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21 STEWARD OF THE PAST

SUE GATES

SUSTAINING CULTURAL TRADITION

FEATHER TYING CEREMONY

COMMUNITY. LIFE. STYLE.

INDIVIDUALITY ON THE COURT

KEVIN RATZSCH

ON THE FLY

DISC GOLF

JULY­AUGUST 2016

HEATIN’

UP SIZZLIN' FASHION TIPS FOR THE SUMMER!

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Ingredients

Ingredients

• 2/3 C Orange Juice

• 2 C Sliced Strawberries

Directions

• 1/3 C Lemon Juice

• 3 Sliced Kiwis

• 1/3 C Packed Brown Sugar

• 3 Sliced Bananas

• 1/2 Tsp Orange Zest

• 2 Sectioned Oranges

• 1/2 Tsp Lemon Zest

• 1 C Seedless Grapes

Bring first five ingredients to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until slightly thickened. Remove from heat, add vanilla and cool. Layer fruit in bowl, in order as listed. Pour cooled sauce over fruit and cover. Refrigerate 3-4 hrs. before serving.

• 1 Tsp Vanilla

• 2 C Blueberries

• 1 Oz Gin • 1 Oz Vodka • 3 Oz Lemon-Lime Soda

• 1/2 Oz Triple Sec • 1/2 Oz Lime Juice

Directions Combine gin, vodka, lime juice and triple sec in shaker with ice. Shake, strain into pint glass with ice. Add soda and serve.

• 2 C Cubed Pineapple

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34 VOLUME 4 • ISSUE 4 • JULY/AUGUST 2016

24

30 06 FROM THE EDITOR 08 THE HUB What’s got everybody talking 16 CALENDAR 8 Picks for your social calendar 14 PROFILE Sue Gates safeguards your memories

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

16 RECIPE Barbecue chicken pizza wrap 18 PROFILE Kevin Ratzsch keeps his eyes up 20 SCENE Ladies on the Loose Downtown 22 GALLERY Local artist, Greg Blair, explores place with sculpture

22 24 DAYCATION AT RICHMOND LAKE A fun summer trip close to home 26 GO FULL-TIME Like camping? Why not do it full-time? 28 IN FULL FLIGHT An inside look at disc golfing in Aberdeen

30 ABERDEEN’S CASA DEI BAMBINI The Montessori School provides a unique learning experience for children 32 A JOURNEY IN TIME A look at the history of the Brown County Fair 34 EXTEND YOUR ROOTS Fall in love with Rustic Roots’ selection of Western style plants


VOLUME 4 • ISSUE 4 • JULY/AUGUST 2016

ISSN 2378-3060 MANAGING EDITOR Becca Simon

PUBLISHER Troy McQuillen

DESIGN

Eliot Lucas

AD SALES

Abby McQuillen abby@mcquillencreative.com

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PUBLICATION OFFICE

40

McQuillen Creative Group 423 S. Main St., Suite 1 Aberdeen SD, 57401 (605) 226-3481

PRINTING

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SUBMISSIONS

Aberdeen Magazine welcomes your input. Message us your story ideas, drop off historic photos, or stop in for a chat. Email us at: becca@aberdeenmag.com troy@mcquillencreative.com

WEBSITE

www.aberdeenmag.com

PRIVACY STATEMENT

36 TIED TO CULTURAL TRADITION Central High's Native American Student Association Honors Graduates 40 HEATIN' UP! The coolest clothes to beat the summer heat 44 IN THE BACK Where are we now?

ON THE COVER Carrie Wegleitner dons a light and elegant top from the Farmer’s Wife Boutique and a sunhat from Karisma Boutique to create a sophisticated summer look. She and Dakota Feller modeled for the magazine to show Aberdeen how to stay cool while still looking fab. Cover Photo by JL Photography

Any personal information, email addresses, or contact submitted to the editorial office or online via our Facebook page will not be sold or distributed. Aberdeen Magazine does wish to publish public comments and attitudes regarding Aberdeen, therefore written submissions and comments on our Facebook page implies permission to utilize said information in editorial content. Aberdeen Magazine is produced exclusively in Aberdeen, South Dakota. All content is copyright with all rights reserved. No content may be shared, copied, scanned, or posted online without permission. Please just ask us first. We’re pretty flexible.

McQuillen Creative Group www.mcquillencreative.com

JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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EDITOR’S LETTER

CONTRIBUTORS

A Summer to Remember

W

hen I was ten years old, I attended a weeklong Girl Scout camp at Richmond Lake. The experience was formative in many ways. For example, in one instance, I was dared to shovel my most hated food (potato salad) into my mouth as my eyes watered profusely and a cafeteria full of wide-eyed girls watched in horror and amusement. In another, I got lost in the forest at night on a “Walk of Bravery” while trying to find the camp counselors hidden amongst the trees. I even successfully managed to tip my canoe and get completely covered in a fascinating green slime that took me several hours to wash off in the luxury camp showers. To my young and inexperienced mind, these events were nothing short of a tragedy. Despite this, I still regard this camp as one of my fondest childhood memories. I was able to experience nature and work together with my friends to learn new skills, all while navigating the murky waters of being a preteen. None of this would have been possible for me without Richmond and all of the facilities and activities it offers for people of all ages. In these pages, you’ll find a guide on how you and your family can make the most of all Richmond has to offer, while (hopefully) managing to keep your own canoe afloat. We’ll also show you how to keep your wardrobe classy even in the summer heat, as well as introduce a popular summer sport within the Aberdeen area: disc golf. As an Aberdeen native, summers in this town colored my experience growing up and made me into the person I am today. Ever since I was little, The Brown County Fair was often the highlight of my year, and I couldn’t wait to take in the carnival while devouring fried dough or my personal favorite, deep-fried Snicker’s. I’ve gone every year since I could walk, and it’s an event I know many Aberdonians are quite fond of. In this issue, we’ll take an inside look at this beloved tradition and its roots. One of my favorite things about Aberdeen is that unexpected changes are constantly happening that breathe new life into this community and provide a variety of new opportunities. A year ago, I certainly never would have expected that I would become the Managing Editor of this magazine as soon as I finished my degree at NSU. I’ve been a fan of the magazine since it published its first issue in 2013, and I was thrilled to intern here last fall. Being at the helm of a magazine has always been a dream of mine, and I can’t wait to share my love of this town with you all. Aberdeen is where I grew up. It’s where I stumbled and scraped my knees, learned how to stand on my own two feet, and made memories that I’ll carry with me no matter where life takes me. Whether you’re the new kid on the block or have lived here your whole life, I believe the memories you make here will last you a lifetime. And I’ll do my best to show you how. // BECCA SIMON Managing Editor

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

ERIN BALLARD Erin is a student, writer, and lover of classic rock n’ roll. She comes from Tampa, Florida originally, but has called Aberdeen home for the last three years. She studies Professional Writing and Rhetoric, along with Desktop Publishing, at Northern State University. Anything involving fashion, music, and home décor makes her happy, and someday she hopes to live sustainably on her own farm. MARK BOWER Mark is the owner of Aberdeen RV Parts store, a local business he started from the ground up in 2010. Prior to starting the store, Mark owned Aberdeen Home Repair doing repair work on homes and mobile homes. Visit him at his store in Aberdeen at 21 2nd Ave NW or visit his website PartsForMyRV.com. DANI DAUGHTERY Dani (Oglala Sioux) works in the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She is a mother of five daughters and a regular volunteer for a variety of tribal entities across the Midwest including Aberdeen's American Indian Parent Advisory Council.

