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TRISHA

ARTS ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO

2019


trisha ARTS trishanarts@gmail.com 519-831-8229 Toronto, Ontario www.trisha-arts.com

EDUCATION University of Toronto

Fall 2015-Present Daniel’s Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Urban Design Candidate for Masters of Architecture Degree Cumulative GPA 4.0

Carleton University

2010-2014 Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism Bachelor of Architectural Studies, Major in Design Cumulative GPA 11.0 2013 Directed Study Abroad in London, England

ADDITIONAL TRAINING Indigenous Competency Training | January 2018 by Michael Etherington, NCCT LeadingGREEN GA Course | November 2017

SKILLS Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Premier Pro AutoCAD, Revit, Rhinoceros 3D, Sketchup, V-Ray Rendering, Grasshopper Microsoft Suite 3D Printing, CNC Milling, Laser Cutting, Model Making


WORK EXPERIENCE WORKac | New York Intern

University of Toronto | Toronto

May-Dec 2018 Sept 2017-Present

Teaching Assistant

KPMB Architects | Toronto

Marketing Intern Intern

Kearns Mancini Architects Inc | Toronto Intern

April 2016-Sept 2016 April 2017-Sept 2017 April 2014 - Sept 2015

PROJECT EXPERIENCE Yangpu United | WORKac • •

Yangpu Riverfront Bridge Park Project Competition Park and Master Plan located in Yangpu District of Shanghai

Beirut Museum of Art | WORKac •

Design Development of competition from 2016 in Beirut

May-June 2018

August 2018

North Boulder Public Library | WORKac

Aug-Oct 2018

DL 1961 | WORKac

Nov-Dec 2018

Schematic Design including Site Selection for City of Boulder Interior Fit-Out of Tribecca loft for a high-end denim company

Bay Adelaide III | KPMB

• Schematic Design and Design Development Phase of major Toronto corporate tower

Deloitte Toronto Head Office | KMAI

• Interior Fit-Out in Bay Adelaide Center for Deloitte’s Toronto Head Office

April -Sept 2017

April 2014-Sept 2015


TABLE OF CONTENTS


professional work YANGPU BRIDGE PARK

06

BEMA

16

BAY ADELAIDE CENTRE III

22

WORKac, 2018

WORKac., 2018

KPMB., 2017

24

DELOITTE TORONTO Kearns Mancini Architects Inc., 2015

academic work NEWTOWN CO-OP

26

FLOATING MUSEUM

36

CREATIVE CITY

46

BOOK

56

University of Toronto 2017

University of Toronto 2017

University of Toronto 2016

Carleton University 2014


01

YANGPU BRIDGE PARK


The Yangpu District is currently divided – both by the Yangpu bridge that cuts through the middle of the neighborhood and by Yangshupu Road, which separates the residential areas from the waterfront. There is a lack of open green space in the area, and the new waterfront park will need to be elevated in order to mitigate the risk of flooding. At the same time, as the old industrial infrastructure becomes obsolete and the city begins to redevelop Yangpu, there is an incredible opportunity to liberate new open spaces and to develop new typologies for working and living. In fact, the large floorplates and high, skylit interior spaces of the old industrial buildings provide ideal spaces for the new economy and its contemporary entrepreneurial “industry”

– from fabrication and robotic labs to internet companies looking for creative workspace. The project proposes to UNITE the divided district through a new kind of elevated park that can connect currently isolated neighborhoods, streets and new buildings, crossing over Yangpushu Road and below Yangpu Bridge – and that can seamlessly link to the elevated waterfront. The new park will sponsor new ecological infrastructure, from wetlands designed to encourage remediation of the river and new wildlife to gardens of native plants and flowers. The elevated parkway will in turn create a series of outdoor “rooms” containing areas for children’s play, sports and a large amphitheater for events.

