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Cultural Quarterly Magazine - A fine arts magazine for Broward County. Spring 2014 Issue.

A Ser vice of Broward County Board of County Commissioners Volume XXIX Number 2

F I N E A RT S M A G A Z I N E

SPRING 2014

INSIDE OUT

Come show your face and become part of Broward County’s history. Participate in one of the largest grassroots art projects in the world!

BROWARD 10 0 Celebrating The Art of Community Our Featured Story:


Broward Cultural Division’s

ANNUAL REPORT 2012 ONLINE.

MISSION : A UNIFIED FOCUS. GRANTS : FUNDING FOR DEVELOPMENT. PUBLIC ART : A SENSE OF PLACE. ARTS EDUCATION : INVESTING IN THE FUTURE. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT : STRENGTH THROUGH INFORMATION. DOLLAR & SENSE : GROWING OUR COMMUNITY. VOLUNTEERS : WHO ARE THESE ARTS AFICIONADOS?. To read more please visit

Broward’s Arts CulturalDivisionAnnualReport.org and Culture Industry Generates $230 Million in Economic Activity


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Table of Contents. Page 14

Broward 100 30 14 Artist Profile: Celebrates the Dawn Rowe. at Fort LauderdaleArt of Community Artist-in-Residence Hollywood International Airport. A yearlong centennial celebration commemorates growth by showcasing the talent and creativity of Broward County.

By Susan Davis. Page 36:

Business for the 36 Stacy Ostrau. Artist Profile: 22 Arts: Sun Sentinel Community Affairs / Rosanna Saccoccio. Society Scene Publisher. Rosanna Saccoccio’s colorful canvas a symmetrical weave of positivity and play Fushu Daiko 39 By Rachel Galvin. brings Japanese Meet Our Writers culture to life By Julie Levin. Page 22:

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Read more about

Since 1990, Fushu Daiko has been giving South Florida audiences energizing performances that also educate about Japanese culture.

Cultural Quarterly magazine’s team of writers online >>

DEPARTMENTS

2 Director’s Message / Earl Bosworth. 4 ArtNews / Update on Broward’s Cultural Community. 42 Artist as Entrepreneur: Beju. 45 Arts Education. 59 Calendar of Events. 64 Staff Member Profile / Susan Schultz.

Diane Weinbrum, Chair Tracy Roloff, 1st Vice Chair Jody Jeffreys-Tanner, 2nd Vice Chair Bonnie Clearwater, Cultural Executives Committee Dr. Margaret Mitchell Armand Sue Gunzburger Alice Simon Commissioner Deborah Kerr Caryl Hattan Bonnie Barnett Councilmember Michael Bassichis Roslyn S. Kurland Darran Blake Jarett Levan Rose Marie A. Cossick Estelle Lowenstein Dr. Claire Crawford Amy Ostrau Wayne A. Gayles Gregory Reed Heather Brinkworth Edith Gooden-Thompson Beth Ravitz Dr. Wilma Bulkin Siegel Jeff Suiter

Broward Cultural Division: Earl Bosworth, Director Jody Horne-Leshinsky, Assistant Director / Cultural Quarterly Editor.

Cultural Quarterly is published online by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners’ Cultural Division, 100 S. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301; phone 954-357-7457. The Broward County Board of County Commissioners does not necessarily agree with individual opinions expressed herein, nor is it responsible for the facts presented by the authors. This publication was funded in part by the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. To receive the electronic version of Cultural Quarterly, send your e-mail address to jleshinsky@broward.org. Broward County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of services.

Local photographers gathered the images and stories of the talented individuals that contribute to our thriving local cultural scene. The Broward Cultural Council, created in 1977, is an advisory board of the Broward County Commission. The Council is dedicated to enhancing the cultural environment of Broward County through development of the arts. Q u a r t e r l y

Broward Cultural Council:

Bonnie Barnett, Chair Howard Katz, Vice Chair Dr. Henning Haupt Alan J. Levy

The first installment of Broward County’s own InsideOut project, explores the diverse talents of our local creative community.

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Martin David Kiar Kristin D. Jacobs Stacy Ritter Chip LaMarca Lois Wexler Sue Gunzburger Tim Ryan Barbara Sharief, Mayor Dale V.C. Holness, Vice Chair

Public Art & Design Committee:

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Broward County Board of County Commissioners:

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REASONS TO CELEBRATE Message from the Director EARL BOSWORTH

EARL BOSWORTH Director Broward Cultural Division

As we draw closer and closer to Broward County’s 100th anniversary, our vibrant arts and cultural community has many reasons to celebrate. Prominent among them is the fact that the County’s 100th anniversary observance will have art and culture at its very core. This October, the Broward Cultural Division will launch Broward 100 – Celebrating the Art of Community – a yearlong series of events and activities commemorating the County’s culture, history, heritage and beauty.

“We can be assured that the next year will be an exceptionally exciting one for Broward County as we use the arts to bridge, bond and build the community.” EARL BOSWORTH Director, Broward Cultural Division

Presented in collaboration with the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau with a generous grant from the Community Foundation of Broward, Broward 100 truly will offer something for everyone. As you will read elsewhere in this edition of Cultural Quarterly, the components of the project include four distinct cornerstones of engagement: S P R I N G

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V I S UA L E Y E S – a series of new public artworks in strategic locations throughout the County C A L E N DA R 1 0 0 – a comprehensive listing of events related to the centennial I N S I D E O U T B R O WA R D – the local incarnation of a global participatory art project C U L M I NAT I N G E V E N T A large-scale public event in October 2015 that’s designed to bring the entire community together to cap off the celebration. Residents and visitors alike will be able to participate in the Broward 100 celebration in numerous ways. We will continue to bring you details in Cultural Quarterly. We also invite you to visit our website at broward.org/arts as well as the new website dedicated to the celebration - broward100.org. As we mark Broward County’s centennial, we are making a conscious effort to look to the future at the same time that we are paying tribute to the past. In this vein, we are pleased to note that the future of funding for our local arts and cultural programs is looking somewhat brighter than in previous years. In large measure, this optimistic outlook can be attributed to the recent actions of the Florida Legislature, which recommended a total of nearly $43.3 million in funding for arts and culture programs in the 2014-2015 state C u l t u r a l

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budget. This represents full funding for all five of the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs’ grants programs, the largest state arts budget in history. We are also anticipating an increase in arts and cultural funding from the Broward County Board of County Commissioners for fiscal year 2015. Meanwhile, at the Federal level, President Obama proposed just over $146 million in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts in his 2015 budget request – the same level of funding in the current year’s budget.

While we always hope for year-overyear increases, level funding still sends an important message about the value of the arts. No matter what happens on the funding scene, we can be assured that the next year will be an exceptionally exciting one for Broward County’s arts and cultural community. We urge you to participate fully in the countless opportunities that are available to you. We look forward to celebrating Broward 100 with an artistic flourish.

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C ALL TO A RT I S T S ! Broward Cultural Division regularly issues calls to artists and performers. See more or subscribe to Opportunities in the Arts

www.broward.org/arts

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Jarett Levan, Commissioner Sue Gunzburger, and Earl Bosworth

closed with a special performance by local dancer and choreographer Pablo Malco.

Annual Planning Forum gets under way

Broward County District 6 Commissioner Sue Gunzburger 2014 Annual Planning Forum highlighted the significant economic Gets the Year Off to a Good Start impact of the arts both nationally and locally, while Immediate Past Chair The Broward Cultural Council convened Deborah Kerr talked about public art a well-attended 2014 Annual Planning installations at Port Everglades and Fort Forum earlier this year. Members of Lauderdale-Hollywood International the community were invited to the arts Airport in 2013, which continue the and cultural ideas exchange - and more development of international relations than 100 artists, local arts supporters, through tourism and trade. elected officials, arts organization Current Chair Diane Weinbrum executives and spoke about collaborations between members of the the School Board of Broward County business and and other agencies designed to secure arts community the arts in core curriculum in County participated. schools. Bosworth shared a PowerPoint presentation on the County’s 100th “We wanted to start the year with a anniversary, Broward 100: The Art of positive and inspiring message, involve Community, and characterized the the community and stir up excitement partnership with the Greater Fort for Broward County’s arts and cultural Lauderdale Convention and Visitors progress,” says Cultural Division Bureau as groundbreaking. Director Earl Bosworth.” “The centennial is a perfect unified A wine and cheese reception in the art project for this partnership to thrive,” he gallery with the DCA String Quartet said. “And along with our Community from the Dillard Center for the Arts Foundation of Broward co-sponsors, we set the stage for the presentations that have a triumvirate of culture, tourism followed in the auditorium. The evening and business.” S P R I N G

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38th Annual Carbonell Awards Winners The South Florida theater community celebrated the 38th annual Carbonell Awards, which took place in the Amaturo Theater at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts in Fort Lauderdale. It was the fastest selling awards ceremony in recent history, according to Carbonell Coordinator Mary Damiano. The Broward County winner of the night was a newcomer to Broward County’s theater community; Island City Stage received six awards on the evening.

through a competitive process to South Florida high school seniors who are pursuing college education in the performing arts and/or journalism. Carbonell scholarships of $1,000 each were presented to Gabrielle Perez of Miami’s Coral Reef High School, Taryn Noble of Davie’s Western High School and Eliana Meyerowitz of Boca Raton Community High School.

Another highlight of the ceremony was the announcement of three winners of the 2014 Carbonell Scholarships. These scholarships are awarded

This year’s awards event was once again live-tweeted from backstage of the awards ceremony. For more information visit the Carbonell Awards website. CQ

The 24 members of the Broward Cultural Council, who are appointed by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners, recommend County cultural policy, arts and culture incentives, and public art.

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BEST PRODUCTION OF A PLAY: The Timekeepers, Island City Stage. BEST DIRECTOR Michael Leeds,The Timekeepers, Island City Stage. BEST ACTOR Michael McKeever, The Timekeepers, Island City Stage. BEST SCENIC DESIGN Michael McClain, The Timekeepers, Island City Stage. BEST LIGHTING DESIGN Preston Bircher, The Timekeepers, Island City Stage. BEST SOUND DESIGN: David Hart, The Timekeepers, Island City Stage.

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This event, which was hosted by ArtServe and sponsored by Business for the Arts of Broward, turned out to be a first in attendance, exuberance and involvement for Broward Cultural Council’s Annual Planning Forum. CQ

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PABLO MALCO, Director of the Pablo Malco Foundation presents a solo dance / rap performance.


Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute Returns to South Florida Changing the Way that Artists do Business Broward Cultural Division, the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture (CPAC) and ArtServe announce the return of the very successful Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI) for South Florida artists. The program, to be presented on four Saturdays in June, will be held at ArtServe, 1350 E. Sunrise Blvd. in Fort Lauderdale. Artists working in all media are encouraged to attend - including, but not limited to, sculptors, illustrators, metalworkers, writers, dancers, jewelers, musicians, performers, media/ filmmakers, photographers, crafts, designers and all interdisciplinary artists. AEI is a course of study designed to assist individual artists by cultivating and advancing their business skills and helping them to strengthen their operating infrastructure and expand their business. To date, more than 400 South Florida artists have graduated from the Institute; many have exceptional success stories to tell. AEI will be offered as 20 classes convening during full-day sessions from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on June 7, 14 and 21 and a Business Plan Clinic and Workshop on June 28 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. S P R I N G

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Registrants will receive an AEI course book, an indispensable resource for artists. Developed by CPAC, the course book features exercises and readings to prepare for each session. It is tailored to the specific needs of artist entrepreneurs. The Business Plan Clinic’s topics, “Working Effectively with Lenders” and “Developing a Brand,” will guide participants through preparation of a simple business plan - an essential tool for any artist. In addition, participants will learn how to work effectively with lenders to obtain financial support. Participation costs $100 and includes light refreshments and free parking. You can RSVP online. For more information, contact Adriane Clarke at 954-357-7530. View the Artist as an Entrepreneur webpage for more information about the course and its history. C u l t u r a l

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ACTION REQUESTED! Have You Listed Your Events on ArtsCalendar.com? The Broward Cultural Division and ArtServe are working to enhance ArtsCalendar.com, Broward County’s complete guide to the arts. In order to ensure that every cultural event that takes place in Broward County is on the ArtsCalendar.com site, we are enlisting your help. Please make sure to send your artsrelated events as soon as you have them scheduled. If you plan your events a year in advance, send them! If you plan your events six months in advance, send them! This database is used in many ways to educate our residents, tourists and program planners. We aim to keep the content as robust as possible, so please send your press releases and/or season schedules and photographs on a regular basis to the Broward Cultural Division at culturaldiv@broward.org

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In Celebration of the Life of Ralph Garth Dearden The Broward Cultural Division honors the life of Ralph Garth Dearden, whose contributions to the arts and community of Broward County will always be remembered. Always interested in the arts as a young boy, Ralph studied piano and loved to sing. Throughout his school years he was a member of the Stranahan Singers, the FSU Men’s Glee Club, numerous church choirs and the Fort Lauderdale Symphony Chorus. His musical pursuits led him to meet Pam Dearden, executive director of the Gold Coast Jazz Society, in the choir of the Second Presbyterian Church and in 1972 they were married. Throughout their married life they continued the joy of singing together in various church choirs, including many years in the Cathedral Choir of First Presbyterian Church, the Fort Lauderdale Symphony Chorus and the Master Chorale of South Florida. S P R I N G

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Ralph’s early work career included managing a Chinese restaurant, running a floral business, working as an auditor at Pompano Harness Track and serving as a deputy clerk for the Broward County Circuit Court. In the early 1970s, Ralph began his tenure in the family’s paint manufacturing business, D&B Paint Manufacturing Company, which he continued to operate until the business closed in the late 1990s. He later worked in the marketing and property management departments of Rausch, Weaver, Norfleet, Kurtz and Company, until his retirement. Ralph Dearden will be greatly missed by all members of the Broward Cultural Council and the staff of the Broward Cultural Division.


Fort Lauderdale Warehouses could be Next Hot Spot By Larry Barszewski, Sun Sentinel

Photos below - Progresso Plaza. One of the few remaining large commercial buildings from the 1925-1926 “Boom” in Fort Lauderdale.

A 30-year-old warehouse district on the fringe of downtown is on track to become the city’s next hot spot. Some envision it as a version of Miami’s Wynwood Arts District, with trendy cafes, galleries and boutiques occupying the dated buildings near the railroad tracks between Sistrunk and Sunrise boulevards. The transformation is just waiting to take off, says area art gallery owner Larry Clemons, but is dependent upon reduced parking requirements to make it practical for new businesses to open. “The synergy for this area is such a no-brainer,” Clemons said. “What I’m talking about is a true village, where on the weekend, everybody goes.”

“What I’m talking about is a true village, where on the weekend, everybody goes.”

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The city agrees and has given initial approval to reduced parking in the area east and south of the tracks. It is expected to extend the rules into the triangle area bordered by Andrews Avenue, Sunrise and the tracks. Already some seeds of change have sprouted. There’s the FAT Village Arts District along the tracks west of Andrews near Sistrunk, and the Laser Wolf craft beer bar in the vintage 1920s train station at the tracks and Northeast Third Avenue. The new businesses would serve the Flagler Village community to the south and the hundreds of new apartments now under construction there. And they would benefit from the planned nearby stops for the Wave electric streetcar, the All Aboard Florida rail between Miami and Orlando, and the proposed Tri-Rail Coastal Link. Mayor Jack Seiler said “this is an area that’s crying out for some sort of relief.”

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He and commissioners said they are receptive to the proposed changes, which would create opportunity for property owners who are ready to get on board with the idea. The changes can’t come fast enough for Clemons, who already has a tentative contract with the owner of the Whole Enchilada Mexican restaurant to open a café and bar in Gallery 721, which used to be a dry cleaners. The area is perfect for David Cardaci, whose Whole Enchilada restaurant is just a few blocks to the east on Federal Highway. He said he’s also considering a brew pub for another nearby spot. “I think it’s a really hip, cool, up-andcoming area in Fort Lauderdale,” Cardaci said. He sees Flagler Village as “where the cool kids play,” with monthly rents in the $1,500 to $3,000 range. “There’s definitely a lot of young professionals in the area,” he said. Not all the businesses in the area plan to change, even if a reduced parking-space requirement takes effect. Tony Curatolo owns seven properties in the triangle area and said business is fine the way it is now. “I have no problem renting them,” Curatolo said. “I have automobile dealers, airplane part dealers. I have a bit of everything.”

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Angela Absolon, co-owner of the ABS Exotic Repair auto shop at Andrews and the tracks, said the change can only help the area.

Integra Corporations’ restaurant concept by the railway tracks.

“Even if we decide we want to stay in our current use, we would like the area around us to improve because it has such great potential,” she said. “It seems as if we’re the abyss, and we have all the ingredients not to be the abyss.” At the Laser Wolf craft beer bar, co-owner Chris Bellus watches the Flagler Village developments under construction and waits. “Most of the stuff isn’t really done yet, so we haven’t seen a huge impact yet,” Bellus said. “It’s cool to see people walking down Andrews … You see the progress and you’re hopeful it’s going to bring a lot more business to the area.” Copyright © 2014, South Florida Sun-Sentinel S P R I N G

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Gallery 721 on Progresso Drive.


And the Winners are... The Fourth Annual PNC Non-Profit Academy Awards Three Broward County arts and cultural nonprofit organizations were honored at the Fourth Annual PNC Non-Profit Academy Awards in early March.

Nonprofit Arts: ArtServe, in-

corporated in 1989 as one of the six original arts incubators in the U.S. and now billed as South Florida’s premier arts incubator. It develops events and programs to help artists turn art into business while also bringing arts to the community.

Nonprofit Leader:

Patricia Zeiler, former director of the Sun Trolley and new director of the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society. She turned around finances at the public transportation program by securing grants, ads, corporate sponsorships and other funds.

Community Choice Award: The Girl Choir of South Florida, selected through online votes. Hosted by the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino and sponsored by many local businesses, including PNC Bank, Publix and Consolidated Credit, the event pays tribute to the great work of many nonprofits in Broward County. Each award winner and finalist receives a cash award for their organization. S P R I N G

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CQ Estelle Loewenstein Recognized during 2014 Women’s History Month When the Commission on the Status of Women honored Broward County’s “Unsung Heroes” Advocates for Women, Broward Cultural Council member Estelle Loewenstein was one of them. Community Activist Estelle Loewenstein has been a participant in many facets of Broward County’s growth and development. Her career, which was concentrated in healthcare, influenced her concern for social issues and humanitarian causes. She has served on the boards of many organizations, such as the Jewish Family Service and Jewish Federation Women’s Division. She has served as a chair of the Broward County Commission’s Cultural Council, as a liaison to Business for the Arts and as a member of the Broward County Film Society Board. As an advocate for historic preservation, Loewenstein is a founder and coordinator of the Hollywood Historical Society Home Tour, a board member of the Broward Trust for Historic Preservation, and serves on the City of Hollywood Historic Preservation Board. She also finds time to volunteer as a political activist for candidates and issues both locally and nationally. CQ C u l t u r a l

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City of Pompano Beach The City of Pompano Beach is a city on its way. With the development of two new Community Redevelopment Areas (CRAs), the city has been taking shape as a cultural and tourist destination. Through a joint effort involving the City of Pompano Beach, CRA, Chamber of Commerce and the Economic Development Council, the foundation has been laid to attract private investment to the city. Over the last year, the CRA has prepared a long-term finance plan to guide the redevelopment of the East and Northwest Redevelopment districts, hired professional staff to implement streetscape plans and incentive programs and positioned the agency to engage in public/ private partnerships to attract private investment. The underlying message is, “We’re Open for Business!” The city has also been developing a Public Art Master Plan. Public Art Master Plan Workshops, which included an open forum and discussion, were held earlier this year at the Olson Civic Center and the Larkin Community Center in Pompano Beach. The master planners presented public art from around the world, all the existing public art in Pompano Beach and ideas for public art projects. Summarized below are the master planners’ opinions of ideas that were appreciated by the

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attendees. These are just some of the thoughts and ideas being considered as the Pompano Beach Public Art Master Plan takes shape: • A theme for the artworks in Pompano. To make Pompano Beach stand out from its neighbors, many of the new artworks could include one type of work, such as murals, or specific themes of work, such as fish. Themes would create an identity for the art collection and the city itself. • Parks, the beach and Atlantic Boulevard are great locations for public art. Artwork looks great in parks. The beach and Atlantic Boulevard provide the main image of the city and are seen by residents and visitors. • Art projects can serve double duty. The location of the artworks or artworks with an extra function could occur, such as locating a mural with lights in a place that needs lighting for improved safety. Or a sculpture that celebrates S P R I N G

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Pompano Drum Circle Photo: Jody Horne-Leshinsky


Read more about public art in Pompano Beach >

performing arts could be installed at the new library on Atlantic Avenue to mark it as the cultural center of Pompano Beach. • Passion for an identity. The city has a strong sense of self but still longs for images that send an exciting message about the future of the city. • Gathering places. With the success of the Beach Park and the new downtown Pompano Beach art events, the public

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art should help make these places beautiful and special to visit and to enjoy. With success, great hope exists for new businesses and jobs. Artworks of light were suggested. • Tourism ideas: Suggestions included an underwater sculpture park and a blimp museum. These ideas are seen as good tourism generators, but people would want to have a way to enjoy the artwork even if they don’t scuba dive or fly. CQ

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This now annual event exhibits nine of the self-taught African-American painters, who showed more than 100 works -from their signature royal poinciana to Everglades sunsets and moonlit beaches - at the historic Sample-McDougald House. Hair Truesdell and Charles Walker scheduled to attend.

Royal Poinciana II by James Gibson

Excerpt from Sun Sentinel Article by Doreen Christensen and published with permission

Famed Highwaymen come to Pompano Beach

The Fort Pierce painters got their nickname because they sold quickly painted works - sometimes still wet - from the trunks of their cars along U.S. Highway 1 in the 1950s and ‘60s. The group of 26 artists was inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame in 2004. Nine have died.

Floridians had an opportunity for an up-close look at a unique part of Florida’s art history when the famed Highwaymen painters gathered to exhibit and sell their vibrant works in Pompano Beach in March.

Their vivid, colorful landscapes hang in homes across the United States, as well as in museums, city halls and the White House. The event is cosponsored by the home’s preservation society and the Pompano Beach Historical Society. CQ

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2014

Now in its eighth year, the spring 2014 program has been updated and refreshed with a new format, new modules and new instructors.

BROWARD.ORG/ARTS/EVENTS contact Broward Cultural Division’s James Shermer 954-357-7502 jshermer@broward.org for more information.


D R A W O R B Ar t of Community e h t g n i t a r b e l Ce

100

BY JULIE LEVIN

100

years ago, Broward County was a desolate, hard to reach southern frontier, once labeled unfit for human habitation. But a century later, through the hard work of its people and the lure of its sun and sea, Broward County now gives off a much different vibe. Home to more than 1.8 million residents, the County is a vibrant mix of culture, art and diversity.

In order to showcase its 100th anniversary, Broward County is embarking on a yearlong centennial celebration to commemorate its growth by showcasing talent and creativity. Broward 100 - Celebrating the Art of Community will encompass a countywide series of events and activities that will use art as a rallying point.

