9:00 AM WHERE: Main Street COST: Free Catch Maroon and Gold fever at this year’s parade, where the theme is “Wolves Go Adventuring.”

PUMPKIN PATCH FOR KIDS WHEN: 12:00 - 3:00 PM WHERE: Centennial Village COST: Free will donation What’s autumn without pumpkins? Come pick your own pumpkin and take in a variety of other activities, including pumpkin painting, barrel train rides, and face painting. The Pumpkin Patch is for children ages 10 years and younger.

ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

5 OCTOBER

7 OCTOBER

14 OCTOBER

27 OCTOBER

28

ABERDEEN AREA HEALTHY AGING RESOURCE FAIR WHEN: 1:00 - 4:00 PM WHERE: Bethlehem Lutheran Church COST: Free Hear from experts across the region about mental health, art therapy, living a healthy lifestyle, caregiving, and more. There will be over 40 program and service booths.

OKTOBERFEST WHEN: 11:00 AM - 11:00 PM WHERE: Aberdeen Civic Arena and Central Park COST: $5, Children 10 and under free Enjoy a full day of German/Russian themed activities, including a dog parade, dachshund races, authentic Bavarian music and dancing, food, beer, and wine.

FOREST DRIVE FRIGHT NIGHT WHEN: 5:00 - 9:00 PM WHERE: Forest Drive/Richmond Lake Recreation Area COST: Park entrance license required, no other cost Explore your spooky side with this scavenger hunt along the trails, a hay ride around Forest Drive, coloring contest, and trick-or-treating tables. All ages are welcome.

HAUNTED FOREST WHEN: October 27 - October 28 6:30 - 10:00 PM Friday and Saturday 1:00 - 3:00 PM Saturday WHERE: Storybook Land/Wylie Park COST: $13 Gather your friends and family for the scariest night in Aberdeen. This chilling Halloween event is for youth and adults of all ages. A special matinée performance for younger children will be held Saturday afternoon with ticket sales from 1:00 - 3:00 PM, which includes trick-or-treating with the Haunted Forest characters.

CULTUREFEST WHEN: 10:00 AM - 10:00 PM WHERE: NSU Barnett Center COST: $5 adults, $3 students grades 1-12, free for children 6 and under This one-day event celebrates the food, dress, customs, and celebrations of a variety of cultures.


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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

13


GALLERY

FOR THE LOVE OF ART

A

COLLECTIVE EXHIBIT THAT celebrates the one-of-a-kind style of every artist is on display at the Granary Rural Cultural Center. “Create! On the Prairie” showcases 60 unique pieces of art made by 38 different artists from across South Dakota and surrounding states. The Dacotah Prairie Museum launched the project this spring by spreading the word through social media that they were in search of anyone interested in sharing their artwork. Professional artists, high school students, and hobby artists all responded and are featured side-by-side to proudly represent our region’s diverse art scene. Each contributor was able to use the media of their choice, resulting in a collaboration that includes everything from painting, drawing, and printmaking to photography, 3D art, jewelry, and beadwork. // — JENNY ROTH  THE EXHIBIT IS OPEN TO VISITORS THURSDAYS AND

FRIDAYS FROM 1:00 PM – 7:00 PM AND SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS FROM 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30. A CLOSING RECEPTION DURING WHICH SOME OF THE ARTISTS WILL BE ON HAND TO MEET WITH AND DISCUSS THEIR ART WILL TAKE PLACE OCTOBER 1 FROM 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. THE GRANARY IS LOCATED NORTHEAST OF ABERDEEN. GOOGLE DIRECTIONS OR CALL THE MUSEUM AT (605) 626-7117.

 "The Chinese Chicken" by Ryan Johnson

 "Mother Love" by Jay Hopkins

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017


LOCAL GALLERIES WEIN GALLERY Presentation College 1500 North Main Street 605-229-8350 Mon-Thurs 8 AM-9 PM, Fri 8 AM-5 PM, and Sun 1-9 PM PRESIDENT’S GALLERY, JFAC GALLERY AND STUDENT CENTER GALLERY Northern State University 1200 South Jay Street 605-626-7766 President’s Gallery: Mon-Fri 8 AM-10 PM, JFAC Gallery: Mon-Fri 8 AM-4:30 PM, Student Center: Mon-Fri 7 AM-11 PM and weekends 1-9 PM

Photos by Troy McQuillen  "Gathering" by Erin Asmussen

 "Mary Mother of Crop Circles" by Erin Asmussen

LAMONT GALLERY Dacotah Prairie Museum 21 South Main Street 605-626-7117 Tues-Fri 9 AM-5 PM, Sat and Sun 1-4 PM ARTWORKS CO-OP GALLERY Lakewood Mall 3315 6th Ave SE Suite #48 605-725-0913 Thurs-Sun 12-6 PM or by appointment JANE WEST GALLERY Capitol Theatre 415 South Main Street 605-225-2228 Open during events, call ahead for additional hours of operation ARCC GALLERY Aberdeen Recreation and Cultural Center 225 3rd Ave SE 605-626-7081 Mon-Thurs 9 AM-8 PM, Fri 9 AM-5 PM and Sat 10 AM-12 PM

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  "Wedding Necklace" by Zaida Larson SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

15


PROFILE

 Brigette and Teniola Lawal at the keys in Brigette’s home piano studio.

aTalent worthsharing BRIDGETTE WEISENBURGER FINE TUNES HER NICHE

WRITTEN BY JENNY ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY BY TROY MCQUILLEN

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017


B

RIGETTE WEISENBURGER knew from an early age where she wanted to focus her life’s work. When she was just 11 years old, she had her first Suzuki piano lesson with former Aberdeen instructor Pam Rossi. She says she instantly found her niche. “That was my first experience with piano lessons and Pam was so wonderful and inspiring that I really just fell in love with it. I’ve known pretty much since then that I wanted to be a Suzuki piano teacher.” Fast forward to the present, and these days you can find her influencing her own students at The Suzuki Piano Studio, which she has operated in Aberdeen for over 20 years. The Suzuki method of teaching is an internationally recognized mother-tongue approach to music education. It uses the principle that children learn to speak by hearing their native language spoken around them constantly, and applies that natural learning process to playing music. Students do a lot of listening to the piece they are trying to master and become very familiar with it. The general rule of thumb for traditional piano lessons is that the child has to be reading to learn so they can read the notes, but the Suzuki method starts teaching students as young as three years old because they start out listening and learning the notes by ear. The culture at Brigette’s piano studio is centered on helping students grow in both talent and confidence. She has immersed herself in becoming a knowledgeable instructor, traveling as far as Tennessee, Colorado, and Montreal to attend various Suzuki courses and workshops that have prepared her to teach. “I started getting certified and teaching when I was 16 and have basically had my own private studio since then.” Even though this style of music education is popular worldwide, there are only a handful of instructors in South Dakota. At her inhome studio Brigette teaches anywhere from 20-30 individual children ranging in ages from 3-18 years-old. Most students are local, but some drive from as far as Jamestown, ND on a weekly basis for lessons. She emphasizes that anyone, no matter how musically inclined, can learn to play the piano this way. “My personal goal is to have everyone reach their own highest potential or brand of excellence, and that’s different for every child. The idea is that talent can be cultivated.” One thing Brigette says her students enjoy the most are the group music theory courses that they all participate in together. Throughout the year, she gathers the kids into these small classes so they can play games and also share the music they are learning with their peers. “Piano is usually not a