The park will be combined wit three bands of new office, retail and residential development stretching across the site. These bands will incorporate historic structures and transform the district into zones for large floorplate “new economy” industry, office-park courtyards and traditional office towers with retail plinths. Each band will have its own associated landscape typology. *text from architect

OFFICE: WORKac PROJECT TEAM: Amale Andraos, Dan Wood, Maurizio Bianchi Mattioli, Cristina Gimnez, Galen Rochon, Katerina Gloushenko, Serafima Korovina, Taylor Um, Trisha Arts


CONNECTING typology

OFFICE TOWERS

COURTYARD BUILDINGS

FOREST GARDENS

TECH STUDIOS GREEN ROOF RIVERFRONT PROMENADE FLOATING

WALKWAY

CONNECTING TYPOLOGIES

FLOATING PROMENADE

STITCHING PATH

STITCHING PATHS OUTDOOR ROOMS

1

2

3

4

6

5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Sports Playground Square Pond Amphitheater Playground Market Ferry

7 8

OUTDOOR ROOMS

8


ROOF PLAN LEGEND: 1 Existing hotel 2 Roller blading rink 3 Forest 4 Office towers 5 Bridge to Office towers 6 Urban farm 7 Skylights 8 New species pollination 9 Bridge to Tech studios 10 Floating promenade 11 Riverfront 12 Ferry terminal 13 Water purification reefs 14 Bird habitat islands 15 Fish spawning

1

N

3

4

2

5 4

3 6 7

6

7 12 8 8 9

10 11

11 11

13

14 15

9


+ 47 m

10 m 7m

9m

7m

0m 2m

50 m Ecological regeneration

Floating promenade

Green roof

Riverfront

Tech studios

24 m

10


TYPOLOGY LEGEND: Forest Courtyard ech studios Riverfront Ecological regeneration Rainwater harvesting Heat production Electricity production Rain water cisterns Electricity bank Rain water collection Shading forest and irrigation Irrigation Urban farm Skylights for natural light Bees and butterflies pollination Bird habitat rejuvenation islands

102 m

Wind break

14 m

14 m

10 m

20 m

20 m

20 m

20 m

20 m

8m

10 m

Urban farm

10 m Forest

20 m Courtyards

Yangshupu Rd

40 m Office towers

11


1

2

3

5 4 6 6

6

7

6

8

9 12

14

15

13

10

11

16

GROUND PLAN LEGEND: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Soccer field meadow Sports canopy Bamboo playground Magnolia square Small games Transit station Wetland grove Pond and waterfall Labyrinth Amphitheatre Tai Chi / Dance pit Butterfly garden Playground Sports Festival space Market N

12


13


20 19

16 21

15

12

14

8 9

18 17

22

10 14

13 11


LEGEND: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Soccer field meadow Sports canopy Bamboo playground Magnolia square Small games Transit station Roller blading rink Wetland grove Pond and waterfall Labyrinth Amphitheatre Tai Chi / Dance pit Butterfly garden Playground Sports Festival space Market Floating promenade Ferry terminal Water purification reefs Bird habitat islands

7 3 4

6

6

2

5

1

15


02

BEIRUT MUSEUM OF ART


A new hybrid – at once public and private, iconic and generic, large and small – WORKac’s design for the Beirut Museum of Art borrows from the modernist vernacular of the city to propose a more open model for the contemporary museum. The design rethinks the envelope of the museum using the balcony as a space for renewed architectural invention and openness. Traditionally, Beirut’s balconies provided shade as well as a mediating space between inside and outside, the street and the private house. For the museum, these reinvented balconies become a series of outdoor galleries in a multitude of scales and shapes, acting independently of the flexible museum floors inside, and creating a new gradient of publicly accessible spaces. *text from architect

ROLE: Originally designed for a competition in 2016, the project was updated in 2018 by request from the client.

OFFICE: WORKac

My role in the project included updating illustrated drawings as well as completing a physical model for presentation. Renderings completed by Zahid Ajam.

*original design by Competition Team, updates to drawings by Project Team

The project is to be completed by 2023.

PROJECT TEAM: Amale Andraos, Dan Wood, Maurizio Bianchi Mattioli, Zahid Ajam, Trisha Arts

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/18/arts/ design/amale-andraos-architect-beirutmuseum-of-art.html


Outdoor galleries can be enclosed with curtains or other shading devices for more sensitive works Rooftop cafe courtyard Rooms can be enclosed in glass for expansion or flexibility, as required Daylit galleries protected by temprorary scrims or permanent frit

Exterior Programs (can be indepedent of interior functions)

Green: Administration

Pink: Project Rooms / Outdoor galleries

SOUTH

EAST Blue: Library

Main entrance

NORTH Magenta dotted path: public promenade does not intersect with indoor gallery sequence unless desired