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“It is a fantastic celebration that will commemorate all of the County’s culture, history, heritage and beauty,” says Earl Bosworth, director for the Broward Cultural Division. “It will also continue to encourage new connections and enhance the diversity of Broward County.” Broward 100 is a combined effort of the Broward Cultural Division and the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention

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BROWARD 100

& Visitors Bureau, which formed a first-of-its-kind partnership with the Community Foundation of Broward. Thanks to a $400,000 grant from the Foundation, Broward 100 will run from October 2014 through October 2015. It will culminate in a large-scale celebration that is intended to become an annual signature event for Broward County. The idea for Broward 100 has been in development for two years, since the time that organizers from the Broward Cultural Council, Tourist Development Council and Cultural Tourism Committee collaborated to find a unique way to mark the 100th anniversary. It was determined

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early in the process that the ongoing celebration should be much more than just a look back. While the observance will be steeped in historical perspective, the focus is setting the stage for the next 100 years and engaging the entire community.

“We wanted to develop a plan that taps into and celebrates the talents and creativity we have right here in Broward County, something that uses our artists, our performing arts groups, our businesses, our restaurant and hotel industry.� EARL BOSWORTH Director, Broward Cultural Division

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Organizers want everyone to understand that they are all an integral part of what makes Broward County go - and there will be plenty of ways to get involved. “We want to celebrate and commemorate Broward County with bold, innovative art projects and create a beautiful awareness and strengthening of this social bond as we celebrate our community,” says Bosworth.

“Any group that wants to be an official event and tell their story about why they are important to Broward County can be a part of this calendar.” JODY LESHINSKY Assistant Director, Broward Cultural Division

To help boost community participation, organizers have developed a creative blend of visual, performance and interactive artworks framed by four cornerstones that will help showcase Broward County. The first cornerstone is VISUALEYES, a visual arts plan to create a series of new public artworks that will pay tribute to Broward’s past, present and future. Placed strategically throughout the County, the permanent and semi-permanent artwork will be in the form of sculptures, murals, performances and more. Organizers S P R I N G

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recently announced a call to artists who are interested in creating works that support the theme of connectivity and community engagement. Another aspect of the visual arts plan is encouraging galleries and museums to find ways to showcase local artists. The second cornerstone is CALENDAR 100 an allencompassing listing of the happenings taking place during the Centennial year. Event organizers throughout the County will be encouraged to include their current annual events in an official celebration of Broward 100. “Any group that wants to be an official event and tell their story about why they are important to Broward County can be a part of this calendar,” notes Jody Leshinsky, assistant director for Broward Cultural Division. The event will also be linked to Broward’s ArtsCalendar.com, as well as all other Broward 100 initiatives. The third cornerstone - INSIDE OUT BROWARD - will associate the County with the world’s largest participatory public art project. In cooperation with Parisian artist JR, C u l t u r a l

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Broward 100 will become one of the largest expressions of the worldwide visual arts display. Inside Out is a global platform that encourages communities to reflect their diversity in large-scale portraits that are exhibited in public forums. “The premise of Inside Out is the idea of people being able to express their feelings related to issues that are important to them and then create a visual of those people in a digital space to share their message,” says Daniel Fenton with the Strategic Advisory Group, a part of the Broward 100 team. Nearly 200,000 people from around the globe have already participated in Inside Out. Fenton believes Broward’s Inside Out project will be one of the most comprehensive approaches to date, designed to reach into every area of the County in order to get groups together speaking about issues that are important to them. “We really hope to reach a lot of people both directly through participation and indirectly through people reading and seeing the message.” Fenton said.

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The Inside Out project is coming to Broward County. The photo on the cover of the spring issue of Cultural Quarterly is a collage of images - taken by photographer Kara Starzyk - to showcase the people who attend various programs at the Miramar Multi-Service Complex, 6700 Miramar Parkway in Miramar. Their message is “Power of the Past, Force of the Future.” Images and video may be viewed on the Broward 100 and the Inside Out Project websites. Created by Parisian street artist JR, who won the TED prize at the TED Conference in 2011, Inside Out is known as the people’s art project because of its bold and exciting format. Using the expressions of the individuals in photographs, as well as their recorded thoughts, Inside Out Broward creates

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large-scale “pastings” and a global platform that allows people to share their “untold” stories. Since 2007, Inside Out has become an international community project. Nearly 200,000 people from more than 112 countries and territories have participated and Broward County is slated to be the largest installation yet! Residents and visitors alike are encouraged to come and show their faces and become part of Broward’s history by participating in one of the largest grassroots public art projects in the world! Let’s put Broward County on the map and be part of the celebration of our creativity and diversity. If you would like to organize an Inside Out Broward project in your community, please visit the Broward 100 website to learn how to get started.

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At the end of the celebration, organizers will pull everything together with its fourth cornerstone - a huge culminating event on October 2-4, 2015, that is expected to bring thousands of people together in a celebration of art, culture and community. The event will include a series of performances designed by a group of Broward’s best creative minds. Using live performances, simulcasts and possibly even satellite performances, Broward 100 will also create a virtual platform for fringe events - events that take place simultaneously through the County - to grow and further contribute to the celebration.

like Broward 100 play an important role in providing a diversity of amenities for visitors. “We don’t have a major gated attraction here [like Disney World or Universal Studios]. We have the beach and the Everglades, so we have to continue to elevate the destination from one end of town to another,” Grossman says.

Grossman says the CVB is already working with a national public relations agency to build hype surrounding Broward 100 and also with hoteliers to create hotel packages tied to some of the events. She says the celebration demonstrates the areas’ vibrancy. “The best thing about it is that Broward “The culminating event will be a great continues to progress, develop and way to highlight and showcase what evolve. There are a lot of communities we’ve done throughout the year,” that have reached 100 and have begun Bosworth says. “It’s something that a different type of progress or slowed not only celebrates the centennial but hopefully becomes the launch pad for an down. But not this County,” she states emphatically. “Broward County is ongoing signature event that ultimately will also have a cultural tourism impact.” walking into the light and continues to evolve into a better place to live and a better place to visit.” Organizers are optimistic that potential visitors from around the world will take CQ notice. Tourism officials are certain Broward 100 will be a boon for their For more information on how to industry, which brought in 13.1 million participate visit the Broward 100 website. visitors last year, according to Nicki Use the hashtag #Broward100 in your E. Grossman, president of the Greater social media posts. Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB). Grossman says events S P R I N G

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IT’S TIME TO CELEBRATE Broward 100 commemorates Broward County’s centennial. Using our arts, sports and recreation venues, natural attractions and incredible diversity Broward 100 aims to creatively bridge, bond and build our communities. Bold, innovative art and performance projects that attract visitors and bring Broward residents together. The celebration will be steeped in historical perspective and will look toward the future. Learn how to engage at Broward100.org.

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PUBLIC ART & DESIGN PROFILE HOWARD T. KATZ BY LEON M. RUBIN

Howard Katz doesn’t just talk the talk about public art. He walks it – or, to be more precise, he dances it!

HOWARD KATZ Public Art & Design Committee

Last fall, Katz helped organize a swing dance flash mob on the Fort Lauderdale Riverwalk to create awareness about public art and the newly formed Friends of Public. On a sunny afternoon, he and about two dozen other dancers from Swing Out South Florida attracted a crowd of delighted onlookers as they showed off their jazzy moves by the Cascade Arch – a public art installation by Barry Tinsley on the Riverwalk.

It wasn’t the least bit odd for the Broward Cultural Council’s Public Art & Design Committee member to perform in public. In a sense, he’s constantly on stage as an art professor as well as the coordinator of media arts and the gallery director at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale. He’s taught about 25 different classes including art history, drawing, 3D design and even theater appreciation at the school. In addition, he’s written and published study guides on art history and art appreciation.

Katz, who grew up in Sunrise, found “We did it to bring awareness to public art himself drawn to the arts as a child. “I’ve always been drawing,” he says. “It and art in general. We started with a pair of started with comic book characters. I dancers and then everyone joined in. We had started taking it more seriously in high school and then decided it was what I a pretty receptive audience. Everyone had a wanted to do forever.” He studied at what was then Broward Community really great time.” HOWARD KATZ College and earned his undergraduate degree from Florida State. A master’s “It was really a blast,” says Katz, who has degree followed from Northern Illinois been swing dancing for the last two years. University, where he taught throughout “We did it to bring awareness to public his three-year program. art and art in general. We started with a pair of dancers and then everyone joined After returning to South Florida, he in. We had a pretty receptive audience. began teaching in Broward County Everyone had a really great time.” The and ultimately joined the faculty at the flash mob followed about a month of Art Institute. He has directed the art rehearsals, he notes. gallery for four years. S P R I N G

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Despite the demands of his life as a teacher and administrator, Katz also makes time to create his own art – primarily painting and drawing. “My second bedroom is my studio,” he says. “I’m not the stay-up-all-night type, but I try to do it as often as I can - though I always wish it were more.” In his work, Katz explains on his website, “I explore the perception of objects on both a formal and conceptual level. From musical compositions explored visually through composition, shape and color to pieces of armor and

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their relevance (if any) in today’s society, to exploring identity and its representation in the 21st century, the artwork, no matter how different aesthetically, all involves the exploration of perception.” CQ To view Katz’ work, visit his website at http://htkatz.com You can find video of the Friends of Public Art flash mob on YouTube S P R I N G

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A RANDOM ACT OF CULTURE Flash mob event at Las Olas Riverfront in Fort Lauderdale.


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SOUTH FLORIDA CULTURAL CONSORTIUM

Rosanna Saccoccio’s colorful canvas a symmetrical weave of positivity and play By Rachel Galvin

Circles and squares, drips and dabs. The shapes and lines that make up a Rosanna Saccoccio artwork are filled with a sense of whimsical spontaneity. And yet, there is a balance in the imperfection, a symmetry in the trickling lines that bisect the plane. The rounded colorful squares with light grays, bright yellows, faded whites, sky blues or even a deeper pea green or burnt umber seem to have a contrasting companion. A dark, seemingly inked-in square-like shape or even a simply traced loose circle shares space on the canvas just to add balance to this seesaw of dark and light. The characters are all out of the box yet confined simultaneously. The canvas becomes a playground on which the forms can play. It is all about positivity, says Saccoccio; nothing negative. Before she was painting with acrylics, Saccoccio was working with textiles from an early age. She says, “As a child, I used to sit on the floor and draw and color (like most children) and always had little pieces of fabric. My mother was a seamstress. I used to collage. I was popular ... always making clothes for dolls.” She continues, “I went to school to be a textile designer … Prospect

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Heights High School (an arts high school in Brooklyn). I had all of the usual academic classes, but four classes of art a day. I learned the technique of fabric design. It taught me a lot about color.” She worked in textiles for many years. “We did designs for the housewife. We also exported to Africa. It was an amazing contrast. For the average housewife, we used little rosebuds. For the Africans, we used exotic photographs on cloth, very exciting prints,” Saccoccio says.

The 2013 South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship recipients (l-r) Leah Brown, Catalina Jaramillo, Dr. Henning Haupt and Rosanna Saccoccio.

“I like color for my paintings to give an uplifted feeling. The way I use color brings a feeling of well-being. The black parts … that’s just the contrast, not negative.” Today, she still does collage. In her latest collection, titled “Ladies of the Evening” (recently shown at Nova Southeastern University’s Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale), she employed glitzy pieces of fabric (“The Golden Girl” look) discovered in thrift stores. S P R I N G

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(opposite) Sunny day acrylic with oil crayon on canvas 48” x 36” 2012


SOUTH FLORIDA CULTURAL CONSORTIUM

She began using paint as an art form when she moved to the Sunshine State. “After I got married and moved to Florida, I started painting,” she says. “An artist friend had a gallery on Las Olas. I was her ‘manager’ and got to paint in the back room. [Later], we purchased a two-story house and used it as our studio and showed our paintings. There is a cute story about it blowing away in 1926 during the hurricane. The water pulled it off its foundation. It floated down to Broward and Third Avenue and they had to bring it back. It is an allwood building, like a little boat. I moved there 40 years ago. I still own it. We have plans for it for the future.” Above At the Circus acrylic, collage, with oil crayon on canvas 2012

Opposite Trolley Car acrylic, collage, with oil crayon on canvas 2012

She has been inspired by many artists through the years. “I really appreciate Picasso’s work. He could whip up a masterpiece in an afternoon. If you study his work, you will see it is all balanced. The technique is so fresh and loose. They are just masterpieces, wonderful. [I also like] Willem de Kooning … also the printmaker [Robert] Rauschenberg. Some of my friends were inspired by him,” she says. She adds, “I grew up in Brooklyn. The whole family would walk to the Brooklyn Museum on good days in summer. We would hear symphonies there. My father was quite patriotic. He took us to all of the landmarks in New

Tangerines acrylic with oil crayon on canvas 2012

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York – the Statue of Liberty, the Flatiron Building, the Brooklyn Bridge.” Now, Saccoccio lives with her daughter in Marblehead, Mass., where she continues her work. “I reached the age of 85 and she invited me to live with her,” explains Saccocio. “I have the most beautiful room in the building. It was built 200 years ago in Dutch colonial style. I am working on a new series with thread and handmade paper. It is white on white. It sort of came to me.”