MY PERSONAL GOAL IS TO HAVE EVERYONE REACH THEIR OWN HIGHEST POTENTIAL OR BRAND OF EXCELLENCE, AND THAT’S DIFFERENT FOR EVERY CHILD. THE IDEA IS THAT TALENT CAN BE CULTIVATED. very group-like activity, so these classes are a nice way for them to get to do something together,” she adds. “The Suzuki method is also very family orientated, so parents get to come to lessons with their kids and practice with them at home, too.” The highlight for everyone is the annual spring recital, during which children get to perform at the Civic Center and see their accomplishments from the year unfold. Piano has always been the main area where Brigette dedicates her time, but she wears many hats. In addition to running her studio, she also coordinates the youth dance program at the Aberdeen Recreation and Cultural Center. This is a huge undertaking that requires the organization of all the dancers, classes, instructors, and even a recital. When she isn’t actively teaching others, you can find her instead stepping into the shoes of the student. Last fall she went back to school to finish her Bachelor of Arts degree in music and is currently studying full-time at Northern State University. All of this combined is a lot to balance at once, but her dedication to connecting with her students keeps her going. “I enjoy teaching. I enjoy it when I see them work really hard for something, and seeing that moment when they own it and master it, it’s really gratifying.” //  MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SUZUKI PIANO

STUDIO CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT WWW.FACEBOOK. COM/SUZUKIPIANOABERDEEN.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

17


UP CLOSE

FOCUSING ON FLAVOR AND GOOD HEALTH New Middle East Restaurant and Market Unique to Aberdeen by TROY MCQUILLEN

A

CTING ON A TIP FROM A FRIEND Yasmin and Mohamudi Abdulle of Sioux Falls have opened a new ethnic food venture here in Aberdeen. The new restaurant and adjacent market are located in the Tiffany Plaza at Sixth and First Street. The restaurant faces south, while the market is on the backside facing north. “We recognized Aberdeen’s ethnic population is growing due to hospitals and large companies employing large numbers of diverse peoples,” states Mohamudi, “so we wanted to try something a little bit different than was currently available in town.” Their new restaurant,

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

called Banadir Kitchen features  (Top to bottom) Rice and Beef a vast variety of ethnic, Middle Stew; Cinnamon East, cuisine including beef, Rice with BBQ Chicken and Beef chicken, goat, and camel meat. Steak; Chicken Their meat is all halal (processing Salad with Lemon not unlike kosher), and sourced from the best quality options available in the region. “We pride ourselves on quality and good health,” says Yasmin. Many of their dishes are served with rice and house-made sauces. And a banana, as is customary in Somali meals. The Banadir Halal market offers a unique glimpse into very different products ranging from foods to kitchen aids, to clothing and bath products. “We want to be a basic, one-stop shop,” says Mohamudi. The first thing you notice when you walk in is the smell of the bulk spices and the pallets of rice and pasta. Somali’s eat a lot of rice and spaghetti so the rice and pasta options are plenty and quite unique. As Aberdeen’s population grows due to more and more jobs available, diverse cultures will continue to appear. Businesses like Banadir Kitchen and Halal offer a great way to better understand a different culture in our midst. Facebook reviews and comments are all very positive about their cuisine. Stop in and meet the Abdulle’s local business partners, Yasmin’s brother Isse, and market manager, Yonis. Both are very eager to introduce you to their unique flavors. //

Photos by Troy McQuillen

 Yasmin Abdulle welcomes everyone to the new restaurant she and her husband recently opened in the old Wishbones space at Tiffany Plaza. “We have something for everyone,” Yasmin says.


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UP CLOSE  While dance instructor Barb Hawk recovers from an injury, she still continues to teach in various places around town like the dance studio in Profiling Beauty.

Leading a seated dance class fits in exactly with her philosophy that anyone, no matter what their circumstances, can gain confidence through dance. “Even if we’re not feeling well or moving very well, we can still get out there, move around, and have some fun. We can still do dancing with our arms, hands, and neck.” The classes she offers cover a wide variety of genres for adults and children including Hip Hop, Street Jazz, Latin and Ballroom dancing, Stomp, and more. “My mission is to have people of all shapes and sizes come in and feel comfortable. I know going into dance class, adults especially can feel really selfconscious, but I want to make it very laid back so people feel good about dancing.” Right now, Barb’s studio is exclusively a traveling one until she re-opens her permanent location at Profiling Beauty Health and Wellness Center in January. You can find her hosting classes and workshops at places like the Red Rooster and Aspire. Another thing that is important to her is providing opportunities for dancers to learn different techniques that aren’t currently being taught in the area. “I want to bring things that Aberdeen doesn’t already have. I want to bring some flare.” She realized that there weren’t Hip Hop or Ballroom dancing options for younger kids, so she decided to offer those lessons. One of her most popular and unique classes is the Brazilian Samba. “Samba is awesome, it’s hardcore, and such a big hit.” A lot of Barb’s inspiration for her classes comes from her time spent training in the Chicago area. She enjoys sharing the styles of dance that are popular there, like Hip Hop and Street Jazz, with her students here in Aberdeen. Whatever class she is teaching, she says the most important part is making sure everyone is having a good time. “I like to do different songs and different routines every week to keep things fun, or add in counts where the class can improvise and add their own moves to the music. Nothing gives me more pleasure than to teach dance. It’s a wonderful and amazing thing.” //

KEEP on DANCING

Barb Hawk’s Studio B Dance Company brings unique, lively and original dance classes to Aberdeen by JENNY ROTH

B

ARB HAWK’S EXCITEMENT IS contagious when she talks about her new Studio B Dance Company. Dancing has been a part of her life since she was a child, and she has traveled all over the country and state teaching dance classes for different studios over the years. But having her own studio has always been her lifelong dream. So last February, with the support of her husband Bob and some close friends, like Mandi Rayuck, she decided to make the leap and opened Studio B Dance Company here in Aberdeen.

