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Sports club team photos p18

“The JD delivers the concluding oration” p11

Tuesday, April 24th, 2007

News Academic lectured by College p2

News USI helps students p3

Societies

www.trinitynews.ie

Students’ Union’s travel company racking up fines Martin McKenna

Editorial

Trinity News has learned from the Companies Registration Office (CRO) that Dublin University Student Travel (DUST) has missed the deadline to file their annual report. As a result the company is being fined €3 every day until they file. Companies who fail to file their report by the 31st December deadline are initially fined €100 and €3 for every subsequent day until the report is filed. As of last Friday, DUST’s fine stood at €380. Filling annual returns is “fairly straightforward” according to a spokesman for the CRO. The two-page form can be downloaded from the CRO website. DUST is a trading name of Trinity College Student Travel Ltd. which is located on the ground floor of House 6. The current Students’ Union sabbatical officers are listed as the directors of the company. The CRO can strike companies off the register if they do not comply with their filing obligations and prosecute the company and its directors. The CRO claims that this is the most common reason for striking off companies. If a company is struck off, it no longer has the protection of limited liability. This means that the directors can be held personally liable for any debts incurred after the strike-off. The assets of a company that has been struck off are seized by the State. According to the CRO website, “In September 1998 the CRO began a vigorous programme of company strike offs to address the high level of non compliance. Between January 2001 and end January 2003 over 67,000 companies were struck off. The programme of enforcement is ongoing.”

The Pope has condemned Trinity p11

Clubs reach agreement over new sports centre

Sport

David Molloy

CSC likes sound of Orchestra p6

World Review A female US president? p8

Opinion Schol criteria needs to be clarified p12

Editorial Climbing over the wall for Trinity Ball p10

Editorial The Agent’s last word p10

Nine new Pinks awarded p17

Sport No gold for Ladies’ Boat Club p18

Sport Trinity better than Oxford p19

Sport Gold for Boat Club p20

Trinity’s new €16.1 million sports centre is open for activities, providing a range of new facilites to students. Trinity News was given a tour of the building prior to its opening by Director of Sport Terry Mc Auley and Physical Recreation Officer Michelle Bennet. The facilities available immediately on opening are the main sports hall, the ancillary hall and the fitness theatre. Mr. Mc Auley promised that the pool and climbing wall will be opened “as quickly as possible”, and are only closed for safety reasons as the finishing touches are added. David Quinn has told Trinity News that the pool is to open next Monday. The new centre has not been without its problems. Some sports clubs had voiced strong objections to the proposed membership rules, which stated that everyone using the new facilities will have to be a full member, paying a minimum of €150 in fees. This causes problems for non-members who wished to try out a new sport, as they would not have been able to gain access to

Next year’s Students’ Union sabbatical officers: Ed O’Riordan, Una Faulkner, Andrew Byrne, Claire Tighe and Bartley Rock. They will assume responsibility for the troubled travel company next year. Photo: Martin McKenna Students’ Union President Dave Quinn said it was “probably just an oversight by our Administrative Officer”. Although Trinity News was not allowed to speak to Simon Evans, the Administrative Officer, Mr. Quinn later said the delay was on SAYIT Travel’s

either sports hall to participate in training. This led to the DU Tae-Kwon-Do club, among others, to boycott the new facility, informing its members that “there will be no classes this Monday until further notice.” Subesequently, the sports clubs have reached an agreement with the Department of Sport which would see the membership levy incorporated into the registration fee that all students pay at the beginning of the academic year. This fee would automatically allow all students access to the new sports facilites, alleviating the concerns of the clubs. The decision, which has been mediated by the Students’ Union President Dave Quinn, is now dependent on approval from the Treasurer’s Office, with whom Quinn met yesterday. Trinity News was told by the Union President that he “didn’t anticipate any problems” with the agreement, and estimated that the increase in the registration fee would be around €40; however, he stressed that this was dependent on the outcome of his meeting with the Treasurer. If this deal is accepted by the College then there will be a referendum held to

part. SAYIT were partners with DUST last year. “They were late last year doing the same thing,” said Mr. Quinn. Trevor Ryan, General Manager of SAYIT, said in a statement, “Both DUST and SAYIT are still reconciling last year’s accounts. We expect to file our final

report shortly.” He refused to be drawn on the costs being incurred by the Students’ Union as a result of this tardiness. Two weeks after this matter was brought to the SU’s and SAYIT’s attention, the fine had yet to be paid.

Climbing in the new sports centre. Photo: Martin McKenna gauge the feelings of the student body. Mr Quinn told Trinity News that the Students’ Union would remain neutral in this referendum, and that the onus would be on the clubs to raise support for the

measure. Although the capital costs of construction have been covered, Mr. Mc Auley estimates its running costs at €2 million per annum, and hopes that student mem-

The risk of being struck off is the latest on a list of recent difficulties for DUST. Their dispute with SIPTU over five redundancies had to be solved by the Labour Court, and Trinity News reported in February that their latest annual reports showed debts of over €245,000.

bers will provide €500k of this, to reduce the numbers of public members. The increased costs of the new building are due to its much higher overheads, including increased staff costs. The centre has 4 permanent duty managers and 8 fitness instructors, in addition to part-time staff. They also require lifeguard staff for when the pool opens, and housekeeping for cleaning purposes. In response to critics who only want to use the sports hall, Mr. Mc Auley said “Saying you can only pay for this part…it’s not practical” When the issue of membership for the Sports Centre was still on the table, Mr. Mc Auley said “If people are willing to pay up to €90 on the Trintiy Ball, and aren’t willing to pay €150 for a whole year’s membership, than there’s something wrong.” When asked what he was most proud of, Mr. Mc Auley said “Getting as many facilities as possible into the space available”. The centre has used the maximum space possible, and has been built the legal minimum of 3 metres from the Dart line on one side, and out to the pedestrian path on the other.


2NEWS

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24,

2007

Foster Place languishing in state of disrepair Deirdre Roberts

Pav's summer opening hours subject to review The summer's first pre-emptive fake tans and goaded streakers have been making their debuts outside the Pav for the past few weeks. Meanwhile, many students have been confused by the recent variation in the closing time of the bar and its grounds. According to Pavillion staff, students may be asked to move off the lawn from 9.30pm to faci litate cleaning of the area. The bar itself will remain open until llpm on most nights. These closing times can change nightl y, depending on the size of the crowd and security considerations. On recent nights College Security have blocked off the fro nt entrance and the library ramp and asked drinkers to exit via Westland Row before 10pm , understandably irking some students who had left belongings in the library for the evening. (A aron Mulvihill)

Red velvet curtains, mahogany tables and an enormous lobby may not sound like the usual setting for a 21st century student- untjl you step inside Foster Place, a College owned building that is unseen by the majority of the student body. Foster Place is an enormous 3,2 11 sq. metre building encompassing 2-4 Foster Place and 30-34 Anglesea Street with an entrance hall of gi lded ceilings and carved p.illars and a vau lt in the basement. Narrow staircases lead into many grand rooms complete with chandeliers and heavy mahogany tables. lt was once an AlB branch but it has been owned by Trinity College since the early 1990s and is presentl y a listed building. Much of Foster Place feels deserted and the Buildings office have not answered questio ns about why it was bought. According to the Communication office, "It has been the College's intention to use the premises to provide space for academic use" and it is currently used by "a ran ge of academic schools, admin/support services and retired staff. " Having toured the building, it can be seen that some of the rooms are offices or tutorial classrooms, but the use of many remains a mystery. The "Grand Banking Hall", as the entrance lobby is described on the campus website, is used entirely as extra storage space. Dusty cardboard boxes and the odd bicycle propped against a table are a strange contrast to the faded grandeur of the vast lobby. The communications office acknow ledge that the hall is " underused". The confined passages in the back show even more disrepair with peeling, dirty wallpaper. There is no set plan for the future of Foster Place, as a planning application has yet to be submitted. As far back as 2000, minutes of the Arts and Buildings

The Great Banking Hall of Foster Place, currently being used for storage. Photo: Martin McKenna Management Comm ittee show that part of the building was to be used by the Law School, which would then vacate House 39 fo r use by another department. In further meetings however, House 39 was declared too small for the Department of English and no other bidders a re mentioned. The minutes of December 2006 show a new plan to refur-

bish Foster Place for use as academic accommodation. The Law School , meanwhile, continue to occupy House 39. Being a campus in the centre of town , Tri nity has limited expansio n space. When asked whether it would be more advantageous for T rinity to sell the building the commu nications office replied, " [T rinityl has limited scope fo r expansion

Eimear Crowe

The Statues Review Working Party has approved a set of "Drafting Principles" by wh ich to rewrite the College Statutes. A commitment to transparency, clarity and pragmatism are central which will see many beloved anachron isms done away with. The review will be descripti ve, with Board retai ning its role as the main policymaking body in College. The statutes, which form a "constitution" for College, date from the 1966 revision and have not been considered since the Webb Committee's abortive attempt in the 1980s. ln keeping with the spirit of regeneration the committee has adopted the latest media to communicate with the College community - it now has a website (www.tcd.ie/local/ statutes), blog, podcast and an RSS feed. The working party meets excamera every Tuesday morning at eleven o 'clock in East Theatre. (Kevin Lynch)

A referendum on the Constitution of the Students' Union will be held on Wednesday and Thursday April 25 and 26. Notable changes to the Constitution would he the reduction of the Executi ve Committee, with the c urrent faculty convenors grouped into three supe r-faculties, with one representative from Arts & Humanities/Human and Social Sciences, Science/Engineering and Health Sciences. The new Constitution will also combine the roles of Electoral Commission Chair and Chair of Council.

Some Corrections The "Students' Union Election Candidates" section in our last issue was edited by Caoimhe Hanley. The interviews were conducted by Caoimhe Hanley and Christina McSorley. The photos were taken by David Adamson and Martin McKenna.

These areas of Foster Place are not the onl y empty spaces in poor condition belonging to the College. Greenane in Trinity Hall is an unoccupied building and is being considered for refurbishment. For now, however, buildings like Foster Place remain half forgotten gems that Trinity allows to slip further into ruin every year.

''Great scholar'' threatened with barring from College grounds

Review of statutes progressing well

Union holding constitutional referendum

on the island site and has, in recent years, acquired space in adjacent locations to fac ilitate expans io n ... To sell it [Foster Place] would remove that potential and leave the College in a position of searching the market for alternative locations." However, it has proved diffi cult to d iscover why this beautifu l building is left partly unused.

The Exam Hall from above: Friends of the Library and the TCD Association and Trust organised the annual booksale last week. Photo: Jago Tennant

EU rules call for scrapping of ESS general paper Kevin Lynch Ratification of the Bologna Process, an EU initiative to harmonise and improve highe r edu cat ion in E urope, by the University Council last Jun e means that there will be a significant overhaul of the deli very of the Economic and Social Studies (ESS) programme. T he Bologna declaration was made by the European Council of Education Ministers in the Italian town of Bologna in 1999. It aimed to improve institutional co-operation, mobility of students, comparability of degrees and a clear delineation between undergraduate and postgrad uate education. The process is centred on the impleme ntatio n of the European Cred it

Transfe r System (ECTS). Unive rsity Council's decision means that all courses must carry an ECTS weight that is a multiple of five credits, with the total of each year adding to 60. Following the College's ratification of this decl aration Junior Freshmen and Sophisters will take six courses while the General paper wi ll be discontinued for Bess and TSM. T he briefing for the Economics general paper described it as testing students' ability to apply economic theories and thinking in a coherent and structured way. "The examiners are not looking for knowledge in depth - this is the purpose of your subj ect papers - but rather whether yo u are able to think like an economist when addressing releva nt and/or topical issues in the real world ...

A good analogy might be a job interview: the interviewer would expect you to be able to answer general questions about the economics questions of the day". There are mixed feelings surrounding th e ending of the general paper. D r Andrew Somerville, of the Economics Dept, said he "personally regretted the demise of the General paper". However, Hilary Allen, a Senior Freshman ESS stude nt and Students ' Union Faculty Co nve ner for Social and Hum an Sciences, pointed out that many students struggled with the unstructured nature of th e exam and generall y performed poorl y in it. T he cha nges will be im plemented from the 2007/2008 academic year and will not affect Senior Sophisters sitting finals this May.

According to an article published in the Sunday Independent on March 25, 2007, a Senior Lecturer in the School of Engl ish, Dr Gerald Morgan, could be facing suspension from College and the loss of his rooms on campus. The furore is the result of an ema il which he sent to academic staff in the Faculties of Arts and Humanities and Social and H uman Sciences call ing for the resignation of the Senior Dean, Professor Cyril Smyth, and Secretary to the College, Mr. Michael Gleeson. The article, entitled "Trinity Don Fears for his Home on Campus and his Job", clai ms that the Provost, Dr John Hegarty, has initiated dis ciplinary proceedi ngs against Dr Morgan following his sending of an " ins ulting email" about Prof. Smyth and Mr. Gleeson to other staff. lt was reported that, although Dr Morgan has apologised to M r Gleeson and Professor S myth "if some in College may have drawn the mistaken concl usion that I regard them as having acted in bad faith," as yet he has not retracted his email. It was also reported that the Provost had sent an email to D r Morgan stating that it is " imperative that you unreservedly withdraw all of t he all egatio ns [against Professo r Smyth and Mr Gleeson]." Dr Morgan responded with an email asking "is the Provost proposing (and does he have the power) to ban me from the College and from my roo ms in College (my ho me since 1985), thus throwing me out onto the streets of Dublin?" Dr Morgan's name has appeared in the nati onal press since 2002, when separate charges of malice and phys ical intimidation and harass ment towards two of his colleagues in the School of English were brought against hi m. Dr Morgan , who has consistently insisted on his innocence in relation to these c ha rges, was banned from the Arts Building in 2002 immediately following the accusation of physical harassment. He then brought cases to both the High Court and the Supreme Court to prevent the convening of a Disciplinary Panel investigat ing the charges which, he told Trinity News, was "under the duress of such a suspension and ban and with the presum ption of innocence to which I am entitled com promised." T he Disci plinary Panel finally met in 2003, fo ll owing which Dr Morgan's sus-

pension from the Arts Building was Iifted. A further outcome of trus Panel was that, as a result of the malice charge brought against hi m, D r Morgan was suspended from his post as Senior Lecturer for three months without pay. He also received a formal warning that ''should he repeat any of the false and malicious accusations ... he will be subject to further disci plinary action that could lead to dis missal as a possible outcome". Dr Morgan, a mem ber of staff since 1968 and a Fellow of the College since 1993, resigned his Fellowship in 2002 in protest at what he claims was a "violation of my rights" and i n assertion of his innocence. He has since sought a reinstatement of his Fellowship, but this was rejected by the Board of College as being legally inadmissible. The College has incurred approx imately â‚Ź 220,000 in legal fees to date as a resul t of the High Court and Supreme Court cases instigated by Dr Morgan, while D r Morgan told Trinity News that he had also incurred legal costs of over â‚Ź200,000. While D r Morgan does not wish to comment publicly on the Sunday Independent a1t icle at this time, he told Trinity News that "I must make it clear that I am in no way responsible for the leaking of emails to [the Sunday Independent]''. He also insisted that "] have not sent 'insulting emails" to anyone. Indeed, I a m the one who has been insulted by the scandalous allegations made agai nst me in 2002 of malice and of physical inti midation and harassment." " 1 have repeatedly asked the College authorities for an apology for these scandalous allegations. Their only response to date is to refuse an apology and to bring yet f urther disciplinary action agains t me." Dr Morgan maintains that threat to the teaching of Medieval Studies, both at Trinity and at UCD is "at the centre of the disp ute". He s uggests that "claims of malice on my part are simply desi gned to divert attention from these important matters." He described himself as a " great scholar" and expressed regret at being "obliged to defend [his1 reputation in the face of these persistant and scurrilous allegations." College would not release a statement on this matter as "there are still a number of matters under consideration". In relation to the Sunday Independent's article, a College spokesperson stated that "we cannot confi rm the veracity of that article".


NEWS 3

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

Student view:

Green is this season’s musthave colour Alannah Sparks Have you ever done a double take at a guy striding past you on the ramp, or stolen a prolonged gaze at the girl sitting a few desks away in the Ussher? Ever peered over computers or angled yourself on the treadmill so you could furtively catch a glimpse of said hottie? Well, for guests at the 2007 FutureFashion show held in the Dining Hall last Sunday week, ocular thievery was no longer the only option. Gathered together under the oil-painted eyes of Trinity’s past presidents was the crème de la crème of Trinity’s lookers, strutting their stuff on the catwalk in various stages of fashionable undress and providing viewers with a glorious visual feast. Mahatma Gandhi once said, “There is no beauty in the finest cloth if it makes hunger and unhappiness”. These days, everyone knows that beauty is wasted if not directed towards a greater good and even the fairest of face are conscious of their Manolo-shaped carbon footprints. Thus the fashion show had the binary purpose of both raising people’s awareness of ethical fashion and raising money for the good cause of the Medical Missionaries of Mary (Uganda). The show is the second to have been put on by eco-chic gurus and former Trinity students Sarah-Jane Cunningham and Cina Connelly. Together they gathered a

group of designers and labels that ran the full gamut of international sustainable design, from India, represented by Numanu, to Germany with Bombyx Mori, to local familiars Urban Outfitters and Ali Hewson’s Edun. Clothes produced by these labels draw attention to the issues of child labour, sweatshops, recycling and ‘clean’, sustainable materials – society ills that should make you think twice before you buy your next little top in Penneys. But not for a moment must you imagine that fair-trade fashion translates into dowdy cotton and Hari Krishna-hemp; Fashion’s new environmental conscience is never at the expense of glamour. Models strode down the runway in organic silky hotpants, Von Furstenburg-esque wrap dresses made from recycled ties, and for the men, vintage Teddy-Boy shirts and slick kimono-style jackets. Afterwards, guests and models partied in Lillie’s Bordello, where the eco theme continued with vintage celebrity and guest DJ Ray Sha providing sustainable heat with his dancefloor hits, as everyone sucked on hemp lollipops and revelled their way into a brighter, greener future. If you missed your chance this year to gaze unabashed at your secret eye-candy, fret not. Luckily, ethical fashion is a trend that is set to stay and with Trinity flying the flag, a comeback next year is as likely as a return of your 1994 dungarees. Ecoradicals, watch this space.

“Having finished your Schol exams, would you like to see scholarships awarded based on end-of-year exams or continuous assessment? Why?” “I like the way they were done this year. To be honest, our academic system is as flawed as any other, and what’s the difference?” Naomi O’Leary SF English Studies

“I think Schols should be more than an academic thing. They should be based on contribution to College life as well.” Diarmuid Coleman SF English and Philosophy

Eimear Nolan struts her stuff on the Dining Hall catwalk on Sunday the 15th. Photo: Jago Tennant

USI launches new initiative to improve student welfare Joey Facer On Thursday March 29 the Union of Students in Ireland hosted an event in Buswells Hotel in order to promote their “5 STAR Future” campaign to the leading politicians in Ireland in the hopes of securing support for the plan leading up to the General Election. The event was well-attended by some leading Ministers and TDs, including Mary Hanafin, Minister for Education, Trinity Senators David Norris and Mary Henry, Senator Fergal Brown, Deputy Barry Andrews, and other TDs Olwyn Enright, Jan O’Sullivan, Caoimhghin O’Caoilean and Liam Twomey. Trinity News talked to USI President, Colm Hamrogue, about “5 Star Future: An Agenda in Third-Level Education”. The document enumerates five areas in need of improvement: student grants, healthcare, accommodation, representation and future investment. In supporting the demand for an increase in the student grant, Hamrogue points out that the grant provides only €346 per month, which in many areas does not event cover rent. One point the USI document raises is the disparity of education authorities. With 66 grant councils in operation, standards are by no means even and many are underresourced. Hamrogue stated that this is the primary reason that grants arrive late. He also made the claim that these problems have been endemic since the 1960s. USI is lobbying to raise the student grants to social welfare levels, and Trinity News enquired of Hamrogue where the money for this would be realistically sourced. Hamrogue replied that by employing “smart spending” the government could free up a lot of equity for education, in particular citing the Port Tunnel that recently went over budget by a considerable amount. At present, Hamrogue informed

“I think they should be at the end of year. They’re very disruptive to other people on the course. It's difficult because they're obviously harder, but they’d save money in marking costs and could stop closing down departments.” Tara Robinson SF English Studies

USI’s Eastern Area Officer John McGuirk and TCD Students’ Union’s Rob Kearns at the launch of the USI’s new initiative. Photo: Martin McKenna Trinity News, it costs €170 million to administer student grants each year, a problem that would be eased considerably by streamlining the agencies that distribute grants. Hamrogue estimates the costs could be as comparatively little as €10-15 million. He added that politicians should be more concerned with how money is spent in the public sector and less concerned with “political dog-fights”. Another point of contention for the USI is accommodation. The Department of Finance has stated that it does not intend to renew the Section 50 scheme which allowed new accommodation to be let exclusively to students for the first ten

years. With an ever-increasing demand for housing, students are quickly being priced out of the market, particularly in Dublin, with a grant that does not keep in reflection with the rising rent costs. Trinity News spoke with John Curren, a Fianna Fail TD for Dublin Mid-West. Curren had little idea of the USI’s requests and Trinity News was obliged to fill him in on the details of the document. Curren stated that he often attended the events in Buswells, without seeming on this occasion to be overly well-informed of the event itself at hand. Curren commented on the Student Grants specifically, saying that he had, on

several occasions, helped his constituents fill out the grant application forms, stating that if a student entering higher education could not fill out the form, clearly it was the form that was in need of an overhaul to simplify it. On the issue of raising the grant, Curren went on to clarify his earlier comment that “anything should be possible in politics” by stating that “no matter what is raised it will never be enough” for students. Denise Keogh, Welfare Officer from Trinity College, pointed out that when the grant “does not even provide a roof over the student’s head”, clearly a change is necessary.

