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Contents

Editors Emma Caylor Savannah Johnson Andrew Legan McCord Pagan Ginny Roper Hunter Todd

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8 News

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Editorials

p. 8 Features

p. 11 Sports

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Parent Portal..................................................................................................................................3 Oil Spill...........................................................................................................................................4 14th Amendment, Band.................................................................................................................6 FFA................................................................................................................................................7 School Changes............................................................................................................................8 Fire lane Follow-up, Heat...............................................................................................................9 Creativity......................................................................................................................................10 College Applications.....................................................................................................................11 All about Yuki...............................................................................................................................12 Difference between schools in China and America.....................................................................13 Secrets of the Torch.....................................................................................................................14 AP Class, Halloween...................................................................................................................15 DHS v. DCHS, iPod.....................................................................................................................17 Tanning, Whitening Teeth............................................................................................................18 365 Dresses in 365 Days, Bone Marrow.....................................................................................20 Amazon walking, If you really knew me.......................................................................................21 Golf, DHS Football.......................................................................................................................22 Girls Soccer, UT Football............................................................................................................23 Volleyball, Cross Country.............................................................................................................24 Teacher Athletes..........................................................................................................................25 YouTube, Glee.............................................................................................................................26

Section Editors Jackson Lay- News Sean Stapleton- Opinion Lauren Brooks- Features Sam Shankle and Chris Wagner- Sports Elizabeth Bumpas- Entertainment Business Manager Hunter Todd Business Assistant Maggie Feith Photography Manager Jill Vondy Production Manager Aura Mae Northcutt Circulation Manager Shelby Andrews

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Circulation Assistant Kopper Harris

Entertainment

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22 Letters to the editor can be on any topic or of any length. They may be edited for length or libelous content. Letters to the editor are accepted in room 220.

25 Check it out! Look at the back cover for a calendar of upcoming events!

Reporters Aubrey Andrews Mackenzie Clark Mary Elizabeth Hamilton Corena Hasselle Anna Horn Katherine Keller Victoria Noe Lauran Olds Hunter Perry Shelby Pleasant Sarah Reaves Emily Taylor Jean Turnbo Rick Van Sant Maria Yousuf Yuki Zhang Advisors Suzanne Edwards Laura Wright Trojan Torch Dyersburg High School 125 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 38024


New online portal service gives parents access to student grades

Photos by Emma Caylor

Easy Going: English teacher Penny Switzer enjoys a smooth transaction with the Portal while entering student information.

Stressing Out: Chemistry teacher Kim Decker struggles to update grades and attendance. Teachers and users alike have to deal with various problems of Parent Portal.

Emma Caylor Editor new program has been implemented allowing parents to know almost everything about their child’s experience at school this year. However, the new system, Parent Portal, is not new to the county. Dyer County High School has had Parent Portal for years, but the portal is making its debut at DHS this year. Several people wanted this new portal system, and when the funding was available, it was put into effect. What is the new Parent Portal system? It is an online program where parents can get information about their child’s performance at school. “Parents can go online to check students’ grades, attendance and discipline,” principal Mickey Mahon said.

portant for parents to keep up with their child and see if they are skipping school,” senior Curtis Moore said. “I do not think this system is fair. It makes you feel like your parents do not trust you,” sophomore Blake Alford said. Sophomore Kristen Williams feels parents should have the right to see their child’s grades but wishes it were just the final ones. “I do not like that my parents can see each grade,” Williams said.  As students adjust to the new program, parents have wasted no time exploring it for themselves. Some parents are already checking their children’s grades regularly. “I check the portal about once a week, and I would like to do more, but the parent ID is long and hard to remember,” parent

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With all this new information, who has more responsibility? Teachers are now required to publish every test grade, every school absence and every discipline problem a student has. Some teachers think this is a good program, and it could help them become more organized. “This system motivates me to stay current posting grades to the portal,” science teacher Deborah Gatlin said. “It (the portal) will force me to be more punctual in keeping grades on the computer,” math teacher Teresa Maxwell said. Other teachers have found some difficulties with the system. “It is hard to keep grades updated. It puts stress on us as teachers,” math teacher Joy Norman said. Students have found pros and cons for the new system. “I think it is a good idea. It is im-

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Lisa Hall said. The portal creates a way for parents to encourage and influence their children to keep their grades up and turn in their assignments on time. “I am really excited about it and hope it has a positive effect on our students’ grades and behavior. It certainly has that potential,” English teacher Laura Wright said. At the Open House, demonstrations were given to parents about how to use and access Parent Portal. Parents have a username and password that allow them to log in to the portal. Parent Portal can be accessed at https://ssms.state.tn.us/portal. Parents can still get their username if they have not already. For any other questions about the Parent Portal, contact DHS Curriculum Coordinator Kim Worley or call the school at 286-3630.

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Spill: Whos to blame? Andrew Legan Editor ore than five months after one of the largest oil spills in world history, the questions remain: Whose fault is the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster and is a similar catastrophe approaching? Although the several parties involved in the event accuse each other, most of these groups share responsibility for the outcome of this incident. As BP officials gathered to celebrate the Deepwater Horizon oil rig’s safety record on April 20, they were unaware that this record would soon be overshadowed by a deadly mishap. In the evening of the same day, the oil rig experienced a series of explosions in the Gulf of Mexico, setting the stage for one of the worst environmental accidents in U.S. history. A bubble of methane caused gas and muddy concrete to erupt from the drilling pipe, killing eleven workers as the rig was set ablaze. Two days later on Earth Day, the rig sank, leaving an estimated 340,000 gallons of crude oil gushing into the gulf each day according to a Coast Guard officer. This spill rate steadily climbed and, according to PBS News Hour, over 190 million gallons of oil were released into the gulf before the well finally reached a standstill on July 15. Although these corporations are trusted to run their operations safely, the government must keep watch over them to ensure that procedure is followed in a cautious and legal way. Twenty-four percent of polled students believe the U.S. government is responsible for the spill. The government’s role in inspecting oil rigs is fulfilled through the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, formerly called the Minerals Management Service (MMS). This is a committee in the Department of the Interior responsible for keeping a watchful eye on oil drilling and performing routine inspections of the oil rigs. According to the Huffington Post, the MMS was not following their own procedure of inspecting the oil rig once a month. Also, in the Department of the Interior Inspector General’s report, it was

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discovered that MMS inspectors “had accepted gifts from oil and gas production company representatives.” In one instance, according to the report, an MMS inspector evaluated several oil rigs in the Gulf while also applying to work for the oil and gas company that was using them. Although BP leased the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, Transocean, a major offshore drilling contractor, owned it. Thirteen percent of polled DHS students accuse Transocean of being responsible for the oil spill. Most of the employees manning the rig were Transocean workers, and the chief electronics technician, Mike Williams, has released several undocumented claims about the events leading up to the rig’s destruction. Williams said in an interview with CBS News that during a test a few weeks before the explosion, the blowout preventer (BOP) was damaged by another crewman. The blowout preventer is essential in stopping oil and gas under pressure from swiftly rising to the surface and causing explosions or other damages. According to Williams, another crewman accidentally began retracting the pipe while the BOP was being tested, causing the device to suffer severe damage. Williams said that chunks of rubber, a key component in the BOP, were found floating in the rig’s drilling fluid after the incident. Whether or not this event and other malfunctions that Williams mentioned are significant causes of the explosion will not be determined until the BOP is removed from the ocean floor and examined. Another party is, of course, BP Plc. (formerly known as British Petroleum). Thirty-eight percent of polled students blame BP for the accident. BP was leasing the Deepwater Horizon from Transocean. BP company managers were present on the rig to contribute to drilling decisions. According to Williams and a fellow employee, Douglass Brown, the BP managers were having frequent disagreements with the Transocean managers on the rig. One disagreement may have had an influential effect on the outcome of the drilling procedure.

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According to Williams and Douglass, a conflict arose between BP and Transocean about whether to remove the protective drilling mud while pouring cement plugs or to replace the drilling mud with seawater before the last plug was established to speed up the process. According to CNN, BP was losing $750,000 a day on this fiveweek-overdue project. The crew members that have been interviewed consistently report that BP’s decisions to accelerate the drilling process were against Transocean procedure. When this seawater replaced the drilling mud on April 20, the pressure that helped keep the well sealed was decreased. According to engineering professor Robert Bea at the University of California at Berkeley, the bubble of methane gas escaped the faulty blowout preventer and rose through the seawater to the surface of the pipe without drilling mud to hinder it, causing the explosion when it emerged. The companies involved in construction and production of rig components have also come under scrutiny. Twenty-one percent of polled students believe these companies are responsible for the oil spill. Halliburton, an oil services company, was in charge of pouring the cement on the day of the disaster. Although much is still unknown about the events that took place immediately before the blowout, Halliburton could be a responsible party as

indicated by the company’s history. In August of 2009, Halliburton was pouring the cement in an oil well off the coast of Australia. This well also suffered a blowout similar to the Gulf of Mexico incident. Halliburton’s cement plugs were meant to keep gas from seeping up through the pipe, but they did not prevent these two blowouts. Another company, Cameron, was the manufacturer of the faulty Blowout Preventer on the Deepwater Horizon. Although this intricate web of corporations involved in the accident makes it difficult to name one culprit, it may be more reasonable to blame our nation’s oil dependency and the oil consumers as the offenders. A mere five percent of students blame the oil spill on the consumer population in the U.S. With almost 250 million motor vehicles in the USA alone, as recorded by the US Department of Transportation, a high demand for energy exists and must somehow be met. “We want cheap energy and no consequences,” The Washington Times said in June. Unfortunately, the cheap energy source that the USA and other countries have built their infrastructure around appears to carry heavy consequences. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill is just one of the many negative effects of this oil dependency.