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

Unfortunately, shortly after getting her business started, she tore her ACL. The knee injury required months of recovery time and meant that she wasn’t able to teach any dance classes to the students who had already signed-up. She could have decided to quit and just refunded everyone’s money, but instead she opted to push forward even though things weren’t going quite as planned. After some searching, she was able to hire another instructor to lead her classes until her knee healed. She also planned some lighter classes she could teach, like her seated dance class for those that are in wheelchairs or less mobile.

MORE INFORMATION ON STUDIO B DANCE COMPANY IS ON FACEBOOK AT WWW.FACEBOOK. COM/1STUDIOBDANCECOMPANY.

Photo by Troy McQuillen

“I WANT TO BRING THINGS THAT ABERDEEN DOESN’T ALREADY HAVE. I WANT TO BRING SOME FLARE.”


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UP CLOSE

START YOUR ENGINES

F

RIDAY NIGHT CAR RACES AT the Brown County Speedway are a deep rooted tradition. Motorsport fans have been cheering for their favorite drivers at the racing track since its start in Aberdeen in the 1920s. Maybe it’s the roar of engines, the excitement that builds in the grandstands during a close contest, the way dirt flies as racers battle for position around a corner, or a combination of these and more that keeps people coming back each week. Todd Neuendorf accurately sums up the dedication of Aberdeen race enthusiasts, “Most people who head to the races are passionate fans who grew up going to the speedway every Friday night and now take their own families. Kids can go down in the pit afterwards and meet the drivers; it’s fun family entertainment that anyone can watch.” Todd manages the speedway along with his wife Jaime, brothers Scott and Troy, and parents Ken and Pat. Prior to their start in running the speedway three years ago, the Neuendorf family made the drive from their home in Watertown to Aberdeen for weekly races as often as possible. “I’ve probably

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

been going for at least 43 years,” Todd said. Because of their love for the sport and the race community, they jumped at the chance to operate the Brown County Speedway when the opportunity came. The county owns the track and leases it out in five year contracts. Even though their 2017 season is coming to a close, as car races run in the summer from Memorial Day through Labor Day weekend, there is still plenty of behind the scenes work that the family takes care of together year round. For example, Todd said, “We do all the track maintenance like taking it apart after races, blading it, putting it back together, and then watering it and driving around packing it down to get it ready for the next week’s races. Jaime runs the concessions and the 40 employees it takes to keep that going. We manage crews who work on race nights and help us clean up the grandstands. Then in the winter we are planning and securing sponsors. There’s a lot that goes into making it work.” On a typical Friday night, hundreds of drivers from South Dakota, North Dakota, and Minnesota

come to the speedway to compete in six different classes for cash prizes. Each class requires a different car model and increases in difficulty and speed. The late model class is the fastest performing in Aberdeen and the top level of racing for our area. According to Todd, many drivers were introduced to the sport at an early age. “A lot of kids that end up growing up and racing are kids that grew up coming to races or raced go karts ahead of time. It’s an expensive hobby, but once it gets in your blood, it’s hard to get out.” //  FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE BROWN COUNTY

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Photos by Cody Papke

Another racing season crosses the finish line at the Brown County Speedway by JENNY ROTH


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PROFILE

A LEGACY of SMILES Dr. David Merxbauer by BECCA SIMON

I

F YOU ASK DAVID MERXBAUER WHAT HIS SECRET to success is in the medical field, he’ll answer with one word: care. For over a decade, the Aberdeen Dental Center has been providing top-notch care from a highly skilled team and prioritizing the needs of patients above all else. “I’ve found that people don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care,” David said. “They know that I care about them as a person, not just about fixing their teeth.” David attended the University of South Dakota already knowing he wanted to pursue a career in the medical field. While studying in the medical school library, he would often overhear students talking about what their life was going to be like as a physician. He thought to himself, “Well, I like to work with my hands, and I like to build and fix things. That opened my mind to what other things in the medical field gave me that opportunity.” David found that the dental field perfectly fit his niche. He was able to work with his hands, be technically savvy, and most importantly, still have time for his family. “I’m not working on call, and there aren’t that many dental emergencies that can’t be taken care of during the week.” After USD, David attended the University of Nebraska before moving back to practice in Sioux Falls, after which he practiced in Sisseton for nine years. In 2006, he returned to Aberdeen after not having lived here since grade school, and opened his own practice. He started in the strip mall just west of Shopko before quickly outgrowing that space. “We hit Aberdeen right at its growth spurt,” he explained. After that, he moved his practice across the street into what used to be a farm service building. From there, they took it down to bare walls and rebuilt it from the ground up. “We’re still in a growing phase. We have been blessed by Aberdeen and find it a great place to raise our kids.”

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

According to David, small communities like Aberdeen are the backbone of society. In addition to raising his kids in Aberdeen, three of them have moved back here, and two of them joined the practice. “They all went into careers that are pillars of the community. I think Aberdeen has so many opportunities, and it keeps a steady growth.” Since they opened 11 years ago, the Aberdeen Dental Center has continued to grow at a rapid rate. At times, this proved to be a challenge. “We came and met a niche, we grew very quickly, and I went from a few operatories to many. We kept growing and adding team members, which have been my greatest asset,” David said. “I’ve been blessed to have some team members for close to a decade. We get good people and we keep them.” One of David’s favorite aspects of dentistry is the fact that things are constantly changing. Being in the dental field means always being on the cusp of new technology. He’s gone from using air driven to electric handpieces, crowns that no longer contain metal, and even fillings that cause your teeth to be less sensitive than in the past. Recently, he attended a seminar where he looked at a new laser and three dimensional X-rays, which is one of his first goals of newer technology to acquire. “There’s so much that has changed in the 25 years I’ve been doing it – it’s fabulous and fun,” David said. However, he tries to avoid buying the first thing that comes out. “I like to make sure it’s a technology that’s tried and true tested.” At the end of the day, it’s the care he’s able to provide to patients that makes his job worthwhile. When he treats them, he always makes sure to offer three or more options for every procedure. “If you come in and have a broken tooth, depending on how it’s broken, we may be able to do a root canal, a crown, put a filling in, or take the tooth out,” David explained. “Every patient has a different goal or focus. I try to give them many options so they can choose.” Regardless of profession, David believes that everyone will have a rewarding life if they choose to put the care of others above all else. “If you care about the patient first and foremost, everything else kind of takes care of itself.” David believes that his practice is in it for the long haul. “We’ve put down roots that make it very stable. I won’t live forever, but I’ve got a continuity plan going – we’re going to be here for a very long time. We’ve got roots in Aberdeen and we’re staying here. Hopefully we’re able to give back to the community as much as it has blessed us.” //

“I’VE FOUND THAT PEOPLE DON’T CARE HOW MUCH YOU KNOW UNTIL THEY KNOW HOW MUCH YOU CARE.”