Rise in number of thefts from College library David Molloy There has been a recent rise in the number of thefts from the library. The Library guards report that over the February/March period, there were at least ten laptop thefts which were reported to them, and it is likely that many more went unreported. In the same period, Pearse Street Garda station reports only two thefts from the Arts Building and none specifically from the libraries. Neither students nor College security seem to be reporting incidents of theft to

“Definitely continuous assessment. But now that it's over it’s good that it’s been done this way, because if we get exemptions, then we are free.” Michael Caroll SF Philosophy and Greek

the local Gardaí. Library officials have said “They’re certainly not all coming into the office” but insist that “everyone who comes in here is told they need to report it.” The Librarian’s office also notes that students only seem to report thefts of expensive items such as laptops for insurance reasons. Trevor Peare, Keeper (Readers’ Services and Systems), commented that “Students are very careless, leaving valuables on unattended desks in the Library: purses with large sums of money, laptops, USB sticks with their work and other personal belongings. It is a wonder that more thefts aren’t reported.” Mr Peare asks that

students “take care of their personal property and not to leave it unattended at any time.” Mr Peare also pointed out that the library guards are responsible for protecting library material, not the personal belongings of students. Reportedly, library staff members have been frequently advising students on their return from long periods away from desks that their belongings could easily have been stolen. Detective Inspector Dolan of Pearse Street Garda Station provided Trinity News with comment on crime statistics in the area. Statistically, the College campus is one of the safest areas in the locality,

with virtually no physical crime or intimidation reported. When crime does occur, it is nearly always theft rather than robbery – the distinction being that robbery involves intimidation or confrontation, whereas theft usually passes unnoticed. Library staff have posted notices around the library asking students not to leave belongings unattended. Dolan told Trinity News that were he made aware of a high number of thefts from students, he would be very interested in working with College security to increase safety. When asked for comment, a College spokesperson stated “College is constantly reviewing its security measures.”

“Schol is too integral to what makes Trinity unique to alter it. The Schol process is challenging and is still an effective way of choosing scholars.” Christopher Kissane JS History

“Definitely not continuous assessment. It's not something you can do all year. The way we do it now is prestigious – you won't find it anywhere else. It'd be a step down to change the format of the exams.” Brian Nolan SF Law

Interviews: David Molloy Photos: Martin McKenna


2NEWS

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24,

2007

Foster Place languishing in state of disrepair Deirdre Roberts

Pav's summer opening hours subject to review The summer's first pre-emptive fake tans and goaded streakers have been making their debuts outside the Pav for the past few weeks. Meanwhile, many students have been confused by the recent variation in the closing time of the bar and its grounds. According to Pavillion staff, students may be asked to move off the lawn from 9.30pm to faci litate cleaning of the area. The bar itself will remain open until llpm on most nights. These closing times can change nightl y, depending on the size of the crowd and security considerations. On recent nights College Security have blocked off the fro nt entrance and the library ramp and asked drinkers to exit via Westland Row before 10pm , understandably irking some students who had left belongings in the library for the evening. (A aron Mulvihill)

Red velvet curtains, mahogany tables and an enormous lobby may not sound like the usual setting for a 21st century student- untjl you step inside Foster Place, a College owned building that is unseen by the majority of the student body. Foster Place is an enormous 3,2 11 sq. metre building encompassing 2-4 Foster Place and 30-34 Anglesea Street with an entrance hall of gi lded ceilings and carved p.illars and a vau lt in the basement. Narrow staircases lead into many grand rooms complete with chandeliers and heavy mahogany tables. lt was once an AlB branch but it has been owned by Trinity College since the early 1990s and is presentl y a listed building. Much of Foster Place feels deserted and the Buildings office have not answered questio ns about why it was bought. According to the Communication office, "It has been the College's intention to use the premises to provide space for academic use" and it is currently used by "a ran ge of academic schools, admin/support services and retired staff. " Having toured the building, it can be seen that some of the rooms are offices or tutorial classrooms, but the use of many remains a mystery. The "Grand Banking Hall", as the entrance lobby is described on the campus website, is used entirely as extra storage space. Dusty cardboard boxes and the odd bicycle propped against a table are a strange contrast to the faded grandeur of the vast lobby. The communications office acknow ledge that the hall is " underused". The confined passages in the back show even more disrepair with peeling, dirty wallpaper. There is no set plan for the future of Foster Place, as a planning application has yet to be submitted. As far back as 2000, minutes of the Arts and Buildings

The Great Banking Hall of Foster Place, currently being used for storage. Photo: Martin McKenna Management Comm ittee show that part of the building was to be used by the Law School, which would then vacate House 39 fo r use by another department. In further meetings however, House 39 was declared too small for the Department of English and no other bidders a re mentioned. The minutes of December 2006 show a new plan to refur-

bish Foster Place for use as academic accommodation. The Law School , meanwhile, continue to occupy House 39. Being a campus in the centre of town , Tri nity has limited expansio n space. When asked whether it would be more advantageous for T rinity to sell the building the commu nications office replied, " [T rinityl has limited scope fo r expansion

Eimear Crowe

The Statues Review Working Party has approved a set of "Drafting Principles" by wh ich to rewrite the College Statutes. A commitment to transparency, clarity and pragmatism are central which will see many beloved anachron isms done away with. The review will be descripti ve, with Board retai ning its role as the main policymaking body in College. The statutes, which form a "constitution" for College, date from the 1966 revision and have not been considered since the Webb Committee's abortive attempt in the 1980s. ln keeping with the spirit of regeneration the committee has adopted the latest media to communicate with the College community - it now has a website (www.tcd.ie/local/ statutes), blog, podcast and an RSS feed. The working party meets excamera every Tuesday morning at eleven o 'clock in East Theatre. (Kevin Lynch)

A referendum on the Constitution of the Students' Union will be held on Wednesday and Thursday April 25 and 26. Notable changes to the Constitution would he the reduction of the Executi ve Committee, with the c urrent faculty convenors grouped into three supe r-faculties, with one representative from Arts & Humanities/Human and Social Sciences, Science/Engineering and Health Sciences. The new Constitution will also combine the roles of Electoral Commission Chair and Chair of Council.

Some Corrections The "Students' Union Election Candidates" section in our last issue was edited by Caoimhe Hanley. The interviews were conducted by Caoimhe Hanley and Christina McSorley. The photos were taken by David Adamson and Martin McKenna.

These areas of Foster Place are not the onl y empty spaces in poor condition belonging to the College. Greenane in Trinity Hall is an unoccupied building and is being considered for refurbishment. For now, however, buildings like Foster Place remain half forgotten gems that Trinity allows to slip further into ruin every year.

''Great scholar'' threatened with barring from College grounds

Review of statutes progressing well

Union holding constitutional referendum

on the island site and has, in recent years, acquired space in adjacent locations to fac ilitate expans io n ... To sell it [Foster Place] would remove that potential and leave the College in a position of searching the market for alternative locations." However, it has proved diffi cult to d iscover why this beautifu l building is left partly unused.

The Exam Hall from above: Friends of the Library and the TCD Association and Trust organised the annual booksale last week. Photo: Jago Tennant

EU rules call for scrapping of ESS general paper Kevin Lynch Ratification of the Bologna Process, an EU initiative to harmonise and improve highe r edu cat ion in E urope, by the University Council last Jun e means that there will be a significant overhaul of the deli very of the Economic and Social Studies (ESS) programme. T he Bologna declaration was made by the European Council of Education Ministers in the Italian town of Bologna in 1999. It aimed to improve institutional co-operation, mobility of students, comparability of degrees and a clear delineation between undergraduate and postgrad uate education. The process is centred on the impleme ntatio n of the European Cred it

Transfe r System (ECTS). Unive rsity Council's decision means that all courses must carry an ECTS weight that is a multiple of five credits, with the total of each year adding to 60. Following the College's ratification of this decl aration Junior Freshmen and Sophisters will take six courses while the General paper wi ll be discontinued for Bess and TSM. T he briefing for the Economics general paper described it as testing students' ability to apply economic theories and thinking in a coherent and structured way. "The examiners are not looking for knowledge in depth - this is the purpose of your subj ect papers - but rather whether yo u are able to think like an economist when addressing releva nt and/or topical issues in the real world ...

A good analogy might be a job interview: the interviewer would expect you to be able to answer general questions about the economics questions of the day". There are mixed feelings surrounding th e ending of the general paper. D r Andrew Somerville, of the Economics Dept, said he "personally regretted the demise of the General paper". However, Hilary Allen, a Senior Freshman ESS stude nt and Students ' Union Faculty Co nve ner for Social and Hum an Sciences, pointed out that many students struggled with the unstructured nature of th e exam and generall y performed poorl y in it. T he cha nges will be im plemented from the 2007/2008 academic year and will not affect Senior Sophisters sitting finals this May.

According to an article published in the Sunday Independent on March 25, 2007, a Senior Lecturer in the School of Engl ish, Dr Gerald Morgan, could be facing suspension from College and the loss of his rooms on campus. The furore is the result of an ema il which he sent to academic staff in the Faculties of Arts and Humanities and Social and H uman Sciences call ing for the resignation of the Senior Dean, Professor Cyril Smyth, and Secretary to the College, Mr. Michael Gleeson. The article, entitled "Trinity Don Fears for his Home on Campus and his Job", clai ms that the Provost, Dr John Hegarty, has initiated dis ciplinary proceedi ngs against Dr Morgan following his sending of an " ins ulting email" about Prof. Smyth and Mr. Gleeson to other staff. lt was reported that, although Dr Morgan has apologised to M r Gleeson and Professor S myth "if some in College may have drawn the mistaken concl usion that I regard them as having acted in bad faith," as yet he has not retracted his email. It was also reported that the Provost had sent an email to D r Morgan stating that it is " imperative that you unreservedly withdraw all of t he all egatio ns [against Professo r Smyth and Mr Gleeson]." Dr Morgan responded with an email asking "is the Provost proposing (and does he have the power) to ban me from the College and from my roo ms in College (my ho me since 1985), thus throwing me out onto the streets of Dublin?" Dr Morgan's name has appeared in the nati onal press since 2002, when separate charges of malice and phys ical intimidation and harass ment towards two of his colleagues in the School of English were brought against hi m. Dr Morgan , who has consistently insisted on his innocence in relation to these c ha rges, was banned from the Arts Building in 2002 immediately following the accusation of physical harassment. He then brought cases to both the High Court and the Supreme Court to prevent the convening of a Disciplinary Panel investigat ing the charges which, he told Trinity News, was "under the duress of such a suspension and ban and with the presum ption of innocence to which I am entitled com promised." T he Disci plinary Panel finally met in 2003, fo ll owing which Dr Morgan's sus-

pension from the Arts Building was Iifted. A further outcome of trus Panel was that, as a result of the malice charge brought against hi m, D r Morgan was suspended from his post as Senior Lecturer for three months without pay. He also received a formal warning that ''should he repeat any of the false and malicious accusations ... he will be subject to further disci plinary action that could lead to dis missal as a possible outcome". Dr Morgan, a mem ber of staff since 1968 and a Fellow of the College since 1993, resigned his Fellowship in 2002 in protest at what he claims was a "violation of my rights" and i n assertion of his innocence. He has since sought a reinstatement of his Fellowship, but this was rejected by the Board of College as being legally inadmissible. The College has incurred approx imately â‚Ź 220,000 in legal fees to date as a resul t of the High Court and Supreme Court cases instigated by Dr Morgan, while D r Morgan told Trinity News that he had also incurred legal costs of over â‚Ź200,000. While D r Morgan does not wish to comment publicly on the Sunday Independent a1t icle at this time, he told Trinity News that "I must make it clear that I am in no way responsible for the leaking of emails to [the Sunday Independent]''. He also insisted that "] have not sent 'insulting emails" to anyone. Indeed, I a m the one who has been insulted by the scandalous allegations made agai nst me in 2002 of malice and of physical inti midation and harassment." " 1 have repeatedly asked the College authorities for an apology for these scandalous allegations. Their only response to date is to refuse an apology and to bring yet f urther disciplinary action agains t me." Dr Morgan maintains that threat to the teaching of Medieval Studies, both at Trinity and at UCD is "at the centre of the disp ute". He s uggests that "claims of malice on my part are simply desi gned to divert attention from these important matters." He described himself as a " great scholar" and expressed regret at being "obliged to defend [his1 reputation in the face of these persistant and scurrilous allegations." College would not release a statement on this matter as "there are still a number of matters under consideration". In relation to the Sunday Independent's article, a College spokesperson stated that "we cannot confi rm the veracity of that article".


4 TRINITY BALL

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

Trinity Ball selling out in record time with only a few tickets left Niall Hughes This year’s Trinity Ball is set to be the quickest to sell-out in recent memory. As of Friday 20 April the Trinity Ball online application system had 1200 available tickets with applications made for 1700 tickets. With a capacity of 6000 people and 4800 of those tickets already reserved and paid-for, this means that there will be a scramble for the last tickets. Students who have reserved tickets but not already paid for them are not guaranteed a place at the Trinity Ball. Now that applications have outstripped the number of available tickets it is certain that there will be hundreds of stu-

dents left disappointed. Just before the time of going to print online applications at the Ball website, www.trinityball.ie, were halted. What this means is that those students who have not yet applied for Ball tickets will be unable to go to the Ball and those who have applied are in a race against each other to secure the remain tickets by paying as fast as possible. One reason for the huge demand for tickets this year is the surge in ticket applications which took place when tickets went on sale on April 4. A ticket giveaway for the first 10 applications led to the website crashing due to high traffic. A total number of 900 people made applications in the first hour and 60% of all tick-

ets had been reserved within the first two days. The fact that so many tickets sold so soon put other students on edge about getting tickets and so their worries of the Ball selling out became a self-fulfilling prophesy as more and more tickets were reserved everyday. With a line-up including Ash, CSS, Director, Hot Chip DJs, Erol Alkan, Justice, Dr Lektroluv, Aslan, DataRock, and The Blizzards it’s no wonder that tickets for the ball are selling like hot cakes. Add to this the announcement on April 17 that The Immediate, Delorentos, Noise Control, Aleko, The Pigeon Detectives, and Warlords of Pez have all been added to the line up and this event could only be expected to sell out.

Some advice for the Ball from a man with experience Niall Hughes

Ball night: tickets are selling out in record time as students look forward to May 11.

Postgrad Studies in Law and Social Sciences Applications for the following programmes are available from the Office of Graduate Studies at (01) 402-3434, postgraduate@dit.ie, or www.dit.ie DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: Friday, April 27th. The School of Social Sciences and Law at the Dublin Institute of Technology offers the following postgraduate programmes in 2007-2008. These programmes are available to graduates from a wide range of undergraduate disciplines in the humanities, business and social sciences.

POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA/MA IN LAW ANOTHER WAY TO STUDY LAW: A one-year, full-time ‘conversion’ programme in law, covering the 'core' modules examinable on the entrance exam to the Law Society of Ireland. For graduates who would like to become solicitors, or anyone for whom law might prove useful in a career in business, government or academics. For more information: Contact Emma Linnane at (01) 402-7181 or law@dit.ie

MA IN CRIMINOLOGY UNDERSTANDING CRIME: A one-year full-time or two-year part-time taught masters programme in criminology. The programme provides an excellent grounding for individuals seeking to pursue higher qualifications (MPhil/PhD.), a career in research, policymaking or for those working in the criminal justice field. For more information: www.dit.ie/DIT/appliedarts/ssls/socialsciences/courses/Criminology.html or contact Dr. Mairead Seymour at (01) 402-4133 or socialsciences@dit

MA IN CHILD, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY STUDIES SOCIAL SCIENCE IN ACTION: A one-year full-time or two-year part-time masters programme in social science approaches to rapidly-changing areas of Irish society, with a particular focus on the child and family. A dissertation is required. For graduates who wish to contribute to the community in a social science context. For more information, contact: Programme Chair, Dr. Brian McCarthy at (01) 402 4217 or socialsciences@dit.ie

www.dit.ie

DIT – It’s a step closer to the real world.

We’d like to use our years of experience and wisdom when it comes to Trinity Ball to provide you with a guide to making it through the longest, messiest night out of the year. What to Wear? This might seem fairly straightforward but there’s always a few who don’t fully get the whole black tie concept – evening dress for the lads and ball gowns for the ladies. For the gents we recommend renting your dinner jacket from a large rental company such as Black Tie. That way when you lose your jacket you can just steal someone elses and hand it back as your own. For the girls there is the dilemma of long dress with runners hidden underneath or shorter dress so you don’t get completely trampled on. What to Drink? Booze to Go is a popular choice for cheap and cheerful Buckfast and sneaky naggins of Svenska Vodka (€6.45). When it comes to sneaing your drink into the ball area girls would do well to remember that garters were actually invented for this sole purpose, failing this a bit of masking tape around the leg to hold the booze in place seems to do the trick. For men, getting drink in undetected is more of a challenge. I do remember a guy last year hiding a shoulder of vodka in a big bag of Doritos he was eating on the way in. For those of you who know some scholar or otherwise unpopular person who lives in College, now is the time to grease the wheels of friendship. Tell them how cool they’d be if they let you and 30 mates stash your drink in their house. Food? You’re probably going to be drinking for about 8-12 hours over the course of the night so it’s a good idea to get some food in at some stage. Try to do so before entering the ball as the dodgy hotdogs sold inside are not going to do your stomach any favours in the morning. You cold always run past the Cadbury’s van every once in a while stealing chocolate. The beauty of everyone being dressed the same is that you’ll never get caught. Try to steer clear of Bourneville though. Getting there? It’s all about arriving in style. This year it’s all about travelling in Ecocabs, the new eco-friendly service set up to promote being green and all that jazz. The real bonus though is that it’s free. It doesn’t cost you anything – not a sausage. If you can’t find one of these then rickshaws are always a fun option. Make sure your friend gets in another one and you make the drivers race all the way down Grafton street, whipping them all the while in a Ben Hur fashion. How to score? Scoring at the Trinity Ball is easier than the Daily Mirror crossword. For girls the Trinity Ball is a magical evening in which romance is in the air and anything can happen. For guys it’s the night where girls get so drunk that they’ll agree to anything. The most popular spots for engaging in the physical act of love (i.e. railing) tend to be up against the dumpsters in Front

What you can expect if things go to plan. Square, on the steps of the chapel (for those feeling particularly blasphemous) and in the bushes near the main stage. My top tip is the roof of the Museum building. If you’re particularly desperate the portaloos are an option but make sure the door is locked good and proper as last year a couple fell out of the cubicle midprocess right onto Library Square. It should also be noted that many people have been compiling what has become known as a “lunge list” for the Trinity Ball. These lists have been made primarily by a core group of final-year ladies who intend on pouncing on all those males that made the list. You have been warned. How to get some class-A drugs? Look for the guy who looks most out of place in evening wear. He’s probably also wearing a dodgy hat and sporting a beard. Failing this just crawl around on the floor of the Dance Tent picking up whatever you find on the ground and putting it in your mouth.

What to do after the Ball? After the obligatory trip over the Spar on College Green to steal everything you can, why not take a trip to Ned’s of Townsend Street or Slattery’s on Capel Street, both of which open at 7:30 am. There’s always the option of bowling and Quasar in Leisureplex where you’ll probably be able to get fixed up for some more of those class-A drugs to keep the buzz going. If it’s a greasy spoon you’re after, make your way up to Manhattan near the Odeon. Full Irish Breakfast for €9, but you won’t get in unless you know the secret knock. If for some reason you’ve made it through the night and you’ve still got some money in your pocket then make your way up to the Sporting Emporium casino just off Grafton Street. Try your hand at some blackjack and roulette while enjoying free booze or make your way upstrairs and play some Texas Hold’em cash games (buy-ins start at €50).


TRINITY REGATTA 2007 ISLANDBRIDGE THIS SATURDAY 28 APRIL


6 SOCIETIES

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

Central Societies Committee Society of the Year Awards

Left: Sinead Fortune, Dominic Esler, Tara Robinson, Niamh Farrell, Kylie L’Estrange, Ian Lahiffe, Pat Moran, Michelle Picardo, Sophie Davies, Pierse O’Reilly and Conor Brady, members of the DU Orchestral Society, winners of the Society of the Year award. Right: Joseph O’Gorman, Andrew Byrne, Katherine Sheane, Lucy O’Connell, Elizabeth O’Brien and Emma Matthews, officers and staff of the Central Societies Committee this year. Photos: Emma Matthews

Orchestral Society sweeps popular vote at Society of the Year awards Elizabeth O’Brien The Central Societies Committee’s annual Society of the Year awards 2007 commenced on Wednesday April 11 in the Hilton Hotel. A plethora of societies were vying for recognition by their peers for their achievements over the last twelve months. The night began with Kat Sheane, Chairperson of the CSC, acting as MC for the night, with her introduction of the long established sponsors of the evening Pat Moran, of

Ernst and Young, and Conor Clancy, of AIB. Nine societies were short-listed from applications for the honour of winning Best Large society. Societies are categorised according to the number of students in their membership base. The Food and Drink Society, with almost a thousand members, won through after a year filled with gastronomic delights. Trinity FM, established half a decade ago, have revamped their studio in the last year and overhauled the entire operation at the top of House Six and duly

Waterstone’s, Dawson Street On the 1st floor

Student Special: 40% off any cappuccino, latte or tea 20% off food and all other menu options

deserved to win Best Medium Society. SUAS, who graced the front page of the Irish Times for their ‘1000 Families’ exhibition won Best Small society. The Best Event was won by “Med Day”, rather unsurprisingly. In the past five years the University Biological Association has expanded its fundraising campaign, culminating this year in the unprecedented gathering of almost €92,000 by 400 volunteers in one day. Atmosphere was built in College with national radio broadcasts from College Park while sponsored individuals raised

thousands from the steps of the Pavilion bar. The Best Individual was won by Brendan McGuirk, Chair of DU Radio Society. His glowing recommendation was submitted by the Trinity FM team who showed their obvious appreciation for his strong guiding hand in professionalising the running of the College radio station. McGuirk beat off stiff competition from 18 other nominated individuals. A compromise was reached in the selection of the winner for Best Fresher with the judging panel deciding to award Nick Kenny from DUBES and Ciaran Gallagher from St Vincent de Paul with the honour of a joint award. This award was created to recognise and encourage the potential for first years to become actively involved in societies within months of arriving in college. Kenny embraced the ethos of DUBES, travelled with the society in Europe and helped organise the Bess Ball. Gallagher has become the Soup Run coordinator and expanded it to two nights a week within three months of joining St. Vincent de Paul. Mud.ie, sponsor of the Best Website chose the Gender Equality Society for its usability and presentation. Niall Sherry from the College Historical Society was chosen by Snap Printing for the Best Poster of the year for the debate “That This House Believes Religion is a Block on Progress”. The final winner of the night was chosen on the night by the societies present. Each guest was supplied with a brochure upon entering the ballroom containing a summary of the short-listed overall finalists and their achievements of the previous year. They were the LGBT, Food and Drink, Trinity FM, Photograhic Association, Biological Association, Suas, Philosophical Society and Orchestral. The popular vote for Best Overall winner went in favour of Orchestral in tribute to a year in which they sold out St. Patrick’s Cathedral with Ian Lahiffe conducting. In their second term Jessica Grimes conducted performances by the orchestra in Dublin and

Ian Lahiffe with the Society of the Year trophy which went missing later in the night. Thankfully it was recovered the next day. Photo: Emma Matthews Cork. Concerts run until the end of the Trinity term and provide a diverse but constant outlet for Trinity musicians. Throughout the night members of societies heaped praise upon the staff of the CSC. Lucy O’Connell, executive officer, and Emma Matthews, marketing manager, work throughout the calendar year for the societies and it is they who organised the ball to pay tribute to the hard work and successes of the student societies. Joseph O’Gorman, Honorary treasurer of the CSC, was also commended for his continuing work mentoring and guiding societies in the CSC.