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Battle against illegal immigration moves to Constitution Jackson Lay News Editor irst adopted in 1868, the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees citizenship to everyone born on U.S. soil. Known as “Automatic Citizenship,” this right is currently being challenged by several members of Congress. According to a study performed by an independent research group in Washington D.C., 344,000 of the 4.3 million babies born in 2008 had at least one illegal parent. The thought is that a large percentage of illegal immigrants coming to the U.S. are coming for the sole purpose of having a child. A child being born on U.S. soil is automatically granted citizenship. Members of Congress supporting the idea of changing Automatic Citizenship include 2008 Presidential candidate John McCain and House Minority Leader John Boehner. “It's a serious problem that affects our country, and in certain parts of our country, clearly our schools, our hospitals are being overrun by illegal immigrants. A lot of them came here just so their children could become U.S. citizens,” Boehner said. Representative Steve King from Iowa is another believer in changing automatic citizenship. “It's a big magnet—it attracts illegals,” King said. “If we're going to shut off the jobs magnet, we need to shut off the citizenship magnet, too . . . We're a welfare state today, and the drafters and ratifiers of the 14th Amendment didn't contemplate

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a welfare state that would be a magnet for people to come here to cash in to this giant ATM called America.” The idea now is to either pass or make a law changing the way the U.S. grants citizenship, or to make a drastic step and amend the Constitution. Passing a law is much easier and faster, but even if passed, it can quickly be struck down by the Supreme Court. Amending the Constitution is a long process that needs a huge level of agreement on the national level. The problem for those in favor of this change is that it would be extremely difficult to accomplish. Even Republican conservative pillar Mike Huckabee has described the problems with implementing this change. “Let me tell you what I would favor. I would favor having controlled borders,” Huckabee said. Other issues include the precedent the change may set. “The unintended consequences are what alarm me,” Contemporary Issues teacher Mark Stenberg said. Most Democrats believe that this issue is simply a rallying point for office-seeking Republicans for the upcoming mid-term elections. "It is always interesting . . . that those that have, with steadfast fidelity, talked about not tampering with our Constitution, have now swerved to pick the 14th Amendment as the best place to address comprehensive immigration reform," White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said.

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Photo by Sarah Reaves

Setting High Sights: Last year, the DHS Marching Band accumulated a great number of trophies. This year, they hope to receive many more to add to their collection.

Marching Band pursues state title with Riverdance Sarah Reaves Reporter inning the coveted state championship title is the band’s primary goal this year. Band director Tim Graham and band students have set their sights to place higher than they have placed in the past years. “We’ve never won a state title,” Graham said. “The highest we’ve gotten in the state contest is sixth.” This year, however, Graham is implementing a new strategy, including increased leadership roles for the seniors and a more rigorous rehearsal routine. The show that the band hopes will win them the title is “Home in the Heartland”, designed by Richard McAnulty and arranged by Chris Butner. “I think that it’s definitely different from all the shows we’ve done. I think we’re going to have a lot of success with it,” senior B.J. Graham said. Graham has also added more choreography to the marching routine. These new routines have been included to heighten the state championship performance. The challenges presented with

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“Home in the Heartland” are marching and music. The director, Graham, chose this theme because he liked the music. “We thought it would be different and unique,” Graham said. Students also like this year’s marching band theme. Some have a particular favorite aspect such as “The music and the bodywork,” sophomore Devin Cannamore said. Students enjoy other aspects such as “all the drum parts,” junior Jordan Rupp said. Dyersburg High School’s biggest competition is Fred J. Page High School in Franklin. “Page High School has won the state title at least five years in a row,” Graham said. The challenge against Page High School is the differences in resources between the two schools. “It’s a challenge because we don’t have all the resources they have,” Graham said. Seniors this year are anticipating the state championship. The biggest difference in the students is their attitude. “I just think the students seem to be more motivated, more disciplined. They set a goal,” Graham said.

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Photos by Mackenzie Clark

Green Thumbs in the Greenhouse: In greenhouse class, students learn how to take care of various plants by watering and fertilizing them. The first plant sale, “Mum Madness,” will be held October 18 at 6:00 pm.

FFA: More than farming Mackenzie Clark Reporter FA, also known as Future Farmers of America, is one of the most successful clubs at DHS. “It is the premiere youth leadership organization in the world,” FFA advisor Chris Cummins said. FFA participates in many livestock shows. The two nearest livestock shows are the Dyer County fair and the Obion County fair, where many of the members show animals. “Our FFA members work the barns and help Dyer County run the petting zoo,” Cummins said. FFA actively participates in competitions known as CDEs. “Our chapter has placed in the top four for the state of Tennessee 19 times. That’s the most of any chapters in West Tennessee!” Cummins said. “We’ve gotten a three-star rank for the past two years. That’s the highest national rank possible,” FFA president Mallory Brunson said. “My favorite part about FFA is getting to meet new people from all different places and competing in different competitions,” junior Maryanna McClure said. “We travel to Minneapolis, Gatlinburg and camps over the summer,” Cummins said. The FFA Convention in Minneapolis is the largest of FFA competitions. There were over 50,000 students attending last year, and the number this year is expected to be even larger.

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A Little Bit of TLC: Last summer, the mums were hydrated with a new irrigation system by John Deere. But what does FFA do outside of their competitions and shows? “FFA helps its members learn about team building, networking, public speaking and leadership skills; it also helps personal growth while teaching valuable life lessons, not to mention you can get a lot of scholarships, and it is great for a resume,” Cummins said. “FFA is a place where you can be yourself and feel at home,” Brunson said. FFA often holds agriculture sales, growing the plants

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themselves in the greenhouse they built themselves. Joining something new is always intimidating, but becoming a part of the FFA family is simple. “I joined freshman year because a friend was in FFA, and she recruited me. It’s really easy to join, not hard at all. You can express yourself here. You don’t have to be athletic or smart. You just have to be yourself,” Brunson said. Interested students can see Chris Cummins in the West Wing, right across from the art room. “FFA opens your eyes to what you can do with agriculture,” Brunson said. “FFA is definitely a family to me, whether it is a weekend at a livestock show or during the week practicing, we’re always together having a good time,” McClure said. “My favorite thing about FFA is that I get to learn things I normally wouldn’t know in school,” said freshman Suzanne Schultz. “We’re very proud to be here. Our FFA chapter is very strong, and we are very excited to see what the future holds. We’re so thankful for all the support!” Cummins said. “I am very proud of our chapter this year. Our officer team and advisors have worked so hard already, and I hope that everyone will notice how well we have done,” Brunson said.

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School changes positively affect student life Sean Stapleton Opinion Editor ith the beginning of a new year, I, along with my fellow students, returned to face many new changes to the building we had become so accustomed to. Despite our initial apprehensions about all the alterations to procedure and scenery, our first day back went as efficiently and smoothly as could be hoped for. Since no one had been allotted a parking spot at registration, we began the day experiencing complete mayhem in the overcrowded parking lots. But dodging other cars and scrambling to find an available space was just what we needed to snap us out of our zombie-like states of morning drowsiness. We entered school exhilarated by our neardeath parking lot experiences, ready to take on any challenges. Giving out parking spots during registration or any time before school started would obviously be time consuming and wasteful. Students would no longer receive the excitement of dueling and arguing for the best spot, and administration would have to worry about trying to create order and organization. As the day progressed, most of us were given as many as three to four textbooks to

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carry home and back. We were forced to haul them around the whole day because lockers also remained unassigned. We originally thought the books were a hassle to lug around school, but having to tote up to twenty pounds in text was an excellent upper body and back workout. Plus, we finally understood what it was like to be pack mules as we carried backpacks stuffed to capacity. It is clear that school administrators were too busy with other responsibilities to handle the extremely difficult task of assigning lockers. It is understandable that it would take more than a week to hand a student a locker number, and once again it would have just been too demanding and challenging to complete during registration. Just as everyone had expected, nearly the entire second floor of the school was reconstructed. Replaced carpets, repainted walls and refurbished staircases, along with a new library, greeted us as we headed to class. These architectural transformations, however, greatly altered how we traveled to class. We were no longer permitted to walk through the library, and only one hallway was left for us to get from one side of the building to the other. Therefore, student traffic had increased

significantly. While cramming as many as two hundred students at a time into a 20-foot wide hallway seemed impractical, if not ridiculous at the time, it only took us a day to get used to it. Our treks from class to class were greatly enhanced by being able to play games of human pinball among the crowds of football players and large upperclassmen. With most of the convenient and practical routes to class blocked off, we were easily able to shed a few extra pounds over the course of the day. Obviously school officials believed that teenage obesity at DHS would quickly be a thing of the past once students could no longer take their favorite shortcuts to class. But why should we be allowed to walk through the library? Obviously we would immediately ruin its mint condition if we were allowed passage through it on a daily basis. Furthermore, its doubtful that traffic would decrease even if the library was unblocked and our walking space was more than doubled. Surely the hallways would still remain crowded. All in all, every change we experienced was widely accepted and liked. Each improvement could not have been thought out and executed in any better way.