Photo by Troy McQuillen

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

25


TASTE

TIGER MEAT… WAIT, WHAT?

Spoiler alert: It's not made from tigers!

A bizarre local delicacy that is not for everyone by TROY MCQUILLEN

M

ANY PEOPLE AROUND HERE CAN’T WAIT FOR A PARTY just so they can serve and eat tiger meat. Why raw beef with raw egg is called tiger meat in these parts remains a mystery. The dish/dip/appetizer is very dangerous due to the raw ingredients and all federal and state food agencies strongly encourage people not to eat it. All risk a side, tiger meat is definitely a Midwest delicacy, in fact it’s not really found in many parts of the country. For whatever reason, we love it here. According to Glen Aipperspach, a former Aberdonian who ran a meat market known for German-style meats, he believes tiger meat is nothing more than steak tartare, distilled down into simpler flavors befitting of the Midwest pallet. His parents owned a grocery store near Lincoln school in the 60s and 70s and on any given Saturday would make and distribute 20-30 pounds of tiger meat to Aberdeen bars. Historically, steak tartare is raw ground beef or horse, mixed with minced onions, raw egg, capers, pickles, Worcestershire, Dijon mustard, and seasonings. Historians argue it was named after the Tartar conquerors, who introduced raw meat to the Russians in Germany, while others contend it means “with tartar” as in raw meat with tartar sauce. In any case, it came to the U.S. via Germans, Russians, or the French. Ultimately steak tartare was fried up in Hamburg, Germany, creating the hamburger. Everything about tiger meat doesn’t make sense. The health risk is severe, although we don’t hear a lot about people getting sick. According to Glen and many online sources it’s best to consume it within two days. We have provided a recipe here because if all the health organizations are correct, you shouldn’t even risk transporting tiger meat to your home from a store without a cooler in your shopping cart. Several places around town sell it in their meat departments (without the eggs) with ample fans supporting their favorite. But so many questions remain. How fresh is it? How fresh is the beef; the eggs? To help reduce the risk, ask the folks behind the counter or make it yourself and eliminate the mystery. //

MAKES

GLEN’S RECIPE

1

POUND

• 1 pound of trimmed beef Do NOT buy ground beef or hamburger! Fat develops e-coli and goes rancid quickly, and will create a pastier texture. Use lean cuts of meat like sirloin or round, with all the fat trimmed away. Venison and buffalo would make for even leaner alternatives. Keep it cold, and don’t get it out until you’re ready to grind.

• 1 egg Assuming your favorite grocery store stocks the freshest eggs possible, go for that, or find someone with a chicken coop and stand by the ready for a really fresh egg.

• ¼ cup finely minced onion • Salt and pepper to taste

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED

2. You can salt and pepper the beef at this point prior to going into the grinder. It is customary to grind meat twice, so grind it up again. 3. Mix in the onions and the egg. 4. Chill immediately for 12 hours prior to consuming. The salt will cause the meat to turn brown, which is perfectly normal. 5. Sample it, then add anything you like to spice it up.

6. To serve, form it like a meat loaf on a plate or dish it into a bowl, on top of a bed of ice. It must remain cold at all times. Beware of piling it too high where the top is too far from the ice. Spread onto saltines or your cracker of choice. OPTIONAL Some folks add green pepper and a host of other spices and hot sauces. But it seems those would obscure the actual taste of the raw beef, which seems to be the only point of consuming something like this, so why bother? Due to the potential health risks associated with eating raw eggs and meat, prepare and consume at your own risk.

COOK’S NOTE: I am not a fan of tiger meat. I added a pound of regular ground beef to my tiger meat prepared for this recipe, made patties and fried them up. The resulting burgers were incredibly moist and delicious.

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

Photo by Troy McQuillen

1. Grind the beef in a meat grinder with a fine blade. (Prior to grinding your beef, place your grinder parts in the freezer so that they don’t transfer warmth to the meat while you grind.)


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 The folks at KDS Vapors, located in the shops in front of Kmart, Tyler Lemonds, Hogan Decker, and Ryley Lemonds, demonstrate the dramatic amount of steam or vapor, vaporizer devices are capable of producing.

UP CLOSE

SMOKING: GOING UP IN VAPOR?

Get the scoop on this steamy new trend HE VAPORIZING INDUSTRY, OR Vaping as it is more commonly called, is a growing multi-billion-dollar global business. It is even catching on here in Aberdeen, with one vaping store in town boasting a customer base of over 350. Despite its incredible growth, many still have little idea what it is all about. In short, vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling vapor produced by an electric device called a vaporizer. The most well-known form of vaporizer is the e-cigarette, but these are just a small fraction of what’s on the market. E-cigarettes come with pre-filled cartridges that need to be replaced and have a very limited selection of flavors or strengths. Advanced Personal Vaporizers (APVs) such as Vape Pens or Vape Mods are usually larger, can produce more vapors, and allow for a vast array of flavors and nicotine strengths. All vaporizers use a small battery charge to convert e-liquid into vapor, which is then inhaled. E-liquid is made up of a base of vegetable glycerin, which produces the vapor, propylene glygol, which is a thinning agent found in many asthma inhalers, food-grade flavoring, and varying strengths of pharmaceutical-grade nicotine, although there are many nicotine-free e-liquids as well. While e-cigarettes are readily available at most gas stations or stores where cigarettes are found, most vapers will get there supplies from a vape store. The

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

wide selection of vaporizers, which can run anywhere from $40 to $400, and the wide array of flavors one can choose make it difficult for a convenience store to meet the needs of the customer. The various flavors are what tend to drive the sales of repeat customers, as the options are as limitless as the creator’s imagination. From simple fruit flavors to more complex flavors such as bananas flambé or birthday cake, vape juice teases the taste buds while settling that nicotine craving. Many vape shops make up their own vape juice recipes, which enables them to provide an individualized service to their clientele. The flavors are usually produced in  KDS Vapors sells a vast array of vaporizers priced for all budget levels.