The Provost Dr John Hegarty, in recognition of the opportunities for personal and professional development offered by societal participation in Trinity opened up his house on Thursday April 19 to celebrate “Outstanding Achievement in 2007” by the societies. After a short speech from the Provost and amusing anecdotes from Joseph O'Gorman, winners of awards from the Society of the Year Ball displayed their trophies to senior members of college including Senior Dean Cyril Smyth, Junior Dean Emma Stokes and Dean of Students Bruce Misstear.

DU Pharmaceutical Society

Pharmacy society hoping for increased profile Michael Craig At the end of last term Dublin University Pharmacy Students Association hosted their annual black tie Ball in Jurys Ballsbridge. This year it was a Golden Ticket Ball theme with lucky ticket holders winning tickets for Tubridy Tonight. The event was well attended with over

300 people turning up and a great success. Before Christmas they were the first society to run a Mystery Tour in Trinity this year and this too was a big draw for their members and friends with 4 buses taking 250 people to Dundalk dog track and then onto Drogheda. They also cohosted the Halloween Massacre-Ade night in the Temple Bar Music Centre

with BioSoc and helped to raise a significant amount of money for neonatal hospital units. Their society is well known within the “Science” end of Trinity but they have been trying to increase their profile throughout College, so feel free to pop along to their end of year events, even if you are an orange-tinted, Ugg-wearing Marilyn from the Ramp.


SOCIETIES 7

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

TCD Afro-Caribbean Society

University Philosophical Society

Archaeologists’ year capped by trip to Rome

Afro-Caribbean members in St Patrick’s Day parade Conor McQuillan It all began in early January, though noone really remembers how. The creative and musical directors of a group called City Fusion, jointly funded by Dublin City Council and St. Patrick’s Festival, asked if they could make a short presentation after one of our drumming classes (I’d tell you they were on every Friday at 6pm in the Eliz Room, House 6, if I though there was a possibility you might not already know they’re on every Friday at 6pm in the Eliz Room, House 6 – honestly, I would). Happy that this presented no clear and present danger to our drummers, we agreed. On Friday, January 19, over a dozen drummers enthusiastically listened as plans for the City Fusion section of the St Patrick’s Day parade were outlined. This was to be a collaboration between hundreds of volunteers working in community and cultural groups throughout Dublin – Irish (various groups from local schools and community groups e.g. Ballymun), Polish, Latvian, Nigerian, Eyo, Sikhs, Muslims – all telling a “fairytale” about people from far and wide coming to a city (“any city, it just happens to have a spire too”) and integrating and contributing to life in this great, bustling city. Where did we fit in? They wanted us to do what we do best – play the djembes and provide some funky rhythms, with the help of a 25-piece samba band from Paris, for everyone else to dance to. No problems there then. “You’ll all be wearing costumes of course, and you’ll have to make them

yourselves” – these words ended whatever discourse there was in the minds of 2 guys standing near the door, but the remaining 14 drummers, of varying hatmaking experience I would say, signed up on the spot. We got to work that night, learning the new rhythms, and over the course of the following weeks in the lead-up to the festival, our drummers and our wise teacher, Gabriel Akujobi, put in a lot of effort and gave up a lot of valuable Friday evening Pav time in preparing the rhythms, costumes and even a mercifully short dance. On Tuesday March 6, we were honoured with the task of providing music and entertainment at the official launch of the St. Patrick’s Festival, 2007, in the grand environs of City Hall. As guests and fellow volunteers walked in before the Mayor’s launch of his city’s biggest festival, we drummed on the steps above Dame Street, attracting the ears, eyes and camera lens’ of passers-by and tourists during evening rush hour. It was us, and the crazy dancer with a giant chameleon on his back. After some last-minute finishing touches to our equipment (i.e. sellotaping foam around the base of the drums to protect our delicate knees as we walked) and 2 hours practicing out in the cold adapting to the weather conditions – on the morning of the 17th (to the point that my hands were killing me before we’d even started the real parade), we set off from our base in Stoneybatter to the cheers of the crowds lining the streets, clinging to lamp posts and hanging out windows all the way from Parnell Square, down O’Connell Street and its

6I I=:

The DU Archaeology Society ended Hilary term with the second annual Bacchus Ball. The black tie event, organised with the History Society, was hailed a success, drawing a good, if slightly drunken, group of students to the Davenport Hotel for a night of revelry. The highlight of the society’s events this year must surely be the recent trip to Rome on which 17 members were able to travel in March. Everyone enjoyed seeing those sites and buildings which they hear about in those monotonous morning lectures back in Dublin. Blessed with gorgeous weather, the group made insightful visits to the Colosseum, Forum, and serveral museums, as well as the Irish bar. The society is already planning a followup for next year.

Rag week most successful ever

Gearoid O’Rourke (right), Schools Convenor of the University Philosophical Society, at the final of the Phil’s “PhilSpeaks” debating competition for secondary school pupils. Photo: Martin McKenna TV cameras and VIP stand (how many people can say they’ve played djembes in Bertie’s presence?), over the Liffey and up Dame Street, past both cathedrals, all the way to Kevin Street. Six hundred and fifty thousand people from all over Ireland and the world – watching, waving, taking pictures and having a great time as we and over three thousand other dancers, musicians and entertainers celebrated our nation’s patron saint with a vibrant display of diversity.

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It was, of course, brilliant fun. I know I speak for the group when I voice our sincere thanks to Dublin City Council and the St Patrick’s Festival organisers for the wonderful opportunity and the unique experience of being part of such an important celebration. We’ve already been invited to take part again next year! Trinity term sees two very important events for us take place – we will be hosting the South African Ambassador to Ireland, Her Excellency Ms Priscilla

Jana, when she comes to Trinity to give a talk, and we will be holding our AGM to elect next year’s committee – both within the next three weeks. We are currently accepting submissions for the next issue of our journal Rhythm and Spice – all articles and enquiries should be directed to afrocarib@csc.tcd.ie, and for updates (and photographs of the parade and everything else we’ve done this year!) check out our new website: www.afrocarib.csc.tcd.ie.

College Historical Society

Hist freshers deal with terrorism

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Trinity Literary Society launches this year’s Attic Trinity Literary Society’s AGM was held on Thursday, March 8 in the Atrium. The AGM, which was extremely well-attended and copiously furnished with Marks and Spencers��� finest wine, also served to launch The Attic, the society’s longestablished magazine. 13 new writers’ poetry and prose was published in the literary journal edited by Eimear Crowe, Joey Facer, Deirdre Hosford and Alan Murrin. The magazine is funded by the Central Societies Committee, the English Department in College and Trinity Publications. It has been published, under a variety of names, since their second year of the society’s inception in 1992.

“Med Day” wins awards

Darren Mooney Daniel Costigan The College Historical Society held its annual R’n’L debate on the controversial topic of political violence or terrorism on Wednesday April 4th. Organised exclusively by the Records and Libraries subcommittee, the debate was a roaring success. This Junior Freshman-run debate was quite an interesting departure from the normal discussions that take place in the chamber during the year. The vibrant and varied discussion of political violence during the debate was a fantastic reflection on the R’n’L. “I’ve never seen anything like it,” commented Hist Auditor James O’Brien. “The energy and enthusiasm shown by the first-years is just amazing.” The motion – “One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter” meant that the speakers didn’t address the House in the usual adversarial manner. The debate quickly became an invitation for speakers to advance from the motion and tackle more broad and varied concepts. Ideas about the pejorative use of the word “terrorist”, subjective Western value judgements and the need to come up with objective criteria by which to define a terrorist were discussed. The debate also challenged the audience to question the violent foundation of western democracies and further used varied and unique analogies comparing terrorism to beating someone to death in a night-club, or pondering if the photogenic nature of the victims is what makes us feel so disgusted at the concept. Is killing killing or is terrorism something beyond that? The highlight of the night was former body double for Uday Hussein, Dr Latif Yahia, asserting that the so-called Democratic Nations didn’t have the principles they so strongly advocated. Dr Yahia alleged widespread corruption, hypocrisy and abuse within the West and challenged us to revise our views of “terrorists” as depicted through our news services. “Two things make the Terrorist,” he warned the audience: “The politician

This year’s Rag week was by far the most successful one to date. A host of events took place over the course of the week, including the steamy Slave Auction, the lecturers’ University Challange, the inaugural and very successful Assassin, and the mercilessly disgusting, as promised, Iron Stomach contest (not for the faint at heart or those who intended to keep their shoes splatter-free). The events were attended by record numbers this year and all of the proceeds went to the Trinity Volunteers’ Opportunities Forum.

The Board of Irish College Societies National Awards hosted by NUI Galway on April 18 celebrated the achievements of the top societies from 14 colleges from all of Ireland. Attending the awards and competing in the “large college” category were representatives from DCU, DIT, Trinity, UCC, University of Limerick, Queen’s Belfast and NUI Galway. Best Event in a large college went to our own University Biological Association for “Med Day”. “Med Day” also won Event of the Year in Trinity at the CSC Ball in the Hilton on April 11.

Dr Latif Yahia at the Hist … and the media.” At the time of printing, Dr Yahia’s speech has been downloaded over 2500 times from the Hist’s website, thehist.com. Students themselves grappled on whether it was possible to justify terrorism, or if they were simply “psychopaths” or “impressionable idiots”. One student speaker assured the crowd that “terrorism is not only justifiable, but it’s also effective”. Everyone had a different view and there were no two speeches alike on either side throughout the debate. The debate was a melting pot of different ideas – with speakers disagreeing on what a terrorist was. There was even some discussion as to whether one of the guests, Deirdre Clancy, was a terrorist herself after her disabling of a military jet at Shannon in 2003. Or, as Village columnist Harry Browne suggested, was she a freedom fighter? The massive variety in the guests and speeches make this debate the best R’n’L debate in a long time.

Trinity News wins four awards Trinity News won four awards at this year’s Irish Student Media Awards, including the top prize of Newspaper of the Year. David Molloy won Journalist of the Year for his work published in Trinity News. Jago Tennant took home the Travel Writer of the Year award. Brian Henry was winner of the Web Site of the Year category for www.trinitynews.ie. The newspaper also received nominations in several other categories.

Music Society holds piano marathon DU Music Society held a twelve-hour piano marathon on April 17 from 10am until 10pm in the Public Theatre. Money raised went to depression sufferers’ charity Aware.


8 WORLD REVIEW

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

A woman in the White House? Feargal Madigan For the first time since 1928, there is no incumbent (either president or vice-president) running for election to the White House. From the outset of campaigning, it has been clear that this election will be very different from those gone past. Precedents are being shattered left, right and centre. Never before has campaigning begun so early. Never before have such vast sums of money and resources been pooled to such a wide variety of candidates. Never before has there been such diversity in the potential choices put towards the American people. The election is, in short, a bookmakers dream; six huge profile candidates with very different agendas squaring off in an 18-month race for the admiration, respect and votes of a country rarely so politically charged. The race will be gripping and exciting. It will also be polarising, divisive and, at times, cruel and gruesome. People will lose millions of dollars. Political reputations will be staked and destroyed. The fallout will damage wider blocs within both major parties. The result of this election will shape the course of American politics for the next decade.

There is much to gain and even more to lose. But who is likely to actually win? Gallup currently gives Hilary Clinton a lead over her Democratic rivals and the current leading Republican challenger, Rudolph Giuliani. Mercifully, the fun is not spoiled that easily. If straight out popularity was what counted in American politics, then Al Gore would be president. In order to be successful, a candidate must be able to deliver important “swing” states like Florida, Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin that tend to deviate between the two parties. Hilary is not doing well in these places especially in the industrial North; and worse, if she ends up going head to head with Giuliani, she could well find herself losing her home state and usual Democratic certainty, New York, where Giuliani is extremely popular. Before Hilary even reaches this stage, she has a very difficult task in securing her party’s nomination. Part of the problem is she is too well known. This means she is unlikely to gain a surge of new voters in the nomination process. All her cards are on the table and she doesn’t have many new tricks to convince the unconvinced. To compound matters she has ceded the high ground to her Democratic rivals on a

number of key policy issues, not least the war in Iraq which she supported and continues to support. For this, she is not loved by the Democratic Party’s left who have found their saviour in the charismatic and exciting Barack Obama. If Obama and other Leftist candidate John Edwards join forces, Hilary will not get the nomination. Her great strengths are the remaining popularity and affection for the days of the Clinton administration and her reputation as a well-balanced centrist candidate who will try and unite, rather than polarise, the country. However, Hilary will be subject to more ferocious and frequent attacks than any other candidate in this race. Unfortunately, she is also likely to face hostility because she is a woman. Several opinion polls have shown that sections of American society would not trust her to lead a war because of a supposed “softness”. Her one big hope is to generate the sort of feeling of inevitability that helped George W to win the nomination and the White House. Nevertheless, her most quoted price at 3/1 is terrible value and one that will almost definitely get longer as the race continues. A more sensible evaluation would reflect a leading contender, but with some noticeable and exploitable flaws.

Hilary Clinton is a leading contender, but has some noticable and exploitable flaws.

Why the West is wrong about Hugo Chavez James Chan

Tibet’s holy palace: Why are so many willing to risk life and limb in order to escape their homeland?

Tibet: the disregarded land of the Dalai Lama Louise O’Connor There are two definitions of the term “Tibet”. One, generally accepted and used by geographers, political analysts, mass media and the Chinese government, refers to an area of Western China. Roughly twenty times bigger than Ireland in size, it is home to 6 million people and claims, among its attractions, the highest summit in the world. The other refers to an independent nation with a unique cultural heritage, the spiritual homeland of millions of ethnic Tibetans, presided over by His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama. The plight of the millions of oppressed Tibetan Buddhists and their exiled countrymen has been disregarded by the world’s media in favour of more immediately contentious issues: various wars, economic crises and celebrity drug addictions to name a few. But the problem of Tibet is a chronic one and more than half a century after China’s aggressive invasion of the country, little has

changed. In October 1950, 40,000 soldiers from Mao’s Red Army launched a concerted attack on Tibetan defence forces. Following this “Peaceful Liberation”, during which over 4,000 Tibetan soldiers were killed, the until-then peaceful nation of Tibet was invaded and occupied within months, forcing the flight of the Dalai Lama over the Himalayan mountains to asylum in India. Over the following 6 decades, he was followed by approximately 200,000 ethnic Tibetans, each of whom risked everything in crossing the highest land tract on earth in search of asylum in neighbouring countries. Those in flight face death by hypothermia, or possibly worse, arrest by Chinese police and detainment in one of a number of “work camps” set up along the routes of flight to India and Nepal. Why are so many willing to abandon their spiritual homeland and risk life and limb in order to escape? The answer lies in the appalling human rights abuses perpetrated by China upon the people of

Tibet. A primary reason, and perhaps the most heartbreaking problem for devout Tibetan Buddhists, is the Communist oppression of all forms of religion. Before being occupied by China, there were more than 3,000 monasteries in Tibet, all places of philosophical learning, meditation and peaceful prayer. Today there are six, to which blissfully unaware foreign visitors are carefully directed, where they are informed of China’s more recent “liberal” stance on religion. Those found to be praying on behalf of the Dalai Lama, seen in the Chinese government’s eyes as a dangerous dissenting force, are arrested, and all images of this spiritual and once secular leader are banned under threat of imprisonment. Stories of torture, physical and sexual abuse and forced sterilisation at the hands of Chinese forces are prevalent among those who have managed to escape. The recent completion of the Qinghai-Tibet railway means that China’s plan for mass internal migration can be accelerated. Citizens from the Chinese

‘motherland’ are being lured to settle the remote mountainous region with assurances of higher living standards and more elevated civil service positions than their ethnic Tibetan neighbours. Paradoxically, while China is willing to assert its claim over Tibet based on a spurious EighthCentury treaty whose terms were only addressed twelve centuries later, the Chinese government seems prepared to execute policies which define their Tibetan countrymen as second-class citizens, or worse, criminals. It cannot be denied that China’s influence over Tibet has brought technological advancement and economic development to what was previously seen as an isolated, backwards nation. But this growth has come at a grave cost to the culture, religion, livelihoods and freedom of millions of Tibetans. The Tibet of lamas, palaces and prayer may have had its own faults, but at least its citizens were free to follow the customs of their ancestors under the spiritual and secular guidance of their venerated leader, the Dalai Lama.

At a time when George Bush is travelling through Latin America, a region that the US has economically and politically destroyed in recent history, others have decided to join him in his hypocrisy. Though the Irish media has proven surprisingly objective, around the world, particularly in the US, there has been a continuous assault on the state of affairs in Venezuela. Typifying the trend, a report from Christine Toomey for The Sunday Times Magazine portrays the current president Hugo Chavez as a blasphemous and undemocratic “secret communist”. Not only was the article ridiculous, it also bordered on slanderous. The facile attack begins with a description of the Enabling Law, recently passed in Venezuela, as an act to “further control the media after closing down the largest run opposition channel [RCTV]; to reduce the authority of state governors, mayors and other officials”. In contrast to this, the immediate reaction from the Irish press was apprehensive but they refused to jump to conclusions, and rightly so. In 2003 The Irish Times described Venezuela as “the most open country in the world in terms of press behaviour” and they clearly wanted some concrete evidence before going back on this bold statement. First of all, the closing of the largest of the many opposition channels occurred when the licensing renewal was refused. This is the channel that played a huge part in orchestrating the 2004 military coup, literally calling out for the assassination of Hugo Chavez. They have since continued to broadcast their anti-Chavez propaganda, assaulting him with petty insults and even after their licence wasn’t renewed they could still broadcast on public TV. In any other “democratic” country they would have been taken off air immediately after the failure of the 2002 coup for their obvious acts of sedition. Secondly the branding of the Enabling Law as a step towards totalitarianism is completely unfounded. It is also a line that The Sunday Times has taken several times before, branding Chavez as “increasingly autocratic” and making meek comparisons with Pol Pot’s old regime in Cambodia. Chavez has used the law three times, none of which affected the democratic system in Venezuela. Also, if one actually looks into what the law says, and Ms Toomey clearly hasn’t, one would find that his powers are very restricted by the national assembly (strictly internal issues), his authority will expire in 18 months (which he has no power to extend) and the law does not interfere with citizen, judiciary or national assembly “check and balancing” of

presidential powers. For instance, normally the law in Venezuela “empowers the people to rescind all laws by popular referendum if 10% or more registered voters request a referendum vote be held, and for laws passed by decree if only 5% want it”. When Bush introduced the Patriot Act, did 5% of the populace have the power to call a referendum? No. When he gave himself the power to invade Iraq under false pretences did 5% of the populace have the power to call a referendum? No. Under Chavez Venezuela has become possibly the most democratic country in existence. The people are given extensive powers over local affairs through local assemblies, and many other acts have been put into place to shift the balance of power in favour of the people of Venezuela. Also, every time Chavez has come to power it has been from elections unmarred by any independent accusations of fraud. The Enabling Act has been passed to allow Chavez to expedite the transformation of Venezuela from an Americanized, free market “democracy for the rich”, to a true democracy where all people have a say in state affairs. Ms Toomey goes on to describe Chavez as having “fundamental frustrations” over his peasant background, this concept is continued with further accusations of Chavez being power hungry, egotistical and ignorant. Yet in almost a decade, Chavez’s rule has raised literacy rates to 100%, reclaimed the oil industry for the people and provided free medical care for even the poorest neighbourhoods. Measures like these to alleviate poverty in the country have consistently secured the president a 60% approval rating. If Chavez has any “fundamental frustrations” he’s clearly channelling them into safeguarding the poor and closing the wealth gap. Weak arguments over the economic boom centred around the oil industry do little more than grasp at straws. They fail because Chavez is using the money from the oil to build stronger ties with neighbouring countries and secure the economic future of the Venezuelan people. As Bush travels around South America he is meeting protests against him at every turn. The Irish Times, reporting on Bush’s trip, highlighted the US’s tariffs on Brazil’s ethanol industry and excessive military aid to Columbia. In the eyes of the people of Latin America, Bush is a visiting leader of an imperialist power, a power that has in the past nurtured dictatorial coups throughout the region. On the other hand, Chavez is heralded as a power that can lead Latin America to a new era of independence and prosperity. It is perhaps fitting then that he is leading a massive rally of around 20,000 people in Argentina against the American president.