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Photos by McCord Pagan

Parking in fire lane still an issue McCord Pagan place taking real action against those who endanEditor ger others by breaking the law. ire Lane: “An approved means of access or For too long people have been parking in the fire other passageway...for emergency apparalane just because they do not want to park around tus where parking is prohibited”-National the building and walk the extra distance to the Fire Protection Association. front. Last spring, I wrote an editorial criticizing the Of the vehicles parked in the fire lane, a police school for its continued use of the fire lane as adcruiser is always visible. ditional parking. One would not know it if one “Officer Mosley parks her car there to show selooked at the fire lane in front of DHS. While the curity and safety. In many parts of Dyersburg you parking in the fire lane is down significantly, the will see empty police cars parked to show a police issue remains. presence in the area,” Mahon said. Fortunately, school administrators have listened In the meantime, there is still illegal parking in and are planning to move teacher parking as part the fire lane. Each day there are about four cars in of the effort to cut down on fire lane abuse. the fire lane, and 18 empty parking spaces. While “The fire lane will be repainted and the center that is down from last year, even one car in the fire lane will be used for parking,” principal Mickey lane is one too many. Mahon said. The issue here is very real and one that needs to In addition to this, some teacher parking will be Parking Hazard: Parking in the be addressed immediately. All the empty parking moved around to the West Wing and by the ag de- fire lane still remains a safety issue. spaces show one thing: people are more concerned partment to expand the visitor parking from the about getting a good parking space than safety. current two spaces. Signs will be installed further to discourage drivers This practice is not only lazy, but dangerous. from parking there. While the administration is making important and much needed But the school needs more than just new signs and paint; it needs changes, there is still much work to be done. real enforcement of the fire lane. All the signs in the world cannot re-

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College Preparation: Shelby Peasant Reporter

How to get

an early start

Photo by Shelby Pleasant

Freshman: Don’t know where you want to go to college yet? It is okay; do not worry! But do not think you cannot do anything as a freshman in high school. One thing to do to really help you is to start your resume. A resume is a list that has everything you have done in high school so far--either academic or extracurricular activities. Keeping up with this as a freshman makes remembering your accomplishments much easier later. Another thing you can do is get involved in not only your school, but your community as well. Also go ahead and take the ACT now. Do not become discouraged though if you do not receive the score you wanted. Something that will help in college is to take rigorous classes in high school. Colleges would rather see a 3.0 GPA with difficult classes than a 4.0 with a transcript full of easy classes and “fillers.”

Sophomore: Something that you can do sophomore year is become involved in many extracurricular activities. Keep in mind that colleges look for a well-rounded student, not just one who specializes in sports or volunteering. But do not think that sports and volunteering do not matter either; those activities just need to be well rounded between school, community and even church. Another thing to do is start visiting college fairs now to get a good idea of where you might want to go. Also, do not forget to add continually to that resume. Finally start ACT prep classes and work on getting that ACT score as high as you can get it.

Junior: What you can do this year is to think of your passion. Then think of ways you can potentially change that into a job. Do not fret if there is not anything that you can think of to do. It is not really crucial at this moment, but it is good to have a basic idea. Another thing that is happening this year is the state-wide ACT test. Something to do to prepare yourself for the test is to buy an ACT prep book or to take a class on test preparation. It is also a good idea to take the PSAT to qualify for the National Merit Scholarships. Once again, remember to keep up that resume! Work on figuring out what colleges are a match for you as well as which are not. Narrow the colleges that are a match, and

Pulling Everything Together: Senior Sarah Collins works to complete her online college application. then go visit them over the summer. Go ahead and get those people who will write a good recommendation letter in your head. Also, check out web sites such as www.intellistudent.com, www.fastweb.com and www.cappex.com.

Senior: This is the year that everything is supposed to come together. Do not worry about it if nothing is adding together nicely, though! You can help yourself remember all those scholarship and application dates by making a huge calendar and keeping it somewhere you will look a lot, such as in your car or on your wall. Write test dates, fees, deadlines, due dates and even when you need recommendation letters sent to schools on this calendar. One thing that you do need to worry about is getting all those college requirements met on time. Go ahead and tell recommendation letter writers in advance the due dates so that when those recommendation deadlines come around, the letters will be ready.

DHS alumni and faculty advice for college: “[High school] kids a lot of times get too caught up with making the right choice. It is okay to pick wrong, whether a wrong major or even a wrong school; you can change. It’s not a life-changing event to make the wrong decision once-in-a-while,” physics teacher Amy Morgan said. “As you challenge yourselves in these years of high school, the rewards later will be much better,” English teacher Penny Switzer said. “Don’t be let down if your first choice of college ends up not working out,” ‘10 alumna Lizzie Lee said. “A college education is what you make no matter where you go, as long as you work to the best of your abilities.” “College is a lot different from what your mind can wrap around, but it’s amazing because you’re thrown into these situations of becoming you and learning about yourself,” ‘10 alumna Jaylin Gardner said. “If you hang out with garbage, you will not come out smelling like roses,” Señor Lance Roy said. “Learn how to take notes,” guidance counselor Harry Ferrel said. “Taking notes gives you a leg up on your classes.”

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Is public education all wrong? Walt Carter Assistant Design Editor ost would agree that Albert Einstein is a famous scientist popularized by the discovery of relativity. But what most do not know is that the genius of the early 20th century was not accepted into the Federal Polytechnic School because he failed the non-science sections of his exam. With this defeat, Einstein later wrote that the spirit of learning and creative thought were lost in strict rote learning. If a genius who has marked a spot in a school science book openly goes against the functions of school, it is evident that there are faults in public education. Inside all of us, there is a strong yearning that inspires us, motivates us and urges us to follow our passions. This beckoning fights to overcome any obstacle, wants to gain knowledge on the subject for which it loves and longs. Obstacles to this desire sometimes prove too difficult, too tedious and too overwhelming. This struggle is constant, and sometimes obstacles can hinder us from reaching knowledge. Could one of these hindrances be public education? Could public education keep our society from true success? In life, learning is directly opposite from the learning methods used in school. When learning is independent, people make mistakes and learn from them. When learning is school-controlled, people are forced to learn, and then they have to apply knowledge to a written test on which they will make their mistakes. It is not the teacher’s job to provide students with a book and give deadlines for when it should be read. Teachers are not here to super-

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find no love as well. Life is about eagerness and letting it motivate the greatness of people. This century’s teaching methods are primarily based on memorization for the next test. Math knowledge fades with the lack of application of the formula; history dulls with repetition of days and dates and English lessons weaken with unappealing books and dry rubrics. Teachers constantly give guidelines and rules that restrict the creative mind. How could students be interested if they can never explore what they love? A teacher should be the tool that fosters creativity and lets it loose. Many years are wasted teaching things that the students will never use. If a student knows his or her passion, let him pursue it, and if he does not, let him explore it. Students cannot be forced to love something they do not, but they can naturally find what they love with help from a teacher. It is evident that Einstein knew his passion, but the Federal Polytechnic School somehow found it appropriate to test him on concepts that he could never be forced to love. Creativity is the basis of everything around us. Any light bulb switched, any movie viewed, any technology in our grasp all started Illustration by Walt Carter with one creative mind. Starting with a human sided discussion. With this activity, the stu- soul courageously stepping out of a stereotypdent draws his own conclusion and ical lifestyle, love and passion quickly turn understands how to work the real-life prob- into an advancement for the world of tomorlem. Since memorization is not used, the row. School should be the venue for opening teacher has set the student up for failure, par- doors and helping students step out of a stereotypical lifestyle and into love and pasadoxically, to meet true success. True education starts with a teacher who sion for learning. values creativity. When a teacher shows no love for the subject, the student will naturally vise; they are here to teach. Therefore, the teachers should use the natural learning process and apply it to real world, relatable problems. Teachers constantly complain about the stubbornness of students. Stubbornness is simply a student’s attempt to be independentto be creative. Give these “stubborn” students independence in their work and watch them instinctively use trial and error to figure out what teachers have been trying to force them to learn all along. After students process all the creative knowledge gained, teachers should reinterpret what the students just figured out and create a two-