Photos by Troy McQuillen

T

by MICHAEL BOMMARITO

a certified lab to ensure product purity and precise nicotine levels. For example, one vape shop here in Aberdeen has its juices made in a lab in Watertown. The flavors, however, draw more than a loyal customer base. One of the biggest criticisms lobbied against the vaping industry is that the flavors cater to children with the desire to get them hooked on nicotine. Although many are worried about the draw of vaping on teenagers, the Aberdeen Public School District reports very few incidents of vaping on campus, certainly no more than regular smoking. While many tout the health benefits of vaping over cigarette smoking, there are many who are skeptical about the long-term effects of this new craze. The American Heart Association is careful to state that while vaping is healthier than cigarette smoking, they stop short of calling it healthy. The two biggest unknowns connected to the health risks of vaping are that it is too new to judge longterm effects and the variety of flavors make it nearly impossible to test all the unique chemical combinations. This is also the case with the risks associated with secondhand vapors. Although the exhaled vapor is far less visible than cigarette smoke, it is still present. Most likely these vapors are still less harmless than exhaled smoke, but how much so is still uncertain. Still the purported health benefits are what attract most people to vaping, mostly to quit smoking. The vaporizer allows the individual to consume nicotine without the risks of inhaling the smoke of burning tobacco. Many who make the switch claim significant health improvements such as having more energy, increased lung-capacity, and overall better health. Although the FDA has started regulating the industry more closely, it seems vaping is going to be around for a while. //


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FEATURE

The Lee family continues their legacy of philanthropy for Aberdeen by TROY MCQUILLEN

W

ITH A MOVE TO A BRAND new building, Aberdeen’s library is retiring the name, Alexander Mitchell and replacing it with K.O. Lee in honor of Karl O. Lee who has graciously pledged $900,000 to the construction of the new library building. For many, Alexander Mitchell is synonymous with our public library for very good reason. His name has been on our libraries since 1901. When Andrew Carnegie was enjoying massive success as a steel supplier to the booming railroads, he offered grants to communities across the country so they could build libraries in new pioneering towns along the railways. In all, he helped fund 1,689 libraries to the tune of $60 million. He was, after all, the richest man in the world at the time (1888).

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

These libraries came to be known as Carnegie Libraries. In all, South Dakota received 25 Carnegie Libraries, several of which still remain today. Aberdeen’s library was built in 1901 with a $15,000 grant on the corner of 6th Avenue and Lincoln Street at the current location of the First United Methodist Church’s expansion wing. It opened the following year and served the community until it was condemned in 1950. It was in fact, not named after Carnegie, but rather for his friend, fellow Scottish immigrant, and president of the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad, the late Alexander Mitchell. Carnegie thought it fitting to name the Aberdeen library for Mitchell because he was from Aberdeenshire, Scotland, the namesake of our city. The legend goes that Aberdeen has the

only Carnegie library not named after Andrew Carnegie. Despite inquiries with the Carnegie Foundation, this appears impossible to prove. Fast forward 14 years to the grand opening of the library we just closed. This building took several years to get approved and built, and no new donor name was attached to it. The Alexander Mitchell name was simply appropriated to the new building that opened in 1964. Mitchell nor Carnegie had anything to do with the library on 6th and Kline. Fast forward another 50 years and we find ourselves planning a very grand opening for a new public library. Plans for our new library began roughly in 2007 with conversations about a new building that would be better suited for a growing community and emerging technology. But what would the new library be called? Alexander Mitchell Public Library staff reported constant confusion with the library in Mitchell, SD (also named in honor of Alexander Mitchell). It was discussed early

Photos by Troy McQuillen

INTRODUCING THE NEW K.O. LEE ABERDEEN PUBLIC LIBRARY


 Karl O. Lee, former president of K.O. Lee Company, still resides in Aberdeen.

 The actual letter from Carnegie’s office (right) requesting that Aberdeen’s new library be named for his late friend, Alexander Mitchell. Aberdeen’s original Carnegie library (above) was opened in 1902 on the corner of Sixth Avenue SE and Lincoln Street. It was demolished 50 years later.

on to retire Alexander Mitchell and simply call it, Aberdeen Public Library because, that’s what it is, and that’s who is paying for it. However, the city would only have available $5.9 million to put towards the new library and looked to the Library Foundation to help secure additional funds to make the library of a size and quality recommended by architects. So the Foundation pledged a total of $2.1 million in addition to their nearly $400,000 already spent on land and planning, and the project got underway. A public vote attempted to thwart the momentum and stop the project, but the folks of Aberdeen approved the vote with a 60/40 win in December 2015. In a sense, Aberdeen was ready for this project and things began to fall into place. Fundraising began with great gusto and within a few months over 25% was pledged. Throughout 2016, fundraising success continued. Then in the beginning of 2017 Karl Lee, a long-time Aberdeen

resident approached the Foundation and offered to fill the gap needed for the Foundation to attain its goal. As part of its strategy, the Foundation established naming opportunities for all the rooms within the library and put a $1 million option on the naming of the building. All agreed that Mr. Lee’s pledge of $900,000 was a substantial enough gift to name the library after him. The actual name on the building will be K.O. Lee per Karl’s wishes. As many know, the Lee family is a familiar name here in Aberdeen. Karl O. Lee is the former President of K.O. Lee Company, a local Aberdeen manufacturing firm that had its beginnings in 1888. The company produced universal tool grinders and accessories, valve seat grinders, sanders, AC welders, drills, polishers, and many other items, generally designed by the company’s own engineering department and distributed worldwide. The Aberdeen facility occupied over 125,000 square feet of manufacturing, warehouse,

and office space under one roof. At its peak, the company employed approximately 200 people. The company was sold in 2008. The Lee family has been involved in the creation of a number of facilities to benefit the Aberdeen area over the last several decades, including Lee Park Municipal Golf Course, C.C. Lee Elementary School, the K.O. Lee Adult Day Health Center at Bethesda, numerous tennis courts throughout the city, and has donated to many other private, charitable, and religious enterprises. Andrew Carnegie had a vision. He has said, “It was from my own early experience that I decided there was no use to which money could be applied so productive…as the founding of a public library.” He encouraged the concept of the free library all across the U.S. as the west was pioneered. Aberdeen truly benefited from Carnegie’s initial grant. Now, into a new millennium, Mr. Lee shares Carnegie’s vision specifically for Aberdeen. “This is one of the proudest days of my life,” said Mr. Lee. “This is an incredibly special moment and I hope this donation will in some small way continue to make Aberdeen the kind of community we all want to live in. My fondest wish is for this facility to become a place for discovery and inspiration for generations to come.” The new K.O. Lee Aberdeen Public Library will open its doors to the public on September 18, 2017 with a ribbon cutting and grand opening the following week. //

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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FEATURE

2017 PHEASANT HUNTING SEASON opening day

Saturday, October 21

Pheasant Phever Aberdeen preps for the 2017 Rooster Rush by LAURA PTACEK AND TROY MCQUILLEN photos provided in part by ABERDEEN CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU 32

ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017


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ACH YEAR ABERDEEN PULLS TOGETHER TO WELCOME  Aberdeen Development in the pheasant hunting season. Our Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) Corporation’s participates each year in a State Tourism competition called “Rooster Rush.” Cheryl Olson hands out Aberdeen The contest is designed to engage as many businesses, citizens, and visitors information packets as possible to make the hunting season a more memorable experience. For three to hunters arriving at the airport last years in a row, the Aberdeen CVB has won the Cacklin’ Community Award from the year. Hunters State and hopes to continue the tradition of winning. And everyone can play a part. could also spin to Here’s a working list of what the folks at our CVB have planned for Rooster win Aberdeen and hunting-related Rush. Check in with the CVB as the season draws closer to see what more might prizes. be happening.