OPINION 9

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

College needs to clarify Schol criteria Ned Daly Fools excepted, there are three kinds of people who attempt Trinity College’s Foundation Scholarship exams. The first group aim for exemptions so they can work or party during May and June while everybody else is studying for the Summer exams. The second group masochistically submit themselves to months of scholarly domination in the real or deluded hope of their handcuffs being released in a climax called Trinity Monday. Many of them are closet aristocrats who aim for the closest thing in Ireland to a meritocratic knighthood; others genuinely believe they have a skill or talent (“spark”, as this ambiguous quality was termed at a pre-Schols briefing) that could set them above the rest and, cape and goat in hand, they can make the world a better place. The third group do it to keep their girlfriend or boyfriend company, and maybe get some work done at the same time. Two of these groups – those aiming for exemptions or, surely, “benefits” – get a pretty good deal. The last is brought to the point of emotional breakdown, material deprivation, having strained their relationships, egos, mental faculties, tolerance to caffeine and over-the-counter stimulants, food budgets and sanity pureand-simple well beyond reasonable allowance, and then left dangling for six weeks – after the papers have been marked and exemptions announced – while their fate is decided by the powers that be. Fair enough. But there is one more ordeal of initiation, less obvious but no less distressing, that the hopeful scholar must undergo. The official line, and that delivered to all Schols candidates in the January lectures designed to strike primal fear into their hearts, is that Schols – that is, the actual full-blown “Give me my goat and I’ll be on my way” Schols and not simply exemptions – is decided solely on the basis of your five or so written or oral exams. The revealed truth is more vague. There are strictly 70 Foundation Scholarships up for grabs, as well as a

Academic excellence: Schol candidates need clarification of the criteria for their award. Photo: M Moriarty varying number of non-Foundation Scholarships. For obvious reasons, not the least of which being the ubiquitous “funding problems” (as the shivering students in the Berkley Library wait in vain for chairs and a drop of heating oil, if it’s not too much trouble, Mr Provost, Sir), the College will want to keep the Scholarship awards down to a minimum. As soon as the exemptions are announced, lecturers and department heads are quickly mobilised for a series of Schols conferences. What happens in these presumably dark and smoky rooms has as much bearing on the likelihood of a candidate becoming a Scholar as does his or her exam performance. Candidates can only guess at the factors that might tip the scales in their favour. Very educated guesses, certainly, but guesses they remain. Section S6 of the University Calendar describing the qualifications for Scholarship includes the maddeningly ambiguous Condition Eight: “The previous conduct of candidates must have been satisfactory”. It

suddenly throws a spanner into the works of reason, objectivity and merit – arguably the very foundations on which this college was based (conveniently excluding those over-emotional women, Catholics and Northsiders). What does it mean? Surely “satisfactory” is not simply the opposite of the “non-satisfactory attendance” letters sent out at the end of term. Could “conduct” possibly refer to behaviour – are the powers-that-be that puritanical? This poses a serious problem for candidates who may have a less than sparkling record. Mary, who hasn’t skipped a day and always has her coursework in before time, but hasn’t had a spark of creativity or foresight since Fine Gael had a chance, bless her, should be make a perfect Scholar. John, the brilliant drama student who’s had his plays performed in Players, but has had to be shaken awake more than once on the cricket pitch without his costume or girlfriend on the Sunday morning after the night before, sadly, hasn’t got a chance. This intervening month and a half,

between the announcement of exemptions and that of scholarships, cannot be spent in idle pondering of these “factors” – not here nor on an Interrail trail with the Schols candidate’s “exempted and free” mates. You will notice on these sunny days, in your lecture theatres, the few who shouldn’t be. Except for a handful of essays, they have completed their course requirements to the letter. Only

the fear of spilling ink on their “conduct”, the gloomy question “What if attendance is taken into account?” chains them to their desks. It is house arrest without the possibility of bail, lest they flee before the verdict is announced. Apart from science students, who bizarrely sit only a few of their exams during Schols and must take the remainder during May, those who have

achieved exemptions and await the announcement of Schols have already demonstrated their knowledge of the course material. The offered argument that they will “get an NS” if they do not attend – that is, be declared “non-satisfactory” for the term – is not valid. One NS means nothing: a stern letter to the student and their tutor and a warning not to let it happen again, a wink and a caution rather than a penalty point. As long as the Michaelmas and Hilary term records are clean there can be consequences; the alarm is only tripped by two non-satisfactory terms. The third strike of the match became unlucky during the trenches of WW1 – the eager sniper sights on the first flash, adjusts for range on the second and mortally aims on the third. So why are these soldiers painted with a bull’s-eye for a month after the battle? Stifled talent is at issue here. Obviously not every candidate is on the cusp of writing the greatest piece of popular scholarship since Shama’s Citizens given half the chance, but the freedom to pursue their interests rather than spoil in a sickly fluorescent-lit room seems a rational demand. If there is a valid reason for keeping the hopeful candidates on a leash, let’s hear it. Demanding they check in like errant paedophiles is a waste of their time as well as their professors’. On every potential scholar’s mind now is the question, “What are the real requirements of Schols?” Scholar candidates would like clarification.

Begging to differ Sinead Fortune Begging is a form of self-expression. I am, of course, referring to one man’s success in overturning 160 years of anti-begging legislation on that very claim. Last week in the high court, Dubliner Niall Dillon argued that Ireland’s vagrancy laws violated his freedom of expression. He had been arrested for begging in 2003. Apart from the fact that his success means a review of begging law and the possible decriminalisation of begging, that in itself is pivotal, that begging could be a form of self-expression is an interesting idea. Doesn’t it seem ironic that begging, an act associated with poverty and necessity, is suddenly being defended on the basis of freedom. Is freedom an almost insulting term for one person deeming it necessary to rely on passers-by for an income? Surely begging is an act propelled by a tyranny of poverty rather than a desire to express oneself? These and other thoughts crossed my mind when I read about the case last week. Critics of beggars often see begging as a kind of choice on the part of the ‘beggar’ (if such a term is PC); we’ve heard nonsensical arguments that the Celtic Tiger has raised all boats (a very nautical kitty indeed). Certainly, I saw the definition of begging as self-expression as being as condescending as those sort of fat-cat views. Yet, we should really question what freedom of expression means. You see, self-expression isn’t just what children are taught in fancy

playschools, neither is it a malady specifically affecting caffeinated arts students. It is (quite obviously) the expression of the self. This is a ‘self’, which, either through a variety of unfortunate circumstances or conscious choices, sits with a polystyrene cup for several hours a day collecting change. A question; why wasn’t this begging ‘self’ permitted to be expressed on our streets for the last 160 years? What is it about the beggar that has defined him or her as a criminal in Irish life? Maybe the realists will point out that begging often is a by-word for general hassle. Certainly, vagrancy is often an umbrella term for a variety of offences; loitering, travelling, perhaps even a hint at prostitution. Similarly, the ‘beggar’ connotes a sort of vagabond of the ‘Fagan’ variety, with the power to make you part with your cash. Yet, we must differentiate between a person passively collecting change and an act of aggression. I’m no law student but, surely, other laws already cover what are seen to be darker aspects of begging. Assault is a crime, you can be charged for both aggression and pick pocketing, so, why exactly has begging been pushed into the criminal underworld up until now? The beggar, the self that begs, has been a criminal in Irish life because they assault us. Yes, I said assault. A rain-sodden mother and child, eyeing us as we mumble excuses, are assaulting us. The sight of their misery barges into our thoughts and viciously attacks our consciences. The damage is catastrophic. For a few

seconds we must abandon ourselves and see what isn’t functioning in society. We might make quick comparisons between our full Starbucks cup and the empty one in the child’s hands. If the assault is particularly brutal, we night feel some vague guilt, even a hint of responsibility. Perhaps we’re not doing enough. Luckily, attacks are short-lived and easily remedied. We are comforted with thoughts of contributing to some sort of charity that deals with these people. Sometime, when we’ve a bit more time. Sure they’d probably spend the money on drink or something anyway (you’ve always been a moral tee-totaller, despite brief sojourns to the Pav). What I’m suggesting is that criminalizing of the beggar has had more to do with their effect on our collective conscience than it functioning as a safeguard against aggressive attacks. So, for our legal system to do a Uturn and allow begging to be a form of self-expression isn’t some sort of theoretical nonsense. It’s a societal revolution. We, the rest of society are allowing the ‘begging-self’ to be seen. The self that blatantly shows that it has not been touched by economic prosperity now has a right to be visible. To be acknowledged. Whatever their presence might say about us and however uncomfortable it renders us. Perhaps also we should look to the acknowledgement of other ‘selves’, the sight of whom forms a similar attack on our consciences. Surely begging isn’t the only aspect of Irish life we’ve hidden through criminalisation. Let’s beg for change.

Continually assess us please Meghan Brown We live in a society where people expect things on demand. Our generation is a one that doesn’t wait around for what we want because we’d just go elsewhere and demand it there. Instant gratification is what we want. Similarly, students expect this in education. We expect to sit down in a lecture, learn something, and leave, all within 50 minutes. Yet our current method of teaching and assessing does not reflect this. Education has become more about psychological stamina than intellectual achievement. Today’s students focus more on final examinations and the degree than what is learned along the way. This is due to our nature of assessment. Studies have shown that when the workload is more spread out, information is retained for longer. Although some courses, such as Economic and Social Studies, incorporate regular continuous assessment at the end of each term, it is weighted very lightly compared to the final exam. 80% of a student’s final mark should not be determined in one day but rather on their academic perform-

ance year-round. The current system makes assessment at term time seem insubstantial and makes a mockery of the structure that we should be aspiring to attain. Although the continuous assessment option is open in some courses, even then it is labeled as “soft”, and students themselves are socially stigmatized as “getting off light” and “having an easier course”. This attitude of intellectual machismo among Trinity students – “look at me, I didn’t do a tap all year, only studied for a month, and passed with a first” – needs to change. Cramming and working hard only in Trinity term is not an effective way of learning. Trinity’s attitude on method of assessment needs to be rectified, from a top-down superior “we do things differently because we’re better” attitude, to one that reflects current times. Instead of rewarding intellectual integrity, this system brings out the best in some that can juggle the pressure cooker that is end of year exams and the worst in those that crack. A full year’s work is crammed into three weeks of assessment. What does this say about our university’s priorities? Is today’s Trinity a mass factory for handing out degrees as long as you

manage to write clearly under a tight deadline? Rather, it shows the disinterest in properly educating the next generation. To compete with higher-level educational institutions in an globalising world, it is necessary that Trinity catch up with the times, and invest in the value of a solid undergraduate education through the implementation of College-wide continual assessment policy. The challenge of university does not diminish with regular assessment; rather, it increases a student’s accountability to the material and alerts a lecturer’s awareness as to where problem areas within the course lie. This pressure cooker only boils in academia. Our learning should not take place once a year but rather mirror society in assessing the learning that takes place regularly. Why don’t we support continual assessment? In the academic world, our current teaching and testing methods are seen by some as barbaric and draconian. The challenge of university does not lessen with continual assessment but rather furthers academic integrity through enhancing learnt material. Are we following yet another tradition just for the sake of tradition?


10 EDITORIAL AND COMMENT

The Agent It’s been quite a year for the Agent. Does anyone remember the floppy-haired Players boy whose girlfriend was cheating on him? Unfortunately their relationship didn’t quite last the year. This is in stark contrast to James O’Brien who led the Hist through an entire session despite strong opposition from all quarters; even the ever loyal and soon-to-be Auditor, Timothy Smyth. But more on that later. The Agent has always said that Bartley Rock was a man capable of doing great things. Indeed, the Agent always said that Bartley would beat that spoon Neil McGough senseless, and it was great to see the Agent’s prediction ring through. With Bartley Rock on the board of College, the students can sleep easy in their beds at night, knowing that their future is safe in the hands of a man of the highest calibre. Oh wait, you bunch of tools, ye deserve everything ye get. The Agent was glad t o

get one prediction wrong though – Claire Tighe is hot, which is why the Agent gave her one in the end. As for the other elections, well, yawn. Poor Simon Evans, that’s what the Agent says. The Agent sees he’s going to have to relocate next year, since Quinner’s gone and signed the deeds of House Six back to the College, in the face of overwhelming opposition from various sources in the Union and the CSC. Fair play to Quinner though, it’ll be great to see the hacks have to slum it down there in that other end of the College with all the boggers and hairy-legged women. Poor Joe O’Gorman is said to be apoplectic. Fair enough, if the Agent was one of those guys he wouldn’t like the thought of the Hamilton end either. Over in the Phil, Ruthie Faller, who i s both o f the society’s two

biggest assets, walked last week to the presidency, sweeping all before her, whip in hand. Faller has a huge act to follow next year of course, but will be blessed by a very well-connected council, including the return from exile of one Ciara Lyden as treasurer. Lyden, renowned for being willing to bust balls to get her way (and she has the thighs to do it, lads) will be the enforcer-in-chief. Meanwhile, Trevor BreenBrown, recently referred to as “unstable” in an internal YFG memo, dropped out of the race

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

for secretary after being told by senior Phil people in no uncertain terms that he’d face electoral humiliation. Meanwhile, the Agent is glad to see that the DU Cricket Club is going to such great lengths to improve their performances during this summer that it has taken to spending our money on paying rent for a couple of Australians to play for Trinners during the coming season. This decision has rankled badly with a lot of the members, who feel that they’re being cheated out of their right to lose the Colours game. The Agent, though, is pleased. After the results of the Students’ Union elections, he thinks that the fewer Trinity students involved in making decisions about anything, the better. Meanwhile, over in the paintballers’ society, rumours reach the Agent’s ears of a major bust-up involving a some kind of five-way lust pentagon involving half the committee. Apparently, several instances of cheating have ratcheted up tensions on a committee already prone to, if not in love with, violence. The Agent won’t name anyone, but suffice to say that you’d need a thick pair of glasses to see to the bottom of this one. In Hist land, the Agent is having a hard time believing that it’s not the Tim Smyth session, and is, in fact, still the James O’Brien session. Daire Hickey has now taken solely to dealing with Tim, after James went over the head of Hist committee to ruin a deal Hickey was negotiating with College. James has also had time to ask his debates convenor to resign, telling him the committee had lost confidence in him, only to have the said debates convenor ask the committee if this was true in front of James. They all said it wasn’t. How mortifying. Meanwhile, the Hist doesn’t have enough people to fill their committee for next year. Solution, James style? Create more positions. We do feel ole James was a tad hard done by recently. The Junior Dean refused permission for a full reception for several Hist and Phil events. This, she said, was due to examinations – but don’t they happen all year round? Nevertheless, the good Dean did allow traditional music in Front Square and certainly hasn’t said anything about the raft of parties taking place in College over the last number of weeks. Inconsistent, to say the least. Much more could be said but this paper has enough to worry about without the good Dean bearing another grudge. At least the Agent won’t be looking for rooms in College this year – a sigh of relief. She’ll no doubt pin this article to her bedpost as a personal victory, but the Agent wonders why she’s ruining a perfectly good reputation. The “Dean of Discipline” has managed to get a few things done though. Previous to her taking residence in the Rubrics, refuse trucks would go about their business at 5:30 in the morning. Not under her watch it seems. In her trademark way, she treated the refuse company

in the same way she would a student. They were told that their behaviour was simply unacceptable and that she’d be forced to fine them if they didn’t go about their business at a more reasonable time. Have a look outside your window this evening! Oddly enough the good Dean hasn’t occupied her time with any of College’s “real” problems. Does she know who Trinity’s infamous “cider baron” is? Which students have been subletting their rooms in College for the last number of months? Who recently went to a College party and gave out 25 pills free of charge? Far more pressing issues than these! Fresh from her victory at the CSC awards (which was nearly snapped away from the poor girl by one bitter hack) Sophie Davies has been lobbying aggressively to fill the “vacancy” of CSC Chair. Some would say that the position always has a vacancy, or perhaps it’s that the chair is always vacant. It’s really just another position at a dinner table. See

“sundries” expenses in the Honorary Treasurer’s report for details. No doubt CSC committee will be filled with the usual hacks. Well, it’s been a long year, and the Agent is happy that it’s coming to an end. The Agent has the honour now of handing out his three big awards for the year: Massive failure of the year: The Agent knows you all expect him to give this one to James O’Brien, but since The Agent always expected Jamesy to do awfully, it goes instead to a man who “was the future, once”. A man who had an opportunity to really do something big this year and failed to deliver, to date. That man, folks, is Students’ Union Deputy President Simon Hall, who completely failed to revitalise the Retard and failed to get started on his much-heralded film about the Union. Massive success of the year: Stand up Bartley Rock. You did it. You fooled the electorate into thinking you have the foggiest idea of what it takes to be an

Over the Wall to the Trinity Ball The weary old hand of the publican Waved toward the clock: “Your glasses now, please, it’s past time to leave. Come, boys and girls – amach.” Old Trinity grads and other fine lads And lasses of every degree Drank down their Guinness and Harp to the finish For someone had plans for a spree. Up then and spake the bold Limerick Rake With a leader-like look on his face. At the sound of his voice, all the hubbub and noise Came to a stop in that place. “Right, boys, now you might know that this is the night Of the annual Trinity Ball. Which of you here has the courage to dare To follow me over the wall?” From hundreds of throats came the time-honoured boast In voices well liquored and hoarse: “We all to the man are yours to command – If the girls will come with us, of course.” This visiting Yank went along on the prank, The soberest one of the lot, To record as a bard for those who were jarred The valorous deeds of the plot. We trouped out the door with the Rake at the fore And stopped at TCD’s front gate. “Look there,” said young Tom, and he lifted his arm, Forgetting his valuable freight. Billy-O quickly bent to prevent the descent Of the Jameson towards its destruction. Unfortunately, so did Breeda McGee, And their heads met without introduction. Young lads with passes and evening-gowned lasses Were lined up the length of the street. “Those fellows are daft,” said Tom with a laugh, “For the fruit that is stolen is sweet.” The Rake raised his hand and said, “Those who can stand...” For he saw that they were very few; He continued “...Will all carry those who can’t crawl. My God, what a sick looking Crew.” The wobbly parade with the Rake in the lead Straggled round to the rear of the school. Just off Westland Row there were others also At the wall. Said the Rake, “I’m no fool.” So we followed him round to Pearse Street and found, As if it were destined by Fate, A new building site that was closed for the night, With a ladder beyond a locked gate. Up over we went, every lady and gent, Though the women wore long and short skirts. “After you, girls,” said one of the churls, The ladies said, “Oh, you’re such flirts.” They put up the ladder, but what was the matter? The ones at the top couldn’t see. And those on the ground couldn’t hear any sound But a splash – Paddy taking a pee. Then someone said, “Shhh,” halting Pat in mid-stream, And whispered, “There’s wardens around.” The Rake took command and said, “I’ve a plan. Come all of ye down to the ground.” Down they all got. We set off at a trot With the ladder back over the gate. When all had climbed over, what did I discover? I’m holding the ladder! Hey, wait! Now I who was brought just to watch, as I thought, Find myself at the head of the charge. Says the Rake, “Have no fear.” But he’s at the rear Of a mad Irish mob that is large. So I run with no choice down the street till a voice Hollers, “Left when you come to the lane.” I’m running like hell and grateful the yell Is drowned by an overhead train. Round the corner we speed with myself in the lead, Hoping to find no police. But what’s that ahead? I wonder with dread, For I’m surely disturbing the peace.

Education Officer. Other notable contenders were Daire Hickey, Rob Kearns and Timothy Smyth. All around hack of the year: The person who shafted, screwed, lied and cheated their way to success this year, and emerged with their reputation totally enhanced. This is the Agent’s most prestigious award – it recognizes the ability to be a total bastard and get away with it, time and time again. And it goes, with the Agent’s compliments, to Students’ Union President-Elect Andrew Byrne. What did Byrne do to earn it? Well, The Agent will tell you next year. For now, The Agent will leave you with this question, readers: Guess which Trinity FM presenter was caught by a close colleague pleasuring him or herself while on air? That’s a whole pile of embarrassment, isn’t it? And it’s true – “thrust” the Agent. Answers on a postcard to the usual address. • theagent@trinitynews.ie

“Sure ’tis only a lad and his girlfriend, bedad, Trying to climb up the wall. To the rescue,” I shout, and the words that come out Sound Irish, not Yankee at all. “Yer man, like, you know,” I say, trying to show I belong with the rest of the boys. The Limerick whispers, “For Jaysus’ sake, The divil take all of this noise. “Up with the ladder and down with the chatter. The invasion is set to begin. Now over the top, and nobody stop, Till this whole sickly Crew is within.” The climb wasn’t hard, but Seamus was jarred, And couldn’t find one of his shoes. On his hands and his knees he went fast as you please. He knew he had no time to lose. Pretty Peggy was next, the flower of her sex, Resplendent in evening array. She climbed even quicker, afraid that her knickers Would show – it was dark, anyway. The last one was me, for I wanted to see If any policemen would come. And just when I got myself safe to the top, I heard someone thoughtfully hum. A man and a lad, both officially clad, Stood squinting up into the dark. Said the one to his mate, “I think we’re too late To witness the boys on a lark. “Never let it be thought that the Gardaí were caught Unaware, it would damage our honour. Enough of this natter. Take down the ladder. Victory to the Garda Síochána!” Back in Verse Number 8, we left with headaches Billy-O and sweet Breeda McGee. They’ve been off on their own for the rest of the poem, Nursing their lumps over tea. But now down the lane, heads together again, They came strolling along arm in arm. “Billy-O,” I called out. He looked all about. Breeda jumped with a squeal of alarm. “I’m up here, you dunce.” “Oh, how was the dance?” “I haven’t been in,” I replied. “The guards came around, the escape route was found, And the ladder is laid on its side.” “Sure you’re in a fine pickle,” said Bill with a giggle, “You’re lucky we came by at all.” He pushed and I pulled till the ladder was hauled Out of sight at the top of the wall. I leapt through the air to a roof that was there And wondered if all the Crew made it. A voice made me freeze – “Pint of Guinness, please.” I saw it was Paddy who said it. He sat in a trance, sadly wetting his pants, So I let him continue his prattle. I climbed down a tree to where I could see That others had fallen in battle. Young Thomas lay prone with his head on a stone, Lovingly hugging his Jameson. Two naked feet, like slabs of fat meat, Stuck out of the hedge I found Seamus in. I followed the trail of the heroes who failed To the Quad, where the music was loud. There stood, broadly grinning, surrounded by women, The Limerick Rake, looking proud. I was feeling much bolder, till a hand on my shoulder Told me I was caught by police. “Come with us, sir. We’d like an answer As to how you got into this place.” “Hold on,” said the Rake. “You’ve made a mistake, For I have his ticket with me.” He reached in his pocket and pulled out a ducat That made me both legal and free. “Hold on, my friend,” I said. “You could have entered This Ball by the main college gate. Why did you call for a crawl up the wall, When you already had tickets paid?” The Rake laughed and said, with his hand on the head Of a fox with a smile on her face, “Now you know that the fun and the thrill of the hunt Is not in the kill, but the chase.” I left at five, and glad to survive. Some never recovered at all. For no one stayed sober the night we went over The wall to the Trinity Ball. By Richard Marsh from Facets (Dublin: Mazgeen Press, 1992). Order from richardmarsh@legendarytours.com, €4.


EDITORIAL AND LETTERS 11

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

To the Editor 6 Trinity College, Dublin 2 Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Keep the rope at the Pav but introduce student card checks The good weather is here, and with it the usual invasion of College Park by students looking to relax in the sun. This is all perfectly normal and is to be expected. However, it is an insult to the University’s cricketers to insist on the removal of the rope which marks the boundary of the playing field at the Pavilion end of the Park, as some students have done. That section of College Park is designated for sporting use and the drinking student has no right to demand a generous area of green on which to indulge his alcoholic habit. It may be that the overcrowding problem (if one considers it a problem) could be alleviated by insisting that only members of the College and their friends, along with paid-up graduate members of the Central Athletic Club, use the Park and Pavilion for drinking and socialising. The Constitution of the Central Athletic Club states that “The Club premises shall consist of the Pavilion, College Park, and no person shall be permitted to use the said premises other than members of DUCAC and their guests”. Student and staff card checks are, however, never carried out. It would be impossible to completely rid the College Park of trespassers. Nevertheless, a few unscheduled card checks by the porters would go a long way towards creating a goth- and ghetto blaster-free outdoor social area. It might also be worth considering introducing a trough at the side of the Moyne Institute to ensure all of the outdoor urinating takes place at one spot.