Coney Island acrylic with oil crayon on canvas 30” x 40” 2012

When painting, she frees herself in the moment. She used to listen to music while painting, but now prefers the peace and quiet.

“[When I had my studio in Fort Lauderdale] I was very spontaneous. I threw paint all over the place. Wooden floors were just covered with paint. I didn’t hold back. Office space blended into studio space. I’m kind of a spontaneous person. It is very exciting to be an artist,” she says. At the same time, she feels that focus is very important for an artist. “I get so many ideas. I have to zero in on one or else I’m all over the place. It only gets worse as you get older,” she says, adding, “I don’t [do work] every day. I did when I was younger. It got to be two to three times a week here; I’m forming ideas. They are coming to me and I am developing them. It could be a month or six months [once you start the work]. I work in a series, usually nine or more (generally odd numbers). In the ‘Ladies of the Evening’ series, I had 12 or 13. I do the first and maybe start the second right away or formulate ideas... I follow through until all nine are completed. By that time, I have spent the idea and want to move on.” Saccoccio has many commissions for everyone from the Broward Cultural Council to Port Everglades. She has done printed posters, artist books, paintings, collages and more. “I was doing quite well [financially] working with the Museum and Cultural Council. But now [money] doesn’t seem

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to matter anymore. It’s all about the work,” she says. But she does plan to put the money she received from a South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship to good use. As one of the 2013 honorees from Broward County, she received $7,500, which she is saving and plans to use toward new projects. In addition to being an artist, Saccoccio crochets hats for cancer patients, likes to cook (and watch cooking programs) and spends time with her family. CQ To find out more about Saccoccio, visit www.broward.org/arts/artists/ SouthFloridaCulturalConsortium.

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Radio acrylic with oil crayon on canvas 36” x 48” 2012

“I was very spontaneous. I threw paint all over the place. Wooden floors were just covered with paint. I didn’t hold back. Office space blended into studio space. I’m kind of a spontaneous person. It is very exciting to be an artist.” ROSANNA SACCOCCIO Recipient, 2013 South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship

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PUBLIC ART UPDATE

Pedestrian Bridges, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport Artist Laurie Lundquist

BROWARD COUNTY ALLIED ARTIST PROGRAM

Courthouse Project; Allied Artist Steven Sylvester is working with David Griggs and Scott Parsons on the Terminal 3 Terrazzo Floor at Fort LauderdaleHollywood International Airport; and Allied Artist Christian Feneck is The Duane Hanson Allied Artist Award Program was established in 1994 working with Laurie Lundquist on the Pedestrian Bridges at Fort Lauderdaleto honor internationally recognized Hollywood International Airport. artist Duane Hanson, who resided in this community and was instrumental New Courthouse Project in encouraging the careers of Broward The shape and form of Broward’s New artists. Hanson served for many River and the graceful seagrasses years as a member of the Broward Cultural Council’s Public Art & Design that inhabit its riverbed inspired this functionally integrated project, which Committee. covers the entire 70-foot by 129-foot area of the breezeway running through The Allied Artist program is the only one of its kind in the tri-county area. By the ground level of the new courthouse providing local artists the opportunity to garage. The artwork includes the walls, assist experienced artists commissioned flooring, seating and lighting elements. It will offer a calming place of respite for for major projects of $50,000 or more citizens and their families participating by the Public Art & Design Program, in the judicial process as well as a the Allied Artists gain the technical pleasant environment in which area and administrative expertise needed to workers may enjoy a lunch break. The compete within the field of public art. lighting elements will activate the area Currently there are three Allied Artists after dark with a dynamic and engaging assisting with public art projects. Allied experience, making the breezeway a safe and inviting corridor for travel between Artist Peter Symons is working with the courthouse plaza and the river. architect Margi Nothard on the New S P R I N G

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Terminal 3 Terrazzo Floor - Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport

Terminal 3 is being modernized and reconfigured to provide passengers and visitors with a more efficient and pleasant airport experience. A major component of the renovation is the replacement of carpeting with terrazzo. The site for the Terrazzo Floor Project is the pre-security main circulation area on the Departures Level of Terminal 3, approximately 65,000 square feet.

Pedestrian Bridges Project Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport

The project sites are four pedestrian bridges that connect Terminals 2, 3 and 4 to the Palm Parking Garage. The bridges, which are approximately 130 feet long, cross over the airport’s loop roadway, creating a visual gateway to the terminals.

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Creative Mural Arrives at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport

Earlier this year, the Broward Cultural Division’s Public Art & Design Program and the Broward County Aviation Department held a unique artistic event at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. A mural being painted in the Lee Wagener Art Gallery created a fun and interactive experience for visitors and passengers. Passengers sitting in the gallery awaiting flights or passing-by were suddenly intrigued, amused and engaged by an innovative artist painting on the walls while a camera crew filmed and photographed the event. Broward County resident and artist Ruben Ubiera painted the spontaneous mural on the three walls in the gallery, which is located in Terminal 2, Departures Level. An artist with a vibrant and interactive

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RUBEN UBIERA,

personality, Ubiera invited excitement and intrigue while slowly transforming the mural into the backdrop for his artworks that are being displayed in the gallery. The exhibition, titled Ruben Ubiera: The Land Escape, “depicts silent urban spaces and forgotten places that exist in our everyday surroundings,” says the artist.

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The exhibition ran through April 7, at the Lee Wagener Art Gallery, located in Terminal 2, Departures Level.

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born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, is a neo-figurative artist known for his strong use of line, graffiti-inspired technique/aesthetic, urban murals, mixed-media pieces and installations that are all created with reclaimed objects and found artifacts. He paints and draws in a style considered to be postgraffism, but he prefers to call it urbanpop since he has lived most of his life in urban, populated areas and most of his inspiration is derived from the interactivity between man and his urban environment. He lives in Weston.

The LEE WAGENER ART GALLERY, supported by the Broward Cultural Division’s Public Art & Design Program and the Broward County Aviation Department, offers Broward artists an opportunity to exhibit their work in a prominent, high-traffic area. Artists are selected through the Public Art & Design Program. Exhibits are changed every three months.


TAKING OFF


FEATURED ARTIST DAWN ROWE

Dawn Roe: Artist-in-Residence at Fort LauderdaleHollywood International Airport By Susan Davis

Airports are - first and foremost - in the business of efficiently moving people from one point to the next. Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport is exactly that – busy, bustling and growing with an expansion project. It does not sound like an artist’s project, does it? But that is where Dawn Roe enters the picture. Dawn Roe is the Artist-in-Residence at the airport as it undergoes this complicated runway expansion project. Her mission is to document the changes as they occur and to record the transitions with an artist’s eye. Roe is not a traditional artist in the sense of using paint or clay. She combines the media of still photography and digital video. Her work will culminate in an installation of artworks which show the development and construction of the south runway and Terminal 4 expansion. Since no major projects of this size have taken place at the airport for years, Roe’s opportunities are limitless. “This project allows me, the artist, to respond to ongoing progress. Showing the subtle shifts in the existing space is fascinating, and I am thrilled to be involved in this venture,” Roe explains. Multi-panel photographs and video works show how her images explore the passage of time as the construction continues.

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“This project allows me, the artist, to respond to ongoing progress. Showing the subtle shifts in the existing space is fascinating, and I am thrilled to be involved in this venture.” DAWN ROWE

The work being done by Roe is not only a promise of a powerful exhibition in the airport, but it is also a process that demands audience participation and feedback in its early phases. Broward Cultural Division’s Public Art Administrator Leslie Fordham explains: “Dawn conducted a community workshop in Terminal 1. She was out in the open and readily available to answer questions or simply let passersby watch. She would patiently explain what the project was about as she continued to photograph items from the work outside. Sometimes it was just a pile of sand. Other times it would be a piece of rock from the area or even a plant.” This interaction provided an open dialogue between the artist and the observers. S P R I N G

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Image Opposite Tilting the Horizon Mixed Media December 2013


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One of the most frequently asked questions by observers is very simply, “Why?” These are Roe’s favorite types of questions to answer. “Construction is a fact of life and studying the process allows for a more extended consideration of its impact and import,” she says. “Approaching the project as a sort of field study allows for the production of images that bring things to the surface that a cursory glance may not reveal.”

Images above and opposite From The Field - edits Still photography and digital video December 2013

Through her work, Roe is “thinking about the very nature of space and place by repeatedly recording discrete portions of the site throughout the construction process as a means of allowing both myself as well as potential viewers a more intimate type of access than is normally expected or even desired,” she adds. S P R I N G

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“These photographs and videos currently playing in Terminal 1 will truly show the beauty in construction work. The colors she captures and the textures she reveals will be a lasting time capsule of this momentous project,” Fordham continues. “As the County prepares to celebrate its centennial, more and more travelers will pass through our airport. The videos and powerful images will show the birth of the project all the way through to its completion. The appeal will be to all passersby whether they are Broward County residents or travelers from other places.” When all is said and done, at the end of 2014, Roe’s work will take many forms throughout the airport terminals. Roe describes portions of the finished project by saying, “The visuals within the photographs and video will likely combine elevated and ground imagery including indigenous fauna and surrounding wetlands in relation to the perimeter of the site.” One of her stated goals is to keep her work subtle with a general sense “of quietude.” This idea certainly will appeal to weary travelers as they observe the passage of time through this relocation of land to make way for progress. Broward County is about to celebrate its 100th birthday. Historically, the County has always grown – always reaching forward for a better way of life for its people. C u l t u r a l

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Clips 05.16.13 Digital video YouTube January 2014

Image Opposite That Slice of Sky Still photography / digital video January 2014 Image Below From The Field edit Still photography / digital video December 2013

What better tribute is there to the forward momentum of the County than the work of this artist at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport documenting the major expansion project? Once again, Roe says it best herself: “I am particularly interested in the ephemeral qualities that natural materials share with personal processes of recollection and recognition. It is within the landscape

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that time moves most slowly, and distinctions between now and then become less clear. Here, the enduring theme of time marks its presence most succinctly. The rich histories within Broward County coupled with the metaphoric removal and redistribution of the land throughout the construction process are perfectly suited to the nature of my work.� Give yourself an early present to celebrate the birthday of Broward County in 2015. Visit the airport and spend some time with Dawn Roe and her exhibition, which will on view in the Lee Wagener Gallery on the departures level in Terminal 2 from July through September. You will be glad you did.