EAST Orange: Community Space

Restaurant Private outdoor terrace for administration

NORTH

WEST

Cafe Private outdoor studio for community space Staff entrance

18

SOUTH

WEST

Community / VIP entrance


19


20


21


03

BAY ADELAIDE CENTER III


Podium Terrace Option 2 Trellis Spaced Members

Bay Adelaide North Tower 07/05/17

As the third and final tower of the Bay Adelaide Centre project, located downtown Toronto, the main task for this project was to improve the design flaws from the past towers. This involved developing numerous studies to present to the client. ROLE: My role included producing renders of the Level 11 roof terrace to show options of seating, canopy structure, and layout. The studies included canopy size + perforation size, canopy bay sizes, west screen wall material study and furniture studies. I was also tasked with developing washroom plans. This was especially difficult because the client wanted to have more fixtures in a smaller space than the past towers included.

OFFICE: KPMB Architects PROJECT TEAM: Bruce Kuwabara, Goran Milosevic, Mark Jaffar, Camille Mitchell, Lilly Huang


04 DELOITTE TORONTO OFFICE


Kearns Mancini is the Executive Architect for the interior fit-outs of Deloitte’s 420,000 square feet Toronto offices. Kearns Mancini is working alongside Arney Fender Katsalidis (a London based design practice) to implement a Functional Program and Schematic Design for the new workplace. Of particular note is the second phase of the project, in which Kearns Mancini designed “Deloitte University”, a 31,000 square foot education and training facility teaching fully accredited courses and programs to Deloitte employees of North, Central and South America. The professional development centre will be used for training and staff conferences. The facility consists of classrooms, training rooms, breakout rooms and multipurpose rooms. Audio visual technology is a key component of the project and all

classrooms are fully equipped with wall mounted, touch screen computers for interactive learning. Deloitte University was developed by Deloitte to support its commitment to growing leadership skills at every level of its organization. Comprising flexible active learning classrooms, multi-purpose space, meeting rooms and lounges it offers a flexible and supportive environment for learning. Spaces are designed with flexibility and future uses in mind. Furniture configurations can be adapted to suit different functions and events with varying numbers of participants. The facility also houses a hospitality component for special events requiring food and beverage. *text from architect

ROLE: My role in the project included supporting the Project Lead through CA phase, liasing with clients and consultants through Aconex. Additionally I assisted in developing construction details and working drawings to produce DD documentatio as well as collaborinting with Deloitte’s Interiors Department to develop material boards. Images courtesy of: Toronto Life, The Globe and Mail, KMAI

OFFICE: Kearns Mancini Architects Inc. Project Team: Peter Ng, Alice Gibson, Carmen Rotundo, Negaar Fathi


05 NEWTOWN CO-OP HOUSING


Located in New York City, between Queens and Brooklyn, Newtown Creek has become an attraction amongst residents and tourist alike. The site is one of the most congested waterways in New York surrounded by industrial manufacturing buildings including some of the highest CO2 readings. Newtown Coop combines the need for an ecological approach to housing with new residents need for a working environment. The project focuses on scales of community, providing intimate units for times of seclusion and large gathering spaces for moments of interaction. This is to help encourage community involvement throughout the coop. The project focuses on providing temporary homes for people in transit - expats, refugees, international students, migrant

workers etc. There is an overwhelming amount of data suggesting the increased work ethic in these constituents, which is key for ensuring the coop program works efficiently. Focusing on the idea of “in transit” residents as well as considering the housing shortage in NYC, the units developed in this project are micro units. By decreasing each unit by 30% it allows for extra space. This space is given back with over double the requested number of units as well as extra community space to encourage social situations. Extra community spaces are given back through educational facilities, job centers, work spaces, community gardens, and generous amenity space. 1 and 2 bedroom units are provided and furnished to cater towards the “in transit” lifestyle.

The residential areas are designed to encourage interaction by providing excess circulation space. It is in these hallways that social situations will occur. The approach to this project is to develop two groups of towers: community towers and ecological towers. Each tower will act as a social hub, a job opportunity, and/or an energy source. This helps to encourage scales of community involvement. These towers work together to take advantage of heat waste, C02, water, and compost.