Time to abandon old periodicals which aren’t up to scratch A consultation of the University Calendar shows the four publications currently recognised by the Publications Committee – Icarus, Miscellany, Piranha and Trinity News. Trinity News is the only one of these to have published its constitutionally mandated amount of three issues so far this year. Despite this, none of the others have been threatened with derecognition; indeed, the only other publication to have printed three issues (a fourth is expected), the start-up In Transit, has been told it will not be recognised! Miscellany seems to plod on from year to year publishing random articles which take the editor’s fancy. Its charism is completely undefined, and it seems only to exist in order to maintain some form of existence for name of the old TCD: A College Miscellany. TCD published weekly in term from the late 19th century until the late 1970s, carrying news on the College clubs and societies and other items pertaining to Trinity. These functions have long been taken over by Trinity News. The current Miscellany does not have anything to do with the old TCD, and should be thrown out for being useless and irrelevant. It also has only published once this academic year – a far cry from when TCD was published six times every term. Piranha, the newest of the currently recognised publications (1979 – some others have come and gone in the intervening years), has not published enough issues this year to justify its continued existence. It should be derecognised; if someone wants to apply to revive it next Michaelmas term they would be free to do so. It would be shame to see Icarus pass, and thankfully it will should be out again next Monday. That the newest of the recognised publications started up in 1979, and that a start-up publication is not being given the encouragement it needs, shows that some of the College publications exist simply because they’ve “always been there”. This is no reason to continue funding them: Miscellany and Piranha should be scrapped and In Transit should be given the encouragement it needs to establish itself.

St Patrick’s Well should be maintained after renovations One benefit of the renovation of the Provost’s stables will be improved access to St Patrick’s Well, the ancient holy well on the College grounds underneath the Nassau Street entrance. It would be nice if those responsible for this area of College would pay some attention to the well, which is not currently maintained and where a lot of rubbish from the street ends up.

Flying the flag won’t change, hide or expunge College’s past Sir, – I am saddened by the campaign to fly the Irish flag over Trinity on a daily basis. This is not because I do not like the national flag – on the contrary, I am extremely proud of our tricolour. However, the national flag is already flown on all significant occasions as is proper and dignified. This is an old issue, already long resolved. What troubles me are the simplistic assumptions behind this campaign: first, that Trinity is somehow not “Irish” enough but can become so by flying a flag more frequently, and second, that by flying the flag more often one can somehow change, hide or expunge the College’s past. Both these assumptions reveal a very reductionist intellectual understanding of the concepts of nationality, history and identity. Ireland has, as we all recognise, a

troubled and difficult history. Thankfully in recent years this island has been moving away from the politics of flag-waving to look at Irish national identity as the product of multiple, complex traditions and heritages, north and south, Protestant, Catholic, Dissenter and Jewish. At a time when we are trying to encourage areas in Northern Ireland to stop branding their kerbstones and street lights with flags of whatever kind, it seems odd that we would now decide that Ireland’s premier university, with its complex and uniquely mixed unionist and nationalist past, needs to fly a national flag on a daily basis, instead of on important occasions as is the norm. Why this need? Why this campaign? Is mise le meas, – Dr Heather Jones Department of History

Desire to fly the flag not xenophobic or triumphalist A chara, – The editorial of your last issue has provoked my disgust in relation to its comments regarding the campaign for the flag of Éire to be flown over the facade of the college, especially in its insulting comments about the “insecure identities” of certain students. The idea that the students in the College attain a separate and exclusive identity is laughable at best, given your suggestion that the campaign is an attempt to separate the College from the UK. I’m quite sure that, just as the students are very aware that they have been part of Éire for the best part of a century, they are also very aware of their being in Trinity College, and as such need no reminder either. If, as has been suggested, flying such a flag would insult the beliefs or nationalities of some members of the student body (with particular reference to international students) then I would question their very decision to undertake a degree in the Republic of Ireland.

Furthermore, considering the identity of Trinity students as being of more importance than that of the Irish populace and therefore being more worthy of celebration, is another pompous and ill-considered idea that flirts with the ridiculous. We, the University of Dublin, are an Irish institution, and have been so, whether those in command were in agreement with such a status or not, for at least 70 years. As such, our identity is not under question and not under threat from any insecurity. The desire to display the Irish flag above the Front Gate emanates not from any xenophobic or triumphalist ideals, not from a national insecurity, but from a genuine pride of the Irish nation to which we belong, whether that be for a four-year degree or for the entire duration of our lives. Yours etc, – Stephen O’Neill JF Diploma in Information Systems

Philosophers’ society has more than four-and-a-half members Sir, – In the article entitled “Eating out in College” published in the Food and Drink section of your publication on Tuesday, 20 February 2007, some inaccuracies have been presented as fact. In the course of your journalist’s in-depth and clearly rigorous research for said article he failed to notice that the Metaphysical Society actually comprises a membership including some 190 persons, and not four and a half as implied by the text. Seemingly, this expose’s “author” is not used to applying more than half measures to his work, given this grievous failure in basic arithmetic. He apparently is aware of there being half a person in College. Surely, a semi-student would have provided ample subject matter for an article rather than half-truths

about our society. Moreover it should be acknowledged that our committee room is situated in a location somewhat radically different than suggested by the “journalist” and that he seems to have fallen short yet again in his attention to detail, disregarding the actuality of our presence in House Six. For forthcoming articles, I would recommend that this particular “writer” should perhaps be strictly monitored regarding his truthfulness or otherwise might seek publicity elsewhere, given his obvious inability to employ actual journalistic approaches. Yours etc, – Diarmuid Coleman SF Philosophy and English Co-Auditor, DU Metaphysical Society

The Pope has condemned Trinity Has Trinity, in consequence of this Act [of 1873], really changed? Has it become less Protestant in character and tone? Less anti-Catholic? Let us see. It is true indeed that every post of authority and honour and emolument – apart from its divinity school – is now open to Catholics. In actual fact a number of offices, emoluments, and prizes are closed to Catholics, for nomination to these is given to committees or bodies which are exclusively Protestant, e.g. Erasmus Smith Board. It may be well to mention here that Trinity’s doors were opened not so much to allow the Catholics to enter as to give admittance to the “dissenters” the Presbyterians, and others, who, up to 1873, were excluded: Trinity had been the exclusive preserve of the Church of Ireland. The entry of the Presbyterians scarcely changed the character of Trinity or made its tone more agreeable to Catholics! Of those who know Trinity, few will be found to say it has changed. Today the odour of its founders is still obvious, and their spirit pervades its halls as well as its Chapel. Its atmosphere, its traditions, its genius loci, are as hostile to the Catholic Faith as ever. The gates and the doors may be open, but its heart beats as true to the intentions of its founders as it did when the Papist stood without its walls. Every act of hers in her recent as in her past history proves that she is Protestant and anti-Catholic, and we have yet to learn of even a single act to show that her heart or her spirit has changed. … Has Trinity ceased to be Protestant? “Fas est ab hoste doceri.” Nearly 30 years after its gates and doors were forced open from the outside, Arthur Balfour when Chief Secretary of Ireland said, in December 1899, “It cannot be denied that if not by its constitution, at all events by its composition, Trinity College is now what it has always been, a Protestant institution by its religious flavour and complexion … the whole current of thought in such an institution is and must be antagonistic to the current of thought which would be acceptable to the large majority of the Irish people.” Mr Gladstone said: “There is no doubt that Trinity College is a College of Protestant traditions and Protestant aspects, and it must long so continue”; and Judge Webb, addressing Trinity College Historical Society in 1892, said: “This University was founded by Protestants for Protestants, and in the Protestant interest. A Protestant spirit had from the first animated every member of its body corporate. At the present moment, with all its toleration, all its liberality, all its comprehensiveness, and all its scrupulous honour, the genius loci, the guardian spirit, of the place was Protestant, and Protestant might it ever remain.” … Of the real reasons why Catholics attend [Trinity], I think the following are the more important. Non-Catholic secondary schools are as much forbidden to Catholics as non-Catholic Universities, and yet not a few Catholics are found attending these Protestant Colleges in Dublin and the larger towns of the country. When these

Trinity News this year Seven issues of Trinity News were published this year, on the following dates: 10 October 2006, 31 October 2006, 28 November 2006, 23 January 2007, 6 February 2007, 20 February 2007, 24 April 2007. This year’s editorial team was: Editor: Peter Henry TNT/Deputy Editor: Gearóid O’Rourke Copy editing: Joey Facer, Monica Beard, Sinead Fortune News: Anna Stein, David Molloy, Niall Hughes Societies: Elizabeth O’Brien Opinion: Kevin Lynch Features: Chloe Sanderson World Review: Robbie Semple, Robert Quinn Science and Technology: Niall Cullinane Business and Careers: Ann Stillman Books: Jago Tennant Travel: Mark Thompson Sport Features: Connel McKenna Sport: David Cummins, Kirstin Smith Music: Steve Clarke, Will Daunt, Catriona Grey Theatre: David Lydon Film: Jason Robinson Fashion: Kerrie Forde Food and Drink: Beth Armstrong, Emma Timmons Relationships and Sex: Sarah Moriarty Television: Darren Kennedy Web site: Brian Henry

This publication is funded by a grant from Trinity Publications. Serious complaints about the content of this publication should be addressed to The Editor, Trinity News, 6 Trinity College, Dublin 2. This publication claims no special rights or privileges.

The College spree Sprees, which are usually given to celebrate an event, such as the winning of scholarship, or passing the Little-go, or the failure to do either of these things, play an important part in College life. The last week of Term there is generally an embarrassment of riches in the way of sprees. The spree is not conducted on total abstinence principles, as may be gathered from the following card of invitation:– 43, Trinity College Dear Sir, – A movement having being inaugurated for the purpose of putting down drink, a meeting of its supporters will be held on Saturday next in the above rooms at nine o’clock pm. You are requested by attendance to show your interest in this absorbing question, and we hope at the close of the meeting to be in a position to exhibit some examples of the baneful effects of intemperance. – Yours truly, Josiah Snooks. A temperance magazine got hold of this joke, and published it shortly afterwards as a proof of the wickedness of College men. The drinks, which consist of champagne (if the occasion is an important one), whiskey, stout, beer, &c, are a supplied by the host; the additional

glasses, chairs, and other conveniences necessary, by such of his friends as possess them. The guests begin to drop in soon after Commons, but it is 10 o’clock before the symposium is in full swing. There is less formality about the spree than there is about the Oxford wine or the German Kneipe, but it possesses some of the characteristics of both. After the health of the host is proposed and responded to, speeches in praise of Wein und Weib, often in the manner of some well-known fellow; songs, racy stories full of point, if somewhat lacking in delicacy, follow one another in quick succession. The fun, noise, and laughter wax furious, until as the dawn begins to creep slowly in through the windows one hears – “From grammar defiers, Long constructions, strange and plusquam Thucydidean,” as the bibulous orators stagger “All through sentences, six at a time, unsuspecting of Syntax.” It sometimes happens that the party is surprised by an unwelcome visitor, in the person of the Junior Dean, who enters accompanied by two janitors. In this case the JD delivers the concluding oration, which is couched in language far from complimentary to the host, and frequently ends with an invitation to be present at the next “at Home” given by the Board. From HA Hinkson, Student Life in Trinity College, Dublin (Dublin: J Charles and Son, 1892).

A College spree in progress.

students leave these schools and go for a University training the heads of these schools recommend Trinity, and have special classes to prepare them for the entrance examination to Trinity, and to Trinity they go. “Tradition” is responsible for the presence of some. A man who has been to Trinity sends his sons there when they grow up. Others, and not a few, go to Trinity, because it has prestige and because they claim education there gives a tone and a high social standing they could not acquire in the National. Trinity has no prestige except what age gives it. As regards ‘tone’ and a ‘high social standing’, what can one say? And these usually are they who say they will not learn Irish and who allege that compulsory Irish in the National compels them to go to Trinity. They don’t deserve serious consideration. All these reasons, however, are nothing when we come to the real reason, the reason that accounts for the presence of 90 per cent of the Catholics found in Trinity. Everybody knows the entrance examination to Trinity is a byword and its Pass Degree is of a very low standard. 90 per cent of Catholics found within the walls of Trinity are there because it is so much easier to get in than into the National, and because to get a Degree in Trinity is so much easier than getting a Degree in the National. … The world today depends on the Catholic Church. The Protestant Church has failed, she has lost her “spiritual sense” and, split up as she is into so many sects, she has no centre, no rallying point, and slowly but surely she is driven to inertness and incompetence. The decisions of the Lambeth Conference show what little influence on men has the Protestant Church of today. The world relies solely on the Catholic Church to save it from the materialism that is threatening not only religion but liberty and civilization as well. She alone has the power to solve men’s difficulties, to give a meaning and purpose to life, and the power is rather in the halls of her schools than in the pulpit. Today more than ever in her history, the Church requires the loyal and immediate obedience of all her children, their active help and co-operation in all that is meant by “Catholic Action”. Trinity College is no place for Catholic youth, and attendance there cannot but render them unfit for the great apostolate that lies before every dutiful son of the Church. It is very hard to understand how any Irish Catholic would be so disobedient and so disloyal to the Church as to act in opposition to its express teaching, and so rash and reckless as to run the risks to his faith which the Pope has declared to be inherent in the system of education pursued at Trinity. One would expect that his Catholic conscience would revolt, that the very instincts of his faith would prevent him from surrendering his conscience at the Shrine of Trinity. May I repeat, this paper is written solely for Catholics, to put before them the law of the Church regarding attendance at Trinity. The Pope has condemned Trinity; the Irish Bishops have forbidden Catholics to enter it – and it “remains forbidden”. It is for all Catholics to obey. From the Most Reverend John Dignan DD, Bishop of Clonfert, Catholics and Trinity College (Dublin: Catholic Truth Society of Ireland, c1930)


12 BOOKS

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

Books you never knew existed, across the road on College Green Rozalind Dineen There’s this bloke standing just opposite the Front Gate of College. Just on the left as you’re walking out. He’s always there, wearing impenetrable sunglasses (RayBans, actually, everyone’s doing it apparently), small moustache, half smile, suit. Seen him? He’s always there, hail, sun, 3am, 2pm, Tuesday, Sunday, hearing fights and facts from those passing. Always, half smile. He’s there more than the harpist, or the chalk drawings that are sometimes next to him. He’s there more than the aborigine (?) nearby on Grafton Street with that funny instrument. More than the Viking Tour Bus in a Dame Street bus jam, spraying water pistols into the rain. He’s always there, waiting to tell you just one quick thing. Have a look for him. When you find him, he’ll tell you this, he’ll tell you: “take a look inside.” And he carries a board with an arrow on it that will point you up four little steps to Books Upstairs. Books Upstairs has been there, opposite Front Arch, quite quietly, for nearly 30 years. It sells cheap books. When I say cheap books do you think “bargain basement”? As in: what a thrill such very cheap books are, but I don’t really want any of them. Books Upstairs has cheap books which you may actually kind of desire. Not need, but desire. Hence the moustached male’s I-know-somethingyou-don’t half smile. For example, the first thing my glance happens to fall on is Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke. The 1000-odd pages of this book seem to have sat undetected by quite a few highly tuned (do I mean turned) noses. But it’s wonderful! It’s about magicians and Kings, magic tricks and ghosts, tarot cards that move, and cat-people, and it just keeps going on and on, exploding more tricks, like a firework you think is about to go out but never does. It leads you through the streets of London and into certain houses and, if I haven’t sold it to you yet, it is also illustrated. There are footnotes too that will lead you into the history of magic, which you can ignore, or not, as you wish. Now I’ve never been a big Harry Potter-er or Potter-y or HP sorcerer or whatever it is that describes the kind who know the date when JK will become the first and second person on the rich list simultaneously as she publishes her 54th novel. However, Jonathan Strange does strike me as a kind of Harry Potter for grown-ups, but equally the un-Trekkiest will be able to enjoy this. Remember when you were little, watching a film, or being read to, or even reading yourself and getting carried away into a limitless vivid otherworld? It’s like that all over again. And (we’re coming to the end of the gush, but here is its climax) it is on sell for five euro in Books Upstairs. Five?

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell is the kind of book you will find in Books Upstairs (right). “The point of this book shop is that you go in looking for a particular book and come out with something you never knew existed.” Photo: Rozalind Dineen I paid nearly 30 for a hardback and it was still worth it. Books Upstairs has a history section, a psychology section, a large area for Irish poetry, philosophy, gay and lesbian, art; everything apparently. But it never has what you want. The point of this book shop is that you go in looking for a particular book and come out with something you never knew existed. This is where you go to get that book which you will read when exams are finished (for now you will glance longingly at it as it sleeps on the bedside table, you may not ever read it, but for now it can be a light bulb in a tunnel). This is where you go to get that book that no one can ever find for your course, and leave with a book that is related to what you study but introduces you to new view points of it and make you interested in it again. And, sorry, can I just ask, do you believe in karma? What’s going around is coming around / I do something nice for fellow man, then fellow man. Allow me this mention then: there’s a book in Books Upstairs for 14.99. Old English Literature is its name, written by RM Liuzza, and it’s full of essays that look very helpful. I do apologise. I know that only about 30 people in each year of thousands of undergrads have to do Old English but

someone’s got to help them, have you seen it? Have you seen it? And for anyone who does not study Old English (I am aware that there may be a good few of you), here’s a gem that I can give you, that is available in Books Upstairs, that could help everyone and could just get good karma gushing in my direction. Between the Irish fiction and Irish poetry sections of Books Upstairs (the most varied collections of each in town) is a small cash-desk, and a lady with a huge smile. She is not there hail and fine, but she is there often enough, and she does not have just one thing to tell you. She has many things to tell you because (and here’s the gem) she knows

everything. A queue formed in front of her as I was making my way around the shop. First I heard two Dubliners asking where good thai/asian food could be found at this time of day (3pm, Monday). The lovely lady, although admitting such food wasn’t to her taste, gave directions, suggestions and recommendations. I don’t think the customers were buying a book; they were there for dining advice. They didn’t want to walk as far as she told them to, but they did. And so they left to fill their stomachs and I hung around to hear the next person ask what was good to read in tropical climates because their niece was going to the rainforest and needed a

good book. She suggested a hard-back, they said it would be too heavy for a rucksack, she said it was too good not to carry around on your back. They bought it. What time does the National Gallery shut? You’re better off going to the Chester Beatty Library at this time of day, she says. I’m thinking of giving up smoking, what shall I read? I want to dump my boyfriend. I’m getting married but I don’t believe in God. I think the wannabe quitter left with poetry. I think the dumper left with a travel guide to Spain. The bride-to-be got the Irish Humanist Services Handbook. The queue that stretched all of the way to lesbian fiction was in fact a queue of people

with queries who were not primarily book-buyers but who took a book with their advice. So that bloke with a half-smile, he knows where the cheapness is, where you’ll find books that you didn’t know you wanted, want books you didn’t know you desired and need advice that you didn’t necessarily want to hear. He knows that Ray-Bans are the lenses to colour your reading perception this summer and he’s heard everything you said as you walked past him that night, but he’s keeping quiet and trying not to smile at you about it. Most of all he is the guard to the sage of Dublin. Don’t ignore him anymore.

The poetry of modern relationship

Alan Murrin Carol Ann Duffy, Rapture “Rapture”: a word with almost as many nuances as “love”, implying an ecstatic and heightened sense of exhilaration. But as Carol Ann Duffy appears to know all too well, such exhilaration can be sourced just as easily from an ungodly row as it can from the sweetness of lovemaking. In this collection of love poems Duffy attempts to reflect an honest image of a relationship from each of its multiplicity of surfaces, with all of the splen-

dour and unpleasantness that this entails. This unflinching honesty lends the poems an immediacy that makes one feel as though they are experiencing the process of the relationship first-hand. Whether one likes it or not, one is consumed by the intoxicating, erotic, maddening and heart-breaking epic romance that Duffy depicts. Her treatment of her theme ranges from love as an ancient and sanctified emotion, as primal and essential as the earth, to love as a kind of temporary insanity. Beginning with love at first sight and then the initial hesitant moments of the courtship, the sense of adoration between poet and subject deepens and intensifies until a tension slowly infiltrates and the fights begin. And this is where things really get interesting. The poem “Row” recounts the effects of the fights that took place between the two lovers at the centre of this work. Such is the fury of this pair that nature is at their mercy. The images used by Duffy in this poem contain the force of Greek tragedy and one could almost imagine a Medea figure who has known all hell’s fury, reminiscing over the person who scorned her: “But when we rowed/the room swayed and sank down on its knees,/the air hurt and purpled like a bruise,/The sun banged the gate in the sky and fled.” The poem “Betrothal” inhabits another mythic realm where the language remains as essential as before but this time we hear the youthful voice of a maiden asking her suitor to marry her. The poem has the quality of an

abilities could. In “Finding the words” Duffy deals with the language of love poetry as a physical object that has become dulled with over-use. But by bestowing the care and attention upon this object that it deserves, the language finds itself reincarnated in the same form yet somehow reinvigorated: …I touched the first to my lips, the second, the third, like a sacrament, Like a pledge, like a kiss,

Carol Ann Duffy’s collection of love poems takes on the big themes. ancient ballad and like all such songs is tinged with sadness at the reality of the girl’s position and the desperation that belies her carefully structured pleas: “I’ll say I do, I do./I’ll be ash in a jar, for you/to scatter my life./Make me your wife.” Many of the poems in this collection deal with the absence of the lover. The poet imagines and re-imagines the figure of her absent love in every possible way to find some solace from the dreadful loneliness and to fill the empty hours since they have departed. Such is Duffy’s diligence at reconstructing her lover that the absent figure becomes a kind of phantom and the poet with her incantations for her lover’s return becomes endowed with the powers of a sorceress. In the poem “Absence” Duffy finds the presence of

her lover in everything and of everything. Her presence possesses earth and sky, flora and fauna, and every one of the poet’s senses. It is a fitting tribute to the poet’s lover that in the final poem “Over” which deals with “the death of love,” there are “No stars in this black sky, no moon to speak of” and indeed she is “without spell” to summon forth her lover’s presence. Memories have become gifts that she betokens herself to ease her pain however temporarily. In Duffy’s poems nature is never treated as a separate sphere but one in which the narrator is as much an element of nature as the sun and the moon, and they too are part of her. In making this connection of the flesh of the lover with the body of the earth Duffy is firmly stating that love is a force of nature and is

therefore as justified in its causes and effects as the wind and the sea. In the poem “River” Duffy goes so far as to depict nature as having to comfort itself in the absence of love: “The river stirs and turns, consoling and fondling itself/with watery hands, its clear limbs parting and closing.” Always in these poems there is an intense awareness of the language that constructs them. In choosing to write a collection of love poems Duffy is conscious of the possible limits and clichés that such a venture could impose upon her work. However, part of the beauty of these poems is that while they are never derivative they are also unafraid of dealing with love in its purest and most familiar terms, and in so doing create something new, as only a poet with Duffy’s

and my breath Warmed them, the words I needed to utter this, small words, and few. I rubbed at them till they gleamed in my palm – I love you, I love you, I love you – as though they were new. Carol Ann Duffy proves in this collection that she is not afraid to take on the big themes and deal with them in the most vital terms. Not for her is a wry and cynical flippancy towards modern relationships. Instead she is bravely pinning her colours to a discussion of love in all its beauty, tragedy and tawdriness and in so doing committing an act of the greatest affection imaginable. For readers who have felt love of this kind these poems will have a sad familiarity, and for those who have not, this collection will either see them terrified of any further human contact or wracked with envy at the absence of such a powerful force in their lives.