ANNA JAHRAUS Anna is a homegrown Aberdeen-based artist and designer. She loves holidays, online shopping and making up reasons to celebrate. Her current catch phrase is, “Excellent.”

JONI LARSON Joni Larson of JL Photography is an energetic and passionate photographer dedicated to capturing your moments, memories and milestones with a personal touch!

HANNAH LOEFKE Hannah is a student and captains the women’s rugby team at Northern State University. In the future, she plans on becoming a high school English teacher. She enjoys writing about everything that gets thrown her way.

JENNY ROTH Jenny is a farmer’s wife, stay-at-home mother of three daughters, and writer. Every week she publishes Aberdeen Area Macaroni Kid, a free online resource filled with local, family friendly events and activities, www.aberdeen.macaronikid.com. Her essays also appear in the parenting magazine Mamalode, www.mamalode.com. EMILY TILLMA Emily is a student at NSU who is passionate about her study of art. A lover of travel, she has studied abroad this past year and traveled throughout Europe. She studies languages in her free time and hopes to travel to every continent at least once.

MEGAN YADA An Aberdeen native, Megan grew up with a passion for reading and writing. When she doesn’t have her nose stuck in a book, Megan enjoys keeping up with current events and daydreaming in nature.


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THE BUZZ SCENE RECIPE GALLERY CALENDAR PROFILES

YO U R S O U R C E F O R WH AT ’ S H A P P E N I N G I N A B E R D E E N

FACEBOOK PAGE? WE HAVE ONE! Keep up with all of our updates at www.facebook.com/ AberdeenMagazine

WHETHER IN BUSINESS projects or creative independent endeavors, people work best when they work together. This is definitely what the folks over at StartHUB had in mind when

they began work on their new makerspace, set to open July 1. Located on the fifth floor of the Citizens Building, the makerspace consists of 2000 square feet and is full of materials that encourage

Make-A-Wish Poker Run

positively impact this area, Fischer, along with volunteers, has set up an annual poker run, which benefits local children. “Every dollar we raise in Aberdeen stays in South Dakota,” she said. Currently, there are four children facing life-threatening illnesses in Aberdeen. The money raised in this year’s poker run will go toward granting their wishes. The run will be held at Biegler’s C&S Motorsport on July 23. The entry fee is $20 per rider, which includes a lunch provided by Steve and Christy Biegler before the event starts. Registration will be from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM, and all motorized vehicles are welcome to participate. For more information, contact Sue Fischer at 605-229-1072. //— ERIN BALLARD

EVERY THIRTY-EIGHT MINUTES, an American child suffering from a life-threatening medical condition gets their last wish granted. This is the product and goal of the MakeA-Wish non-profit organization; to create hope and joy, while invoking strength and empowerment. Sue Fischer has been one of the regional ambassadors for the organization since its beginnings in Aberdeen. Fischer was initially hooked “when I saw the difference that getting a wish made for these children.” To

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

makerspace, co-working space, and even free coffee. Day passes will also be available. “We want to make it a hub for those one-off, side-gig organizations not many people know about,” Liz Hannum, founder and director of StartHUB said. “By putting them in the same place, they can feed off each other and give each other business.” To make the makerspace the best it can be, StartHUB will need a little help from the community. To do this, they are launching a Kickstarter with a funding goal of $10,000. Rewards for donating include membership, classes, stickers, and all kinds of things depending how much you choose to donate. The Kickstarter can be found at www.starthubsd.com/ kickstarter. //— BECCA SIMON

Photo courtesy of Terry Simon

Makerspace Provides Creative Hub

learning, interactivity, and creativity. It will contain 3D printers, CNC machines, laser cutters, and all sorts of expensive machinery that will be open for the public to use after they take an educational safety class. There are also call rooms, window seats, standing desks, and a conference room that can be rented. In addition to the machinery, the new makerspace also boasts an open space that can be used for events. They plan to host a variety of events throughout each week, such as educational TED Talks and social gatherings. Founder’s Club membership fees are available for $25 a month, but only for the first 25 people. For everyone else, a monthly membership will be $45, and provides full 24/7 access to the

Photo by Troy McQuillen

The Makerspace, when finished, will be home to a variety of technology such as 3D printers and laser cutters as well as meeting rooms that encourage co-working and creativity.


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CrossFit Rails and Murph's Challenge LOCATED JUST NORTH OF THE YMCA, CrossFit Rails has been open for a little over a year, but already has about 120 members. According to their website, the goal of CrossFit Rails is to provide the best overall workout experience possible, while maintaining safety and intensity throughout. By combining varying, functional movements with high intensity execution, CrossFit gives its users a more balanced overall fitness. The largest event that CrossFit Rails puts on each year, Murph’s Challenge, took place on Memorial Day, in honor of the fallen American hero LT. Michael Murphy. Murph’s Challenge is the actual workout that Murphy trained his own team with, and consists of two one-mile runs, with 100 push-ups, 200 pull ups, and 300 air squats in between. Performing the challenge is how Murphy’s memory and legacy are honored across the nation today. “The Murph’s event is about more than just our business here… It’s a special thing,” Director Taylor Newton said. A significant portion of the money that CrossFit Rails raised for the event will go to the LT. Michael P. Murphy Memorial Scholarship Foundation. //— ERIN BALLARD

WITH A GREEN LIGHT OF APPROVAL from the city council, it won’t be long until the community of Aberdeen has some new park areas to enjoy. In the next few years, the Parks, Recreation & Forestry Department will be busy with construction at two separate locations. The first is at an area off of South 12th Street, near the Aberdeen Cemetery. Right now, this park only has the backstop for what will someday be a recreational baseball field for local children to play and practice on. Development on the park began in 2015 and every year will hopefully see a new piece of equipment, according to Parks Director, Doug Johnson. This fall, construction will begin on a new playground. In subsequent years, a basketball court, picnic shelter, and sand volleyball court will be added to the area. The other work-in-progress can be found just southwest of the fairgrounds, and a recently added sign marks the turn-off that will lead visitors into the new Aberdeen Nature Park. With a master plan that includes two 9-hole Disc golf courses, a fenced-in dog park, several shelters, and over a mile worth of gravel trails, the Parks Department has big plans for this area. Originally acquired by the city for flood control purposes, the sprawling nature park is about 110 acres in size and will be one of the few natural areas in Aberdeen that can be enjoyed by the community once completed. //— ERIN BALLARD

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

Improvements Coming to City's Parks

A map detailing the plans for the new Aberdeen Nature Park, located southwest of the fairgrounds.