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Stacy Ostrau Sun Sentinel Community Affairs/Society Scene Publisher Stacy Ostrau manages the Sun Sentinel Company’s community and public relations programs. She also serves as publisher of Society Scene, a weekly magazine-style section highlighting the charitable and philanthropic efforts of the community. Active in the community, Stacy serves on a number of community boards and committees including Young At Art Museum, Broward Partnership for the Homeless, Business for the Arts of Broward, Broward County Sports Hall of Fame, Special Olympics Broward and Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities. She is a graduate of both Leadership Fort Lauderdale and Leadership Broward. Prior to coming to the Sun Sentinel, Stacy worked as the marketing programs manager for the Florida Marlins Baseball Club. Stacy is a native South Floridian and has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Georgia and a master’s degree from Florida State University

1. As a business person, what makes you passionate about the arts?

Art can stir your heart and evoke emotion. At Society Scene, covering the arts is a huge part of what we do and, as publisher, I am happy we can give a voice to organizations in our community that provide the essential culture our community needs. They also provide great opportunities for our children to learn and build an appreciation for the arts of their own. Working with the Sun Sentinel Children’s Fund, I have seen what the grant programs for the arts can do for underserved communities. The arts help build a sense of appreciation and self-worth. S P R I N G

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2. How do you feel that arts and business should intersect in general? When people consider moving here for business, they appreciate finding a community that is well-formed and full of arts and education opportunities.

3. And in Broward County specifically?

We have a well-rounded, expanding arts and culture community here. Just consider significant expansions at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts and Museum of Discovery and Science, new opportunities at NSU’s Museum of Art l Fort Lauderdale and the new Young At Art Museum. There is space for the diverse, emerging groups, new C u l t u r a l

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with the information they need when they want it and how they want it. We are South Florida’s information source across these many channels.

5.What are ways you feel we can forge this relationship, between your business and the creative industries, on a continual basis?

collaborations and growing arts districts in Fort Lauderdale and Hollywood, in particular.

4.Tell us about your business in Broward County, and how you see it growing and developing?

The Sun Sentinel Company reaches an audience of nearly two million weekly in a variety of ways, including print, online and on the air. We interact with South Florida through our more than 30 products, anchored by the daily newspaper, Sun Sentinel. As a multimedia company, we are integrated across publishing, interactive and broadcasting, allowing us to offer customized multi-platform advertising solutions. As the media industry evolves, the Sun Sentinel has evolved as well, providing our readers and viewers

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The Sun Sentinel is our community’s watch dog, its eyes and ears. As the leading information provider in our community, we provide a platform to expose a greater number of people to the arts - as well as provide a vehicle for the creative industries to spotlight the contributions they’re making in our community. The arts add vibrancy and context to our lives and the Sun Sentinel is in a unique position to cover the arts and provide linkages that really no other media can match. The Sun Sentinel’s annual Guide to the Arts, for example, keeps up with new media, digital, emerging and mainstream arts and culture, melding the cultural traditions of our diverse community. Looking historically, the Sun Sentinel has been a leader in every significant arts and cultural initiative here in Broward – providing volunteers, funding, media and focusing public attention – from the Broward Center for the Performing Arts to the AfricanAmerican Research Library and Cultural Center. The company itself employs people with creative and arts backgrounds. S P R I N G

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6. What can we do; we - the local arts agency; we - the citizens?

The chambers of commerce and business organizations should work closely with the Cultural Council to determine how each can benefit from the other. Broward County residents can also continue to support the arts. There are many ways to do that – attending, learning, donating or advocating.

7. How have the arts impacted your life, personally and professionally? Growing up in Broward, my parents exposed me and my siblings to the arts anyway they could (visual arts, performing arts, music, etc.). The arts have become an integral part of our family and many family outings revolve around arts-related events. It is part of our family.

This has not only given me wonderful memories (Bye Bye Birdie will always hold a special place in my heart as it was one of the first musicals I remember my father taking me to at Parker Playhouse. I fell in love with the whole experience and can still sing all the songs!) but it has helped me appreciate S P R I N G

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and understand the importance of arts education in the schools. My mother has served on the boards of many arts and culture organizations in the community, such as the Young At Art Museum, Performing Arts Center Authority and the Cultural Council. Watching her give so much of her time and passion instilled an enthusiasm in me to follow in her footsteps. I also serve on the board of directors for the Young At Art Museum and have been involved in other arts organizations, such as Arts for the Future and Funding Arts Broward. And throughout my career at the Sun Sentinel, I have had the privilege of seeing many arts education programs created with the deep belief that the arts are an essential component for a complete education. These programs provide children with an environment that fosters their sense of joy, creativity and well-being.

8. How important do you think art and culture, as an interactive feature, are to a developing County? It’s a no-brainer! You cannot have a viable, vibrant community without arts and culture. CQ C u l t u r a l

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Fushu Daiko brings Japanese culture to life in South Florida By Helene Foster

There is so much more than just the percussive drumbeats made by the members of Fushu Daiko, the taiko drum ensemble. There is a preservation of Japanese heritage. And it’s an art form that has been passed down in oral tradition through many generations. Since 1990, Fushu Daiko has been giving South Florida audiences energizing performances that also educate about Japanese culture. Broward County resident Jennifer Hoffman first fell in love with taiko (Japanese for “big drum”) as a college student in Massachusetts. She had never seen it before, but she said that she was amazed and overwhelmed with the power and beauty conveyed. When she moved to Florida, she was happy to find that there was a similar group that performed at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach. “I didn’t know that taiko existed anywhere outside of Kodo, the group I first saw,” she recalls. “At the museum there was information about adult classes to learn taiko presented by Fushu Daiko.” That was 2006, and with no musical or performance background, she decided to give it a try. She had minored in Japanese language and literature, so this was another way for her to connect with Japanese culture. Now, she performs regularly with the group in addition to serving as its executive director.

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“Taiko is different because it is taught very differently from music or drumming,” Hoffman explains. “No musical training is needed as it is a folk art that has been around for thousands of years - in religious observances, agriculture and in festivals - and is passed down only by oral tradition.

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45th International Taiko Fest 2013, San Francisco


The Volcano Group perform at Hatsume 2013, Morikami Museum and Gardens’ largest annual event.

There is a lot of repetition and there is not one standard notation that someone can take home to practice.” Each sound that is made corresponds to a word that lets the taiko drummer know how and where to hit the drum and when to pause. Audiences will notice that the performers are also often yelling while drumming. According to Hoffman, this is done for two reasons: one, which is similar to martial arts, is kiai, a “yell” that releases energy and power from the feet and through the body. The yells also encourage fellow drummers. Fushu Daiko has been captivating audiences since 1990 and will enter

its 25th year in 2015. With the help of funding from the Creative Investment Grant (CIP) from the Broward Cultural Division, it will soon present “Florida’s Big Drum: Fushu Daiko’s Story of Japanese Taiko Drumming in South Florida.” The program will take place at several libraries in Broward County as well as at South Florida Taiko Dojo, the home base of Fushu Daiko. These presentations, along with other community and library programs, will continue educating Broward County residents and visitors about the art form and pass along cultural traditions.CQ For more information and to see where and when Fushu Daiko will perform, visit www.fushudaiko.org.

Fushu Daiko in performance.

Opposite page Performing at Family Fest at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts

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Beju and the Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute: A Perfect Match By Susan Davis

Beju Pitouflette “In us we trust”

You may find yourself trying to ascertain what a sculptor who was born in France has in common with Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The answer is simple – it is the Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (AEI). Beju Lejobart, or simply Beju, has a story that definitely needs telling. The AEI has the means to help him, and other artists, achieve this goal. and wood, he concentrates on the shift Beju was born in Cognac, France. When in perception of the object. “Wood no longer is organic while the metal he was in his late 20s takes on a life of its own – becoming he was asked by his more and more organic,” he continues. grandmother to repair Carefully balancing these materials and some furniture that his techniques, he brings them all to life. had been damaged in Throw in a dash of humor and add a World War II. One of these pieces was a table, pinch of sentiment, and you have Beju’s exact style. which he discovered

“I want to mimic the environment. All of my work is born from there.” BEJU

Another project originated by the graduates of AEI is the DBA Exhibitions. Beju’s works - along with other featured artists’ projects were displayed at gallery six, located on the sixth floor of the Broward County Main Library in Fort Lauderdale.

was missing a piece. At this point, as he duplicated what should have been there, his vision as an artist was born. As he carved the piece of wood, he realized that not only was this something he could do, but it also was something he felt an immediate love for doing.

Thus, Beju became a sculptor. He is totally self-taught, which makes his work that much more impressive. Pairing together elements like metal S P R I N G

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Since Beju grew up in a military family, he traveled constantly as a young man, and then as an adult. “I never had the traditional roots that most kids had. I credit this lifestyle with helping me make quick moves and relocate easily,” he says. The travel, the chances to observe art and artists and the different cultures have shaped Beju into the artist he is today. When Beju first arrived in Fort Lauderdale, he came as a businessman, not an artist. Eventually, though, he knew he would have to follow his heart and return to what he loved – sculpting. Fortunately, he never lost touch with his artwork. C u l t u r a l

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ARTIST AS AN ENTREPRENEUR

There is nothing Beju likes better than to work in his own home, particularly on his patio. “I love working outside regardless of rain, humidity or heat,” he explains. He is known to canvas the area looking for discarded wooden pallets. “Finding stainless steel is a little more difficult,” he says. But, he keeps looking as he frequently tests other mediums, seeking to expand his repertoire. Beju’s resume is an impressive piece of work in and of itself. At FAT Village in Fort Lauderdale in 2013, he presented an interactive, immersion piece with eight other artists called the “UnMade Room.” He has exhibited in a juried show at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. He was commissioned by the Italian city of Segni to create “Auguraculum Collettivo,” a work of art to help facilitate communication between city officials and citizens. Currently, he has submitted an application to create a mural as a part of the Broward 100 Mural Project. His credits, like his vision, are both impressive and unlimited. As most artists know, however, being talented, working with the medium you love and simply loving your craft is just not enough. That is where the AEI comes in. The Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute is an artist-focused course of study designed to assist individual artists of all disciplines by cultivating and improving their business skills.

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Beju, who attended the institute in 2013, describes it as, “the most wonderful tool box needed to face the real world.” The most important thing he says he learned is also one of the main goals of AEI - to teach each artist how to identify and develop his or her personal brand. To date, more than 400 artists have graduated from this program, which is presented by the Broward Cultural Division, ArtServe Inc. and the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture, based in Cleveland, Ohio. The artists receive instruction on reaching their target markets, raising capital and identifying ways to protect their work legally. These are, according to Beju, “questions most artists don’t even know they have. The benefits of these practical applications are just too numerous to list.” Beju probably explains it best when he says, “If van Gogh had attended AEI, he would have died a billionaire!” This remarkable sculptor and the other graduates of the institute can certainly testify to the benefits of this practical and effective approach to becoming artists with strong business senses. CQ S P R I N G

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The Unmade Room - FAT Village Art Exhibition 2013. The Unmade Room explores that which exists without being made.The unmade is something that is whole but not complete.The room is the space, moment, or memory where this element exists.These are the qualities that are explored in the exhibit through full-scale immersive and interactive installations.

This year’s Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute will be presented on consecutive Saturdays, June 7, 14, 21 and 28, at ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale. (See article on page six)


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ARTS EDUCATION

Left: Parsons Etude Choreography David Parsons Dancers Bak MSOA Dance Repertory (2009) Photographer Eddie dePool, with permission by Bak Middle School of the Arts, West Palm Beach,

2014 Arts Education Convenings & Dance Industry Symposium by Lisa Turano Wojcik

A meeting of the minds! Assemble, congregate, meet, collect, gather, and exchange ideas with experts in Arts Education and Dance at ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale. On Wednesday, May 14, 2014, the Broward Cultural Division hosted two backto-back regional convenings: Arts Education: Policy, Equity and Action (2:00pm5:00pm) and Cultivating South Florida’s Dance Community (5:30pm-8:00pm). The convenings brought together stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and organizations, representing a range of perspectives. These gatherings are designed to generate ideas and action beyond what single individuals are able to imagine or achieve on their own.