University of Toronto, Fall 2017 Design Studio IV: Option Studio ADVISORS: Amale Andraos, Dan Wood, Sam Dufaux (WORKac)


28


KIDS TOWER $

WATER TOWER $

FARM TOWER $

COMMUNITY TOWER

AQUAPONIC TOWER

$

$

SOLAR TOWER

WORK TOWER

$

$

TYPICAL PLAN LEVEL 2

29


COMMUNITY $ playground + gynmasium

SOLAR TOWER $ turbine for steam production

COMMUNITY $

AQUAPONIC TOWER

children’s library

$ aquarium

COMMUNITY

WATER TOWER

$ meeting rooms + lounge space

$ community pool

COMMUNITY

SOLAR TOWER

$ library + work spaces

$ laundry facilities

AQUAPONIC TOWER $ fish farm for teriary filtration

WATER TOWER $ water filter and storage tank for grey water return system

30

FARM TOWER $ spiral ramp located to encourage social gathering around tower

SOLAR TOWER $ boiler room used for exchanging steam into energy


AQUAPONIC TOWER $

oyster + mussel farm for primary filtration

WATER TOWER

WATER TOWER

cistern for rain water collection

rain water storage

$

$

AQUAPONIC TOWER $ algea farm

COMMUNITY $ classrooms

COMMUNITY $ fitness center

COMMUNITY

SOLAR TOWER

$ reading rooms

$ community farmers market

SOLAR TOWER $ facade clad in photovoltaic panels to maximize solar gain

COMMUNITY $

COMMUNITY

daycare facility

excess circulation space to encourage social interaction

COMMUNITY $ language learning center

COMMUNITY $ job center

31


32


VIEW OF FARM TOWER

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34


35


06 FLOATING MUSEUM


Entitled “Floating Museum,” this proposal for the home of the Toronto Story collection considers the museum within its larger urban context. By bridging into the proposed Rail Deck Park to the south and creating a series of strategic ground-level pedestrian connections, it functions at an infrastructural scale. With a design informed by Toronto’s existing finegrained urban grid, the project seeks to enrich Toronto’s cultural network, acting as a literal and conceptual threshold to adjacent public amenities, both existing and proposed. The Floating Museum design seeks to free up the ground plane, featuring a “hovering” two-storey museum and archival datum at the height of the Rail Deck with a continuous cantilevered perimeter. A central east-west pedestrian pathway divides the ground level into two campuses: the north exhibitionauditorium campus and south admin-

commercial campus. This pathway creates a connection between Victoria Memorial Park and the WELL’s proposed pedestrian promenade to the east. Combined with the below-soffit perimeter promenade, these pathways create a rich pedestrian network and interior-block plaza, allowing for animation of the courtyard as well as the commercial street front. Floating Museum’s structural strategy is based on minimum column placement and a structurally free perimeter. The museum level is suspended from a system of floor-height trusses that run through the archival level above. This hanging structural system is visible by means of a continuous atrium on the museum level that corresponds to the pedestrian promenade below. Because of this visibility, the museum and atrium levels function as structurally and curatorially integrated spaces.

The integration of Floating Museum’s architectural, structural, curatorial and environmental strategies ensures the comprehensive expression of the proposal’s central themes: ground-level lightness, vertical voids, infrastructural span, and “hovering.” By providing high quality public spaces and park connections, Floating Museum seeks to function as a new cultural hub for the city of Toronto.

University of Toronto, Winter 2017 Design Studio V: Comprehensive PARTNER: Eva Sampson ADVISORS: Steven Fong


A

LOBBY

B

ADMIN OFFICES

LIBRARY

C

STORAGE

D

SERVICE

E

AUDITORIUM

F

G

L01

S1

A

TICKETING

B

OUTDOOR SCULPTURE GALLERY

COAT CHECK

C

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM (LG)

LOBBY ATRIUM

D

S2

M+E

AUDIO-VISUAL EXHIBITION SPACE

E

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM (SM)

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM (SM)

F

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM (SM)

G

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM (SM)

16 15 14 13 8

9

10

11

RESTAURANT

KITCHEN

AUDIO-VISUAL EXHIBITION SPACE

11

5

6

7 RESEARCH + RESTORATION

STORAGE

7

M+E

6

4 RESEARCH + RESTORATION

3 2

4

1

STORAGE

10 CAFE

9 5 3 2

KITCHEN

8

12

14 13

10

1

STORAGE

STORAGE

18

LOBBY ATRIUM

17

MUSEUM GIFT SHOP

18 SERVICE

17

STORAGE

16

RESEARCH + RESTORATION

18 9

12

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM (LG)