Photo by Emily Tillma

HUB | BUZZ


Photo by Emily Tillma

Rise of the (Hub City) Robot MOVE OVER, WALL-E, there’s a new robot in town. Hub City, Inc. is currently employing the assistance of an automated machine to increase efficiency in the manufacturing plant. The robot, which has been in the works for about two years, is about six feet tall, has a reach of 56 inches, and can hold a payload of about 22 pounds. It can replicate any motion that the human arm can, making it extremely useful in the assembly process. Hub City has dabbled a bit with automation in the past with autoloaders or auto-feeders, but this is the first time it is being introduced to assembly. According to Eric Pulling, a manufacturing engineer at Hub City, Inc., “there has been a drive to introduce efficiency in the plants since 2002.” Lots of hard work, designing, and

redesigning went into the robot’s creation. Currently, they are still working on some bugs to make sure it runs smoothly. Once that’s taken care of, there are plans to add different types of shafts to the robot that will expand its role in the manufacturing plant. The machine is capable of

learning up 99 different programs. The reception of the machine has been overwhelmingly positive. Since it reduces the need for human labor, employees have more time to focus on other aspects of work and keep the orders coming. “This is exciting for me,” Eric

said. “I’ve been here going on five years. The assembly process hasn’t changed or evolved much since the early 2000s. This addition brings us up with a lot of other manufacturers and gives us better ability to compete with price and delivery times.” // — BECCA SIMON

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8

HUB | CALENDAR

PICKS FOR YOUR SOCIAL CALENDAR

Amazing Nature Race

JULY 2

Put your brains and brawn to the test by participating in various challenges around the park. Fun for the whole family! When: 1:00 PM Where: Richmond Lake State Recreation Area Cost: Free

Wylie Park 4th of July Celebration

JULY 4

Celebrate Independence Day the right way with various activities throughout the park and Storybook Land, and take in various performances such as the Aqua Addicts Ski Show, the Duck Derby, and music by the Municipal Band. And of course, what’s the 4th of July without fireworks? When: 10:00 AM – 10:00 PM Where: Wylie Park Cost: Free

Rural X Summit JULY 19 -20

Have you ever felt that small towns don’t get enough love? Come support rural communities across South Dakota and connect with people and ideas in an effort to empower the places you call home. Featuring nationally recognized speakers like Emily Pilloton, Becky McCray, Deb Brown, and Michael Goodwin, this summit invites you to engage with the communities you love like never before. When: 1:00 PM Where: Dakota Event Center Cost: Ranges from $40 - $180

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

Crazy Days JULY 14 – JULY 17

Shop ‘til you drop with these totally crazy sales in the Mall Concourse, jam-packed with spring and summer merchandise at unbelievably low prices! Where: Aberdeen Mall Cost: As much as you’re willing to spend!

Storybook Land Festival

2

JULY 22 – JULY 23

Watch all your favorite children’s stories come to life during this weekend of fun featuring authors, storytellers, and a variety of hands-on activities and crafts! When: Friday 6:00 – 9:00 PM Saturday 10:00 AM – 10:00 PM Where: Wylie Park/Storybook Land Cost: Free

Monster Truck Nationals

4

JULY 30

There’s nothing quite like watching the intense speed and fury of huge monster trucks in an awesome showdown. This is the first time ever that the Monster Truck Nationals are making an appearance at the Brown County Speedway. Don’t miss it! When: 7:00 PM Where: Brown County Fairgrounds Cost: Children - $10 Adults - $15 in advance or $20 day of show

Brown County Fair

6

AUGUST 15 – AUGUST 21

There’s no hotter place to be in August than the Brown County Fair. Come down for this annual weeklong event and take in all the sights and sounds, from the carnival and the Expo buildings jampacked with vendors, to the mouth-watering food stalls and animal exhibits. Don’t miss entertainment from big names such as MercyMe, Dustin Lynch, Montgomery Gentry, and Jake Owens. There’s a little something for everyone! Where: Brown County Fairgrounds Grounds Admission: Free

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Sizzlin’ Summer Nights Car & Motorcycle Show AUGUST 27

Cars, motorcycles, food, and more! Make your way downtown for an evening of fun for the largest car and motorcycle show in the region. When: 3:00 PM – 8:00 PM Where: Downtown Main Street Cost: Free

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HUB | PROFILE

Sue Gates Safekeeping Memories from the Past, for the Future verything has a history. Even the smallest of objects can tell a about the person who owned it, who owned it before them, or E story who created it. By asking questions about the things and people around us, we participate in an ongoing dialogue that connects us to our past, present, and even future. For Sue Gates, the director of Dacotah Prairie Museum, this curiosity became a lifelong career. Sue grew up being surrounded by history. Both her mother and her aunt were avid antique collectors. When she was in 9th grade, she did a civics project on a dear old friend whose life was rife with stories about moving to America. However, she could never predict that these influences would be a forerunner for what she was going to do for the rest of her life. An Aberdeen native, Sue has served the museum for 28 years. Looking back, she never would have expected she’d end up back in Aberdeen or that so much of her life would be dedicated to history. She obtained a degree in music performance from St. Olaf in Northfield, Minnesota, and in an unexpected turn of events, she returned to Aberdeen and opened up her own music studio where she taught students how to play the piano and flute. While looking for a part-time job to fill her day when she wasn’t teaching, she stumbled upon a position in the museum’s collection department. In 1995, the director left and she was encouraged to apply for the job, and the rest was (quite literally) history. According to Sue, each day at the museum is exciting and different. She starts each day with a to-do list, but between all the people coming in asking for research requests, bringing in artifacts, and asking for tours, not much gets crossed off that list. Towards the end of the school year, the museum gets even busier as students fill the building for various activities and demonstrations. Sue says she loves the engagement Aberdeen has with the museum. “I think that the community has become aware that this is a place where you can share your history, either your personal family history or your business history, with the public.” When businesses close or people are cleaning out their houses, they often bring in their treasured items that are representative of either their family or their business. Since “IT'S A REAL the museum takes care to carefully preserve each item, people can be sure that their memories will be kept safe. “It’s a real HONOR honor to be responsible for people’s history,” Sue explained. TO BE “We are stewards of your past.” RESPONSIBLE Moving forward, Sue wants to see Dacotah Prairie continue to build on its good reputation and incorporate more recent FOR PEOPLE'S history in order for the museum to move more seamlessly into HISTORY.” the future. In order to do this, the museum is going digital by beginning to put their collections online so they will be accessible to everyone. Whether you’re interested in Native American culture, fashion history, or art, Sue guarantees that the museum has a little something for everyone. This fall, they will be opening a new exhibit that features a rotational theme of sports in Brown County. “I always hope that people take away an appreciation for their hometown, and that they learn something that they didn’t know before.” //

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

Photo by Troy McQuillen

BY BECCA SIMON


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HUB | RECIPE

Wrap it up! All the goodness of barbecue chicken pizza, converted to a quick wrap.