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From Beijing to Dyersburg:

Chinese exchange student adjusts to small town life

Savannah Johnson Editor wo years ago, Dyersburg High School established the Mandarin Chinese program. Last year a student founded the Chinese Club. This year, Yiruo Zhang “Yuki,” an exchange student from Beijing, China, is the school’s latest addition to the Chinese movement. Although this is Yuki’s first small town experience, it is not her first time to visit the United States. From the east coast to west coast, Yuki has traveled to all of the major metropolises including our nation’s capital. The agency Academic Year in the USA (AYUSA) Global Youth Exchange is the agency that Yuki joined to become an exchange student. The agency randomly places the students, and Yuki ended up in Dyersburg. According to aysua.org, “Our vision is a future where na-

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tions and people recognize their similarities and have an acceptance of differences.” Moving from the busy streets of Beijing to a low-key Tennessee town will be a transition for the China native. Beijing’s population is over 20 million, while Dyersburg’s is only 20 thousand. This is only one of the drastic cultural differences Yuki will encounter during her stay. The experience will be rewarding not only for Yuki, but also the students she interacts with. There are plenty of things for her to learn from local students, but there are also things for students to learn from her. As the world continues to become more globalized, interacting with other cultures will be a common aspect of everyday life, so Yuki’s visit offers the students of Dyersburg High School a great opportunity. see related article on p. 13

Questions and Answers Q: What has been the biggest adjustment in moving to Dyersburg? A: It has been hard to understand local English.

Q: What has been your biggest surprise about Dyersburg? A: The homework is much easier than I imagined.

Q: What do teenagers in China do in their spare time? A: We go shopping, play sports, eat dinner out and study.

Q: If you could have one thing from Beijing here in Dyersburg, what would it be? A: My friends.

Q: How did you deal with leaving home? A: I have made adjustments to local life. I sometimes email my parents and friends in China.

Q: How is the fashion different in Dyersburg compared to Bejing? A: In Dyersburg, the style is simple. In Beijing, there is more variety.

Q: What is your favorite American food so far? A: I do not like American food.

Q: Who are your favorite American musicians? A: Lady Gaga, Mariah Carey, Taylor Swift and Justin Bieber.

Q: What is something you like more about Dyersburg than Beijing? A: The fresh air.

Q: How did you get to come to Dyersburg? A: The agency arranged for me to come here.

Q: What is something you miss about Beijing? A: I miss my family and my friends.

Q: Where else in the world have you traveled? A: Korea, Thailand, England, Singapore and the United States once before. Q: Is there anything you want to do before you leave Dyersburg? A: I want to swim in a lake. Q: What made you decide to join AYUSA? A: One of my friends was an exchange student, and she told me about it. Q: What do you want to learn or accomplish while you are here? A: I want to improve my English skills.

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Photo by Savannah Johnson

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Breathing the Fresh Air: Foreign exchange student Yuki Zhang welcomes the change of scenery from her city life.

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Chinese school life

differs from American school life

Yuki Zhang Reporter Chinese exchange student is attending Dyersburg High School this year. As a cultural communication ambassador, I, Yuki Yiruo Zhang, would like to explain my school life in China. In China students are required to have six years of primary school and three years of middle school. Then about 70% of students (in the city) will go to three years of high school.

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SCHOOL HOURS For first-year and second-year students, school starts at 7:30 a.m. Students take a morning self-study until 8:00 and have morning exercise for 20 minutes. Students have five classes until 12:30. Each class is 40 minutes long with 10 minute breaks between two classes. Lunch time lasts until 1:30, and students have another three classes in the afternoon. Then there is one more hour of selfstudy in the classroom, and students can ask their teacher for help on work. Students cannot go home until 5:00 pm. For graduate grade students (seniors), things are different. They can not be in clubs, do activities or have free time. After dinner they have self-study until 9:00 or 10:00 pm. They have to take another six classes on Saturday. Their life revolves around homework and exams.

SPORTS In September we have an athletic meeting every year. It includes track and field, rope skipping and simple gymnastics. All of the students gather on the playground to watch and take part in the games. Each class is a team. In spring, we have a sport season for two weeks. People dance and do fun sport games after school. We have to do morning exercises for 20 minutes every day. In winter, we run for excerise. Boys like to play basketball or soccer after school. Girls usually do not play sports, although there is enough ground for any track and field or other sports. We also have professional dance teams, track and field teams and gymnastics teams. HOLIDAY There is a three-day break around New Year’s Day. A one-month break is in February or March for the Spring Festival. There is a one-day break in April for the Spirit Festival, a one-day break in May for the Labor Festival and a one-day break for Olds Day. The biggest vacation is summer holidays. It is from the middle of July to September first. There is a week-long break in October for National Day. There is also a one-day break for The Dragon Boat Festival.

RULES No smoking, no drinking, no make up, no jewelry and no curling or dyeing of hair is allowed. Girls have to comb their hair and boys can not leave their hair long. Students must wear their uniforms everywhere and at every moment. Most of the teachers and parents disagree with teenagers being in a relationship because it will hinder children’s grades. If you do date, be careful.

CLASS In my high school, there are 10 classes in each grade. Three of them are fast classes, which means students there are the top grade groups. Forty people make up a class, and take every class is in the same classroom. Photos contributed by Yuki Yiruo Zhang

Similarities: Students in a Chinese chemistry class go through the same processes that an American class would.

That is a part of my normal school life schedule. On the other hand, the academic study life is different and more complicated. It is too much to talk about. see related article on p. 12

LUNCH Most students eat lunch in the dining room, a four-story building in the school. You can also bring your lunch to school and eat it in the classroom. The school forbids us from going off campus for lunch because of safety; however, there are various restaurants nearby the school.

ACTIVITIES We have poems recitation, club week and fun-subject quiz in the spring. “High School Musical” is a singing and dancing competition among students and teachers. It is held near Christmas. There are two one-day trips in the spring or the autumn. We climb hills or go to the countryside for sightseeing.

CLUBS There are about 100 different clubs in my school. All of them are set up by students. They usually meet once a week if there is no exam. There are some popular clubs such as dance, Chinese literature, drama play and picture. Some of them play shows on the stage. I am a member of the school student union. I take charge of the school magazine. Trojan

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In class: Chinese students listen as their teacher explains the homework assignment for that night.

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Jill Vondy Photography Editor dvanced Placement (AP) classes are college-level courses taken by high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. But how can people pass a class that is admittedly as grueling as a college level course when they are only in high school? “Students should start in honors classes from day one of high school. The intrinsic desire to learn is imperative. Laziness is not an option,” AP English teacher Penny Switzer said. “Do not give up when things get difficult. You are admirable for even signing up for the class and taking the challenge. Just because something is difficult for you doesn’t mean you are stupid. Don’t be afraid to step up and try it,” 2010 DHS graduate Alex Jacobi said. “Most people want to wait until a few days before the AP exams to study, but if you begin a studying habit sooner, you can end up doing really well on your AP exams, possibly resulting in college credit for the course," junior Luis Portillo said . “I just studied the material we got from our

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teachers. They were all pros at AP, so I did just fine. Seriously. Dyersburg High School's AP teachers know what they're doing,” college freshman and former DHS student Alissa Plewa said. Other study guides are available for extra review if you do feel the need for it. One of the most highly recommended is the Princeton Review. For more information go to their website, http:// www.princetonreview.com/. On the other hand, AP Literature teacher Suzanne Edwards recommends that students be careful when purchasing study guides. “ I think that some of the authors of the study guides I’ve seen have never seen an AP Lit exam. Get recommendations before you purchase!” Edwards said. In most instances, students are taking AP courses to earn college credit while still in high school. This allows them to get basic courses out of the way. College credit for a course is determined by one’s score on the AP exam. Exam scores range from one to five with a five meaning you are extremely qualified and a one meaning no recommendation. For most

colleges, a score of three or higher will qualify a student to receive college credit. The AP exam can also be taken by students not enrolled in the AP class. Students may take the regular version of a class and then later take the AP exam and receive credit just like students who took the AP version of the class. “AP classes are usually more difficult than introductory classes at a public university. By taking an AP class, you learn not only about the subject being taught but also about the sort of study habits that will help you succeed in college,” Ole Miss freshman William Bumpas said. “I think that taking AP classes helps prepare you for college by creating that study habit that is necessary to even survive the class.” “AP classes aren’t for everyone, of course, but I feel as if I am so incredibly lucky to have taken that route. If I had taken an easier path, maybe things would have been smoother, but I wouldn’t feel as prepared as I do now,” Jacobi said.

How Halloween is celebrated

Anna Horn Reporter n the month of October, leaves change colors. Fall starts arriving and Halloween comes along. Halloween can be a lot of fun. There are a variety of ways to spend this fun holiday. Some people say that trick-or-treating is silly, and others say high schoolers are too old for it. Sophomore Felicia Mckelvy said that a person is too old to trick or treat when he or she is ten years old. Some students and faculty have memories of past Halloweens. “My favorite memory about Halloween is when my family used to have a bonfire, cookout and wear costumes. My mom would decorate Wikipedia.org the house, and we would have a big Jack-o-lantern: The pumpkins eerie house glows in time,” English teacher Pasty Pecken- the night. Carving pumpkins is a Halloween favorite. paugh said.