L02

A

B

C

D

ARCHIVE

E

F

G

L03

38

17

15

16 15 14 13 12 11 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1


39


ELEVATION EAST 1:250

EE

LONGITUDINAL SECTION 1:250

2% SLOPE

2% SLOPE

TRANSVERSE SECTION 1:250

40

S2

ELEVATION NORTH 1:250

S1

NN


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42


43


PAVERS DRAINAGE GRAVEL CORRUGATEDMETAL DECK W/ CONCRETE TOPPING VAPOUR BARRIER DENSE DECK WATERPROOF MEMBRANE

METAL FLASHING

RIGID INSULATION

RIGID INSULATION

DRAINAGE COURSE

WOOD PARAPET SUPPORT

FILTER CLOTH

CONTINUOUS AIR VAPOUR BARRIER

GROWING MEDIUM

SHEATHING

VEGETATION

2 LAYERS OF RIGID INSULATION 2% SLOPE

VAPOUR BARRIER WOOD BLOCK SUPPORT GYPSUM BOARD PERFORATED METAL SCREEN

STEEL BRACING CONNECTION FOR PERFORATED SCREEN STEEL CLIP WITH THERMAL BREAK NEOPRENE GASKET CONTINUOUS AIR BARRIER WELDED STEEL PLATE BETWEEN BEAM AND TRUSS THERMALLY BROKEN MULLION CAP OPERABLE WINDOW SYSTEM STEEL BEAMS TENSION RODS FIRE SPRAYED STEEL TRUSS TENSION RODS MECHANICAL DUCTS - RETURN AIR

TRIPLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL

HYDRONIC FLOOR HEATING/COOLING CONCRETE ON METAL DECK WITH POLISHED FINISH INTERIOR PARTITION GLAZING WALL INTERIOR PARTITION MULLION

GYPSUM BOARD DROP CEILING MECHANICAL DUCTS - RETURN AIR RECESSED LIGHTING

HYDRONIC FLOOR HEATING/COOLING CONCRETE ON METAL DECK - WITH POLISHED FINISH THERMALLY BROKEN MULLION RIGID

INSULATION

CONTINUOUS AIR VAPOUR BARRIER METAL PANEL SPANDREL

STEEL BRACING CONNECTION FOR PERFORATED SCREEN STEEL CLIP WITH THERMAL BREAK NEOPRENE GASKET WELDED STEEL PLATE BETWEEN BEAM AND TRUSS STEEL BEAMS DRYWALL SHEATING CONTINUOUS AIR VAPOUR BARRIER MECHANICAL DUCT - SUPPLY AIR RIGID INSULATION GYPSUM SHEATHING THERMALLY BROKEN MULLION TRIPLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL

HYDRONIC FLOOR HEATING/COOLING POLISHED CONCRETE SLAB TRIPLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL THERMALLY BROKEN MULLION WEEPING TILE PAVING TILES LEVELING SAND GRAVEL 2% SLOPE

EARTH

CONCRETE FOUNDATION SLAB SHEATHING CONTINUOUS AIR BARRIER VAPOUR BARRIER RIGID INSULATION FOUNDATION WALL

CONCRETE FOOTING DRAINAGE GRAVEL DRAINAGE PIPE

44

HEATED PLENUM SPRAY FOAM INSULATION METAL SOFFIT RECESSED LIGHTING


SOFFIT CONSTURCTION DETAIL

1. STRUCTURE

2. SECONDARY STRUCTURE

3. FINISHED SLAB

4. HEATED PLENUM

the major structural system of the soffit is a series of beams spanning 9m spaced 2m apart

38mm corrugated metal deck runs north south, opposite of the major structural system to provide additional support.

polished concrete topping sits on top of the steel deck to provide a finished floor slab with radiant floor heating

HVAC supply ducts run beneath the structural system to provide a heated plenum space

7. SPRAY FOAM

6. CONTINUOUS VAPOUR BARRIER

5. SOFFIT the soffit is suspended from cables attached to the structural beams

spray foam insulaion between the cladding and main structural steel ensure sthat hte underside of hte slab stays insulated without penetration of moisture

a continuous vapour barrier wraps around the entire system

8. METAL PANEL CLADDING the cladding of the soffit is conposed of metal panels, punctured by recessed lighting to illuminate the exterior

PARAPET CONSTURCTION DETAIL

1. STRUCTURE

2. SECONDARY STRUCTURE

3. SECONDARY STRUCTURE

large, full height trusses run east west across the building supported by a secondary structure of beams spaced 2m apart. the large truss connects to a suspension rod that acts as the major structure system for the level below.