N

BY TROY MCQUILLEN early every pub and restaurant has added barbecue chicken pizza to their menus. While it’s become a classic, getting the same effect at home isn’t necessarily very easy. The crust is hard to get crisp, the ratio of sauce to ingredients is tricky, and what sauce do you use? Forget the crust, forget the hot oven, and whip out these zesty wraps for dinner or lunch. For added convenience, just buy a cooked rotisserie chicken from the deli and start with that. //

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

Serves 4

4 grilled chicken breast halves or whole rotisserie chicken boned 1 Small bag leafy romaine lettuce 2 cups cheddar cheese shredded 2 Tbls cilantro chopped 1 Large red onion, julienned thinly 1 bottle sweet and zesty barbecue sauce 1 tablespoon lemon juice 4 12-inch flour tortillas

HOW TO MAKE IT: 1 Sauté the onions until caramelized. Shred the chicken with two forks and put in a large mixing bowl. 2 Add the onions, cilantro, ¼ cup barbecue sauce, lemon juice and mix thoroughly. 3 Divide mixture into four even portions. 4 Coat the entire surface of each tortilla with 1-2 tablespoons barbecue sauce with the back of a spoon. 5 Deposit one portion of chicken mixture across the diameter, sprinkle on a good amount of cheese, and two handfuls of lettuce. 6 Roll the tortilla tight, squeezing filling out to the ends. Tuck the ends in or leave open. Cut in half or into medallions and serve.

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016


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JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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HUB | PROFILE

Kevin Ratzsch Keep Your Eyes Up

ind your gift. Develop your gift. And pass it on.” These words, spoken by the late Northern State University basketball coach F Don Meyer, have served as a guiding light and life motto for Kevin Ratzsch, owner of Eyes Up Sports. A 2009 graduate, Kevin played basketball for NSU under Don Meyer’s guidance before going on to play for teams around the world. Now, four years later, Kevin remains on the court, passing his gift on to the youth of Aberdeen. Kevin believes his time at NSU was very transformational. “I definitely came here a very immature mama’s boy, and left a man, or almost a man.” His college experience was much more than simply playing basketball and going to class. Coach Meyer held his players to very high expectations both on and off the court. Before anything else, Meyer stressed the importance of serving others and taking responsibility for your own mistakes. “He (Meyer) drilled us every day,” he explains. “He kicked our butts.” But NSU was just the beginning. For three and a half years after college, Kevin flew overseas and played for four different teams in Ireland, Australia, and Spain. By this point, his body was very worn out, so he moved back to his home in Illinois to take some much needed R&R. After coaching for a year at Mayville State, North Dakota, Kevin received a call from the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, who just so happened to be searching for a sports chaplain in northeastern South Dakota. The workouts he ran in Aberdeen continued to grow and grow until Kevin realized this is what he wanted to make a career out of doing. Although he was running workouts for both the FCA and another company, they weren’t clicking completely with his personal vision. “Many sporting companies are focused exclusively on getting kids scholarships and pro contracts,” he explained, “There’s nothing wrong with that, but that’s not what I’m going to preach to a kid.” Instead, Kevin wants to show kids that the way they commit to something can carry over into other parts of their life. Taking a page from the words of Don Meyer, he encourages kids to find and develop their own unique gifts. “I get some kids that are outcasts in some regards, and I say embrace that. If you have a different personality and different style than most people, that’s a good thing. Don’t try to hide who you are.” Thus, Eyes Up Sports was born. During his workouts, he constantly tells the kids to keep their “eyes up.” On the religious “DON'T TRY side, it goes even deeper than just physically keeping your eyes up, hence the name. TO HIDE Kevin looks forward to growing Eyes Up Sports even more in WHO YOU the future. This summer, they will launch a volleyball program and ARE.” host a daily camp that will last the whole summer. In addition, he plans to partner with Aberdeen Christian to build a gym that Eyes Up will also utilize. Above all, Kevin wants to change the way people think about themselves and sports as a whole. “Sports seems to be the number one thing in the world, and it’s used negatively lots of times for business and selfish desires. I can’t change that, but I want to help change mindsets. I can’t change a billion people, but if I can change a few hundred mindsets, it’ll grow into a thousand mindsets and then ten thousand, and then who knows?” //

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

Photo by Troy McQuillen

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HUB | SCENE

Ladies on the Loose

Photos by Troy McQuillen

ON THURSDAY, MAY 19, ladies from around the community were unleashed downtown for a fun night of shopping, food, and wine sampling. Starting at Karisma Boutique, ladies were invited to pick up a passport and get it stamped at a variety of unique locations Downtown while simultaneously partaking in sales and free samples. According to Brent Brandt, the Director of Membership for the Aberdeen Downtown Association, this event was a great way to get people into businesses they might not normally go into. “We wanted to showcase some great businesses Downtown and get people thinking about all we have to offer.” Around 85 ladies completed their passports and returned them to Karisma for a chance to win over 25 prizes from various Aberdeen businesses. The night turned out to be a wonderful way for Aberdonians to get to know their Downtown like never before! // — BECCA SIMON

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016


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JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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HUB | GALLERY

Greg Blair works on one of his many upcoming sculpture projects.

For local artist Greg Blair, place and art are intimately connected.

BY BECCA SIMON

ABOUT SEVEN YEARS AGO, local sculpture in the Visual Arts in Portland, Maine. He and his artist and associate art professor Greg Blair and wife Sara moved here to teach at Northern State a few of his friends spontaneously created an University. earthwork in the hills of Tuscany on the grounds One of his favorite things about working in of a feudal estate. Although he isn’t sure if any sculpture is that it is very diverse and doesn’t evidence of this creation remains require the artist to stick to one today, it represents well the focus specific medium. “You can use of his work and what makes it almost anything you want,” he “JUST KEEP unique: themes of identity, place, said. “In the past, I have really and the perception of how things enjoyed utilizing wood and other MAKING are formed. natural materials.” THINGS, Originally from Red Deer, Taking inspiration from other Alberta, Canada, Greg attempted artists that work in a multitude of EVEN IF to be a punk rock drummer mediums such as Francis Alÿs, YOU AREN’T before turning to visual art. For Roni Horn, or Roman Signer, as long as he can remember, COMPLETELY Greg says the focus of his art he has been interested in art. is constantly shifting. Although HAPPY WITH He took many art classes, and most of his work has a similar shortly after he graduated high theme, the goal or intention can THEM.” school, he and his friends started change depending on his current a small publishing company for project. “My dissertation was DIY zines. After completing his about the relationship between MFA in sculpture from the University of North the agency of place and the development of Dakota, Greg went on to obtain his Ph. D in Art indigenous knowledge. I don’t really separate Theory from the Institute for Doctoral Studies my scholarly work from my artistic production;