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“My favorite Halloween memory is when I fell in the tub while I was bobbing for apples,” senior Mercedes Lewis said. “My favorite Halloween tradition is seeing little children dress up and seeing what children and their parents come up for with their costumes,” librarian Patricia Twilla said. There are some people who like to carve pumpkins and to spend time with their family and friends. But many students like to prank others. “My favorite prank is to jump out and scare people,” freshman Aaron Gauldin said. There are some consequences for pranks. “Students could be charged for vandalism and assault,” Officer DeAnn Mosley said. Many students enjoy going to parties or haunted houses. There are many creative ways to celebrate this holiday. Trojan

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How we make the paper:

secrets behind the fold

Hunter Todd Business Manager very year students are given new issues of the Trojan Torch. Behind the cover are news, sports, editorial, feature and entertainment articles. While the student body looks through the individually-designed pages, they are unaware of the weeks of work that go into the final product. Throughout the process of producing a Trojan Torch issue, the journalism students follow a series of steps. Each phase is filled with deadlines and a workload that each student must complete. Students begin each issue by thinking of ideas for articles. These “futures files” are then put into a list that the class can choose from. By the end of this step, everyone has his or her own article, and a deadline is made for article completion, normally a week. As soon as articles are given and a deadline is set, it is time to begin the writing process. Journalism students are kept busy with writing, interviewing and picture taking. Not only must the articles be written by the deadline, but they must also be proofed by students and teachers for any errors they may contain. Once the articles are completed,

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students begin the layout process. This step requires days of computerized page design. Deadlines are due every day or two, and students are required to have completed certain steps in their layout. By the end of this phase, each page has been designed and proofed. It is now the editor’s time to pull the pages together. The pages are organized on computers and printed by the hundreds. With the pages ready to be made into a completed Trojan Torch issue, the process of collation begins. The paper finally takes form as students stack, staple and fold the pages. The assembly line process turns out paper after paper, and the copies are given to the circulation team to be organized for distribution. There, more than 800 papers are divided into stacks and labeled with the appropriate destinations.

Finally, the Trojan Torch is ready to be given out. Students take the papers to every teacher to be handed out to the DHS population. The paper also goes to the school board, businesses, new students, visitors, other schools and competitions. The award-winning school paper is now completed and the process starts over for the next issue.

Ph ot os by Hu nt er Todd

What is your fa

vorite thing ab ou

t journalism? “My favorite th ing is how we ca n over- “I lik come the minor e how we have difficulties and more responsib create a jour great paper.” ility in nalism than any other class.” -Junior Lauren -Senior McCord Brooks Pagan “I like that we pu “Journalism is t so much work the best class at and heart Hig Dyersburg into the paper. h School. We lear When I see peop n so many skills le outside ne of journalism re about wspaper, but m ading the pape ore importantly, r, I like to ab w say, ‘I helped m e learn out life. The re ake that.’ ” lationships built in jo urna lism are the ones -Senior Kopper Harris I will remembe Editing: (left) Elizabeth Bumpas and Ginny “My favorite th r.” -Senior Savann ing about journa ah Johnson lism is that “W Roper perfect their articles.(middle) Chris we not only pu e are just a big fa t together an am m ily .” azingly Wagner asks for Jackson Lays opinion awesome pape -Senior Andrew r, but we learn Legan great life “I while Andrew Legan is hard at work on his skills.” like how everyt hi ng re st s on the shoularticle. (right) Aura Mae Northcutt concenders of the stud -Senior Ginny Ro ents.” pe r trates on writing her article. -Junior Walt Ca rter Trojan

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iPods revolutionize human culture

Rick Van Sant Reporter Pods have contributed to Apple’s business success in the past, including further development for the design, distribution and updated versions of Apple’s products. Ever since the first iPod was invented, Apple has been a success in the music industry and human culture. Ever wondered how iPods became so popular? Apple has had many advantages in the past to influence that popularity. A huge part of Apple’s success has come through iPods. iPods were first introduced on October 23, 2001. Since then Apple’s profits have increased drastically. The majority of Apple’s income has been from iPods. Senior Vice President of Industrial Design for Apple, Jonathan Ive, is the man responsible for the design of iPods. Over 31 dif- Ph ot o by Ri ck Va n Sa nt ferent iPod models have been designed by Ive in the recent years. The name “iPod” was first introduced by a Reinventing Humanity: iPods befreelance copywriter come the trend throughout the ages. named Vinnie Chieco. He was called by Apple to help introduce this new product. When Chieco saw the new product, he thought of the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey” and the phrase "Open the pod bay door, Hal!" It turned out to be that that name had already been in use and was trademarked. In July 2000, Joseph N. Grasso of New Jersey had already listed an “iPod” trademark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for Internet kiosks. In 2001, the “iPod” kiosks were discontinued. Grasso assigned the name to Apple Computer, Inc. in 2005 after the trademark was registered in November 2003.

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The cost of a modern iPod is anywhere from $59 to $399. If this is not a good price range, then there is a solution in the form of refurbished iPods. “Refurbished is less expensive,” computer teacher Nancy Austin said. Many companies have been designing products that are made for iPods. For instance, Nike has combined a product with Apple that helps with fitness called Nike + iPod. SDI Technologies has invented a home audio system called “iHome,” which allows an iPod’s sound to be transmitted through speakers. Since there are many different versions of iPods, there are also many different functions. “There are iPods in a variety of colors for all types of people ,” senior Jacob Sells said. The iPod Classic has a 2.5 inch color LCD screen, but the iPod Shuffle does not have a screen. The iPod Touch has a 3.5 inch touchscreen. An iPod Nano (5th generation) comes with a video camera on the back of it. A variety of retailers sell iPods: Wal-Mart, Best Buy and Radio Shack are all carriers. In addition, there are retailers online that sell iPods. A wider selection of iPods can be purchased from amazon.com and eBay.com. Some iPods are used for purposes other than just music. “From my point of view, it helps you with research,” sophomore Jovon Hopkins said. The iPod Touch has Safari (Apple’s internet browser), YouTube and “apps.” The “App Store” is an Apple online store that allows one to purchase a vast selection of applications for one’s iPod. “Culture has become a lot more advanced,” sophomore Ragan Hinson said. iPods are continuing to become more popular. It seems as though iPods have revolutionized human culture and music. With this in mind, there might be a chance that iPods will become a staple of modern culture.

Dyersburg-Dyer County Rivalry: Gone too far? Jean Turnbo Reporter ave you ever wondered how the Dyersburg-Dyer County rivalry began or why it is so strong? The Dyersburg-Dyer County games arrive with much anticipation, no matter the sport. However, the recent football game that erupted in a fight that cleared both benches has fans wondering if the rivalry has gone too far. “I love going to the Dyersburg-Dyer County games because it seems to me that the teams play harder and the students get more involved,” sophomore April Dunevant said. “I believe we are fortunate to have two great schools that allow kids to choose where they would like to go. We have a healthy rivalry,” Dyer County High School Principal Peggy Dodds said. “I feel we take it (the rivalry) into our lifestyle. I love seeing Dyersburg come together for the common purpose of winning a game,” senior Ricky Kirby said. Having a healthy rivalry is acceptable as long as it does not get out of hand. Trojan

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“No game or amount of money is worth a student getting injured. We have been in the same district for so long; it makes the stakes higher, but I feel it will cool off in the future since Dyer County is now in the AAA division,”chemistry teacher Kim Decker said. The fact that Dyersburg and Dyer County are not far from each other may have something to do with why the rivalry is so strong. “We started playing Dyer County in 1949, and we stopped for a few years until the superintendent said we should start again. We have been playing them off and on for years,” former athletic director Terry Glover said. Fans seem to have different perspectives on the issues, whether they are teachers or students. “I feel it is kind of crazy,” sophomore Nicholas Williams said. “I tend to believe both adults and students fuel the rivalry, but adults make it worse. Kids would leave it on the field, but not the adults,” Decker said. “Bad behavior is not acceptable, no matter what school it is,” Dodds said.