38mm corrugated metal deck runs north south, opposite of the major truss structural system to provide additional support.

the metal deck is topped with 64mm of concrete topping.

4. PARAPET

5. CONTINUOUS VAPOUR BARRIER

6. INSULATION

the parapet is framed by blocks and studs, located on top of the concrete deck. metal brackets are attached to the steel trusses to support the screening system.

on top of the vapour barrier is dense deck panels, a waterproof membrane and then 2 layers of rigid insulation.

on top of the concrete is a continuous vapour barrier, which wraps around the parapet insulation.

7. VEGETATION

8. FINISHES

9. FACADE

a drainage course and filter cloth sit below a layer of growing medium to support the extensive roof vegetation.

pavers are located along the perimeter, sloping towards the extensive green roof to allow for draining. metal flashing covers the top of the parapet. thermally broken aluminum mullions are located to support the 2 story glazing facade.

triple glazed curtain wall system is introduced with operable windows to allow for natural ventilation.

45


07 CREATIVE CITY


The approach to the design of the rail deck park and the land immediately north of it came out of a shared interest in, as well as a skepticism about the efficacy of Richard Florida’s “Creative Class” theory and related notions of culture-based development. Looking back through a number of proposals put together by the Toronto Arts Council for a “Creative City Planning Framework,” as well as studies on the potential for Toronto to become a global leader in the knowledge industries from the University of Toronto’s Martin Prosperity Institute, an idea was developed about what the city needs right now, and how this park could present the opportunity to deliver it. This proposal is meant to foster and solidify the cultural identity of Toronto by designing a multi-disciplinary, professionally and demographically diverse district in the heart of the city.

The process began by accepting information from research in the first stage of this project, regarding the economic benefits of talent clustering– or bringing educated, highly talented workers in what Florida calls the creative class into close proximity to one another near city centers. This includes creatives in the sense of artists, designers, and musicians, but it also includes engineers, entrepreneurs, technology workers, and other people with ideas and generally progressive values. Our methodology for this project leaned heavily on four common values and goals. Those requirements are for an amenity rich environment, a strong support network, distinctive experiences, and a concentration of cultural institutions and facilities. Adapting a three-part formula for attracting culture-based development in the area, the

project recognizes that an area needs to have a cultural hub or incubator, spaces to showcase various expressions of creative production, and “sites of memory” that create strong geographic identity. These overlapping lists of imperatives led to the decision about 4 primary constituencies that would direct the ideas about development on the site. The site is a unique situation where the park is located overtop of the raildeck, creating an issue in grade change with the existing infrastructure and a specific landscaping strategy University of Toronto, Fall 2016 Design Studio III: Super Studio PARTNER: Graham Schwitzer, Nicholas Reddon ADVISORS: Dina Sarhane


21% 3175

17%

16%

18%

2490

4555

16% 2900

20% 2530

18%

21% 20%

3050 16%

2130

21%

20%

2590

2105 2850

21%

40655

9135 25%

CULTURAL WORKERS Top Places of Work and Residence

11%

4450

4060

Top Places of Work for Cultural Workers Top Places of Residence for Cultural Workers

%

% #

Percentage of Cultural Occupations Other Occupations

#

Total Occupations few

many %

% #

Percentage of Cultural Occupations #

Other Occupations Total Occupations

EXISTING CULTURAL WORKERS

investment fund incubators/accelerators services

TECH START-UPS

51

41

18

29

37

5

21 26

2

42 53 50 11 22

47 4

23 12

49

27

26 17

55 52

48 14

43

8

15

10

32 40 39 24 25

1 38

16

35 6

9 36 46

30

33 19 31

13 3

TOURISTS

CONSTITUENTS: The proposal was based on providing a space for 4 identified constituents. These consitutents were existing cultural workers, artists, tourists, and Toronto`s emerging tech industry. These constituents were the basis for the design intentions.

48

45

20 44

34

7

54

2205


ANCHOR POINTS: In order to promote pedestrian activity throughout the site, we oriented diagronal axes through the site punctuated by anchor points such as the Skydome, Fort York, a proposed market/transportant hub and proposed Tech campus. At the very center of these axis we’ve located a new museum to act as a cultural focal point.