GYPSY DAY PARADE

September 30 The CVB will have an entry in the Gypsy Day Parade that will give exposure to Rooster Rush. They will have small flyers to hand out during the parade, (and maybe some candy!) so expect to see a sea of orange!

DECORATING THE COMMUNITY

October 9-20 The CVB will again be making corn shocks and purchasing straw bales to decorate Aberdeen hotels. Tires from previous years with “Welcome Hunters” painted on them in orange will also be utilized as part of the décor. The CVB will provide giant shotgun shells for Aberdeen hotels and local businesses to use as either decoration or entry boxes for giveaways. Rooster Rush “Wing It,” window clings will be available for businesses to add to their windows and doors to promote the event throughout the community.

ROOSTER RUSH AND WINGS HOCKEY

 T-shirt design featuring Wing It In Aberdeen, this year’s theme for the Rooster Rush contest.

October 13 The CVB will be taking over a Wings hockey game! Hockey fans will be greeted as they enter the arena for a chance to win a gift certificate to the Wings Pro Shop. Rooster Rush t-shirts will be thrown out into the crowd during the hockey game. The CVB will entertain and engage the crowd during the intermission between the first and second period along with taking over the digital display during the game. They hope to turn the Wings hockey game into a major Rooster Rush event!

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 CVB Executive Director, Casey Weismantel (right) hands out pheasant sandwiches to visiting hunters at the airport with Gretchen Sharp, CVB Board President.

ROOSTER RUSH KIDS CONTEST

October 16-31

Young Guns, SoDak Sports, Runnings and Ken’s Shell Express have been invited to be part of the kid’s prize giveaway. Kids will be encouraged to visit all four of these locations to enter for a chance to win a $200 Chamber gift card to be used toward the purchase of outdoor apparel or firearm. Look for the giant shotgun shells just like the ones in the hotels at these four locations.

AIRPORT RUSH October 19-20 Over 300 pheasant sandwiches are assembled the night before the rush of airport passengers. Sandwiches are distributed at the airport Thursday and Friday to those disembarking for hunting adventures. This volunteer effort helps keep Aberdeen’s pheasant sandwich legacy alive. Many of the hunters will be experiencing their first taste of this iconic recipe during this time. All hunters will receive a visitor bag, which includes an Aberdeen Community Guide, Hunting guide, Aberdeen Magazine, contact information for Aberdeen veterinarians, info from bars and restaurants, and a small baggie of dog treats. Hunters will have a chance to spin a prize wheel for their chance to win a t-shirt, hoodie, or a variety of other prizes, and can also sign up to win a Winchester SX4 shotgun, courtesy of SoDak Sports.

FRIDAY EVENING GREETING AT HOTELS

October 20

CVB staff and volunteers will greet the hunters and guests as they check into the hotels on Friday evening from 3-8 PM. They will be encouraged to register to win a Yeti cooler filled with hunting and Aberdeen items.

LOCAL BEER

October/November Aberdeen’s own Dakota Territory Brewery will produce a special beer and label in honor of Rooster Rush. This will give the hunters and guests yet another way to get a taste of the Rooster Rush celebration in Aberdeen!

OPEN HOUSE EVENT AT THE DEPOT

November 2

The entire community is invited to help celebrate Rooster Rush – literally! An open house on Thursday, November 2, from 3-7 PM at the historic Milwaukee Depot is planned so that the community can sample a traditional pheasant sandwich. The WWII Pheasant Canteen ladies will be included in the preparation for this event. Coffee, lemonade, pheasant sandwiches, and donuts will be served – just as they were during Aberdeen’s WWII era. Actors from Aberdeen Community Theatre will be on hand, dressed in 40s-era clothing to provide a historic atmosphere, along with 40s-era dancers that will provide entertainment. This is a great way to honor the tradition of the WWII Pheasant Canteen, and the unique history that Aberdeen has with the 1940s war effort.

STILL WANT MORE?

There is no limit to what Aberdeen can do during this exciting time for our community. While Aberdeen’s Rooster Rush is part of a statewide competition, it could very well grow to be our own version of the “Rally” in Sturgis. How can you be a part of Rooster Rush?

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017


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 Each year, hundreds of hunters pass through Aberdeen on their way to hunting adventures at the various lodges. Many stop and register for prizes made possible by the community.

PHEASANT SANDWICH SHOOTOUT CONTEST In yet another way to keep the pheasant sandwich legend alive – and to get more involved in Rooster Rush – Aberdeen Magazine is coordinating the first ever Pheasant Sandwich Shootout. This contest will be held in conjunction with the Open House at the Depot (see left). Entries will be received in two categories: Professional restaurant cooks/ chefs, and individual home “chefs.” All are invited to enter one or two sandwiches. The first being a personal interpretation of the “traditional” canteen recipe (white bread, pheasant, eggs, carrots, onion, celery, relish, mayo), and the second a modern “twist” on a pheasant sandwich of any variety. With the help of the City Marketing Fund, the Chamber of Commerce, and the CVB, winners will receive a cash prize, a traveling trophy, and best of all, BRAGGING RIGHTS! Complete details are still in the works but you can check out the entry form at www.visitaberdeensd.com/ pheasantsandwichshootout. Stay tuned!

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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FEATURE

A TRIP DOWN

MEMORY LANE 36

ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017


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 Built in 1960, Aberdeen’s long-standing bowling landmark continues to grow and reinvent itself due to the many committed enthusiasts, pros, and recreational bowlers. It has been in John Osborn’s family for decades.  Current owner, John Osborn carries on his family’s legacy.

WRITTEN BY JENNY ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY BY TROY MCQUILLEN

W F R I E N D S H AV E M E T A N D FOUND THEIR SECOND H O M E AT T H E V I L L A G E BOWL FOR OVER 50 YEARS.