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Whiter teeth to a brighter day: New ways to improve your smile Shelby Andrews Circulation Manager n the top ten list of fun ways to live longer, smiling is labeled third. If it is known that smiling more leads to a longer life, why do people hold back because they are not confident in their teeth? Over the past few years, dentists have developed ways to brighten and whiten teeth, both in the office and at home. professional Although whitening can cost up to four times more than do-it-yourself whitening kits, it is well worth the money. The regulations on store-bought products do not allow as much bleaching substances, whereas professional whitening can use stronger materials, leaving the teeth whiter and brighter in less time. For those do-it-at-home people, there are over-the-counter products such as Listerine Crest Strips, White Whitestrips and AquaFresh Whitening Trays. “When using at home products, just bleach your top teeth first so you can compare color and tell if the product is working,” dentist Scott Self said. On top of all these products, there are home remedies and little things to do every day that can improve the color of teeth. One recipe uses a strawberry, containing malic acid, which works to remove discoloration, combined with half a teaspoon of baking soda. This works to buff away stains. Leave this on for five minutes once a week to brighten your smile quickly. There are also foods such as carrots, celery, apples and pears that can be used to trig-

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ger saliva that helps scrub away stains. There are risks to whitening teeth, however. Too much bleach can result in the burning of gums, which is more likely with at-home products. Also know that while it bleaches all other teeth, whitening products will not whiten manufactured teeth. Younger people typically get better results because their teeth are still young and healthy, while with older people, the outer layer of tooth enamel wears away leaving the underlying layer which is more yellow. All in all, while there are other ways to whiten teeth, professional whitening is recommended most often.

Photo by Shelby Andrews

Saying Cheese: Sophomore Alex Agee shows her teeth for the camera.

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Tanning darkens future Corena Hasselle Reporter he United States spends about $1.8 billion on treating skin cancers caused by tanning each year. The Obama administration recently added a 10% tanning tax to the health care bill. The tax may reduce skin cancer in the future. Tanning beds are popular despite warnings of their dangerous effects. Studies show that tanning in a tanning bed even once by the age of thirty-five increases the possibility of developing melanoma, the most dangerous and rarest form of skin cancer, by 75%. In fact, one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in his or her lifetime, but skin cancer is not the only dangerous effect from the use of tanning beds. About thirty million Americans use tanning beds each year. There is evidence that tanning actually thins skin and prevents the healing of scars; however, approximately 90% of visible aging signs, like wrinkles, lines, sunspots and leathery skin, are caused from sun damage from ultraviolet (UV) rays. “I don’t think it’s worth it. It makes your skin look good now, but if you start in middle school, by the time you’re twenty your skin looks like you’re thirty. So when you’re thirty, it looks like you’re forty,” Spanish teacher Lance Roy said. “It’s like smoking; it’s killing yourself slowly. It feels good temporarily but has devastating, long-term effects,” Roy added. “A lot of people think that having a tan could be healthy, but that is not necessarily true. Tanning can cause some immediate effects like blistering. Too much

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sun can cause long-term problems like skin cancer, cataracts and immune suspension. Over exposure to the sun causes wrinkling and the aging of the skin,” Dyersburg High School and Dyersburg Middle School nurse Elaine McCormick said. A rare but dangerous accident occurred to Melanie Wraith. She got inside a tanning bed for twelve minutes, and the canopy of the bed fell on her arm. Wraith said that the bed came on and gave her an electric shock. She was stuck for more than two and a half hours with 65% burns. On the way to the hospital Wraith stopped breathing and spent two days at the Birmingham Burns Unit. “I don’t think tanning beds are very good for your skin, but some tanning in the sun is good. Sun bathing is good because it’s a great source of vitamin D. But the more sunburns you get, the more likely you’ll get skin cancer; the same is true with tanning beds,” sophomore Alli Rutledge said. “I think it’s vain if you obsess about being tan,” sophomore Sam Webb said. “I believe we need to be sunwise and limit ourselves to sun exposure. We need to wear sunscreen to protect ourselves from UVA and UVB rays: UVA are the rays that cause aging and UVB rays are those that cause burning,” McCormick said. The best way to prevent skin cancer and premature aging is not to use tanning beds and avoid sun exposure. Although sun can help your body by producing vitamin D, too much sun can harm your skin and have lasting effects.

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Give a little, get a lot: Donating bone marrow Elizabeth Hamilton Reporter ow would you feel if your only hope of survival rested in the hands of complete strangers? That is the reality that the 6,000 Americans awaiting bone marrow transplants face every day. Bone marrow is the tissue found in the hollow area of the bones. In bone and blood diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and most cancers, a bone marrow transplant is the only hope of survival. Finding a person who has the same marrow type is not always easy. In the case that a donor cannot be found within the patient’s family and friends, that person is put on a list to receive a bone marrow transplant. There is hope for these people, though. All across the nation there are centers and drives set up to try to find matches for people in need of bone marrow transplants. Dyersburg native Jerry Edwards is one of the many people across the country on a list to donate bone marrow. Edwards was first put on the list in college by retired Dy-

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ersburg State professor Buck Tarpley. While Edwards has not yet been called on to donate bone marrow, he is one day hoping that he will be called on to make a difference in someone’s life. “It’s a really good cause,” Edwards said. For those who one day might be interested in donating, there are some guidelines to follow. For one thing a potential donor has to be considered a legal adult and be in good health. When donors sign up they give a sample of blood, and then the doctors will check to see if anyone in the area is in need of a bone marrow transplant with the donor’s blood type. Then all the donor does is wait. Sadly, most people who volunteer to donate are never matched with anyone, but that should not stop students from going out and trying to make a difference. “Bone marrow transplants are very worthwhile and afford others higher quality of life,” DHS nurse Elaine McCormick said.

wikipedia.org

Saving a Life: A patient undergoes the operation to donate bone marrow. It involves pulling the bone marrow directly out of the hip bone.

New dress a day transforms trash to treasure Ginny Roper Editor hen Marisa Lynch lost her job, just months before her thirtieth birthday, she put herself into motion and decided not to let herself become depressed. It was a viewing of Julie & Julia which prompted Lynch to get her creative juices flowing. “Then the ‘aha’ moment came to me. The thing that makes this girl happiest is scouring flea markets, vintage stores and garage sales for the perfect pieces to add to her wardrobe,” Lynch said on her blog at newdressaday.wordpress.com.

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Now, Lynch is putting her sewing skills to the test. She has 365 days to transform 365 pieces of unattractive thrift store clothing items into a oneof-a-kind, hip fashion statement. The twist, however, is that she only has a budget of one dollar a day to spend on clothes, which means foregoing trips to the malls and boutiques. “365 days. 365 items of clothing. 365 dollars. And the blogging begins,” Lynch said. Expect more sewing and transforming from her at www.newdressaday.wordpress.com until November 26th.

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Thrifty Fashion: Marisa Lynch models one of her dollar creations.

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New show sheds light on harsh realities of high school Aura Mae Northcutt Production Manager igh school is known for cliques, bullies and labels. So what would happen if the nerds, jocks, preps or dorks took a day and got to know each other and each other’s life stories on a more personal level? “If you really knew me, you would know that I worry constantly about my brother being deployed to Afghanistan,” senior Jessie Williams said. In the new MTV series, If You Really Knew Me, the students and faculty assemble in the gym for a one-day program to break down all the walls and barriers and try to bring the students together on a closer, more understanding level. Playing games, sharing stories and crossing an imaginary line leads to an emotional day. “The show brings into the open that you are not alone when you have a problem. There is always someone who’s been through it or is going through it,” senior Emily DiGirolamo said. The program sponsors If You Really Knew Me is called Challenge Day. It is a non-profit organization that helps people learn to connect through powerful, life-changing programs in their schools and communities. This program has united many schools and is planning to unite many more. “NOTICE, CHOOSE and ACT is the formula for change,” according to challengeday.org. Changing one

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school/organization at a time, Challenge Day is known for being optimistic, life-changing and understanding towards all people going through rough times. “If you really knew me, you would know that I want to change the evil and hate in this world more than anything. I see good and potential in every person, and I want everyone to realize they have it in themselves,” sophomore Ciara Dycus said. Challenge Day seeks to change our world into a world where every child feels safe, loved and celebrated; where bullying, violence and oppression are things of the past. “If you really knew me, you would know that I love to sing, dance, travel (which is my favorite) and meet new people,” senior Kiandra Higgins said. A lot of people do not know someone before they are judged. Not knowing people and criticizing them can be hurtful. “If you really knew me, you would know I struggle everyday in most every way. You would also know that I have it rough, but stay strong and wear a smile anyway,” an anonymous student said. To get on the show or for Challenge Day to show up at your school, have your school official to log onto the website and click on the tab Challenge Day and scroll down to where it says booking. Your principal must fill out all of the information on the request form.

Photo by Aura Mae Northcutt

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wikipedia.org

Saving the Amazon: Hiker Ed Stafford wades through one of the many tributaries of the Amazon River.