Arts Education Convening: Policy, Equity and Action

The topics highlighted in this session were the result of a decade-long study and report, Reinvesting in Arts Education, published by the President’s

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Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH). PCAH is a research board currently headed by First Lady Michelle Obama, who serves as honorary chair. Introducing model policies to reinforce the place of arts in K-12 education. The President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities believes that the arts should be part of the education of every child in America. The PCAH supports initiatives that give young people the opportunity to experience S P R I N G

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Far Left Battleworks Etude Choreographer Robert Battle for ADLI Dancers Bak Middle School of the Arts Repertory Dancers Photographer Organic Soul Photography, with permission by Bak Middle School of the Arts, West Palm Beach


“I believe it is important that artistic endeavors are provided for the sake of ‘creating art,’ which is important in itself!” TIMOTHY LEISTNER

accomplishments that are part of being an artist and scholar. The PCAH forms these beliefs into governmental policies which help support the arts in education at local levels.

Below Limon Etude Choreography Carla Maxwell Dancer Angelina Granitz (2010) Photographer Eddie dePool

Building collaborations among different approaches. One aim of this convening was to foster partnerships among places of art - museums, galleries, artists’ studios, acting and dance ensembles, local governments, schools, universities, and other community organizations. Through collaboration comes artistic advancement, which will in turn benefit communities.

Developing the field of arts integration. Broward teaching artist Timothy Leistner, Ed.D, believes that integration of the arts into school curricula is of vital importance. Engagement in the arts gives students skills which cross over to and enhance core academic areas. He also says, “I believe it is important that artistic endeavors are provided for the sake of ‘creating art,’ which is important in itself! And the arts have no socioeconomic barriers; engagement in the arts benefits children from all economic backgrounds.” Expanding opportunities for teaching artists. Betsy Mullins-Urwin, art services director at Arts for Learning Miami talked about her organization’s Teaching Artist Training and Certification Program. The program will give training and credentials to local artists interested in sharing their talents with the community through teaching in schools and other educational programs. A4LMiami is one of South Florida’s leading sources of arts-in-education services. It provides programs that connect the arts to core-curriculum subjects. This connection promotes life and communication skills, literacy, problem solving, self-discovery, and self-esteem.

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ARTS EDUCATION

Dance Industry Symposium – Cultivating South Florida’s Dance Community The Broward Cultural Division invited businesses, organizations, educators, dancers, choreographers, schools, and suppliers involved in the dance industry to join in a discussion with the public. Participants explored critical questions. What is the state of dance in South Florida? This lively forum brought more attention to the discipline of dance, an art often left out of the spotlight. It’s a rare opportunity for both the experts and the public to inform policymakers on issues, needs, and concerns specific to the field of dance. Program attendees experienced a real treat. Talented dance students from Bak Middle School of the Arts in West Palm Beach performed short modern dances learned from collaborating with Laura Bennett of the American Dance Legacy Initiative from Brown University. Bak MSOA is a premier magnet school for the visual and performing arts in Palm Beach County. The performance was followed by an interactive workshop and discussion panel. What can be done to ensure dance as a viable, thriving arts discipline within the region? The American Dance Legacy Initiative (ADLI) is part of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public

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Humanities and Cultural Heritage at Brown University in Rhode Island. ADLI produces innovative materials and programs designed to engage artists, educators and the public with America’s dance heritage of signature works by historical and contemporary choreographers. ADLI has been working to develop a unique compilation, the Repertory Etudes Collection. Julie Adams Strandberg, co-founder of ADLI, says this collection comprises a common knowledge of dance history and movement traditions which are rarely ever shared in the field of arts education.

“Anyone can study music from Bach to Duke Ellington or theatre from Shakespeare to Tennessee Williams, but until now, this has not been so with dance.”

JULIE ADAMS STRANDBERG

ADLI’s purpose is to widely share this collection with dance organizations and schools. Strandberg and Bennett plan to offer “concrete nuts and bolts tools” that dance students can use. Bennett explains that these dances are adaptable to a variety of skills levels, affording all students the ability to practice this repertoire. Martha Satinoff, Dance Director at Bak MSOA is enthusiastic about ADLI’s work. “It challenges us artistically and technically. It brings modern dance S P R I N G

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history into our classrooms and onto the stage, allowing our dancers to be a part of passing the art from one generation to the next.” Strandberg was excited about “realizing our vision in Florida during this event.”

Below Buraczeski Etude Choreography Danny Buraczeski Dancers Bak MSOA Dance Repertory (2014) Photographer S & O Photo

Toranika Washington, dance director at the University School at Nova Southeastern University, says, “This is an exciting opportunity for creative growth and development for South Florida artists. I’m looking forward to it, and I encourage all artists, especially dance educators to attend.”

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Both sessions were free of charge and hosted by ArtServe, 1350 E Sunrise Boulevard. For more information on future events, please contact Grace Kewl-Durfey, Broward Cultural Division arts administrator at 954-357-7869 or gkewl@broward.org.

These two events were made possible by the following collaborators: American Dance Legacy Initiative at Brown University; VSA Florida; Florida Dance Education Organization; Arts for Learning Miami; the School Board of Broward County; Broward County Board of County Commissioners; Broward Cultural Council; ArtServe; Children’s Services Council of Broward County; Kravis Center for the Performing Arts; Power of Performance, Inc.; Bak Middle School of the Arts; Body and Soul Dance Theatre; and Brazz Dance.

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BROWARD MOMENTS

Port employees welcoming the first train load of cement to arrive at Port Everglades. 1931

Merle Fogg poses with a WACO Model 10 airplane at the hangar for Merle Fogg’s Flying Service, 1928 Lewis W. Marshall’s vegetable packinghouse on the south fork of the New River. Farmers would barge their crops to one of the packinghouses on the river, where crops would be prepared for shipment via railroad to northern markets

Broward County’s History Encompasses Memorable Moments By Rachel Galvin

Broward County is celebrating a monumental milestone: It will be a century old in 2015 and yearlong festivities will mark the occasion. To commemorate this remarkable evolution, the Broward County Historical Commission has partnered with the County and the BB&T Center to share “Broward Moments.” These 15- to 20-second video spots, highlighting important moments in Broward County history, will be shown during Florida Panthers hockey games whenever the scoreboard is activated. They also will County has come a long way. What be available on the Broward100.org website and through social networking. was once a swampy no man’s land has In addition, videos will be showcased on turned into a thriving region filled with business, culture and industry. From the television by Comcast. River of Grass to the west to its sandy beaches to the east, this portion of the These historical moments represent Sunshine State has transformed from an just a few tidbits of the rich history of agricultural hub to a beacon for tourism. the area. In the past 100 years, Broward

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In 1913, Frank and Ivy Stranahan’s house was essentially the easternmost residence in town.The narrow unpaved path leading to the river on the right is now the location of Federal Highway.

All photos by kind permission of The Fort Lauderdale Historical Society www.FortLauderdale HistoricalSociety.org


Probably no single individual influenced south Florida’s development more than Henry Morrison Flagler, a former partner of John D. Rockefeller. In 1896, Flagler brought his Florida East Coast (F.E.C.) Railway south from Palm Beach to Miami, opening what was virtual wilderness to development.

Broward County’s first schoolteacher, Ivy Julia Cromartie, in the outfit she wore to be married to Frank Stranahan in 1900. She watched the isolated frontier community of Fort Lauderdale grow into a modern American city.

Annie Jumper Tommie - mother of Chief Tony Tommie - was one of the first to set up camp in the new Dania Reservation, the location of an earlier Seminole camp founded by her mother.

Chicago millionaire Hugh Taylor Birch, while visiting South Florida was impressed with the solitude of the Fort Lauderdale area and purchased approximately three miles of beachfront property. (Photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory)

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Frank Stranahan came from Titusville to the New River in 1893 to manage the overnight campground. Soon after he arrived, the camp and ferry crossing were moved approximately one mile west, where Stranahan purchased ten acres and began making improvements to what we know as Stranahan House.

Betty Mae Tiger Jumper, pictured here in 1945, became the first female leader of the Seminole Tribe of Florida when she was elected chairwoman in 1967.

Dr. James Sistrunk was Fort Lauderdale’s first permanent African-American physician. He delivered an estimated 5,000 babies during his career and supposedly could remember all of them. He was a cofounder of Provident Hospital, the first hospital in town for the black community.

Sandy Nininger attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, graduated in 1941 and volunteered for the Philippine Scouts based at America’s Asian outpost. For his heroic actions, Sandy Nininger was posthumously awarded the first Congressional Medal of Honor of the Second World War.

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Damage from the 1926 hurricane. Tom Bryan came to Fort Lauderdale with his father in 1896 to help build the railroad. He owned the city’s first ice plant, electric company and telephone exchange and developed many of downtown’s early commercial buildings. Here in 1955, Bryan stands in front of his family-run New River Inn. Gene Hyde Collection. Above: A Cunard liner, the T.S.S. Caledonia, docked at Port Everglades, 1930s. Photograph by Gene Kelcy.

until 1892, when a rock road was completed and the mail was taken over by the Bay Biscayne Stage Line. A statue commemorating these brave early postal workers, created by sculptor Frank Varga, sits today next to the Hillsboro Lighthouse.

BROWARD MOMENTS

(Right) Mural of barefoot mailman on wall in West Palm Beach post office on Olive Avenue. Credit: State Archives of Florida, FloridaMemory.com (Far right) In 1919, famed director D. W. Griffith came to Fort Lauderdale to shoot the silent film “Idol Dancer.”

The following topics are just a few of the ones that will be included in the Broward Moments videos.

BAREFOOT MAILMAN When Florida was a virtually unpopulated landscape, a special route by foot was established in 1885 to provide a way to transport mail back and forth between the more populated areas of Miami and Palm Beach. The mailmen walked barefoot for 40 miles near the water’s edge and took a small sailboat and rowboat for the remaining 28 miles. They stopped at Houses of Refuge along the way to rest. These houses primarily sheltered shipwrecked sailors. The route lasted S P R I N G

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TINSEL TOWN comes to the Sunshine state. South Florida has been an ideal place for the production of many movies and TV shows through the years. One of the more prominent visitors in the early 20th century was well-known Hollywood director D.W. Griffith, who shot his film “The Idol Dancer” in Broward County in 1919. He and his crew stayed at the then-popular Broward Hotel. He transformed the New River into South Seas islands and hired locals, including members of the Seminole tribe, to be in the production.

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TBM “Avenger” torpedo bombers lined up at the Fort Lauderdale Naval Air Station, 1945.

JAMES NEVILLE MCARTHUR – philanthropist and businessman. During the challenges of the Great Depression, some entrepreneurs pulled up their bootstraps and persevered. One such businessman was James Neville McArthur. In 1929, he opened a farm in Hollywood with 20 Jersey cows. By World War II, he had more than 5,000 and, today, the company has more than 16,000 animals. He was one of the first to use a milking machine and to employ artificial insemination. McArthur, inducted into the Florida Agriculture Hall of Fame, is also known for his philanthropy. He gave funds for everything from the construction of the Florida Turnpike to McArthur High School in Hollywood.

Mayor Walter Seth “Doc” Kipnis and finance director William Francis White stand in front of the new Pembroke Pines city hall, c. 1962. Gene Hyde Collection.

(Above) Crews film Where the Boys Are, a low-budget spring break movie, at Spring Break central–the Elbo Room–at the corner of Las Olas and A1A, 1960. Gene Hyde Collection. (Below) High diving at Fort Lauderdale’s “hall of fame” swimming pool State Archives of Florida, FloridaMemory.com

SWIMMING HALL OF FAME brings athletes. The International Swimming Hall of Fame aquatic complex continues to bring athletes and tourists. The complex is located on the site of what once was Fort Lauderdale’s Casino Pool, built in1926. It featured an Olympicsized pool used for swim meets. In 1935, it hosted the first Collegiate Aquatic Forum, which brought participants from around the nation. The pool was torn down in 1966 to make way for the current complex, which also houses a museum filled with swimming memorabilia.