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they are intimately linked – like two sides of the same coin.” Currently, Greg is in the process of working on many projects, including a series about the uniqueness of place that includes sculpture, audio, and performances. In addition, he is doing a writing project about remaining out of place as a strategy of transgression and political resistance. “Lastly, I am excited to have started working as a member of an art collective called Exo-Syndicate,” he added. “We are having our first exhibition together at the Dacotah Prairie Museum this summer and are also working on an outdoor sculpture project for the North Dakota Museum of Art and Public Arts Commission in Grand Forks, ND.” For Greg, the most important thing to keep in mind as an artist is to never give up. In his art classes, he used to have beginning students read a text called Art & Fear. “It is getting a little dated, but the one thing that stuck with me after reading it is that as an artist, the worst thing you can do is stop working. Just keep making things, even if you aren’t completely happy with them.” //

Photos by Anna Jahraus and courtesy of Greg Blair

In The Raw


LOCAL GALLERIES Wein Gallery Presentation College 1500 North Main Street 605-229-8350 Mon-Thurs 8 am-9 pm, Fri 8 am-5 pm, and Sun 1-9 pm

President’s Gallery, Lincoln Gallery and Student Center Gallery Northern State University 1200 South Jay Street 605-626-7766 President’s Gallery: Mon-Fri 8 am-10 pm, Lincoln Gallery: Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, Student Center: Mon-Fri 7 am-11 pm and weekends 1-9 pm Lamont Gallery Dacotah Prairie Museum 21 South Main Street 605-626-7117 Tues-Fri 9 am-5 pm, Sat and Sun 1-4 pm Artworks Co-op Gallery Lakewood Mall 3315 6th Ave SE Suite #48 605-725-0913 Thurs-Sun 12-6 pm or by appointment Jane West Gallery Capitol Theatre 415 South Main Street 605-225-2228 Open during events, call ahead for additional hours of operation ARCC Gallery Aberdeen Recreation and Cultural Center 225 3rd Ave SE 605-626-7081 Mon-Thurs 9 am-8 pm, Fri 9 am-5 pm and Sat 10 am-12 pm Red Rooster Coffee House Gallery 202 South Main Street 605-225-6603 Mon-Thurs 7 am-9 pm, Fri 7 am-11 pm and Sat 8 am-11 pm Aberdeen Originals 9 2nd Avenue Southeast  jacob.bosmoe@gmail.com Thurs-Fri 1-6 pm and Sat 10 am-3 pm

Greg’s work focuses on its relation to place and occasionally visual puns and wordplay.

Benjamin Victor Gallery NSU Lincoln Hall Basement 1200 S Jay Street 605-626-3240 Mon-Thurs 10 am-2 pm

JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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T R AV E L

RICHMOND LAKE SUMMER DAYCATION GUIDE

BY JENNY ROTH PHOTOS BY ANNA JAHRAUS

PICTURE THIS: you wake up one morning this summer on your day off, and the forecast shows we are in for beautiful weather. You want to get outdoors and enjoy it, but you don’t want the hassle of traveling far or spending a ton of money or time planning a trip. A perfect solution is to head only 10 miles Northwest of Aberdeen to Richmond Lake Recreation Area. No need to book a camping reservation or spend the night; the campground is open for day passes and includes plenty to do to keep everyone busy for an afternoon out. My daughters and I spent a few hours at this state park in June and had a blast exploring the beach, hiking and spotting birds. Read on to find out what you need to know to have an amazing daycation close to home this summer.

WHAT TO BRING A list of things to throw in your bag (or vehicle) before you head out the door includes: ~~ Bug spray ~~ Sunscreen ~~ Small first aid items such as Band-Aids ~~ Picnic lunch or snacks ~~ Water ~~ Good hiking and/or water shoes ~~ Swimming and fishing gear and bicycles if you plan to do any of those activities

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WHEN AND WHERE TO GO

Richmond Lake Recreation Area is open year round and is located 10 miles northwest of Aberdeen off US Highway 281. Guests with a day pass can visit the campground any day of the week from dawn until dusk. During the summer months on select weekends, the park hosts special events such as guided nature trail hikes or outdoor scavenger hunts. These events vary from week to week and take place through the end of summer. If you are looking to visit the park during one of these special events, call 605-626-3488 for a detailed schedule.

ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016


Tabitha Martinmaas enjoys a peaceful day at Richmond fishing on the shore.

Ann Scott takes a break from hiking to makes a wish as she blows on a dandelion.

SPEAKING OF ACTIVITIES

When most people think of Richmond Lake, they think of the beach. At the campground area you can spend time relaxing on the beach or swimming. You may even spot some Pelicans passing by in the water or flying overhead. After the beach, you can check out the hiking trail. This short trail goes through the forest and next to the lake and can be completed by hikers of all ages. Keep an eye out for the different butterflies, birds and small wildlife that call the area home. When you are finished hiking, families may want to head to the playground area. Other options would be to take a short drive to the Forest Drive Unit of the park and play disc golf or jump on another walking or biking trail.

WHAT TO EXPECT

The cost for a day pass at Richmond Lake is $6 per carload or $4 per person with kids ages 11 and under free. These passes can be purchased at the campground entrance upon arrival. A modern restroom facility and roofed picnic shelter are located at the campground area. There are additional things to do at the park not listed above, including horse riding trails and fishing pole rentals. To see more information on activities as well as a detailed campground map check out www.gfp.sd.gov/state-parks/ directory/richmond-lake. // Adam Schultz skips a rock on the smooth surface of the lake.

The trails in Richmond’s recreational area provide beautiful scenery and prime opportunities for bird watching.

JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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Go Full-Time I want to camp full time. Am I crazy?

BY MARK BOWER

I want to be a FULLTIMER! I live, dream, eat your motorhome, do a test run. Go travel in your and sleep the idea of becoming a Fulltimer. A motorhome or camper for a month or two and Fulltimer is someone who lives and travels in see how you like it. If after a test run, you and their RV full time. They travel to a location and your spouse dread coming home, then you got stay a few days, a few weeks or a few the bug to be a Fulltimer months, then pack-up and move on to So what else is required to become the next location. I want that lifestyle! “ARE YOU a Fulltimer? You need to love people. I want to see more of this great country READY TO If you don’t enjoy the camaraderie on my time. Are you ready to join me? of being with people, becoming a So what do we need to do to be ready JOIN ME?” Fulltimer is pointless. Visiting with to live the life of a Fulltimer? First, fellow campers is what it’s all about. I be sure you really want to become a Fulltimer. want to know where you’ve been, where you’re Before you sell everything and leave town in going, and I want to know everything about your