HEN YOU’VE LIVED IN THE ABERDEEN AREA MOST OF your life, it’s easy to take for granted the buildings and businesses that you pass by nearly every day. But if we stop for a second look, we’re often surprised to find that these places offer interesting history and stories that can teach us things we didn’t know about our community. One such city landmark is the Village Bowl. Over the decades, so many local people have put in their time to make it a space where everyone, from the very young to the very old, can have fun and make lifelong friendships. Bowling became a widely popular sport in Aberdeen as early as the 1930s. The Village Bowl was built in 1960, but before that, Hub Recreation and King Pin were the two main bowling alleys in town. Myrna Chamberlain has been a part of the Aberdeen Women’s Bowling Association for years and has helped record the Village Bowl’s history. She told us that when it opened its doors in the SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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 While not all the lights are operable on the iconic sign, a fresh coat of paint helps it grab the attention of passerbys on busy North Highway 281.

 Photo courtesy of Special Olympics South Dakota

 Al Waltman, Bowling Center Manager

60’s, the center was completely full. “Our first season had 1300 bowlers and 31 leagues. Back then bowling was a very popular thing to do.” At first, only men organized their own bowling leagues. But after going every week and watching their husbands play, a group of 10 women decided they wanted to bowl, too. They did just that in 1938 by forming the first women’s bowling league in Aberdeen, called Hit or Miss, which grew from two teams of five bowlers to eventually include over 40 members. Myrna explained how important it was for women at that time to not only step up and form a league, but to be able to participate and compete in the sport. “We didn’t have all the opportunities that there are now.” The Hit or Miss League is still going strong today with members meeting to bowl every Monday night at the Village Bowl. It’s easy to see how lasting friendships form around bowling when you spend time with your teammates every week and even travel together for tournaments. Myrna added more good insight as to why bowling is such a unique sport. “Because you get a handicap based on your average, you can go to tournaments and have a really good day and add in your handicap and be right up there and win. And while with most sports

you have to qualify, with bowling if you are a sanctioned member and bowl at least 21 games in a season, you can enter to play in the state or national tournaments.” John Osborn is the owner and general manager at the Village Bowl. His father, Robert Kent Osborn, was one of the original partners who opened the business. He explained that while Right now there are about 800 league bowlers he manages the bowling alley, it has really been in Aberdeen. A challenge faced by many bowling all the people who love the culture of bowling so alleys is that because there are so many activities much that have kept the Village Bowl going for for kids to do, they have to get creative to find ways decades. Every bowling alley has associations made to get youth involved in the sport. One way the up of members who run the Village Bowl has been getting kids interested is by behind the scenes work like participating in a national kids bowl free program, managing the men’s, women’s, which allows kids under age 15 to have two free and youth leagues, keeping games of bowling every day in the summer. They track of scores, collecting fees, also have junior bowling leagues that start this year running city tournaments, on September 16. Open sign-ups for junior leagues and more. Up until this year, will take place on September 9 during their free there was a men’s association food, drink, and bowling open house and bowler and women’s association in appreciation event from noon- 6:00 PM. Aberdeen, but this season they are joining into If you ask them, most bowlers will agree that the one committee called the Aberdeen Bowling best part of their sport is the camaraderie, and the Association. John said, “We’ve been lucky to have time that they have spent together bowling with so many people involved with the associations who friends over the years. John described it by saying, have for a long time put in a lot of effort and time “It’s a community; it’s a culture, there’s a lot of sense into running the bowling organizations.” of belonging and having a common interest.” //

“IT’S A COMMUNITY; IT’S A CULTURE.”

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017


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Y E S T E R DAY S

A SLICE OF

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HISTO


ORY

 The Bel Aire Building, located on the corner of Railroad Avenue and Main Street, was originally built in stages. Completed by Andrew L. Larson in 1905, as the Commercial Hotel, it was the oldest downtown structure in continuous use for lodging. It housed Lu’s Pizza when this photo was taken in the 1960s. It sustained substantial fire damage in 2004 and was demolished. Photo from the Brown County Assessor’s Office.

Viva! Lu’s Pizza by PATRICK GALLAGHER

T

WENT Y-FOUR YEARS ago, a restaurant in Aberdeen closed that still so tantalizes its patrons they’ve flocked to rare opportunities to re-experience the tastes they’re missing. Lu’s Pizza remains close to the heart of so many Aberdonians that Doug Griess, whose mother Lucille was the pizza queen, can’t return to his hometown without getting stopped on the street to hear a great reminiscence of the old restaurant. The roots of the Italian specialty Lu’s served actually came from Germany, where the family lived during Doug’s father’s military service. They ate pizza there and brought the delicacy back to the States, first to Lu’s home state of North Dakota then to Aberdeen. When they got back to America, “Lu started making pizzas,” Doug says, and like a dutiful son, “I ate them. Sometimes seven days a week. But they were mealtime-appropriate pizzas like egg omelet pizza for breakfast.” Lu catered small house parties, but it wasn’t quite enough for her. As Doug observes, “Lu had hopes and dreams like all of us, but had the motivation to make things happen.” In 1963, in the kitchen at home, Lu began making and freezing pizzas, which she sold to local stores, starting with the old Four Brothers grocery store. When the kitchen and then the basement weren’t big enough, she built what Doug calls a small pizza factory, a cinder block kitchen, in the backyard, and the business continued to grow. Seeing an opportunity in

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 Lucille Griess assembling her soon-to-be-famous pizzas in her home kitchen.

 A 1963 photo of Lu’s delivery van equipped with a freezer that could be plugged in at night at home.

an ordinance that allowed bars and nightclubs to stay open late if they sold food, Lu supplied frozen pizza and ovens. Then her market expanded to grocery stores in several other counties, so she refurbished a delivery van with a freezer and spelled out the business name on the hood in reverse like an ambulance, so cars in front could read it in their rearview mirror. Opening a restaurant was inevitable, and Lu started up at 6th Avenue and Main Street. In line with the interesting habit humans have of building a new place of worship on the site of a previous culture’s temple, Domino’s now occupies the same space. The story of that first location is yet more interesting. Initially, Lu purchased property on 6th Avenue next to Moccasin Creek, planning to open there. But a few days later, her realtor called to say he could help her turn a profit on her brand new investment, because a place called McDonald’s was looking for property in Aberdeen. Thus was born Lu’s Pizza on Main Street in 1966. Altogether, Lu’s operated out of four locations in Aberdeen, moving from the south end of downtown north of the tracks to Main and 1st Avenue NE, where the name became Lu's Italian Villa (and later International Villa). This was the