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BROWARD MOMENTS By 1961 county officials still had not addressed the lack of amenities and the difficult access to the so-called “black” beach.To draw attention to the problem, NAACP officials Eula Johnson and Von D. Mizell staged a series of wade-ins at Fort Lauderdale’s famous, and segregated, public beach. A Fort Lauderdale policeman orders young protesters to leave the whites-only beach. Gene Hyde Collection

BROWARD MOMENTS

President Franklin D. Roosevelt doffs his hat to the crowd as he boards the Navy destroyer Monaghan at Port Everglades on his way to a fishing trip, March 23, 1936.

MARINE INDUSTRY helps World War II effort. As World War II ravaged Europe, Broward became involved early in the war effort. The port and the coast became an arena for some of the fighting. Local businesses such as Dooley’s Basin and Dry Dock (where Lauderdale Marine Center is today) - which made air-rescue boats, subchasers and minesweepers - joined the war effort. Airbases, including Forman Field (later the site of Nova Southeastern University) sprung up. A Naval Air Station was constructed where the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport now stands and was later moved and turned into a Naval Museum. Training camps sprung up at places including Tradewinds and Lauderdale Beach Hotel in Fort Lauderdale. The U.S. Coast Guard made a home at The Silver Thatch Inn in Pompano, while Navy officers settled in at the Hollywood Beach Hotel. S P R I N G

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CIVIL RIGHTS After war waged abroad, the Civil Rights movement escalated at home. In Broward, people such as Eula Johnson, president of the local NAACP, and Dr. Von Mizell, one of the first black doctors, stood up for their beliefs. They helped to stage a series of “wade ins” beginning on July 4, 1961, which hundreds attended. The reason for the demonstrations was the County’s failure to provide proper access to the only beach then available for people of color, as well as equal amenities. When the City of Fort Lauderdale filed suit against them and the judge denied the city’s request a year later, it was a pivotal step toward the eventual desegregation of all public facilities in the County. These are just a sampling of some of the Broward Moments that will be included in the videos in order to educate the public and inform viewers about Broward County’s rich history. Find out more about Broward Moments at www.broward100.org.

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These are just a few Broward Moments. Check out some of the videos at the BB&T Center to find out more. Happy Birthday, Broward! C u l t u r a l

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(Above) In August 1966, a group of African-American youths were arrested for throwing rocks and bottles at police cruisers. Local black leaders charged the Fort Lauderdale police with harassment and cruel conditions and organized the protest march at the police station shown here, along with white counter-protesters. Charges against the young men were later dropped. Gene Hyde Collection. (Left) During the 1961 wade-in protests, a group of AfricanAmerican youth and one white boy play basketball at Fort Lauderdale Beach. Gene Hyde Collection.

Learn more about Broward County’s history by visiting the Broward County Historical Commission’s webpages.

(Above) Burdine’s, Fort Lauderdale’s first major department store, opened in 1947 at the northwest corner of Andrews Avenue and SW 2nd Street. In 1980, when a new Burdine’s opened at the Galleria Mall, the downtown store closed, and the building was renovated to serve as the Broward County Government Center. (Left) In the 1950s, developer George Gill built a triangular hotel at the south end of Fort Lauderdale beach and christened it the Yankee Clipper. Gene Hyde Collection.

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A tongue-in-cheek sign goes up at Tamarac Estates, 1967. Gene Hyde Collection.


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WA L K S Communities come together each month to offer Art Walk events complete with food, drink and music to share and celebrate their creativity. The walks are as different as the artists who inspire them. EAST VILLAGE UNCORKED POMPANO BEACH

First Friday of each month from 6 to 9 p.m.

ISLAND CITY ART WALK WILTON MANORS

Third Friday of each month from 7 to 10 p.m.,November through April.

NOBE ARTWALK NORTH BEACH / GALT OCEAN MILE First Saturday of each month from 7 to 11 p.m

FAT VILLAGE ARTS DISTRICT ARTWALK DOWNTOWN FORT LAUDERDALE Last Saturday of the month from 7 to 11 p.m. December excepted

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ART FALLOUT: A DAY FOR CONTEMPORARY ART FORT LAUDERDALE The frst Saturday of October

THIRD AVENUE ART DISTRICT ANNUAL ART WALK FORT LAUDERDALE The first Saturday of February

DOWNTOWN HOLLYWOOD ARTWALK HOLLYWOOD Third Saturday of each month, 7 to 10 p.m.

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June

Just a sample of listings from ArtsCalendar.com the leading online resource for Arts and Cultural information for Broward County. ArtsCalendar.com offers the largest database of South Florida Arts and Cultural events, as well as additional listings of classes and workshops, auditions, calls to artists and more.

ART

June 7 – August 17 THE ART OF NAT H A N S AWAYA : June 10 IN PIECES M O N T H LY A R T Internationally renowned R O U N D TA B L E S artist Nathan Sawaya returns

Location: Art and Culture Center of Hollywood Time: 10 am Information: 954-921-3274 Website: artandculturecenter.org

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ART = ANTID OTE TO H AT E . This exhibit

Discuss consumer culture, mass-communication and television culture through the photography, video, drawing and design of local artist Sarah Michelle Rupert.

will raises awareness and engages patrons in these human issues, and bridges the gap between the life of the individual and life out in the community.

Location: Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale Time: Noon Information:954-262-0221 Website: moafl.org

Location: ArtServe Time: 6 pm Information: 954-4628190 Website: artserve.org/ exhibits/#B

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DANCE

June 14

THE LION, THE WITCH, AND T H E WA R D R O B E

Expression of Joy’s ‘A Ballet’ based on C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, The Witch, and The

The Broward Center for the Performing Arts

this summer with all new sculptures and mixed-media works that continue to change the way we look at Lego bricks.

June 12


View our full listings at ArtsCalendar.com Wardrobe brings the story, music, and the timeless beauty of classical ballet. This production is mixed with elements of adventure and faith with the message of redemption, promising for an amazing show. Location: Broward Center for the Performing Arts Time: 7 pm Information: 954-462-0222 Website: browardcenter.org

FA M I LY

June 6

A R T S PA R K MOVIE NIGHT

Wreck It Ralph. A FREE weekly family friendly flick. Bring a blanket or a lawn chair. Location: ArtsPark at Young Circle Time: 8 pm Information: 954-921-3500 Website: visithollywoodfl.org/ events

F E S T I VA L S

June 6

D E S T I NAT I O N F R I DAY S : BRAZIL

Experience the diversity of Brazil through food and drink (while supplies last), plus music, dancing, and live entertainment. Mingle and dance with samba dancers. Location: AfricanAmerican Research Library and Cultural Center Time: 6:30 pm Information: 954-357-6210 Website: broward. org/LIBRARY/ LOCATIONSHOURS/ BRANCHES/Pages/AA.aspx

June 14 H O L LY W O O D A R T S PA R K EXPERIENCE: COLORS OF THE CARIBBEAN

Be inspired by the work of exhibiting artist Pablo Cano to create marionettes.

The Rhythm Foundation presents a spectacular musical celebration of Caribbean heritage, featuring live music, dance, food, drinks and kids’ activities showcasing the diversity and richness of island culture.

Location: Coral Springs Museum of Art Time: 3 pm Information: 954-340-5000 Website: coralspringsmuseum.org

Location: ArtsPark at Young Circle Time: 7 pm Information: 954-921-3500 Website: visithollywoodfl.org/ events.aspx

June 14 FA M I LY F U N DAY: MARIONETTES

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Colors of Caribbean: Kes The Resolvers performing at the ArtsPark at Young Circle

June 18

June 28

JUNETEENTH C E L E B R AT I O N

AMID THE STREET NOISE: SHORT FILMS ON THE PECK TERR ACE

Juneteenth Social - Rhythms, music, games, prizes and refreshments. Limited seating. Location: Old Dillard Museum Time: 6 pm Information: 754-322-8828 Website: broward.k12.fl.us/ olddillardmuseum/

FILMS

June 8

L A FA N C I U L L A DEL WEST

In the wake of the first literary westerns and as cinema began to exploit the genre, Puccini gave opera its first ever western: a tale of souls stranded at the edge of the world, a tale of laughter and of tears, both exotic and overwhelming. Location: Hollywood and Fort Lauderdale, Cinema Paradiso Time: Various Information: 954-525-FILM Website: fliff.com/Films_and_Events 2 0 1 4

Screening of juried short films and videos by south Florida artists shown on the museum’s 2nd floor terrace overlooking Las Olas Location: Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale Time: 6 pm Information: 954-262-0245 Website: moafl.org/home/ events?page=2#.U2PnfaJdySo

L I T E R AT U R E

June 10

MEET ELAINE V I E T S author of

Catnapped.

Socialite Trish Barrymore and her rich husband Mort can agree on one thing in their bitter divorce: shared custody of their beloved cat. But when Mort is found dead and the cat nowhere to be found, it’s up to husband and wife P.I. team Helen Hawthorne and Phil

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Sagemont to go undercover in the world of cat shows to find the catnapper – and Mort’s killer. Location: Broward Main Library Time: 2 pm Information: 954-357-7443 Website: broward.org/library/

Christian McBride at the Miniaci Performing Arts Center, Nova Southeastern University Campus.

Location: Miniaci Performing Arts Center Time: 8 pm Information: 954-462-0222 Website: southfloridajazz.org

June 18 MEET JOHN SI E G F R I E D, AU T H O R O F G R AY & G AY

June 20

Gray & Gay by John Siegfried is the account of one man’s struggle toward acceptance of his homosexuality, his marriage of 35 years, his divorce and his life of 20 years with a male partner. Location: Broward Main Library Time: 6 pm Information: 954-357-7443 Website: broward.org/library/

CL ASSIC ALBUMS L I V E ! Playing Abbey

Road. Classic Albums Live takes the classic rock albums you love and recreates them live, on stage - note for note, cut for cut. Location: Parker Playhouse Time: 8 pm

Information: 954-462-0222 Website: parkerplayhouse.com

June 26 T H E VOIC E

The Voice Tour, presented by CLEAR Haircare begins this summer with past stars and this season’s finalists! Catch up on their journeys on The Voice and see them showcase their resilience! Location: Broward Center for the Performing Arts Time: 7:30 pm Information: 954-462-0222 Website: browardcenter.org

SCIENCE

June 3 – 5, June 10 – 12, June 17 – 19, June 24 – 26

2014 TURTLE WALK

Participants will have the opportunity to witness a 300-pound Loggerhead sea turtle venture out of the ocean to lay her eggs.

Location: Museum of Discovery and Science Time: 9 pm Information: 954-467-6637 Website: mods.org

MUSIC

June 14

C H R I ST IA N MCBRIDE TRIO South Florida JAZZ. Grammy Award winner Christian McBride, who comes from the Ray Brown tradition, is a chameleonic virtuoso both of the acoustic and electric basses.

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An endangered green sea turtle heads back to the ocean after laying her nest in the sand. Join the TurtleWalk at the Museum of Discovery and Science. Photo: Andy Royston / FtLauderdaleSun

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View our full listings at ArtsCalendar.com T H E AT E R

June 13

Jesus Christ Superstar Arena Spectacular. Jesus Christ Superstar, the global phenomenon that has wowed audiences for over 40 years, is reimagined for the 21st century as an arena rock spectacular. Location: BB&T Center Time: 8 pm Information: 954-835-7000 Website: thebbtcenter.com

June 19 B R IA N R E G A N L I V E C OM E DY T O U R ! Brian Regan has

distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country. The perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Brian fills theaters nationwide with fervent fans that span generations. Location: Coral Springs Center for the Arts Time: 8 pm Information: 954-344-5990 Website: coralspringscenterforthearts. com/

June 26 DA N G E R O U S L IA I S ON S

Curtain Call Playhouse. Revenge is a dish best served cold...The moral ambiguities of seduction and revenge make this story one of the

most exciting and scandalous plays. Its prime movers, the Vicomte and the Marquise - gifted, wealthy, and bored form an unholy alliance and turn seduction into a game. Location: Township Center For Performing Arts Time: 8 pm Information: 954-970-0606 Website: curtaincallplayhouse.com

July ART

Currently On View THE INDIGO ROOM OR IS M E M O RY WAT E R SOLUBLE

This installation from the heart and hands of Edouard Duval-Carrié, with the assistance of students from the Dillard Center for the Arts, bespeaks the artist’s ineradicable connection to the island of his birth.