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

RV. Tell me your story and ask me what mine is. How about financially? You don’t have to be retired with a nest egg to Fulltime. Seems like when we have the health and energy we don’t have the money, and by the time we do have the money we aren’t guaranteed the health to take advantage of traveling. In other words, if you have your health and the kids are grown and you have the desire to Fulltime but still need an income, then why not do it? That’s what I keep asking myself. Obviously the less debt you have, the less you will need to earn. Fulltiming costs can vary depending on your lifestyle. Obtaining health insurance can be tricky because you’ll want to be sure your carrier has a presence where you intend to travel. Sources of income while Fulltiming can vary greatly. Obviously the less expenses you have, the less money you need to earn. Becoming a campsite host (camphost.org) is one way to park your RV for free. Otherwise there are several magazines and websites (rv-dreams.com, trekwithus.com) devoted just to listing jobs and opportunities that Fulltimers can do while on the road. Obviously, what works for you depends upon your work experience. Maybe you can work right from your RV doing freelance work or selling things online. Or maybe you can do odd-jobs for other people or work short-term stints for area employers. Some Fulltimers have businesses back home and are able to continue managing or overseeing them while on the road. Many Amazon warehouses build RV parks next to their facilities for the sole purpose of enticing Fulltimers to come work for them. Whatever you decide, have a plan and a budget before venturing out. Some people travel with their camper as their job sends them from one worksite to another. Technically that too is camping full time. But are they Fulltiming in the way they want to be? I personally worry that by the time my wife and I have enough money to fully retire, we’ll be too old to enjoy Fulltiming to its fullest extent. I turn 50 next year and although I’m told it’s just a number, I feel like all I’ve done is work, and that there’s more to life while I have my health. Unfortunately, we’ll still need to earn an income for the foreseeable future, but we don’t want to turn 80 and still find ourselves asking why haven’t we started Fulltiming. We have our health, our son is grown, so despite the fact we still need to earn an income, my wife and I have made a commitment to begin Fulltiming within the next 24 months. Can’t wait!! Maybe we’ll also see you along the way. //

Photo courtesy of Mark Bower

Mark Bower and his wife, Lise, show off the RV they call home as they begin their full-time camping adventure.


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www.aberdeen.sd.us/storybookland JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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SPORTS

Seth Gennetten makes his first throw from a tee pad at Melgaard Park during a league event.

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D

ISC GOLF IS A SPORT that has grown exponentially over the years, with Aberdeen being no stranger to the growth. The Richmond Lake Disc Golf Course, which has been around for almost 20 years, offers a beautiful course that provides a challenge to players while also housing a fun and relaxing activity that people of all ages have come to enjoy. Disc golf is very much like regular golf, however instead of a set of clubs and ball, you have a frisbee. Instead of a hole in a small hill on plastic grass, disc golf uses a basket with chains strategically placed to provide the best challenge to aim the frisbee towards. It’s slow paced enough for anyone to play, while being fast paced enough to make you want to keep going again and again and spike your interest. The sport of disc golf is fairly simple. You start out at the tee pad and throw your frisbee towards the goal, continuing until you make it in the basket. The stroke count is the same as in ball golf. The player with the lowest score begins the next round. The player with the lowest score at the end wins the game. Some players and leagues have even come up with new rules and games to shake things up a bit. For Seth Gennetten, disc golf is a sport he has been a part of for quite awhile. How long? “I always take that as two questions. I’ve been

playing recreationally since 2006, so about 10 years now. But competitively and being active in the community, about two years.” Since he loves the sport so much, Seth revived the Aberdeen Disc Golf league, which was disestablished years ago due to most of the members moving out of the area. Gathering friends and other players around the area who shared the common interest, Seth formed the

“IT’S A SPORT THAT’S FOR EVERYONE… IT DOESN'T MATTER YOUR SKILL LEVEL, EVERYONE IS WELCOME.”

current league that meets every Monday and Wednesday at 7 pm at the Melgaard Park Course. On Sundays, the league regularly has mock tournaments out at the Richmond Lake course. Both options are open for everyone to partake in, and are beneficial ways to grow and expand your disc golf skills. In addition to starting up the new league, Seth and three other members of the league designed the new 9 hole Melgaard Park course as another option to use. The course was approved by the city quickly, however, installing the tee pads took a little longer. The course is now completely finished, and is used everyday by players of all ages. “It’s a sport that’s for everyone, and it’s inexpensive. You can go to Wal-Mart and get three discs for like 15, 20 bucks. It doesn’t matter your skill level, everyone is welcome,” Seth encouraged. Currently, Seth is working on getting 8 more holes installed out at Richmond to offer a different tournament style for both the local league and the national tournament. The holes will likely be installed by October, as well as different tee placements for some of the holes and overall general changes and maintenance to the course. For many, disc golf is used to relax after a long day, to provide relief from everyday stress, or to get your mind off of personal issues. For Seth, disc golfing is the perfect way to calm down. “I know that if I’m having a terrible day, I can go out and throw and not even have to keep score or anything, just throw, and feel immediately better. It’s like walking meditation. At the same time, I like the competitive side because it keeps me wanting to play and get better. As it gets bigger, it also gets a lot more fun and gives me more opportunities to go to tournaments around the country.” For more information on league times and local tournament dates, visit the Aberdeen, SD Disc Golf page on Facebook. // JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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SPOTLIGHT

Miss Elizabeth Kiesz helps to teach Spanish through work with the Montessori Materials. Here, she is testing to see if the children can identify color names in Spanish.

ABERDEEN’S CASA DEI BAMBINI Susan Dalager affectionately refers to the Montessori School of Aberdeen that she directs as a ‘casa dei bambini’ or ‘children’s home’. This is because everything in the school, from the math supplies to the kitchen utensils, is sized for and placed easily within reach of active preschoolers and kindergarteners. Not to mention their learning facility is literally set up inside a beautiful, historic home in Aberdeen. 30

ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

BY JENNY ROTH PHOTOS COURTESY OF MOMENT TO MOMENT PHOTOGRAPHY

T

he term Montessori refers to a philosophy of education founded in the early 1900s in Rome by Dr. Maria Montessori. The method encourages a love of learning by allowing children to complete everyday tasks and acquire educational skills in a hands-on environment. If you were to step inside the Montessori School of Aberdeen during the day, you would find a busy group of 3-6 year olds actively exploring their world. In one area, students can grab a spot and start working with various academic tools like math counting blocks, letters, map puzzles, paint easels, or science experiments. In the next room, children can practice basic life skills by gathering dishes and food prepping supplies and helping out in the


“ONE THING THAT MAKES OUR SCHOOL SO SPECIAL IS THE INVOLVEMENT OF THE PARENTS.”