TRAVEL 13

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

Checking in and checking out Dublin’s Merrion Hotel “The swimming pool and spa must surely be the jewel in the crown at the Merrion hotel”. Photo: Mark Thompson Mark Thompson Occupying four very grand and very gracious Georgian townhouses on the superexclusive Merrion Row, the Merrion Hotel is considered one of Dublin’s most luxurious hotels. With a location directly opposite Government Buildings, an uberpolite doorman complete with fancy top hat, and the only Two Michelin Star restaurant in the whole of Ireland, the credentials on paper alone are most definitely impressive. But is the Merrion going to suitably rest, relax and revive your parents on their weekend in the city? This

Trinity News writer went to investigate. From the moment you step off the street and pass through their doors, you enter a totally different and definitely delightful world: it has old-school grandiose, with an air of elegance and a hint of class. The drawing rooms and lounge areas, leading off the lobby area, are warm and inviting and play the perfect host for the Merrion’s signature offerings of afternoon tea. We could find little fault with our bedroom. It was sumptuous and spacious, with a nice sitting area and an open fireplace. The plate of strawberries dipped in chocolate and the bottle of Bailey’s made

the perfect arrival gifts and such unique offerings seem to be renascent of the Merrion way. The HD screen TV is almost certain to please your Dad, and your Mum should be content with the large selection of fancy magazines and art brochures sprawled out on the coffee table. However, the bathroom offerings may leave her a little disappointed, as although some of the toiletries were Molton Brown, they were few and far between, and this writer has seen more of a selection in a Travelodge. After a blissful night’s rest in quite possibly one of the largest beds imaginable, the breakfast left me a little unen-

thused; if only Patrick Guillbaud was on call to give the chefs in the Cellar restaurant a few tips. While the buffet offerings of fresh fruits, cereals, pastries, breads and cheeses were commendable, the Irish breakfast was a lacklustre effort verging close to a standard more associated with your local greasy spoon than an upscale hotel. However, the plate of smoked salmon and scrambled eggs also ordered was faultless. It just seems a shame that something so quintessential as an Irish breakfast could be so far off the mark. The swimming pool and spa must surely be the jewel in the crown at the Merrion Hotel, and we know of no other

central Dublin hotel which could even come close to such extraordinary leisure facilities. The freshly-squeezed orange juice and morning papers awaiting you from your swim are also, once again, another nice commendable touch helping to set the Merrion apart from its competitors. The Merrion Hotel is a fantastic example of how a true five-star hotel should be run. The staff are helpful but unobtrusive, the rooms seem to be have been lifted straight out of Buckingham Palace, and the service is faultless. It will be interesting to see how the Merrion fares now that the Shelbourne has

reopened and the upscale hotel market in Dublin becomes ever more competitive. Such competition, however, can only be good, and we feel the Merrion has little to worry about. Given that this writer and his companion could have happily holed up in Room 371 for an entire week, it would seem that the Merrion Hotel is most definitely worthy to play host to your parents next time they are in town. Average standard double: €495.00 Afternoon tea for two: €60.00 Pint of Guiness in the Cellar Bar: €4.50 Three-course meal for two with speciallychosen bottle of wine: €120.00 www.merrionhotel.com, tel. 01603600

Sleepless in Seoul (and maybe in Pyongyang) Ah-Young Koo People often ask where my home is. Before I even get to open my mouth, they follow with the most shattering of all questions: “China or Japan?” Well, fair play to them for getting the continent right, but their geographical inaccuracy and their smug faces showing their (extremely) wrong assumption crushes this reporter’s heart. Of course, I do take pleasure in proving them wrong, but once and for all, I would like to establish Korea not only as a wholly independent nation with plenty of attractions, but most importantly as a country of beautiful and eyecatching attractions. Where to begin? Would you be surprised to hear that Seoul, the capital of Korea with its 10 million inhabitants, is bigger than London? Ever since the Korean War, the American influence has hit us pretty badly, but this is still not enough to undermine the beautiful nature and landscape of the country. With the old palaces of the royal family scattered along the hillside of Seoul, and plush hotels built on top of mountains that overlook the city, this capital screams beauty. Hostels and condominiums come at a handy price of around 20 euro so pile as many people into a room as you can. If you want the

ultimate Seoul experience, try living in the typical Korean apartment in the city. I must warn you first: they do not come with curtains or blinds and the late night traffic does take a lot of getting used to! Move away, Seattle; sleepless in Seoul is more apt! With bright neon-light signs to keep you up at night, if you want to get out of your bed and shake off that jet lag (or perhaps the traffic), there is not a city better for you than this. Underground karaoke bars, jazz bars, clubs, late night flea markets, snack stands with plenty of new food to try, and latenight shopping centres are only few of the many things you can do in the middle of the night. It does not stop here, however: Irish pubs are commonplace. With queer names such as O’Kim’s Bar and Murphy’s Pub, you certainly won’t get homesick, no matter how far away you are! Along with the delights of the old Guinness and beer, why not try some of our traditional drinks, such as sweet potato wine or rice wine? Prices vary from 1.50 euro for our special wines to 5 euro for a pint of Guinness, and the food is very reasonable too. With choices from American, Italian, Mexican, Indian, Turkish and Moroccan and many more eateries in our international districts where food is a bit pricey, anywhere near universities you can get a sandwich for one euro.

A busy Seoul street at night. Photo: Ah-Young Koo Three hours north of Seoul is the border that divides the two Koreas and remains as a reminder of its sad history. The Demilitarised Zone’s (DMZ) wild flora, fauna and ever-decreasing population of wild animals, untouched by human hands, heighten the tragedy. The museums and the footages of the Korean War and the conflict between the north and the south will not fail to move

your heart. If courage takes you over and you want a story to tell your grandchildren, you can always hop over the border to North Korea. As simple as that may sound, easy it most definitely is not. 800€ and a bit of interrogation and questioning and off you hop on the ferry to Mount Kumkang, the only place open for tourists. However, caveat travellers: one word of complaint out of your mouth and

you are pretty much on a one-way ferry to North Korea. I will leave the rest up to your imagination. Korea boasts four distinctive seasons and the temperature varies from minus 10 degrees in the snowy winter to 38 degrees in mid-summer. The reporter suggests the readers to avoid mid-July and early August due to the extreme humidity and the monsoon season (unless either/both

seem attractive). Autumn is the most suitable time to visit and it also avoids the tourist crowd of the summer. All in all, the reporter feels happy that a little bit of justice has been done to the beautiful country to Korea, the “Land of the Morning Calm”, and if you ever find yourself in Korea not able to find any pubs, just call.


14 SPORT FEATURES

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24 2007

Hurling

National League campaign offers a timely boost to Dublin hurling Neil Franklin No Dublin team has ever won an AllIreland Senior Hurling championship. The record books may show that the county has won six titles, but those teams were all largely made up of nonnatives, and in any event, the last of those titles was won aeons ago, in 1938. A one-point defeat to Tipperary in the 1961 final is the only time a team of Dubliners has even come close to AllIreland glory. Since then, apart from a brief and ultimately unsuccessful flirtation with a Leinster title in the early 1990’s, the story of Dublin hurling has been one of utter mediocrity. Indeed, it is less than a year since Dublin lost to Westmeath in the Leinster Championship first round. But this year’s National League campaign began with an impressive run of results achieved in the shape of a draw with AllIreland champions Kilkenny and wins over Galway and Limerick, with a place

in the knockout stages looking all but assured before defeats to Tipperary, and disappointingly, Antrim, somewhat took the sheen of the Dubs’ placing in the Division 1B table. Nonetheless the progress represented by those early results has provided sufficient reason to be cheerful with the Championship moving onto the horizon. If this is the start of a bright new dawn for the Dublin senior team, it won’t be by accident. Serious work has been put into hurling at underage level in Dublin for several years now. Development squads were introduced so that young players could get the benefit of high level coaching, the aim being to produce competitive underage teams, which would, in turn, filter through to the senior team and also to club hurling in the county. That the standard of club hurling improves is just as important as what is happening at county level. If the standard at club level rises then the county team cannot fail to benefit. It’s all connected. These underage development squads

are crucial to developing the skills needed to compete at a high level – clean striking, an ability to hit well off both sides, hooking, blocking - the basic building blocks of the game which seem to come so readily to the traditional counties but have let Dublin teams down time and again over the years. There are 45 full time Games Promotion Officers employed across the county working with clubs and schools, and 360 young hurlers are involved in various development squads from under13 to under-16 level. Real headway is being made. Areas of South Dublin, for example, are becoming hurling heartlands. Kilmacud Crokes won the Feile, the All-Ireland under 14 club title, in 2005. Students at Blackrock College can even play hurling at school now. Perhaps the key change to be seen in the current League campaign has been in mindset. This Dublin team is populated by players who have grown up accustomed to not only beating Wexford and Offaly regularly at underage level, but to giving Kilkenny a serious run for their

money, (and indeed beating them in the triumphant 2005 Leinster Minor campaign). Traditionally Dublin teams have frozen at the very sight of a black and amber jersey. Dublin Colleges’ victory in the Croke Cup (the All-Ireland Schools Cup) in 2006 was further evidence of a new attitude. The team that has had such success this Spring is an exceptionally young one, with several of the stars of that 2005 breakthrough, such as John McCaffrey and Joey Boland, to name just two, already making the transition to senior level. Tom Naughton, who last year replaced Humphrey Kelleher as coach of the senior hurlers, knows many of the players from his time in charge of the under-21’s. Underage success by no means guarantees success at senior level (as several counties in both codes are currently finding out), but it is a pre-requisite for a county like Dublin which is starting from such a low base. But it has been a long and tough battle to get the county board to take hurling seriously, and there is a feeling even still

that some elements in Dublin GAA are not entirely behind the small ball game. Hurling’s biggest problem in Dublin has always been, and will likely remain, Gaelic Football. Many of the county’s talented young hurlers are equally as adept with the big ball. Perhaps understandably, several players who would have been key men for the hurlers, such as Conal Keaney, Shane Ryan and David O’Callaghan, have opted for the glamour of the footballers. Sadly it’s hard to see circumstances where the likes of Keaney will come back to hurling. Dublin are doing nicely without him at the moment though, and the signs are encouraging. The side that went to Limerick last month was by no means at full strength. Yet they popped over the points from all angles and ended with an impressive tally of 0-22, in the process moving the ball with speed and composure not usually associated with teams from the capital. There’s no point getting carried away just yet though. After all it is only winter hurling and this is a very young team.

While a good run in the League is of huge value in chalking up winning experience at senior level, the most pressing goal for Dublin this year is to establish themselves as the second-best team in Leinster. That means beating Wexford in the Leinster Championship Semi-Final in June, where victory would guarantee an All-Ireland Quarter Final place. While gaining respectability is a start, Dublin need to keep producing successful underage teams (by all accounts, this year’s minor group is a strong one) to keep advancing. It may take a good ten years of successful underage teams to create the winning culture needed to really challenge Kilkenny and Cork at senior level. Those counties have set the benchmark for excellence. They are not going to regress – it’s up to Dublin and the other counties to catch them. At the moment this may still seem like a pipe dream, but if the likes of Offaly, whose traditional hurling areas have a tiny population, can win four All-Irelands in seventeen years, then Dublin can certainly aim for at least one.

Cricket World Cup

Soccer

English football Irish cricketers pundits as bland as bridge class chasm national team David Lydon

Neil Franklin Allow me a quick rant, if you will. Being used to the high standards of our national station’s football coverage, it’s a bit of a comedown to have to watch the dross on BBC, ITV or Sky. On RTE, the analysis is usually more interesting than the football itself. Over on the British channels what passes for analysis is usually cringeworthy stuff. Definitely of the Steve Staunton “football’s a funny old game” soundbyte school. Obviously. In a way, Apres Match’s lampooning of some the British pundits means they can never be taken seriously again. Terry Venables on ITV, for instance, has become almost impossible to separate from his caricature, similar to the BBC team. There seems to be a mortal fear of offending anybody running right throughout the three main British channels coverage, so what passes for analysis almost becomes an insult to the viewers’ intelligence. Indeed intelligence is a bit of an anachronism when it comes to British football pundits– most of them can’t string two coherent sentences together – and if they can, it is usually complete gibberish. Jamie “he’ll be disappointed with that, Richard” Redknapp on Sky has got to be the worst. Go to your dictionary, pick out ten completely random words and arrange them in a sentence, and they’d make a lot more sense than what Redknapp says. He is the master of banality. I have never once heard him make a single point where it was not a case of “stating the bleeding obvious”. And yet there he is, week after week, his gormless, vacant grin staring out at me before he rambles on inanely to the equally boring Richard Keys, and I switch channels. Some of Sky’s team are actually pretty good. Jeff Stelling, genuinely knowledgeable about the game and effortlessly funny on air, has turned Soccer Saturday, which should be no more than a glorified teletext service, into compelling viewing, far more interesting than actually watching a game. David Platt, while not up to RTE’s standards, is not a bad analyst, but then, he does have the ability to talk coherently, which instantly marks him out as a rarity. I’ll let Andy Gray off the hook because he at least has a bit of life about him and especially for that immortal line, “take a boo (sic) son”, when Steven Gerrard scored that goal against Olympiakos. The great Liverpool teams of the 1970’s and 1980’s are proof that the best players don’t necessarily make the best pundits. A

Lineker: Appalingly bad gags, says Neil Franklin huge number of former Anfield legends now make their money from feeding clichés to the public. Hansen and Lawrenson on Match of the Day are the obvious ones. Match of the Day’s decline started in earnest with the accession of Gary Lineker to the presenter’s chair. Originally quite awkward on camera, Lineker gradually became more at ease, but unfortunately somewhere along the line he got the idea into his head that he was funny. Nowadays, he can hardly go fifteen seconds without making a pun or some lame in-joke with Hansen or Lawrenson. Every time Lineker or his mates laugh at another of their appallingly bad gags, its hard not to feel like reaching for the sick bag. Any meaningful discussion is quickly by-passed. Match of the Day has declined to the point where it mirrors the England international team – lazy, boring and believing its own hype. Bring back Jimmy Hill, I say. Oh, yes, when I said Jamie Redknapp was the worst, well, of course, I meant the worst after Ian Wright. Is there really any need to explain why? Maybe when the poor quality of analysis on British TV is considered, it’s no wonder there are so few decent English managers at the top level, and somebody like Steve McLaren ends up as national manager (although we can hardly crow about our national team). Now we have our very own peddlers of

pathetic punditry – TV3. How the nation must have wished that Dunphy, Giles and co. were on hand to deliver the truth about Ireland’s pathetic performances against Cyprus and San Marino. Instead we were treated to John Aldridge proclaiming “we can still qualify” and Matt Holland reminding us that “we’ve got to focus on the positives from the game”. This is after Cyprus had beaten us 5-2. RTE is miles ahead, but isn’t perfect of course. Outside of the old reliables some of their B-grade pundits would be more at home on TV3. Ray Houghton and Trevor Steven add no real insight. Outside of televised football, the British channels’ sports coverage is pretty decent. Alan Green on Five Live doesn’t care who he offends, the rugby coverage is generally acceptable enough and the cricket coverage is usually spot on, especially when Geoffrey Boycott, probably the best sports pundit in the British media, speaks his mind. So why can’t football get it right? Well, it suits everyone with a vested interest for it to be that way. Blandness is production policy. Uncritical analysis and endless hype feeds nicely into the bubble that modern day football exists in. But one wonders what the producers’ idea of the target market is. Do these people honestly think their entire viewership never progressed beyond remedial class? Because it’s certainly football for slow learners.

Well who’d have thought it? A bunch of Irish cricketers taking on the big boys at the 2007 World Cup and progressing further than established nations Pakistan, India and Zimbabwe. When Ireland qualified after the 2005 ICC Trophy, future for the sport in this country was good, but not even the most optimistic fan could have foreseen such a dramatic reversal of the form book. Even when it was announced that Ireland had the West Indies, Pakistan and Zimbabwe in their group – three teams as unpredictable as any you’ll find, it seemed unlikely that the boys in green would be hanging around in the Caribbean for longer than the group stages. In fact, in the absence of last-minute Ryanair flights to the West Indies, the Irish Cricket Union had already booked their return flights, so that bowling stars such as Dave Langford-Smith could return to their day jobs driving security vans. The first signs of promise began to emerge shortly before the World Cup began, as the team ran pre-tournament favourites South Africa close and beat Canada convincingly in their allocated warm-up games. The team were undeniably motivated by reports from several cricketing luminaries calling for the ‘minnows’ to be excluded from such a prestigious event. West Indian fast bowling legend and general foot-inmouth expert Michael Holding was particularly damning, decreeing that teams like Ireland could not be competitive at the top level. How he was wrong. Holding hadn’t reckoned with three vital factors that were essential to the Irish success story: self-belief, exceptional fielding and the undying support from the Blarney Army. The first asset, self-belief, was of critical importance. It being severely lacking in other teams (most notably Pakistan, India and England), Ireland were able to equal more than the sum of their parts by simply believing they could win in any situation, and backing themselves until the final ball. The historic win over Pakistan highlighted this, as Ireland could have crumbled were it not for Niall O’Brian’s heroics and captain Trent Johnston’s late-order hitting. Similarly, Ireland looked dead and buried on several occasions against Zimbabwe, but pulled it back to secure a thrilling tie. Against Bangladesh, a match described as Ireland’s own World Cup final, Johnston’s men excelled in all three disciplines to comprehensively beat their fellow ‘minnows’, ensuring official One Day International status in the process. The second strength, exceptional fielding, is a virtue that can separate the good teams from the great. Upon their readmission into World Cricket, South Africa decided to sharpen their fielding as it was less reliant of natural

Players such as Andre Botha have revelled in the less-familiar surroundings of Carribbean stadiums. skill than batting or bowling. The end result was Johnty Rhodes, the best fielder ever to grace the game. Irish coach Adie Birrel obviously took this to heart, as every time his team took to the pitch they fielded as if their lives depended on catching and diving. Such brilliance in the field, exemplified by William Porterfield’s great catch against Sri Lanka, won the match for Ireland against Pakistan, and helped secure that memorable tie with Zimbabwe. The third major reason for Ireland’s success is perhaps the most important. The travelling group of fans, quickly dubbed the Blarney Army, played a huge part in the success of their team, offering vocal support, often whilst wearing Leprechaun outfits. As Ireland progressed through the tournament, they became as important as the eleven on the pitch, and just like with Munster in the Heineken Cup, it seemed like they gave

their team an extra player. The scenes on St Patrick’s Day after Trent Johnston hit the winning six were a sight to behold, and it was touching to see the players mingle with the fans after their Super Eight exit. This World Cup will unfortunately be remembered for the tragic death of Bob Woolmer, the empty stands and the problematic format. However, there have been many cricketing moments that have caught the public imagination. From an Irish perspective, the World Cup has proved that smaller nations can compete with the traditional powers, and their new-found official status will ensure that top-flight cricket will be coming to Belfast and Dublin for a long time yet. No matter what shortcomings this World Cup has had, there will be two definite winners – the team that lift the trophy in Barbados, and Ireland, who will return home to a rapturous welcome.