FA M I LY

July 2 – 25

July 11 & 12

SUMMER SIZZLE

Open theme, open medium, 2-D, 3-D and Jewelry. Participating artists are encouraged to make their works available for sale Opening Reception: Saturday, July 12. Location: Broward Art Guild Information: 954-537-3370 Website: browardartguild.org

July 18 – 28 HEIGHTENED SENSES

Seven artists explore individual themes such as reflections, juxtaposition, perspective and more in glassworks, photography, ceramics and paintings. A multiple sensory audience participation opening. Location: Studio 18 In The Pines Time: 10 am Information: 954-961-6067 Website: ppines.com/index. aspx?nid=285

RAPUNZEL

This witty and enchanting musical has it all, including a possessive mother who happens to be a witch, a tentative young man who happens to be a prince and a strong-willed but naïve young girl with the longest hair in the world. Location: Aventura Arts & Cultural Center Time: Varies Information: 954-462-0222 Website: aventuracenter.org

July 12 FA M I LY F U N DAY: C E L E B R AT E U S A-

American Artists. Discover the artwork of America’s favorite artists and create pieces inspired by their signature styles. Location: Coral Springs Museum of Art Time: 3 pm Information: 954-340-5000 Website: coralsprings museum.org/

Location: Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale Time: 11 am Information: 954-525-5500 Website: moafl.org Pan’s Labyrinth, Part of the Bailey Contemporary Art’s Movie Lounge Series, is a 2006 Mexican-Spanish film written and directed by Guillermo del Toro.

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ARTS CALENDAR

F E S T I VA L S

July 4

J U LY 4 T H S TA R S PA N G L E D S P E C TA C U L A R

Annual July 4th Star Spangled Spectacular on Hollywood Beach as the City of Hollywood Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts hosts a celebration of the nation’s 238th birthday. Time: 1 pm Information: 954-921-3404 Website: hollywoodfl.org

July 4 WESTON’ S A N N UA L J U LY 4TH HOMETOWN C E L E B R AT I O N

and a spectacular Fireworks Show. Location: Pines Recreation Center Festival Grounds Time: 6 pm Information: 954-435-6525 Website: ppines.com

FILMS

Fridays in July BAIL EY C ON TEMP OR ARY ART: MOVIE L OU NG E SER IES

The series celebrates the spirit of BaCA itself with an eclectic mix of films focusing on art, artists, musicians, cinema history, substance and style. Complimentary wine, conversation about film and then screening.

5K RUN/Walk: The morning festivities kick off with a 5K Run/Walk, PARADE: Join us later that morning for the City of Weston 4th of July Hometown Parade.

Location: BaCA Time: 7:30 Information: 954-284-0141 Website: bacapompano.org

Location: Weston Regional Park Time: 4 pm Information: 954-389-4321 Website: westonfl.org

July

July4 INDEPENDENCE DAY C E L E B R AT I O N

In addition to the Food Truck Roundups, FREE rides for children, a children’s area, the fabulous Pocket Change Band

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L I T E R AT U R E

THE TIME T R AV E L E R’ S WIFE

Discussion of the book The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger with Librarian Helene Palmer. Location: Broward Main Library Time: 2 pm Information: 954-357-7443 Website: broward.org/library

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100+ Native American Women Who Changed the World - KB Schaller

HISTORY

July 22

NAT I V E AMERICAN WOM E N W I T H K B S C HA L L E R When author KB Schaller (Cherokee/Seminole heritage) published her latest title, 100+ Native American Women Who Changed the World, the former classroom teacher who has taught on the Florida Seminole Indian Reservation and in public schools achieved a longheld dream of researching, editing and publishing a biographical collection that honors Native American women.

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Location: Broward Main Library Time: 2 pm Information: 954-357-7443 Website: broward.org/library

MUSIC

July 2

K AT Y P E R RY Musical concert with special guest Capital Cities. Katy Perry is an American singer, songwriter, businesswoman, philanthropist and actress. Location: BB&T Center Time: 7:30 pm Information: 877-530-9349 Website: thebbtcenter.com


July 17 AMERICAN IDOL LIVE! TOUR 2014

AMERICAN IDOL® LIVE! gives fans the unique opportunity to be up close and personal with Season 13 Finalists C.J. Harris, Jena Irene, Caleb Johnson, Jessica Meuse, MK Nobilette, Alex Preston, Dexter Roberts, Majesty Rose, Malaya Watson and Sam Woolf. Location: Broward Center for the Performing Arts Time: 8 pm Information: 954-462-0222 Website: browardcenter.org

SCIENCE

July 8

A L O V E S T O RY: HOW THE MOON FA L L S F O R T H E E A R T H A Love Story:

How the Moon Falls for the Earth with physicist Hiram Bleecker of the Museum of Discovery and Science.

We will discuss what it means to be in orbit, how do things become weightless and see a demonstration of weightlessness. Location: Broward Main Library Time: 2 pm Information: 954-357-7443 Website: broward.org/library

Cirque Dreams Jungle Fantasy

T H E AT E R

July 22 – 27

C I R Q U E D R E A M S J U N G L E FA N TA S Y. From the breathtaking

soaring aerial butterflies to the balancing giraffes, gigantic flowers, trees and kings of the jungle, this world-class explosion of athleticism, theater and imagination will exhilarate and entertain audiences of all ages. Location: Broward Center for the Performing Arts Time: Various Information: 954-462-0222 Website: browardcenter.org

July 24 – 26 M E N A R E F ROM M A R S , WOM E N A R E F ROM V E N U S L I V E ! Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus LIVE! is more than just the book.

This hysterical one-man fusion of theatre and stand-up starring Peter Story and based on the New York Times #1 best-selling book will have couples elbowing each other all evening as they see themselves on stage. Location: Broward Center for the Performing Arts Time: Various Information: 954-462-0222 Website: browardcenter.org S P R I N G

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A R T S C A L E N D A R . C O M

for arts, entertainment and culture in the 954 times and locations for theater | music | dance | visual arts museums | film & videos | poetry literature | childrens & family events comedy | specials | free happenings and more!

An initiative of

C u l t u County’s r a l Q u a r complete t e r l y S P guide R I N Gto 2the 0 1 arts 4 Broward 63


SUSAN SCHULTZ Financial Analyst, Broward Cultural Division By Samantha Rojas

A conversation with Susan Schultz can easily veer off into a multitude of directions. She and her partner, Mark Lowell, are building a boat. They’ve met with marine architects and a designer once a week for the past two years. Schultz herself loves to travel – and takes advantage of any opportunity to do so. She went to Hong Kong on a business trip in 2012. Two years earlier, a family wedding took her to Marrakesh, Morocco.

“So here I am…the English, Social Studies and Special Education Major, doing Math!”

Susan with her partner, Mark

“I try to make payments to the artists and organizations a smooth operation and answer any other questions that they have regarding contract management – making it easier to work with us,” she says in explaining her role. Her efforts to inform and educate grant applicants about what can sometimes be a daunting process come naturally to her. Schultz has been predisposed to education in one form or another throughout her career – and before.

Her longstanding interests in international culture and diversity serve her well in her position as financial analyst for the Broward Cultural Division, where she assesses grant applications from more than 575 not-for-profit arts and cultural organizations.

“In high school (in Grosse Pointe, Mich.) there was a little special education school across the parking lot, and I would go over there and volunteer with severely challenged children. That is where I started – and I liked it,” she says.

Many of these applicants are dedicated to expanding, teaching and sharing the cultures of nations halfway around the globe with residents and visitors to their new home in Broward County.

She followed this line of interest into a degree in special education from Michigan State University and a master’s at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. Following college, while she

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EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT

was raising her family, she worked as a substitute teacher for high school-age students in a Federal program set up for Lebanese immigrants displaced from the war in the mid-‘80s. “Dearborn has the highest Middle Eastern population outside of the Middle East,” Schultz explains. Many of her students hadn’t been to school since kindergarten or second grade because of the war and the schools being closed in their homeland. Because they spoke in a completely different language, and since many had no concept of how to be in school, the experience was fascinating for Schultz. “It was interesting for the American teachers. I kept going back as a substitute teacher because I was drawn to the differences in culture and learning - and passionate about teaching these youths,” Schultz says.

“There were fewer girls, who added to my cultural exposure, because as teachers we would connect with young girls who were in arranged marriages or a lot of social situations that are different to the U.S.” From prayers at noon in a special room, or learning how to make tabouli or teaching how to acclimate the girls within the system so as to not provoke the different cultures, Schultz found she was drawn to educating herself about how to respect their culture and adapt to it. She also learned that sometimes one doesn’t have to travel far to learn about a culture that that is so different. Schultz continued into many education and curriculum-based management positions, which ultimately brought her from Michigan to Florida in the 1980s. “When I first moved to Florida, I worked with at-risk programs from Vero Marrakesh May 2010

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EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT

Susan and Mark’s boat - The Qt66 by Quiet Thunder - is a 66 foot ultra-high performance four stateroom motor yacht designed for the owner/operator or highend charter services.

Beach to Key West and gained a lot of satisfaction as I watched the programs develop and be successful.” She recalls. “I was working for software companies at the time and introducing computerassisted instruction to the teachers in the programs. The students completed their graduation requirements and testing using the computer curriculum and testing modules”

Hong Kong Harbor May 2012

Ultimately, a friend told her about a job opening in the Cultural Division – and she applied. “She thought my education background would be a good fit,” Schultz says. While she appreciated the arts, she really didn’t expect to stay at the Division for a long time. But nine years later the relationship is going strong.

“I liked it, so here I am…the English, social studies and special education major, doing math,” Schultz says. “It’s a great place to work with lots of exciting new activities going on all of the time – and the staff really is like family.” As of 2010, 32 percent of Broward County residents were foreign born. This year, as the county gets ready to celebrate its centennial, the focus is to commemorate 100 years with bold, innovative art and performance projects that attract visitors and bring Broward residents together using arts, sports and recreation venues, natural attractions and incredible diversity to creatively bridge, bond and build their communities. From her roots in the heartland of America, Susan Schultz brings a natural propensity towards different cultures to a government agency that enhances the community’s cultural environment through the development of arts and culture.

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ARTS?

State of the Arts Specialty License Plate Available at your local auto tag office or through the mail Locate your tag office online at flhsmv.gov/offices

Broward.org/arts #BrowardArts


INDIVIDUALS

ORGANIZATIONS

The Cultural Division offers a variety of Incentive Programs designed to promote the development of Broward-based not-for-profit cultural organizations, municipalities and not-for-profit agencies that sponsor art activities and enhance the cultural environment of the people of Broward County.

MUNICIPALITIES

PROJECT INVESTMENT & OPERATING

Incentive Programs are awarded on a competitive basis and the Broward Board of County Commissioners determines the amount available in any given year. Incentive Programs are paid on a reimbursement basis, contingent upon the successful completion of the project or program and meeting the requirements of the Incentive Program agreement.

Community Arts Education Partnerships Creative Investment Program Creative Place Making Program Cultural Diversity Program Cultural Institution Program Cultural Investment Program Cultural Planning and Facilities Program Cultural Tourism Program Regional Investment Program

Broward County Cultural Division Incentive Programs recipients are strongly encouraged to attend Broward Arts Connection meetings. TO APPLY VISIT www.broward.org/arts/funding for updated workshop dates & locations

BROWARD.ORG/ARTS 100 S. Andrews Ave., 6th floor, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301

954-357-7457

#browardarts


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