largest place and the location where she stayed the “Lu also employed a large number of people who longest (it now houses RAM Enterprises). Next, enjoyed their jobs. A lot of camaraderie and warm Lu’s moved a few blocks south to Main and Railroad feelings of friendship, closeness and loyalty shared Avenue, across from the Flame (now a vacant lot). among the group.” Like his six siblings who all The final location was South 2nd Street and 3rd worked at Lu’s at one point or another, Doug did Avenue SW, the current Auto Towne. most jobs around the family business. “I delivered No matter where Lu landed, she created a a lot of pizzas, which helped me afford a two-yearplace people wanted to go. “It was kind of a old Camaro while in high school.” Happy Days place,” Doug says. “She enjoyed the Besides the restaurant, Lu also offered a catering delightful reaction from people when she invented service. She once fed 1,500 people for a Chamber something new.” The most popular pizza was Lu's of Commerce banquet in the Civic Arena (the House Special, which featured mushrooms, green Aberdeen American News said guest Johnny peppers, pepperoni, and Italian sausage. Lu also Cash called his meal the “best damned prime rib” loved to combine unusual ingredients, like potato he ever had). Doug, who has twice come back to and beef; blue cheese, mushroom, and onion; Aberdeen to make Lu’s pizzas for Roncalli High shrimp, green peppers, and mushrooms; and chili. School reunions, laments, “I thought I beat her by Brian Schumacher, who remembers Lu’s from the doing 1,000 pizzas for the 2014 reunion!” 1960s and beyond, says Lu’s pizza affected his taste After a couple of decades of this, Lu saw her buds permanently: “I don’t like the pepperoni pizza future in the glitziest place in the glitzy West—Las I get these days because Lu’s was the best I ever Vegas. Over time, she gradually started moving had. Today, pepperoni just doesn’t measure up.” Liz there, opening a restaurant while keeping Lu’s open Snow, who has since moved away from Aberdeen in Aberdeen, which helped finance her westward but frequented the shop in the 1970s and 1980s, expansion. During the business transition to Las remembers the “sauerkraut and peanut butter and Vegas, Doug had a customized van and made a jelly pizzas,” and concludes that Lu’s “was the best dozen roundtrips hauling supplies from Aberdeen pizza in the world.” to Vegas. It was a great place to work too. Doug remembers, Ultimately, Lu settled there permanently in 1978, arriving the day a Vegas fixture died, Elvis Presley. Whatever that portended, however, it apparently “I don’t like the pepperoni pizza I get these days because wasn’t bad. Her restaurant thrived, attracting the ubiquitous Las Vegas celebrities, including piano Lu’s was the best I ever had. Today, pepperoni just showman Liberace, the pop singers Captain and doesn’t measure up.” Tennille (who loved Lu’s sauerkraut pizza), and

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 After her 6th and Main location, Lu moved across the tracks on North Main. After this spot, she moved to Railroad and Main (Bel Aire Building).

 Assembly line of workers making pizzas for Roncalli’s 2014 High School reunion.

“The restaurant became the place to go for many families. A place to enjoy each other and a place to meet others. Nothing is more personal than your favorite food.” porn star (and former Ivory Snow mom) Marilyn Chambers. In time, Lu connected with a partner and created a marriage chapel empire, which, after her 2010 death, her family continues to run. Meanwhile, back in Aberdeen, Lu’s Pizza hung on until it closed its doors in 1993 and launched a diaspora of unrequited pizza patrons. Why does it linger in people’s minds? Doug believes there are several reasons for its popularity. “First and foremost, the food and flavors. The restaurant became the place to go for many families. A place to enjoy each other and a place to meet others. Nothing is more personal than your favorite food. And it was a fun place to share it with family and friends.” Aberdonian Teresa Garofalo went to Lu’s with her family, “I was too young then to drive myself anywhere so I definitely went with family. It was

In this excerpt from his book, a true labor of love to memorialize his mother’s work, Doug Griess eulogizes a great Aberdeen entrepreneur and her creation: "A tradition was born. The restaurant became "the place" to go for many

a special treat if we all got to go out for pizza.” She adds, in a common refrain among Lu’s fans, “I remember the pizza being so much different from what I had known before. Lu’s was something really distinct from that—the crust, the sauce were very different. We loved it!” The memories don’t surprise Doug: “Lu was a caring person but also had a hard business side.” Brian Schumacher agrees, “Lu’s was a great place to hang out while I was in high school, and it was affordable for a high school freshman to eat there. But there was a limit to how long Lu would let kids just hang around after we were done eating before she would shoo us out to make room for paying customers, and I can’t complain about that.” As noted, Doug brought Lu’s pizza back to Aberdeen twice for all school reunions at his Roncalli alma mater in 2004 and 2014, serving

families. A place to enjoy each other and a place to meet others. Both customers and employees enjoyed a mutually satisfying social experience. The secret to Lu's success? Passion. A passion for flavors, a passion for creativity, a passion for making

hundreds of people, both alumni and townies, with pizza that he made with the volunteer help of many of Lu’s fans. Garofalo was one of those fans: “We had people lined up through the cafetorium and out the door and down the hall! People loved getting the chance to taste that pizza again.” Doug, who is now a Twin Cities video editor, is keeping the spirit of Lu’s alive in other ways too, including the website luspizza. com, a YouTube video on “How to make Lu’s pizza,” and a forthcoming coffee table book. In addition to Doug’s efforts, another family member runs a Facebook page called People Who Loved Lu’s Pizza. If these aren’t enough for you to reconnect to your favorite pizza joint, maybe you’ll be lucky enough for the ultimate. If you happen to bump into Doug on one of his Aberdeen visits, he might bestow upon you Lu’s secret spices, which he often carries with him in plastic bags. Then you can then go home and make your own genuine Lu’s pizza. It’s almost like being there. Long live Lu’s! //

people happy. Simple recipes, basic flavors, and an uncompromising attention to detail. One person’s recipe to success that captured the hearts of many. Pizza is personal, and Lu delivered."

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WHERE ARE WE NOW?

Lager's Inn Revive Day Spa  Located on the corner of Third and Main, this building was originally built as Aberdeen’s first J.C. Penney store in 1925. This photo was probably taken around the same time.

 Located on Third Avenue SW, the Lagers building was built as a “strip mall” perhaps as early as 1902. The above picture is from the Brown County Assessor’s Office and it was shot in 1960.

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017

LIFE | HEALTH | AUTO | HOMEOWNERS | BUSINESS | FARM

605.225.3172

|

R H O D E SA N D E R S O N .CO M

Modern photos by Troy McQuillen

M

ANY PEOPLE HAVE DIFFICULTLY ORIENTING THEMSELVES when seeing an old picture from Aberdeen’s past. This typically is because the buildings change so much over the years. Here are two popular buildings in our downtown, paired with images of what they looked liked in their near-original state. // — TROY MCQUILLEN


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Aberdeen Magazine September/October 2017  

Aberdeen, South Dakota's community lifestyle magazine.

Aberdeen Magazine September/October 2017  

Aberdeen, South Dakota's community lifestyle magazine.

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