kitchen. Heading outside into the yard, you will find a vegetable plot and bird feeders all cared for by proud student gardeners. Everything in the home is set up in a way so that young kids can access the materials that interest them and complete projects on their own. Students also take part in various field trips around the area throughout the year. One of their favorite spots to visit is their own outdoor campus, complete with nature trails and chickens to tend, located a mile and a half north of Aberdeen. The school has grown in recent years, but has been a part of the community for decades. Aberdeen native Susan Dalager is the current Directress and also the founder of the first Montessori School of Aberdeen, which she started in the early 1980s. While studying Elementary and Early Childhood Education at Northern State University, Susan became impressed by the Montessori Method of teaching and after earning her B.S. Degree, she went on to complete two years of Montessori Teacher Training. A short time later, she opened Aberdeen’s first Montessori school at the same time her oldest child was at the age to be able to attend the program. Her family eventually moved from the area, but all six of her children attended Montessori schools in other locations while other Directors ran the school in Aberdeen. Then in 2009, Susan moved back to Aberdeen

and coincidentally also had a preschool aged grandchild. She decided to relocate and renovate an old home and turn it into a new Montessori school to serve her granddaughter and other children. The idea snowballed, and the school has been growing in enrollment numbers ever since. Full-time Spanish instructor Elizabeth Kiesz and teachers Jillian Schaunaman and Mariah LeBeau have also stepped in to work with students throughout the day. “One thing that makes our school so special is the involvement of the parents,” Susan said. “We serve families who have moved to Aberdeen from all different parts of the world including India, Pakistan and Mexico. The parents have been wonderful in bringing in food, items and experiences in order to share their cultures with the children. We also have students who attended the Montessori School when it first started in town back in the 1980s now as adults sending their own children to the school.” To learn more about the Montessori School of Aberdeen you can call Susan Dalager at 605-7252269 or visit www.montessoriaberdeen.com. //

JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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A B E R D E E N | Y E S T E R DAY S

A map and illustration depicting the humble beginnings of the Tri-State Fair, now the Brown County Fair, in 1921. From the start, the Fair had plans to draw in big crowds, something it continues to do today.

A JOURNEY IN TIME

A LOOK AT HOW THE BROWN COUNTY FAIR HAS CHANGED THROUGHOUT ITS 95 YEARS OF HISTORY BY ERIN BALLARD SINCE ITS BEGINNING, Aberdeen’s Brown County Fair has continued to be the center of social, economic, and agricultural gathering in South Dakota. In 1921, a local newspaper defined the fair as “a place where all the people in a community may go and meet every other man, woman, and child and compare their products, the fruits of their labors and their merchandise with those of the others.” 95 years later, the Brown County Fair continues the legacy today that it began all that time ago. Though it has been in existence since the 1880’s, what we know today as the Brown County Fair began in fall of the 1920’s. Representing South Dakota, North Dakota, and Minnesota, the fairgrounds were originally owned and operated by the Tri-State Association, who wanted to create an event for the showcase and selling of livestock, vegetables, grains, and machinery, while promoting community through congregation. On September 5, 1921, at the Brown County Fair’s current location just northwest of Aberdeen, the Tri-State Fair opened its doors for the very first time. With local railroads offering special rates for travelers heading to the fair, visitors were treated to horse shows, livestock competitions, and agriculture classes. For women, Tri-State Fair events would have consisted of shoe races, style shows, and a “What’s New in the Dairy Department”, sponsored by Kessler’s.

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

Entertainment included marching bands, circus acts, and miscellaneous “free acts” between scheduled sets. Despite the large crowd turn-out for the first Tri-State Fair — “it packed the grandstand to capacity and overflowed around the track,” read a 1921 newspaper clipping—the Association had even greater ambitions in mind when they chose the location and built the structures for the event. Walking in, one visitor commented that, “distances are being planned with an eye to big things. Plans are made to handle big crowds in a big way.” In fact, they were not off by much in their projections — the Brown County Fair draws over 200,000 visitors from across the region each year. Unfortunately, the Great Depression had a comparably disastrous effect on the Tri-State Fair as it did for the rest of the country. In 1933, the Association was forced to foreclose on the fairgrounds due to financial problems. The Brown County Commission swooped in and took control of the land at this time, and in 1935, the Brown County Fair was born. Financial problems were not over for the fair, however; in 1986 the Brown County Commission reported a deficit of $35,000, which was apparently ten times more than was previously conveyed to the public. Nevertheless, the Fair Board had some ideas to help alleviate the large debt, in the form of

ticketing fees. It was then that the “Booster Button” concept was introduced. The idea was that whoever bought and wore the button to the fair would be granted access to all of the quality grandstand entertainment for the week. The “Booster Button” allowed more people to experience the fair by making the entertainment more affordable, and consequently increased revenue for the fair. This model is still being used at the Brown County Fair today, though the actual buttons are a thing of the past. All of the profits that came from the “Booster Buttons,” or come from today’s tickets, go to improving the fair in some way: bigger, better names in music entertainment; more exhibits, shows, and displays; newer and updated buildings and grounds. But despite being well-known for its excellent music entertainment, the modern day Brown County Fair still incorporates shows, classes, and competitions of all breeds of livestock, poultry, and field and garden crops. There are also the rodeos, tractor pulls, food vendors, children’s events and chili cook-offs that bring in high attendances from visitors each year. And even after all this time, the Brown County Fair is still a free event, making it one of the only fairs in the nation that still is out of the 2,500 that occur each year. The concepts that founded the Tri-State Fair in 1921 are still central today; the Brown County Fair is a place for people to gather, share, and compare their lives, products, and interests with those of others in the area. Today, a 25 member, all-volunteer Fair Board is dedicated to making each Brown County Fair the best one yet. This year’s fair will be held from August 15th—August 20th, with Dustin Lynch, Montgomery Gentry, and Jake Owen as the headlining performers. More information about fair events can be found at www.brown.sd.us/ brown-county-fair/home. //


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JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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SPOTLIGHT

EXTEND your

ROOTS BY BECCA SIMON

PHOTOS BY ANNA JAHRAUS

Ah, South Dakota – where it’s too cold to feel your fingers nine months out of the year and devastatingly hot for the other three. While the longer winters might be favorable for snow enthusiasts, for local gardeners and plant lovers it is nothing short of a nightmare. A short growing season means that plants barely have a chance to thrive before the cold returns and they have to be thrown out. What’s a South Dakotan to do? Rustic Roots, the new specialty floral shop in town, has the answer. Owned and operated by Juli Ermer and Nikki Reigle, Rustic Roots is excited to provide Aberdeen with plants that can grow outside and inside – all year round. The store, which opened up shop in April, specializes in bouquets and arrangements of succulents and cactuses that give off a Western and vintage vibe. Whereas many floral gifts die quickly, the arrangements at Rustic Roots are guaranteed to be gifts that last. “I wanted to make something for other people that was something unique that they could keep,” Nikki explained. Succulents are a great alternative to fresh cut flowers because of how durable they are. They require little maintenance, minimal watering, and are resistant to extremely hot or dry climates. They’ve grown quite popular amidst the urban crowd in recent years, and it’s easy to see why. The succulents filling the quaint little space of Rustic Roots come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. According to Juli, “No two plants are the exact same.” The arrangements the two women create are as unique and charming as the plants themselves. They use a variety of antique containers – from old pots to toolboxes and even typewriters – to creatively house the plants. On holidays such

as Christmas, Easter, and Valentine’s Day, they diversify their containers to match the theme. Their current building right off Main Street matches Rustic Roots’ vintage, historic feel and comes with a huge south-facing window that allows for lots of light to filter in. However, Juli and Nikki have plans to continue to grow the business to hopefully fill an even bigger space. Currently, they only accept custom orders, but in the future they hope to expand so people can come in and buy a single plant if they choose. What started out as a hobby grew into a lifelong passion for Juli and Nikki. Although both women have very busy lives on top of running the business, they are determined to share their love of flowers and cater to their customers no matter what. “We want to accommodate others,” Juli said. “We can get you what you need, any day of the week.” So whether you need a gift for a loved one or simply want a cute hanging air plant for your room, Rustic Roots is sure to enchant and delight you. Visit their shop on 9 2nd Avenue SE on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM or contact them anytime via Facebook or phone at 605-290-7703. //

"I WANTED TO MAKE SOMETHING FOR OTHER PEOPLE THAT WAS UNIQUE."