SPORT FEATURES 15

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24 2007

Soccer

Engrossing battle at each end as Premiership season enters final furlong Connel McKenna Chelsea, until Sunday at least, couldn’t stop winning, and in recent weeks it would appear that Charlton Athletic and West Ham United have discovered a similar taste for it. Perhaps it’s finally dawned on them that the odd three points actually assists with a survival bid, but in any case, the form of all three teams has presented us with something that not too long ago appeared to be a distinctly distant prospect – an exciting and competitive race to the finish at both ends of the Premiership. This is in happy contrast to last season, when Manchester United, almost out of an embarrassed sense of duty, only briefly threatened to challenge Jose Mourinho’s juggernaut of a team, while the relegation issue was settled with weeks to spare. In fact, given the Blues’ successive title processions, all the neutral has had to wet his slacks in excitement with over the past 24 months was that remarkable basement scrap in 2005, when West Brom memorably emerged as the survivors on ‘Survival Sunday.’ ‘Survival’ has been a word often used by Mourinho this term, one in which his double-champions have displayed their mettle by the spadeful but found magic in significantly shorter supply. It is to their immense credit though that they have struggled impressively with injury problems and under-performing star signings to match Manchester United, who are enjoying one the finest seasons in Premiership history, almost stride-forstride. Such has been the quality of United’s football this season that one can only point to Arsenal’s unbeaten season in 2003-04 in comparison. It is worth remembering though, that the Gunners drew 12 of their 38 games that season, almost registering a tie for every two victories they recorded. This United side equalled their 25 wins for that season with seven games remaining to play in this one, and are at this premature stage also thre points in excess of the 79 the legendary treble-winning side attained in 1999. Even Chelsea’s remarkable campaign during Mourinho’s first season, when they lost only once and conceded an obscenely miserly total of fifteen goals, didn’t produce the quality this United

United star Cristiano Ronaldo reflects the all-consuming end-of-season tension. team has shown itself capable of. The fact that they have scored twenty goals more than their West London title rivals is indicative of the style with which they have been winning games. Where Chelsea have edged matches, with crucial goals aften coming late or via set-pieces, United have been crusing through them, regularly putting games beyond doubt before half time, with free-flowing, swashbuckling football becoming the sta-

ple diet for Old Trafford season ticket holders. Even during a brief spell when their fluency deserted them at the tail-end of winter, they showed qualities more recently typical of Chelsea in winning all the same. It was during this period that Mourinho, that great stirrer of pots, began to harp on about the luck that Ferguson’s side had undoubtedly enjoyed in winning at Anfield and Craven Cottage, but his

laughable mutterings shouldn’t be allowed to blur the lines. Chelsea have gained more late, undeserved points this season than the Old Trafford club (away games toWatford, Wigan and Everton spring to mind) and after all, Chelsea’s title wins, deserved as they were, were inescapably punctuated by numerous deflected, and, to borrow from that silvertongued Scouser Paul Jewell, “poxy” goals. I’ll be charitable though and spare

Jose the raising of John Terry’s apparentely legitamate goalkeeping skills. Truth be told, it isn’t the first time he’s played the role of pot calling kettle black; if the Premiership table were to be reflective of performance rather than result, United would be much further than three points clear at the top. This is a foolishly fanciful notion though, and football has never made any bones about rewarding the most effective teams rather than the most aesthetically pleasing. If United are to triumph this season it will be a welcome victory for style over functionality, but as their recent slips have demonstrated, it will be in achieving the basic function of collecting three points that they will haul themselves over the finish line ahead of a formidable unit one can almost assume will continue to succeed in this requirement. With their incredible victory over Roma, Ferguson’s men suggested that they have the legs and the quality to see the job through, but their aspirations are being severely hindered by an injury crisis - one “of epic proportions” according to Fergie - which has rendered their entire firstchoice back four unavailable for the majority of the season’s business end. This situation has shed some perspective on Chelsea’s mid-season loss of John Terry and Petr Cech, and has given the Blues a very real chance of overhauling their three-point deficit. It is due largely to this that the destination of the Premiership trophy remains hugely uncertain, despite Chelsea’s failure to crank up the pressure on United following an abject draw at Newcastle. Both sides are showing signs of fatigue, but if United can enter into the crunch clash at Stamford Bridge on May 9 with three points clear, it is difficult to see them failing to clinch the Championship. Thrillingly, the foot of the table more resembles a free-for-all than one-on-on combat. Sheffield United, Wigan and most alarmingly Fulham, have been dragged into the mire by their own poor form and the drastic improvement witnessed in recent weeks at both The Valley and Upton Park. Should The Hammers ultimately survive they will look to their escape for some vindication in dismissing Alan Pardew back in the autumn, but Charlton’s success in the second half of the season (they have lost just four Premiership games under Pardew) rather

betrays the heinous haste with which he was jettisoned. The Hammers may feel that they have in Alan Curbishley the right man to eventually establish them as a Premiership club, but Pardew had arguably already achieved something more tangible than this in leading West Ham to a 9th place finish and the FA Cup final (where a cruel defeat on penalties still yeilded European qualification) last season, with largely the same squad that came sixth in the Championship the year before. Whether Hammers fans would enjoy successive Charlton-like seasons of stability more than those heady days is questionable. What cannot be questioned is that fans of both clubs are presently yearning for days recently gone-by. It is likely, with three games remaining to each of the five clubs still battling for survival, that West Ham and Charlton will join Watford, relegated on Saturday, in the Coca Cola Championship next season. Sheffield United, having gained a pivotal point at The Valley, will take comfort in their remaining fixtures, entetaining as they do, both Watford and Wigan, and travelling to Villa Park, where most visiting teams fancy at least a point. The smart money is also on Wigan, who also have home games against West Ham and Middlesbrough to come, finishing with just enough points to avoid relegation. The team most vulnerable could indeed be Fulham, who travel to Arsenal before hosting Liverpool and finishing with a tricky trip to The Riverside Stadium to face ‘Boro. The sacking of Chris Coleman was curiously timed to say the least, and Fulham, if they do retain their top-flight status, will probably do so by virtue of the points they have gained thus far, unlikely as it is that they will pick up any more than just one in the coming weeks. As always though, the desperation for points at this stage of the season often makes any predictions appear ultimately rather misguided, and while the head-tohead games will be crucial, do not be surprised to see shock points picked up at places the Emirates, or when the likes of Liverpool and Tottenham come to town. With injuries and aching muscles muddying the waters at the top end of the table, the unexpected twists are likely not to be confined to issues at the bottom. Enjoy it, we’re being treated to a preciously fascinating end to the season.

Real Tennis

Something for the weekend, sir? Dave Lowry What is real tennis? Real tennis is the original racket sport which provided the foundation from which such games as lawn tennis and squash developed. Aspects of the game may appear complex at first, so the aim of this article is to show why it is so interesting and why it is so enjoyable to play. Real tennis is played on a court of a similar size to a lawn tennis court. The real tennis court, however, is fully enclosed and is asymmetrical. On three sides (at both ends and along one side) are “penthouses”, sloping surfaces which are part of the playing area. On the fourth side is a flat, vertical wall. Flat, that is, except for the presence of the “tambour”. The tambour is a buttress protruding from the otherwise smooth, the effect of which is to change the line of flight of any ball which strikes it, often shooting the ball sharply across the court from one side to the other. During a lawn tennis match the players change ends every two games, and the most prominent difference between the ends is usually related to the position of the sun. At real tennis, in contrast, there are particular advantages to be gained from retention of the service end, and a change of ends – and of serve – must be won by the receiver. In fact a whole match might be played without a single change of ends, although this would be unusual. The two ends of a real tennis court are different. They are referred to as the “Hazard End” and the “Service End”. As the name suggests, all serving of the ball is done from the service end of the court. The service end may be contrasted with the hazard end, at which service is received, and at which are to be found a number of features which add to the accuracy of its description, not least the tambour, mentioned above. The ball approximates to a cross between a lawn tennis ball and a sliotar.

Each ball is hand made from cork wrapped in cotton tape, with a handstitched felt cover. The ball is quite heavy (it hurts when it hits you!) and takes spin very well. Real tennis rackets are wooden and slightly asymmetrical – a characteristic which means that the sweet spot is closer to one edge of the racket head, which is useful because the real tennis ball tends to stay low and one therefore plays many shots close to the floor. The main aspects of the scoring system would be familiar to lawn tennis players, as lawn tennis borrowed the terms and structure long established in its parent game. Points are therefore counted in the ‘love – 15 – 30 – 40’ sequence, with the winner of six games taking the set. A distinctive means of winning points is afforded by each of three parts of the real tennis court. If the ball is played from the service end into the ‘winning gallery’ or the ‘grille’ at the hazard end, and if the ball is played from the hazard end into the ‘dedans’, it is a winning shot. The dedans is an opening at the back of the service end below the level of the penthouse. It stretches most of the width of the court from hip level to just above head height. The grille is a square recess, with sides some 1m long, located at the hazard end below the penthouse and against the main wall (i.e. just beyond the tambour as viewed from the service end). The winning gallery is one of a series of openings in the wall opposite the tambour at the hazard end. It is the opening furthest from the service end and usually contains a bell which rings to mark the success of an accurate – or lucky – shot into its net. There is another extra element to the scoring of points in real tennis. This revolves around markings on the floor at the service end, which indicate the distance in yards from the back of the court. If the ball is not struck before its second bounce the distance in yards of that second bounce from the back wall is noted and a “chase” is called. Although the

player failed to hit the ball he has not lost the point. When the chase is to be played off, the players change ends, and in order to win the chase (and thus the point), the player who conceded the chase must play the ball so that its second bounce is closer to the back wall than that struck shortly before by his opponent. A chase at the hazard end, or hazard chase, is also possible but occurs less frequently. As there is a significant advantage to be had by the server, retention of the service end is often the priority. Chases are played off in two situations: at game point any outstanding chase must be played off; and in the course of a game when two chases have accumulated they must be played off in sequence, one after the other. Now that you have read this short introduction to the game, the key question must be - where can it be played? Alas, there are no active courts in Ireland. In fact, there are fewer than fifty in the entire world. Some 25 of these are in the United Kingdom. Two courts are known to survive in Ireland, although neither is currently usable. It seems that there were once many more courts in different parts of the country over the centuries – real tennis is a game, after all, which has been played at least since later medieval times, and the oldest court still in use – in Scotland – dates from the sixteenth century. There seems once to have been a court in Trinity College, on or around the site now occupied by Aras an Phiarsaigh. Of the two surviving structures one is on Lambay, the island off the north county Dublin coast. As well as being one of only two courts in the world open to the sky, its layout is somewhat unorthodox. The other is on Earlsfort Terrace and is currently occupied by the civil engineering department of University College Dublin, which has used it for some years as a laboratory. However, UCD is to vacate its Earlsfort Terrace premises – thus completing the move to Belfield started in the 1960s – by the end of 2007. Opportunity knocks! It is the hope of many, in Ireland and interna-

Real Tennis in all of its rather unfamiliar glory. tionally, not least the Irish Real Tennis Association (IRTA), that the court will be restored to its former glory – it was after all the venue for the World Championships in 1890 – and reopen for the playing of real tennis after a 70 year pause between games. The establishment of a Dublin University Real Tennis Club is envisaged, and it is hoped that it would be in a position to organize events later in 2007. To start with the Club would arrange trips in conjunction with the IRTA to courts in the

UK, in France, and perhaps further afield, to afford Trinity students the opportunity to play this excellent and fascinating game. Indeed, a group from the Dublin University Squash Rackets Club has already sampled real tennis: College squash players, in Oxford in January 2007 to play squash against the locals, took the opportunity to try real tennis – and all look forward to playing again before long. The game is growing in popularity internationally as well as in Ireland, where the return to use of the Earlsfort

Terrace court not only provide Irish players with a home venue, but would also attract visitors from all corners of the real tennis playing world. To find out more about the sport look at www.irishrealtennis.ie; type “Real Tennis” into youtube to see video coverage of IRTA members playing on the Newcastle and Cambridge courts; and then sign up to the IRTA and join a trip to try your hand on court! For more information contact dlowry@tcd.ie


16 SPORT

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

DU Cricket Club

Promising season beckons for College Park cricketers David Lydon It’s that time of year. The sun is shining, skies are blue and Trinity students can finally socialise outside again. What better place than by the cricket pitch? The Pavilion bar is within walking distance, the library is only a short stroll away (should you for some reason feel the need to venture inside before the exams) and most importantly, there’s cricket to be seen. Now, before Ireland’s success in the Cricket World Cup ensured that the joys of leather on willow became the new national sport, cricket must have seemed merely the background to that picturesque postexam drinks session down by the Pav. However, with an increase in popularity due to the World Cup, everyone seems to be a cricket fan, with even the most unlikely individuals willing to discuss the merits of bowling maidens and the qualities of a good googly as opposed to a legcutter. Trinity has been a stalwart within the Irish cricket community for longer than anyone can remember. It is well documented that some of the game’s greats, such as WG Grace, Len Hutton and Gary Sobers, have strutted their stuff on the College Park. In recent times, there has always been a strong showing by Trinity within the Leinster leagues, and the College has traditionally excelled in the Intervarsities Championships. This year promises to be no different, with the club boasting three male league teams, the more social Ramblers XI, and the ladies league team. The first XI, led by Mark RafterySkehan with the assistance of vice-captain Mark Lane, will be competing against the cream of Irish cricket in the DGM 45-over league. This league features many overseas professionals and Irish Internationals,

so the standard is extremely high. With a comprehensive pre-season training programme and upcoming friendlies, the firsts will hope to have gained momentum in time for the start of the season. The first match, against Civil Service, is on April 29, so head down to College Park to give the boys some welcome support. The Second XI will hope to improve upon a disappointing 2006 season, where several critical matches were rained off or cancelled due to exams. Under the leadership of David Lydon, the team will be competing in the intermediate “A” league. Having won the first two matches of the year, the seconds are pushing for promotion and can hope to continue doing well this season. For the first time in as long as anyone can remember, Trinity will field a Third XI in league cricket this season. Previously, the Ramblers XI, a team comprised of players of all ability that is picked according to the fixture, has been the college’s third team. However, with captain Ronan Kane at the helm, the thirds have a strong chance of outplaying many of the teams in their Junior “B” league, and will hope to start the season well against Leinster on May 2. Until then, the Ramblers will be playing on a regular basis, matches having bugun on the 10th and 12th April. Both of these matches were in College Park, and there is no better way to enjoy your lunch break than by the side of the Pav. As well as these 45-over fixtures, the ladies’ team will be playing shorter evening matches in front of packed Pav crowds. Led by Caoilfhionn Rowan, the ladies began their season on April 20 with a win against Merrion, and will hope to thrill the masses that fill the Pav in the long summer evenings. If you would like to play cricket for Trinity this season, contact lydond@tcd.ie.

This year’s first cricket squad. Back row: Jonathan Evans, Robert Miley, Gary Baugh, Eoin Ryan, Lewis Carpenter, Peter Blakney. Front row: Titkish Patel, John Glynn (president), Mark Raftery-Skehan (captain), Mark Lane, Ben Dunk. Photo: Martin McKenna

DU Camogie Club

DU Ladies’ Hockey Club

Not the best league year Trinity girls winners for hockey girls despite of Purcell Shield some notable wins Teresa Buckley

Caoimhe Costigan Kate Stewart Starting way back in September, it’s been a long season for the teams of DU Ladies’ Hockey Club. Cold, wet and windy training sessions in Santry and icy Saturday mornings at matches seem a thing of the past. Reflecting on the season, it has been mixed, one of both success and failure and for all five teams there has been triumphs as well as disappointments. Trinity’s ladies’ third XI are the Club’s major success story. Following disappointing relegation last season, the girls determined to redeem themselves. And that they did, losing only two matches all season. The most important match of their year was against Old Alex fourths on March 10. Old-timer Laura Binion’s goal put them at 1-1, a score that remained until fresher Holly Jones sealed the victory seconds before the final whistle. As leading goal scorer it was one of Jones’s many this year which crucially put the team at top of the league table. The final match of the season saw the team take on Botanic in an away match which meant playing on Botanic’s grit surface. The match was a crucial one, as a win would guarantee promotion and improve the chances of topping the table. Rising to the challenge, the girls overcame the home team’s advantage and won 1-0. Promotion was secured but in order to win the league they needed Old Alex to either draw or lose one of their remaining 2 matches. Thankfully Bray put an end to Old Alex’s hopes of a win and the thirds were crowned league winners and will once again play in division six. The first XI also began the season optimistically. With new coach Dave Bane at the helm they undertook a gru-

elling new training regime, which underlined their unfaltering determination and commitment. Their efforts were not in vain and a number of individual successes gave confidence to the Trinity side. Danielle Costigan, Lyndsey Watson and Emma Gray were all selected for the Leinster under-21 squad, while Rachel Griffith and Ciara Rowe were chosen to represent Trinity on The Irish Universities’ team. In spite of currently lying ninth in division one, Trinity have had results worth celebrating. The highlight of the season came in early March when a single goal from Danielle Costigan secured an impressive victory over fifth position Railway Union. Although disappointed not to come away with any points from last weekends encounter with Three Rock’s ladies, there have been other noteworthy performances. Including a draw with old rivals against UCD in what was a very tight match and a 1-1 draw with Clontarf, though the girls were unlucky not to achieve all three points on this occasion. At the end of the season, the team found themselves in ninth position, four points clear of bottom of the table Clontarf. However neither team will face relegation, as the top two teams in division two are ineligible for promotion. The second XI had a slow start to the season with a number of unlucky draws which proved to be of great significance in recent weeks as the team became a major runner in the race for promotion. After Christmas the girls upped the pace and a string of victories saw them undefeated in eight successive matches, including an important 2-1 win over league winners Avoca. These three points made promotion to division four a real possibility and the upcoming match against Weston a massive occasion.

Inconveniently played over the holidays meaning a lack of available players Trinity’s determination in this nail biting match did not falter. A 1-0 victory brought the side within one point of Weston, who held second position in the league and looked set for promotion. Trinity’s destiny was now out of their hands and for once they were hoping for a UCD victory over Weston in the final match of the season. However, it was not to be as UCD were on the end of a 6-2 battering, which meant the second XI narrowly missed on promotion. However this young and talented side are more resolute than ever to succeed next year. Although a few great results after Christmas, Trinity’s fourth XI’s season ended in disappointment. Despite facing relegation, the reality is that they are actually eight points above bottom of the table Genesis and a mere 3 points behind UCD. Their fate was sealed by an unfortunate loss to Railway Union last weekend. Although the score was 1-1 at half time, the arrival of the Railway’s 11th player in the second half proved too much for the ten Trinity girls ending in a 4-1 defeat. Trinity 5ths had a mixed season which saw them finish 9th place in a table of eighteen in division 13. Recent results include a tight 1-0 win over Diocesan and a draw with Railway Union. In an exciting final match they were unlucky to lose 3-2 to Malahide 2nds last weekend. Although on paper not the most successful season to date in the leagues, other events have brought more success, such as cup events, Colours, Intervarsities and Easter Festival. Furthermore, the club is thriving, registering a record number of players this year. With plenty of young talent, the future certainly looks promising.

Sunday March 11 saw history being made as the DU Camogie Club contested the final of the Purcell Shield, hosted by Athlone IT. This came after one of the best years yet for the club, with the introduction of Dublin’s Caroline Duggan as dedicated coach and the provision of excellent new training facilities in Clann na nGael GAA Club Ringsend. The girls’ hard training and commitment since October paid off when, after winning Colours against UCD before Christmas, they went on to defeat Sligo IT in the Purcell Qualifiers with a decent score line of 3-4 to a goal. A narrow loss of 3 points to DCU in the Cup/Shield decider put the girls into the Shield semi-final against St Pat’s, Drumcondra. The opposition could not field on the day and so with Queen’s Belfast edging past Mary Immaculate College in extratime of the other semi-final, a not to be

missed Trinity-Queen’s final lay ahead. The Trinity team travelled to Athlone on Saturday the 10th and spent the day preparing for the game at hand. With a 20strong panel, the 15 who lined out put on an unexpected performance. Coming in as underdogs to title holders Queen’s left many doubting their ability. However, the girls showed they were no force to be reckoned with when they rattled the Queen’s net with a goal from Niamh Taylor in the opening five minutes. A point from Taylor again followed to settle the Trinity side into the game. Queen’s awakened 15 minutes into the game and matched the Trinity goal. They upped this by three points in the following minutes, two from frees. In the final minutes of the first half, a rebounded free presented the perfect opportunity for the Queen’s full forward to take their second goal, leaving Trinity trailing by five points at the halfway mark. Despite much encouragement from the side-line and effort on the field, Trinity was unable to make up the deficit

in the second half, which grew to see Queen’s retain their title on a score line of 3-3 to 1-2. While the Trinity team retreated to the dressing rooms disappointed at the final result, they were satisfied to know that they had put in a trojan performance in their first ever Purcell final. They celebrated such a performance in style at the banquet held by Athlone IT that night in the Shamrock Lodge Hotel Athlone. Congratulations to Purcell AllStar winners Catriona Power and Niamh Taylor. The Trinity Camogie Club would like to commend Athlone IT on hosting a successful and enjoyable weekend. Many thanks is to be extended to manager Caroline Duggan, GAA development officer Gavin Kerr, Eamonn Glennon for his help, The Palace Bar for sponsorship, Clann na nGael GAA Club for the use of their excellent facilities and, of course, all committee and team members. A fond farewell to our final-year students for whom the Purcell final was the last match they will play with Trinity.

DU Surf and Bodyboarding Club

Surfers fourth in varsities Eoin McCarthy Deering This year’s Irish Surfing Intervarsities promised to be better than ever with extreme commitment from the host college WIT, prizes galore and a huge array of teams from 13 third level institutions from around the country. Competing in this years magnificent event were NUI Galway, UUC, GMIT, Trinity, Waterford IT, DIT, Queen’s, Limerick IT, NUI Maynooth, Cork IT, UCC, UCD and DCU. The Irish Surfing Intervarsities kicked off with registration in the Shanty

Bar on Friday evening. The following morning brought clear skies, blustery winds and 3ft waves-decent conditions for the start of the competition. Throughout Saturday all the heats up to the semis in each category were run off with intense surfing in all divisions. The Expression Session (a new addition to the event) began at 1600. This was a fun-filled surfing competition for all the surfers and supporters who did not enter the main event. Categories ranged from Best Wipeout, Best Dressed, all the way up to Best Overall Surfer. The Expression Session presentation took place in the Shanty Bar on Saturday

night, there were over 20 categories and Trinity College blitzed the session taking over half of the prizes for their exploits in the water. Trinity’s surfers recorded the following results: Best Shortboarder: Rob Green; Wave of the day: Ronan Kane; Best Barrel: Tim Mills; Most Enthusiastic Surfer: Niamh Smith; Best Handstand: Peter Goulding; Surfer With Most Potential: Brendan Murphy; Best Aerial: Andy Wall; Best Drop-In: Aideen Griffin; Nicest Surfboard: Iseult Kirwan; Best Noseride: Tina Flannagan; Dirtiest Surfer: Niamh O’Brien (who wore a nappy surfing).


SPORT 17

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

DU Central Athletic Club University Colours

Nine new Pinks awarded at Hilary term captains’ meeting

Pinks: requiescat in pace

Peter Henry

The temporary demise of Pinks in 1936 was marked by this editorial in TCD: A College Miscellany.