Man vs. deforestation: Taking on the Amazon one step at a time Victoria Noe Reporter magine spending 859 days walking along a river in the humid and treacherous rainforests. From April 2, 2008, to August 9, 2010, Ed Stafford, a former British Army officer, walked along the entirety of the Amazon River. The Amazon River, located in the South American countries Brazil and Peru, stretches approximately 4,200 miles. Even though this was such a huge undertaking, Stafford stated that he spent “a year probably, -- but mostly that was fund-raising.” Not only did Stafford have to deal with the mental trials, jaguars, snakes and other forms of jungle life, he also had encounters with the people of the Peruvian rainforest. “Many of the communities thought that I was “Pela Cara” or “CortaCorbeza” (a person who would steal infants and body organs), Stafford said, “The people believed it and were scared of me.” Even in such situations, Stafford never once thought about death. “When the

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adrenalin’s running, you don’t think about death,” Stafford said. At one point, he and his companion, Gadiel “Cho” Sanchez, were even suspected of murder, but they were innocent and allowed to continue their journey. From the beginning Stafford’s intention was to raise money for Cancer Research UK, the ME Association, Project Peru, Action for Brazilian Children, and Rainforest Concern. He also wanted “to raise awareness for the Amazon and highlight the pertinent issues to the rest of the world.” Not including the money raised for the charities themselves, the expedition cost about $100,000. Many have walked with Stafford. Luke Collyer began the expedition with Stafford but dropped out after three months. Several hundred locals have walked with Stafford, but Sanchez walked with him for the majority of the way. The two have become close friends. Stafford plans to have Sanchez accompany him on his next expedition, which is set for September 2011.

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Golf team drives into new season Katherine Keller Reporter he golf team is off to a flying start. With a new group of freshmen ready to play, many new opportunities are opening up. The golf team has many key players ready and able to go to state this year. Even though there are only two girls returning, junior Shelby Andrews and senior Ann Ashley Lombas, they are both district champions and were highly spoken of by coach Randy Coffman. “My goal is to win districts and go to state,” Lombas said. “My goal is to drop five shots from my consistent total score and to move past regionals to state,” Andrews said. The upperclassmen play a big role in the team. “Our top four golfers from last year returned,” Coffman said. They are seniors Bryce Beasley and Kyle

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Paschal and juniors Walt Carter and Sam Shankle. The freshmen this year have also played a part in the season’s success. “We have a solid class of freshman golfers,” Coffman said. Freshmen James Putman, Alex Brewer and Zach McNeil have already seen action on the course. “My favorite thing about golf is the feeling after hitting a good shot,” said McNeil. The team’s biggest opponent this season is Obion County. Last year, Dyersburg was runner up to Obion by one stroke in the regional tournament. Gibson County is also a tough competitor this year. Dyersburg placed sixth out of fourteen teams in the Kickoff Classic held at The Farms Golf Club on August 19th, and won the District Tournament on September 20, 2010. At press time, the golf team was participating in the regional tournament.

Photo contributed by Dayton Keller

Warming Up: Freshman Zach McNeil loosens up before a match

Dyersburg vs. Dyer County rivalry banned? Hunter Perry Reporter n the recent month, the superintendents of Dyersburg and Dyer County schools have made a decision to ban all Dyersburg vs. Dyer County games in all sports. The ban was enacted to help stop unsportsmanlike conduct between the schools. This is not the first ban on Dyersburg vs. Dyer County games. The last one was lifted in 2001. The ban may not stay in effect with Dyersburg’s superintendent Lloyd Ramer retiring this year, according to Athletic Director Jon Frye. The new person stepping up may decide to lift the ban. With this rivalry being important to both schools, it is not difficult to see how it affects a school financially. “Yes, it is a large gate game. It’s hard to make that up,” Frye said. With a stadium that is packed and has a lot of income attached to it, “it will probably take two games to make up for it,” Frye said. Both stadiums are worth a lot more than an average game. This ban has students and faculty members responding. “I can see both sides of the argument; I wish we were still playing. Most of the students get along and this was a isolated incident,” science teacher Jim McArthur said. “The students are probably the most disappointed. The guys and girls that play and know what it’s like will be disappointed, but after two years when really no one is left, it will die down,” Frye said. “It’s a big fund-raiser for the home team,” junior Ragan Watson

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said. ”We are rivals, have always been rivals, and we will always be rivals,” junior Cody Gray said. “It’s a good idea to let things cool down. It’s just a game: when it’s over, it’s over,” English teacher Penny Switzer said. The ban may not be the end to this rivalry. ”Hopefully, in a few years it will pick back up; it’s good for the schools and the communities,” said MacArthur. As far as the historic rivalry goes, some people will miss it after it seems to have come back. “I have heard a mixed bag of reactions from adults,” said Frye. The big rivalry games date back to the 1990’s.

Photo by Hunter Perry

Dedication: Members of the DHSfootball team prepare themselves for the game ahead.

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Girls soccer injuries jeopardize goals Emily Taylor Reporter ith a new season underway, girls’ soccer begins this year with a new team, new players but the same goal: going to state. The new season has had a rocky beginning. So far the main obstacles that have been in the way are injuries. Several players have had injuries that have put them on the sidelines watching their teammates. “Every day at practice, when people fall down, you don’t know if they are going to get up,” freshman Laurie Williams said. Injuries have also put girls in different positions that they do not usually play on the field. At the moment, the team is just trying to move forward.

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The team also expanded this year. At the end of last season, two players were lost. This year the team has gained a total of eight new players. Some goals for the season are to improve skills, work on technique and become better with communication. Luckily, there are many returning players who carry experience with them. “We should be where we want to be by the end of the season,” senior Brooke Hubbard said. For this year the team will be facing Martin Westview, their biggest competition and biggest rival. The opposing team is skilled, physical and aggressive. So far the girls’ soccer team is very prepared for the upcoming season. “We want to have a good time this year,” Coach Joy Norman said.

Photo contributed by Will Clift

Going for theGoal: Senior Savannah Johnson sprints to place the ball in the back of the net.

Derek Dooley looks to make something out of Vols ChrisWagner Sports Editor ane Kiffin suddenly announced January 12th that he was leaving Tennessee football to become the head coach of the University of Southern California. This decision angered many of the Volunteer fans, since they expected him to stay at least for the six years he had agreed to in his con-

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tract. The whole state of Tennessee was left in shock. Not only were they without a head coach, they were facing a number of recruiting violations that Kiffin had caused including staging a mock news conference for prospects and mentioning recruits by name both on the radio and on his Twitter and Facebook accounts. So, enter Derek Dooley. Born on June 10th, 1968, in Athens, Georgia, he is the son of former Georgia coach Vince Dooley. Dooley served under Nick Saban at LSU as the coach of the running backs and special teams. He has also served as the head coach of Louisiana Tech. The Vols are currently at 76 scholarship players , which is nine under the NCAA limit of 85. This list of 76 includes three walk-ons, who were recently awarded scholarships. Their starting offensive line and two starting defensive tackles have a combined three career starts, all by senior guard Jarrod Shaw. Junior college newcomer Matt Simms is the starting quarterback, but he's hardly ever taken a snap in an SEC game. Despite this list of inexperienced players, the lack of talent on campus is not a fear in Dooley’s mind. In fact, Dooley is confident that the players he's reeling in are the right fit for the way he wants to run this program. The Vols opened their season September 4th with a win at home over UT Martin. SEC play began September 18th with a grudge match against the Florida Gators.

Preparing to Play: Tennessee Vols head football coach Derek Dooley inspires his team for the new season.

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Volleyball team prepares to face challenges of new season Maria Yousuf Reporter etermined to get to state and training harder than ever, the Lady Trojan volleyball team prepares to face the challenges of a new season. Several elements differ from last year, and one of the many changes is the conditioning of the players. “We’re a lot more focused on quick movements and playing when we’re tired,” Coach Sarah Morris said. “We’ve added in strength conditioning, which we didn’t do last year, as well.” According to Morris, there are about fifteen players, which is about the same number as in previous years. Additionally, the amount of work the players have to put in has increased drastically. “In order to be competitive at a state level, we’ve had to step up. We work a lot harder than we have in previous years,” Morris said. Volleyball is also exceedingly popular among students. “I love volleyball,” junior Sandreka Quinn said but added, “I’ve never been to any [games].” However, not all went exactly as planned; the reconstruction of the team was delayed. “There’s a younger team this year, and our outside hitter, Shelby

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Andrews, is out for the season,” Morris said. The team started the season on the 23rd of August against Munford, to whom they lost. A goal for the Lady Trojans is to conquer them later on in the season. Even though the girls may have been beaten in their first game, they are not willing to give up and continue to press forward, dedicated as ever. “I think we’re going to be competitive. I also think we have a pretty good shot at going to state,” Morris said. Expanding on their goals, Morris said, “We want to be undefeated in our region again. We want to beat Munford and Brighton. We’d also like to win one match at state,” she said. Teams that they find challenging to play against are Southside, Munford and Crockett County. One of their goals, vanquishing Brighton, was accomplished almost right after the season began, even though it was merely in a jamboree. “I’m looking forward to beating Crockett and going to state,” sophomore volleyball player Sydney McNeill said and added that she was sure the rest of the team would agree. The Lady Trojan volleyball team is in for an action-packed season.

Photo by Maria Yousuf

Serve It Up: Senior Mary Baker serves the ball during a heated match against rival Crockett County. The team won the game after five sets.

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Photo by McCord Pagan

Going the Distance: Junior Hoyt Newsome works hard during practice to prepare for the teams next meet on October 7th.