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016


Rustic Roots owners Juli Ermer and Nikki Reigle show off some of their arrangements. They use a variety of unique containers that give off a cool antique vibe. JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016


l a r u t l dition CuT ra

tied to

CENTRAL HIGH’S NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION HONORS GRADUATES BY DANI DAUGHERTY

In a beautifully personal celebration, each graduate received a star quilt from the Aberdeen Public Schools’ Office of Indian Education. Graduates also spoke about their future plans and introduced each family member who came to support them. Some graduates received personal gifts or guidance from their family, including words of encouragement, a personalized quilt one graduate received from her grandmother, and a traditional song. The honoring included special recognition of the efforts of Doug Neuharth, Coordinator of the Office of Indian Education. It was noted that during Mr. Neuharth’s tenure, Aberdeen demonstrated some of the highest Native American student test scores statewide and was successful in prestigious Native American college scholarship applications. Mr. Neuharth demurred that the students made him look good. One grandparent summed up the honoring ceremony's spirit of encouragement when he reminded the crowd that the graduates are all of our grandchildren.

Photos by Anita B Photography

ON APRIL 30, 2016, the Native American seniors of Aberdeen Central High School and their friends and families gathered together to share tradition, song, prayers, and a meal to celebrate the upcoming graduation. It started with an order of eagle feathers from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Eagle Repository – long feathers to be given to male graduates and fluffy plumes to be given to female graduates. About a week before the honoring ceremony, parents gathered together to prepare the feathers. This included purification with the smoke of burning sage of those handling the feathers and the feathers themselves, as well as the porcupine quill decorated medicine wheels created for the feathers. This purification process is called azilya (ah zeal ya). At the April honoring ceremony, Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate spiritual leader, Danny Seaboy, again blessed and purified the feathers and spoke to the graduates about their responsibilities of receiving the feather. The feathers are tied in each student’s hair during the ceremony.

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GATES MILLENNIUM SCHOLARSHIP RECOGNIZES GRADUATE

Members of the American Indian Parent Advisory Council and parents met prior to the honoring ceremony to assemble the feathers and medicine wheels. Feathers came from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Eagle Repository. Preparation included purification with the smoke of burning sage of those handling the feathers, the feathers themselves, and the porcupine quill decorated medicine wheels created for the feathers. This purification process is called azilya (ah zeal ya). //

To purify the feathers, the smoke of burning sage is used.

2016 Aberdeen high school graduate Cortez Standing Bear recently received a unique competitive scholarship funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The Gates Millennium Scholarship is only available to certain minority students, including Native Americans, and covers most unmet education costs for the recipients through graduate school. Only 1,000 students receive the scholarship annually nationwide, and 2016 represents the last year these scholarships will be available. The scholarship is intended to increase minority representation in the fields of math, science or education. Ms. Standing Bear is a member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe in southwestern South Dakota and she intends to attend Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota this fall. The Native American seniors at CHS prepare to be recognized as high school graduates as they don traditional quilts and feathers.

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

Photos by Troy McQuillen

Photo by Abby McQuillen

PREPPING OF FEATHERS


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6/1/16 10:18 AM JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE


Heatin’ Up Sizzlin' Fashion Tips for the Summer!

BY HANNAH LOEFKE PHOTOS BY JL PHOTOGRAPHY It’s 90 degrees and humid, and the dog days of summer are in full swing. Rather than staying inside in front of the A/C all day, consider venturing outside to catch some rays while showing off these hot summer looks. Thankfully, you don’t have to look far; local boutiques such as The Farmer’s Wife, Karisma, and Burnt Lily have a variety of swimwear, tops, accessories, and even skin-care products to get you ready for the heat. Our beautiful models, Carrie Weiglletner and Dakota Feller, showed us how to rock these beach-ready outfits and stay cool even in the burning heat. Whichever look you’re rollin’ with, hang loose and enjoy the heat.

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016


 show off in the bikini, grab

If you aren’t quite ready to

 beach or lay around

Cool off at Richmond

in the lazy river. Break out of your comfort zone and try wearing something other than just your old bikini. Burnt Lily Boutique, located in the Citizens Building, has some rad, retro merchandise. They have several vintage inspired tankinis.

a romper or a coverup. Bright colors are a splendid summer choice. A flowy hippie romper from Farmer’s Wife Boutique can help you stand out.

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 when you hit the beach.

Keep it simple and stylish

One-pieces are back in style, and Burnt Lily’s cool selection of alternative clothing can give you the edge to stand out.

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 can also serve as a sweet An oversized, loose tank

 products, such as sunscreen,

coverup. Too Rock N Roll for the flowy Stevie Nicks look? Transform an old band tee by cutting it into a crop top. Pair it with some dark aviators and maybe a vampira dark lipstick to add more rock to your outfit.

just another summer outfit accessory. Make sure to grab one that keeps you safe from both UVA and UVB rays. Since you’ll be sweating, don’t skip out on the deodorant! Farmer’s Wife has you covered for a variety of skin and hair products.

ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

Consider other skin care


 Karisma. Hats are an excellent summer choice for both style and skin care. Make your look pop with a big, classy sun hat from

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JULY/AUGUST 2016 ABERDEEN MAGAZINE

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ABERDEEN MAGAZINE JULY/AUGUST 2016

1. Column capitals on the east façade of old Central High School. 2. Finials atop the original St. Luke’s hospital on State Street and 3rd Avenue SE 3. Third floor of 206 S. Main 4. Tiles on façade of 207 S. Main Street 5. Monument to Kate and Claude, City mules in Aldrich Park. 6. Rosette window on west façade of First Presbyterian Church on Kline and 4th Avenue SE

6

Photos by Troy McQuillen

5 2 3 Do you recognize these six places in Aberdeen?

Where are we now?

4 1

IN THE BACK


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Aberdeen Magazine July/August 2016  

Aberdeen, South Dakota's community lifestyle magazine.

Aberdeen Magazine July/August 2016  

Aberdeen, South Dakota's community lifestyle magazine.

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