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50


LANDSCAPE RULE: retaining aa maximum RULE: zone zone 3 3 landscape landscape strategy strategy should should rise rise from from low low retaining walls walls to toSTRATEGY maximum height height at at center center to to allow allow for for deep deep soil soil and and planting planting 5m 5m

1m 1m

1m 1m

planting area should slope to site periphery

RULE: paths paths between between the the planter planter boxes boxes should should be be wide wide to to allow allow for for potential potential program program in in the the space, space, and and to to maximize maximize sunlight sunlight on on paths paths RULE:

8m 8m

8m 8m

8m 8m 8m 8m

planting area should be divided by wide paths

section section drawing drawing of of possible possible configuration configuration

plant and tree types should be chosen by available depth

possible arrangement of features

guidelines for programming the park relative to retaining wall height

possible features for < 2 m retaining wall height

possible features for 2 - 3 m retaining wall height

possible features for 3 - 5 m retaining wall height

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52


^ sectional model photographs

53


HIGH RISE CONDOS + HOTELS

TECH CAMPUS

MUSEUM

STUDENT RESIDENCE

MARKET

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

ARTIST RESIDENCE

LIVE/WORK

OFFICE BUILDINGS

RETAIL

54


NON - RESIDENTIAL: HOTEL RETAIL MARKET OFFICE MUSEUM TECH CAMPUS

RESIDENTIAL: MEWS ARTISTS RESIDENCE AFFORDABLE HOUSING LIVE / WORK HOUSING STUDENT RESIDENCE CONDOS

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08 DUBAI PUBLIC LIBRARY


Amongst a city of skyscrapers, the proposed Dubai Central Library provides cultural character that is rare in the tourist-oriented city. Located in the business district of one of the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest cities, the library acts as a beacon, drawing in members of the community and introducing them to an environment that contributes to the civic identity of a foreign culture and place. The design of the library takes inspiration from various traditional components of Dubai architecture. The elevation was designed to mimic an open book and the decision to raise one end of the mass was derived from the original Arabic Library: introducing a spire to act as a visual focal point. Located at the base of the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tallest building, this focal point is necessary to encourage traffic through the site. Screens also feature traditional

Dubai architecture, utilizing the 3 essential shapes in the construction of a minaret: the circle, the square, and the hexagon. These screens provide a cultural aspect to the building, while working congruently as a passive cooling system. The strategy of the project was to divide the building into two parts, separating the major programs: the auditorium and the library. To bridge the two programs a covered courtyard is introduced, providing a social platform for the public. Inside the main program, a central atrium allows natural light to flood the public library stacks, creating circulation around the delicate glass structure. The main literary collection is located on level 2 and as the user ascends, the program becomes more specific. Meeting rooms, study rooms, and work tables surround the perimeter allowing for desired views into

the atrium. This project provides relief from the consumerism typically found in Dubai by creating a social environment that celebrates traditional architecture while fostering education and research.

Carleton Univeristy, Winter 2014 Design Studio VI ADVISORS: Emmanuelle van Rutten Nominated for Terron Scholarship Award


PUBLIC PLAZA LIBRARY ATRIUM LIBRARY STACKS PUBLIC COURTYARD AUDITORIUM

N

site plan >

58


<library stacks

BUILDING PROFILE: The section of the building was inspired by the shape of an open book. The program is composted of 3 major components: the auditorium, the courtyard and the library. Together these 3 programs combine in section to create the illusion of an open book.

<library stacks

1

+

2

+

3

59


<library atrium

60


CEILING SCREEN To provide shade, the glass canopy is covered with a screen. The design of the screen is based off of the 3 shapes used in original Dubai libraries: the minaret.

GLASS CANOPY the glass canopy covers the courtyard and continues into the library connecting to the structure of the entrance

FOLDED ROOF the varying wall heights create folds in the roof structure, with the glass canopy protruding through

VARYING WALLS the height of the walls vary, creating an elegant elevation with the highest point acting as a beacon at the NE entrance

GLASS ATRIUM the building incorporates 2 masses - 1 interior, 1 exterior - into a fluid glazing system that allows light into the building

PROTECTIVE SCREEN to provide protection from the sun, screens are introduced over the exterior glass facade

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auditorium

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office + meeting rooms

prayer rooms

public courtyard

library stacks


library atrium

kids zone

library admin

library lobby

public plaza

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THANK YOU


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trishanarts@gmail.com 519-831-8229 ww.trisha-arts.com

Profile for Trisha Arts

Trisha Arts-2019 Portfolio  

Trisha Arts-2019 Portfolio  

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