Cross country anticipates strong season Lauran Olds Reporter ith the loss of last year’s state champion, Loren Newsom, and the addition of new freshmen, the cross country team is preparing for a new season with the same goal: going to state. “I have a lot of freshmen this year, which is good. I hope my older, more experienced runners will help them out to reach their potential,” Coach Amy Beckley said. This season, she expects seniors Paige Waldron, Andrew Legan, Shannon Turner and junior Hoyt Newsom to step up to the plate. “They’ve all been to state,” Beckley said. Like most sports, the heat has affected cross country. “The team is not getting much practice,” Beckley said. Because of the heat, Beckley had to make some adjustments to practicing. “They are not running much and mostly in the evenings,” Beckley said. Overall, no major changes have been made. “Goals would be to finish as well as they can and hopefully go to state,” Beckley said of what she hopes the team can accomplish this season. Any injuries could prevent this goal, Beckley added. Most of the team’s meets are not at their home course. On October 7th, the team has its only home meet. Beckley considers Madison Academic and Trinity Christian to be the toughest opponents for the team this year.

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From great plays to straight As: Athletes become faculty Aubrey Andrews Reporter t is difficult for students to picture their everyday teachers taking the field or court. However, some of the faculty were once high school or college athletes. Chemistry teacher Kim Decker played high school and college basketball. “Every year we played a sport, we were doing something fewer and fewer people had done, and that would set us apart,” Decker’s junior high and favorite coach said. She had a successful basketball career, winning the TCAC conference championship her freshman year in college. Basketball gave her an interesting story to tell in that her last college game was against her co-worker Coach Jackie Wilder. “Basketball led me toward becoming a teacher,” Decker said. Math teacher Patricia Gam played high school girls football and tennis and ended up playing college tennis. As a football player, her positions were right offensive tackle and right defensive tackle. “I learned to work well as a team and do my best as an individual,” Gam said. “It doesn’t matter what you do; find your extra-curricular activity.” Math teacher Anne Houston saw high school and college through a swimmer’s eyes. “It was a lot of fun traveling,” Houston said. What she enjoyed the most about swim team was her friends and teammates. Her college coach, Janey Tyler Barkman, won two gold medals and a bronze in the Olympics. Her teammate, Barb Ehring, also went on to the Olympic trials. Houston had some wins when her team won third in state three of her high school years.

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Photo by Aubrey Andrews

Photo contributed by Anne Houston

Before Teaching: Grady Andrews (above right) and Anne Houston (above first row second from left) were active high school athletes in various sports. Trojan

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Counselor Connie Wright--basketball Volleyball coach Sarah Morris--basketball, volleyball and softball Office secretary Athena Kanable--track and tennis Girls’ soccer coach Joy Norman--basketball Spanish teacher Lance Roy--basketball, soccer, volleyball and softball Technology teacher Nancy Austin--basketball Marketing teacher Judy Henry--basketball and tennis Math teacher Wanda Robertson--basketball Office secretary Peggy Walker--basketball Principal John Lowrance--football, basketball, wrestling and track Family and consumer sciences teacher Sandra Lanier--cheerleading English teacher Sharon Carr--golf, football and basketball Science teacher Angie Pickens--basketball, golf, softball and track Assistant girls’ basketball and golf coach Jeff Chandler--high school basketball, golf and baseball; college golf and baseball Agriculture teacher Brett Butler--high school football and baseball; college football Secretary, cross country and track coach Amy Beckley--high school volleyball, basketball, cheerleading and track; college cheerleading, volleyball and basketball Principal Mickey Mahon--high school basketball and track; college basketball Softball coach Steve Wilder--high school football and baseball; college baseball Assistant girls’ basketball coach Jackie Wilder--high school basketball and softball; college basketball Math teacher Grady Andrews--high school and college football

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Glee reinvents musical comedy on TV Kopper Harris Circulation Assistant hen most people hear about the new TV show Glee, they wonder, “What is Glee? What is it about?” Glee is a new musical comedy to hit the TV screen. It displays the stereotypical views of high school, showing the jocks, the cheerleaders, the geeks and, at the very bottom of the food chain, the glee club. The main point of the show centers upon the glee club called “New Directions” and how, even though they are overcoming the stereotypes that everyone faces in high school, they join together to create a harmonious unison that no one has ever heard. Glee began with only the expectancy of one season consisting of thirteen episodes, but it became such a phenomenon that the producers had to

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give more to the world. With an extra eight episodes, Glee set the bar, not only for television but for music as well. Glee came out with five sound tracks that all reached number one on the charts with some selling over 7 million copies. Glee has also won various awards, such as the Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series and People’s Choice Award for Favorite New TV Comedy. It was also nominated for 19 Emmy Awards. The characters were also nominated for individual awards like Best Actress/Actor, Best Supporting Actress/Actor and TV Breakout Star. Overall, Glee is a show of talented teenagers joining together to create a chorus of epic proportions. Through the music the walls of stereotypes are broken down ` and all that is left are people, people who care about what they do.

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Singing on Stage: The second season of the TV series Glee airs on Tuesday nights at 8/7c on FOX.

YouTube: From the computer screen to the silver screen Elizabeth Bumpas Entertainment Editor n April 23, 2005, the first video ever to be put on YouTube was posted. Little did the creators know that YouTube would become one of the most viewed, most used sites in the world. In our society YouTube has become part of everyday American life. But has anyone ever stopped to think what a privilege YouTube is? It allows average people from America and around the world to reach an audience of millions, simply by creating and posting a video. It allows average people to show that they really are not so average after all. Any kind of ability, talent or even something completely random can become one of the most viewed videos on YouTube. In fact, fame on YouTube can quite possibly lead to fame outside of YouTube. Justin Bieber, one of the most well-known young musicians in America, got his start when he was putting videos on YouTube for his relatives to see. He quickly gained fame on the site, and consequently signed with several record companies. He earned the fame he has today through YouTube! Another musician who gained fame from YouTube and other sites on the Internet was DeAndre Way. Known as Soulja Boy, Way had written several rap songs and wanted a way to make them known. Using YouTube Soulja Boy did just that, making him one of the most wellknown rappers in America.

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Not just musicians have the opportunity to become famous via YouTube. Artist Noah Kalina took a picture of himself every day for six years and compiled the pictures together into a video. After Kalina posted the video on YouTube, it received millions of views. Lucas Cruikshank, better known as “Fred,” created a channel on YouTube in which he acted as a six-year-old kid of that name. For a time, the channel was the most subscribed to on YouTube, and now this year, Nickelodeon will be airing Fred the Movie. Cruikshank was an ordinary person made into a movie star through a site that anyone can access. Amber Lee Ettinger, or “Obama Girl” on YouTube, posted a video called “I got a crush...on Obama” that literally made her famous overnight. She made the video just for fun and would never have guessed that she would be getting calls from several TV stations the next day. The video was also said to have helped Obama be elected because of its popularity. Just about anything or anyone has the potential to become popular on YouTube, and the chance to have fame outside the site as well. It has become an outlet for aspiring musicians, actors, artists and almost anyone else. It is there, ready and easy to use. Why not give it a shot? That next YouTube-made star could be you.

Entertainment Xxxxxxxx

Photo by Elizabeth Bumpas

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September and October Sunday 26

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 28 29 30 01 27 Cross Country (A) Volleyball v. Halls (A) Soccer v. Westview (H) Volleyball v. Ripley (A)

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04 Volleyball v. Gibson County (A)

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Soccer v. Gibson County (A) Volleyball v. Crockett County (A)

Volleyball v. Caruthersville (A)

Soccer v. Peabody (A) Volleyball v. Milan (H)

07 Cross Country (H) Soccer v. Lexington (A) Volleyball v. Madison Academy (H)

Fall intersession 13 14

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Football v. Crockett County (A)

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Band Competition

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Football v. Obion County (H)

15 Football v. Milan (H)

Soccer v. Ripley (H) Soccer v. McKenzie (H)

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Fall Break Volleyball District Tournament

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Cross Country Regionals (A) Late Start Day

21 Volleyball Sectionals

Cross Country v. Obion (A) Volleyball Regionals

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Volleyball State 10th Grade PLAN test

22 Football v. JNS (H)

29 Football v. Haywood (A)

23 ACT Exam Band Competition

30 Band Competition

Homecoming week Aura Mae Northcutt Production Manager he third week of September was set aside for Homecoming dress up days and events. Monday students dressed up for favorite team day; Tuesday everyone dressed up for nerd day; Wednesday was costume day; Thursday was class color day; Friday was homecoming t-shirt day. Students signed up for events including powderpuff football, fastest boy and girl, farthest football throw and many other activities.

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Costume Day: (left) Freshman Jim Heckethorn sings with the crowd to keep them entertained during the wait to find out who was dressed as the best nerd. (top right) Juniors Regan Watson and Ashten Maldonado play through the school levels as Mario and Luigi. (bottom right) Sophomores, Emily Mckee, Sellers Hickman, Matt Norville, Blake Alford and Katherine Guthrie take on the Scooby-Doo gang.

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Issue 1 10-11

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