Nine students were awarded University Colours at a meeting of the captains of the DU clubs on Thursday, 8 March. University Colours, as distinct from Club Colours, were first introduced in 1927, when Pink was chosen as the University colour. The Pink is vaguely analogous with the Blue of Oxford and Cambridge; however, Pinks are normally awarded for individual participation at international level, rather than for competing for the University teams, as at Oxbridge. The idea to introduce University Colours here was first discussed in the pages of TCD Miscellany in 1895 when St Patrick’s blue and green were both suggested. The awarding of University Colours was abolished for a time, and the abolishment was applauded in TCD, reproduced here. Nevertheless, Pinks was reintroduced a few years later and the award continues to be given out today. At the recent meeting, the minutes of the previous meeting were first read, recalling the names of those who were awarded Pinks last year on April 27, 2006: Darren Dempsey (Association Football), Michael Fouhy (Amateur Boxing), John Behan (Basketball), Cecilia Joyce (Ladies’ Cricket), Kate Harvey (Fencing), Matthew Crocket (Football), Marc Warburton (Football), Niall Conlon (Football), Paul Doran Jones (Football), Teresa Walsh (Swimming), Cian O’Morain (Ultimate Frisbee). The new Pinks, pictured here, are Russell Treacy (Sailing), John Downey (Sailing), Ronan Murphy (Sailing), Stefan Hyde (Sailing), Katie Hamilton (Sailing), Claudine Murphy (Sailing), Lisa Tait (Sailing), Peter Blakeney (Sailing), John Deenihan (Judo). The seven sailors’ Pinks are rewards for their win at the Student Yachting World Cup. Pinks are not normally awarded to whole teams – club colours exists for this purpose. Nonetheless, it was felt that the sailing team’s achievement merited University recognition. Trinity’s sailors competed against twelve other universities from around the world, including three from the UK. Hopefully many of them will go on to compete for Ireland. Peter Blakeney’s Pink is remarkable in that he was previously awarded University Colours for hockey. As Dr West commented at the meeting, the nominations presented were nothing less than “open-and-shut” cases. This year’s second Pinks meeting is scheduled for this Thursday. It is expected that the first croquet Pink in 13 years will be awarded to a deserving candidate, as predicted in these pages back in October 2005. (Photos: David Adamson)

Russell Treacy (Sailing)

John Downey (Sailing)

Ronan Murphy (Sailing)

Stefan Hyde (Sailing)

Katie Hamilton (Sailing)

Claudine Murphy (Sailing)

Lisa Tait (Sailing)

Peter Blakeney (Cricket)

John Deenihan (Judo)

The Easter Vacation has proved not uneventful in that is it marked by the passing of “pinks”. University Colours are gone and will, no doubt, soon be forgotten, for few can possibly regret their demise. So let us write not in memoriam but requiescat in pace. Some years ago certain prominent Trinity athletes felt the need for the institution of University Colours on the lines of the Oxford or Cambridge “blue”. However, probably in a spirit of self-abasement and humility, they decided that not every man to whom senior colours had been awarded by his club was worthy of being further honoured by the University, contending that the standard of sport in College all round did not compare favourably with that in the sister Universities. So it was agreed that only to those of outstanding individual ability “pinks” should be awarded. The practical difficulties of such a scheme are at once obvious to the meanest intelligence; the results of its working, be it well or badly operated, are only a little more difficult of visualisation. By far the most valued essential of almost any sport of importance is generally accepted to be team-work. One is taught in school to “play for one’s side and not for one’s self.” It seems nothing short of directly destructive of this spirit to select for especial honours two or three individual players from a team of anything from seven to fifteen players. But such selection is not only opposed to the ethics of sport – it is also, in itself, a task practically impossibly of satisfactory performance. In almost every newspaper report of a football match an attempt is made to single out members of the teams involved for individual praise; it is very seldom that the players thus chosen are identical in any two accounts. But these difficulties are increased at least an hundred-fold when the player must be compared not only with his team-mates but also with participants in sports that have not the remotest similarity to his own. It is bad enough to be required to decide whether “bow” or “No. four” pulled the more weight in the Senior Eight. To compare the value of the respective services to University sport of the favoured oarsman and of, say, the goal-keeper of the Hockey team would be the task of a super-man – or a fool. As is to be expected, bickering and jealousy within and between the various clubs was the result of such an iniquitous system. The contention that sport in Trinity is generally of a lower standard than in other universities is scarcely to the point but nonetheless deserves com-

ment. Of late years we have at least held our own with both Oxford and Cambridge in Rugby and Hockey, Golf being the only other sport at which we have met them. It is only natural that in an institution as small relatively speaking as Dublin University undergraduates should in the main confine their attentions to a comparatively small number of types of athletic activities. That we can compete on level terms with the larger universities in these games is a very healthy sign, considering how much lower is the membership of our clubs. Any attempt in Dublin University to imitate slavishly Oxford or Cambridge for imitation’s sake alone deserves to meet with an ignominious failure. It should be remembered that in both these universities there are many colleges, each of which preserves an autonomy in most of its domestic affairs, including sport. Thus the Rugby Club of any college is a completely separate entity from that of its nearest neighbour, having its own distinctive colours, badge, blazer, and all the regalia which seems a necessary adjunct to present-day sport. The fact that a man has represented his college does not entitle him to sport a “blue”, the prerogative only of those who have been chosen to represent the University as a whole. The difference, which lies in the respective connotations of the terms “University” and “College”, would appear to be obvious and yet is continually forgotten when dealing with questions such as the present one. Theoretically speaking Trinity is a college of Dublin University but, since it is the only one, may, for practical purposes, be identified with the University. Thus we can have only one club to cater for any sport. It is then the nature of mere laurel-hunting for an individual to seek from the University recognition of his merits other than that afforded him by his club. It is futile to award honours as it were in duplicate and “pinks” have undoubtedly done a great deal to lower the value of club colours in the public estimation. There is to some an entirely different cause for rejoicing since the pink scarf was never, pasthetically speaking, a joy to behold. How the colour originally came to be decided upon we do not know, nor can we find the choice justified by any tradition or usage. We would say, at the risk of offending athletic susceptibilities that that particular shade has always seemed to us essentially feminine and associated with things poles apart from goal-posts and swivel-row-locks. So let us hope that the diehards who will, we realise, insist on attending College functions swathed in this antiseptic-seeming material will not be numerous. We notice that the vote of the DU Central Athletic Committee which abolished “pinks” was almost unanimous and we congratulate those gentlemen (themselves University Colourmen) who worked hard to achieve this consummation. The experiment has received a fair trial and has not justified itself. Again we say, requiescat in pace. From TCD: A College Miscellany, May 14th 1936 (No 739).

DU Harriers and Athletic Club

DU fifth at Cross-country champs Denis Tkachenko

Competing at the cross-country intervarsity comp.

On 24 February, the DU Harriers crosscountry squads ventured out to Athlone to take part in the IUAA Intervarsity Cross Country Championships, hosted by Athlone IT. After a bitter defeat in the recent cross-country Colours match, the Trinity runners were raring to make amends. The day started off with two worrying forecasts, one concerning the weather, the other one, sadly, concerning the men’s starting line-up. Captain Mark Kirwan was in gloomy mood; in the run up to the event, his squad had gone from what looked like the strongest team in years, to a rather unbalanced team of six, the bare minimum to be eligible for a position in the final standings. It was especially downing as Mark tried to save the best for the varsities, resting certain athletes for the Colours match. Among those lost to injury were recent 3 km indoor champion Fintan McGee, Mark himself and former 10 km outdoor track champion David Kelly. In the absence of these elite athletes, our chances for medals were quite slim. However, even under such dire circumstances, the remaining runners did not lose their fighting spirit, and many of those sidelined with injury came out to support their club nonetheless. It was up to the ladies to save the day, and the pressure was mounting on Captain Fodhla

Treacy and her team, with their 4 km race first on the event schedule. On arrival in Athlone, the teams rushed off to examine the race course, conveniently located just beside the hotel. It should be said that Athlone IT provided an excellent course complete with a nasty combination of hills and sharp turns on the downward slopes, proving to be challenging even for the most experienced cross-country athletes. First up was the ladies’ 4 km, where the final standings were determined by the positions of the top four on each team. Shortly after the ladies started their race, the forecasted rain finally came down on Athlone. This further exacerbated the gruelling nature of the competition already ensured by a tough course and top notch competitors. Indeed, some competitors, especially later in the men’s 10 km, collapsed from exhaustion during the race. DCU ladies, with a plethora of big name athletes, grabbed the lead straight away, and dominated the race throughout to land their first four finishers within the top five. This meant that they claimed all of the individual medals and won the trophy for the fifth consecutive year. As this was obvious from the start, the main area of interest was concentrated around the second and third team positions, to be fought for between Trinity, UCD and UU. A few minutes into the race, DU ladies established a strong presence in the top 20, led by Louise Reilly and Bryony

Treston, and followed by current and former captains, Fodhla Treacy and Caitriona Hooper. Sarah Jacobson, Megan Murphy and Sinead Roche also produced impressive performances in their first cross country intervarsity outing, which bodes well for their next few years on the team. Interestingly enough, all of the DU scorers had to win an individual duel with a UCD athlete, and found themselves battling head-to-head for most of the race. But, cheered on by numerous supporters, and demonstrating sheer determination against all odds, the DU ladies overtook their UCD opponents one by one towards the end. The one exception was UCD captain Ruth Mills, who barely managed to stay ahead of Trinity’s first finisher, Bryony Treston, by two seconds. After the race, it became clear that arch-rivals UCD had been defeated; the recent colours loss had been avenged. However, the battle for secondplace was not completely resolved, as UU and Trinity were very close in the standings. Tired, soaked and confused as to whether they had achieved second or third place, but overjoyed nonetheless, the DU ladies hurried off the rainy field to the nearby shelter. Little did they know that they just made history in Trinity athletics by producing the best cross country performance in five years. The uncertainty was resolved only at the medal presentations at the dinner party later in the evening: Trinity ladies

indeed won the silver, edging out the UU team by a single point! That was the highest result one could rationally have hoped to achieve, given DCU’s (laden with athletics scholarships) complete dominance. Next up was the men’s 10 km, with the final standings being determined by the performance of the top six on each team. As previously mentioned, our medal expectations waned as most elite Trinity runners were missing the race due to injuries. Nevertheless, the DU men’s team, spearheaded by highly experienced Sean O’Heigeartaigh and Karl Fahy, gave their all to get their college as high as possible in the standings. Among other competitors were newcomers to the squad Owen O’Dwyer, Thomas Lupton and Sean Flynn, as well as old reliables Michael Early and Simone Grassi. While the DU athletes struggled to keep their college in a decent place, the attention of the spectators was captivated by the epic battle between UCD and DCU. The latter, dubbed by many as favourites, were missing their main star and reigning champion Mark Christie, while UCD brought out their finest in full strength. In the end of the highly entertaining rivalry, UCD came out on top denying DCU for the second time in a row. Trinity managed to finish fifth, losing narrowly to UCC. Full results of the championships can be viewed online at the following address: sindar.net/iuaa/results/meet/163.


18 SPORT

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

DU Ladies’ Boat Club

DU Judo Club

Female rowers lose Colours race again

Good day for Trinity at Judo varsity comp

Áine Feeney Ildico Wille On Saturday, 10 March, DU Ladies’ Boat Club’s first-year novice and senior crews took on their contemporaries from across the river in UCD in the annual Colours race on the Liffey. The day presented mildly favourable conditions for racing in these testing waters through the city, from O’Connell Bridge to the Guinness brewery on Victoria Quay. First up were the novice ladies in their first head-to-head race. The girls put up a confident performance and stayed ahead of their opponents, on the north station, from the beginning. Lauriane Bertrand steered the boat through the eight bridges, along the winding course to finish three quarters of a length ahead, a victory that sees the Sally Moorhead Trophy returned to DULBC following an absence of two years. Huge congratulations are in order to all the girls involved, whose racing that day shows signs of great promise for the coming regatta season. The senior women’s eight, comprised mainly of second-year novices and two former captains (Sive Geoghegan and Anna Walsh), took on a strong UCD crew later that afternoon. Following a slower start by the Trinity ladies, an exciting race ensued, which saw the distance between the two crews decrease as the race proceeded. Cox Eimear Deady steered a near perfect course but unfortunately UCD emerged eventual winners. DULBC put in an admirable performance, losing by a mere half a length. Although disappointed with the loss, the senior crew was pleased with its performance. On St Patrick’s Day, DULBC novice women took part in Tribesmen Head of the River, held on the Corrib in Galway. The course was shortened dramatically due to adverse weather conditions. The eight, coxed by Dónal Finnerty, finished third behind NUIG and UCC. DU Ladies’ Boat Club’s first eight vs UCD: Maeve O'Donnell (bow), Maire Gallagher, Kate Hogan, Katherine Sheane, Aine Feeney, Sive Geoghegan, Anna Walsh, Margaret O’Donoghue (stroke), Eimear Deady (cox).

Maggie O’Donoghue and Eimear Deady preparing for the start of the Colours race, the Corcoran Cup. Trinity lost. Photo: Martin McKenna

DU Sailing Club

DU Hockey Club

First varsity sailing win since 2003 Lisa Tait On 22 February, the relatively dormant town of Kilrush, Co Clare was shaken from its slumber by a gaggle of voices stemming from lifejacket-wearing strangers in search of Lucozade Sport and breakfast rolls, as sailors from all over Ireland gathered for the commencement of the annual Intervarsity National Team Racing Championships. This year, the task of organising the event fell to the hands of the Dublin University Sailing Club. After much deliberation and many refusals (due to the reputations of our predecessors) the Western Yacht Club in Kilrush was chosen as the location for our four day event, much to the delight of a certain Mr Randall Cunnihane. The event got off to a smooth start, courtesy of our captain, Davie Carr, as people scurried to and fro laying marks, rigging boats and squeezing into wetsuits after the long winter months. Locals gathered at the water’s edge, bewildered by the array of strange and colourful sails. Their mouths dropped as the racing began and they soon witnessed the sheer frenzy and vulgarity which team racing seems to invoke in otherwise placid sailors. Trinity really raised the bar in entertainment terms this year, kicking off the first evening’s activities with hypnotist Adrian Knight. Even the most sceptical of people were silenced as they watched their comrades doing ballet, chasing leprechauns and finishing with a (near) full

DIT hosted this year’s Judo intervarsities in Dublin. The main aim for both Trinity’s men’s and women’s teams was to defend last year’s titles. As more people than ever signed up for DU Judo this year, hopes were high to achieve good results and many medals in the individual categories, too. Thanks to the belt categories, not only experienced fighters had a good chance, but we also sent beginners to their first competitive experience. The day got off to a difficult start however, as the club learned of the recent death of their trainer Tony Gentles just minutes before the fights began. As Tony could not train with us in the weeks leading up to the event, we were not aware of this and not informed until a minute of silence was held on his behalf. Even though emotions were running high, the players managed to focus on the competition and were determined to do well in his honour. The competition kicked off with the ladies’ team event, which consisted of three fighters for each club. Trinity sent out all its female fighters on two teams, thereby taking the risk of not having substitutes. Trinity’s first team, which included ladies’ captain Jenny Dwyer, Ildico Wille and Elizabeth Moloney, regained their title convincingly by winning all of their fights. The second team, Inga Jende, Stephanie Toetsch and Amy Nordon shared third place with Coleraine. The second men’s team got a good fourth place, with Kevin Lally, Jeremie Garnier, Joe Moore, Luke Feighery and Ed Burridge fighting. The first team, however, also had a title to defend. Captain John Deenihan, Ciaran Cosgrave, Conor Flanagan, Kevin Moerman and Paddy “The Bear” Wheen successfully demonstrated Trinity’s domineering status in almost as spectacular a fashion as the ladies. The ladies’ events went on without a

break after the teams, with the weight categories coming first. Trinity’s ladies collected medals here as well. In the –52kg, Steph Toetsch won Bronze, being the lightest as her own category (–48 kg) had to be cancelled. In the –57 kg category, Jenny Dwyer made it to the final, unfortunately losing with a bite in her thumb. Inga Jende won Bronze. The –70 kg was dominated by TCD, with Renata Tekoriute winning, Ildico Wille taking second and Elizabeth Moloney and Amy Nordon sharing bronze. In the men’s weights, Joe Moore won silver in the –66 kg category. Ciaran Cosgrave, despite being injured, fought his way into the finals of the –73 kg category, and after a fierce fight, emerged victorious. John Deenihan, later to be crowned player of the day, started his winning streek by winning the –90 kg event. Paddy Wheen won his category (–100 kg) with none of his fights lasting longer than a few seconds. Whitebelt Ed Burridge in his first competition won the +100 kg, showing that even beginners can reach a high standard in our club. In the lower kyu, a category for people with white and yellow belts, Inga Jende won silver, defeating team mate Elizabeth Moloney in the semi-finals who won bronze. The middle kyu had the highest rate of participants and was dominated by Trinity again, with Ildico Wille winning all of her fights to take gold, and Jenny Dwyer only defeated by her teammate taking silver. Kevin Moerman won the men’s higher kyu. John Deenihan completed his gold collection by winning the men’s open category. He also became player of the day and Ciaran Cosgrave was awarded the trophy for the throw of the day. Despite the difficult emotional circumstances, it was a good and successful day for Trinity. We would like to dedicate our winnings to Tony Gentles. Even though he was only training with us for a year, we appreciated his knowledge of judo and his personality very much and will keep him in our memories.

monty. There also were two themed nights (all following the general trend of “naked chicks and loads of guns”, an old favourite!), two lock-ins and plenty of scandal to be discussed in between races. After two days of round robins, it was time for the knockout stage. In the Gold Fleet, the Trinity first team (comprising John “bouncebackability” Downey, Mel Croxon, Geoff Tait, Jess Guy, Neil Duke and Lisa Tait) saw off the Scottish universities’ sailing seam, placing them in the semi-finals against old rivals UCC. Trinity were determined not to see a repeat of the previous year (where UCC defeated Trinity 1 in the final), and after a gruelling three races emerged victorious, ready to take on UL. Spirits were high as both teams prepared for the racing ahead. All the while the wind steadily increased, serenading us with showers of hailstones. After some tough and competitive racing in the best of five final, Trinity managed to pull through in four races, winning the intervarsities for the first time since 2003. UL graciously congratulated us before we were swiftly dunked under the icy water as part of our much deserved punishment. All was forgotten however as the night culminated in a masquerade ball where many messy celebrations were to be had. We awoke with heavy heads on the Sunday morning, reluctantly cleaning up our houses in the vague hope of our deposits being returned and setting off home, back to reality, and back to our nine o’clock lectures, dragging the cup with us triumphantly.

DU Hockey Club’s first squad this year, winners of the Colours match against University College Dublin and the Irish Intervarsity Championship. Back row: Cian Denham (captain), Richard Miles, David Benjamin Hewitt, Aengus Stanley, Chris Tyrell, Nicholas Odlum, Niall Sommerville, Arul Anthoni (head coach). Front row: Stuart Cinnamond, Barry Glavey, Conor O'Sullivan, Jason Bryan (first XI captain), Daire Coady, Graham O'Neil. Photo: Martin McKenna

DU Boat Club DU Boat Club’s senior eight this year, winners of the Gannon Cup race against University College Dublin. Back row: Joseph Calnan, Edward Roffe-Silvester, David Cummins, Robert Swift. Front row: Eoin MacDomhnaill, Rory Horner, Gabriel Magee (captain), Gavin Doherty, Eoghan Kerlin. Photo: Martin McKenna


SPORT 19

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

DU Football Club

Oxford lose to gutsy Trinity side at Merrion Road Robert Swift Dublin University 23 Oxford University 20 It was St Patrick’s Day when DUFC took on its Oxford University counterpart, and with the British side being the superior on paper, it was up to Trinity to use the home advantage (if you can call it that) of playing at the Wanderers ground on Merrion Road to the best of their ability. On a day when the clouds looked menacing all morning and a wind was blowing strongly lengthways down the pitch, this looked to be a game where each team would need to take every chance that came their way. So it proved, and with Oxford starting into the wind, Trinity soon found their footing and were able to gain some effective territory from which Oxford could do no better than run back at them. When the Trinity XV did decide to use the width early on, it proved very effective, and after just four minutes Paul Gillespie was able to put wing George Byron in for a try in the corner. This was just the start Trinity needed against an Oxford side that looked groggy after their flight that morning. Trinity continued to play some good pacey rugby through the hands, but it was the forwards who produced the second try as the home side took advantage of quick ball from the ruck and again put Byron through against a disorganised defence. A further try and some gutsy kicking with a blustery wind behind put twenty Trinity points on the board, whilst the only fruits of Oxford’s labour came when Jonan Boto, who looked a threat with ball in hand, executed well to leave the score at 20-5 on half time. Now came Oxford’s turn with the wind and the away side started playing safe rugby, kicking for territory and executing neat driving mauls with their powerful forwards. A notable substitution from Oxford was the inclusion from halftime of Joe Roff, OURFC captain for next season and Rugby World Cup winner with the Wallabies. His inclusion seemed to galvanise the team and Trinity knew that they would have a game on their hands. The dark blue pack soon pitched camp in the Trinity 22 and put together successive forward moves. Time and time again they pushed forward, but some valiant Trinity defending (and unheard calls for yellow cards by one set of coaching staff) kept the Irish side in the game. Trinity’s back row served them superbly, knocking back any of the large Oxford charges, but they could not hold off two

February was a busy month for the Trinity’s Shotokan Karate club. It included a two-day weekend training course that gave us a great opportunity to improve the technical aspects of our Karate, and a trip to Belfast for the Karate Intervarsities. On the Weekend of 10-11 February, the Club attended a training course organised by the Shotokan Institute of Ireland and imparted by Sensei Dirk Heene, who is 7th Dan Karate-do, technical director of the BKSA (Belgian Karate-do Shotokan Academy), and chief instructor to the SRKHIA (Shotokan Ryu Kase Ha Instructors Academy). The course was a great experience, and everyone who was there learned something. It was also a great opportunity to meet other karatekas from different parts of Ireland, and abroad. On 17 February, the allIreland Karate intervarsities took place in Queen’s University Belfast, with over 100 participants representing 13 colleges. Even though the Trinity team that attended was small, with only nine competitors, the performance was excellent, coming home with five golds, one silver and two third places.

Debating hacks clash on soccer field With the Oxford side being the superior on paper, it was up to Trinity to use the home advantage to the best of their ability. Photo: Peter Henry tries and a penalty being chalked up to leave the scores at 20-20. Not to be discouraged, Trinity took an opportunity to burst out of their own half and when the referee raised his arm for a penalty, Jonny Watt did not look twice before bisecting the Oxford uprights into the wind.

As the clock ran down, Oxford again rallied and in the resulting fray, Trinity let discipline slip to give away what were, in the referee’s opinion, too many penalties in their own 22. Yellow cards were the result and with his last play, Roff chose to tap the ball from hand instead of kick the penalty to tie things up.

The strong Oxford pack rumbled over, supported by an extra man, but having crossed the line all they could manage was a pile up, and, had the ball been grounded, it would have been impossible for the referee to award. The whistle sounded and a jubilant Trinity team were able to celebrate a truly gutsy perform-

ance. 23-20 at Merrion road. DU Football Club’s first XV vs Oxford: 15 Paul Gillespie, 14 George Byron, 13 Brian Hastings, 12 Conor Donohue, 11 Charles Coyle, 10 Johnny Watt, 9 Andrew Dold (Eddie Hamilton 65), 1 Graham Murphy (Tristan Goodbody 55), 2 Ben Cunningham, 3 Andy King, 4 Roger Young (John Byrne 55), 5 Max Cantrell, 6 Shane Young, 7 Ross Condren, 8 Peter McFeely (John Clark 78).

Disc-throwers retain intervarsity title Trinity came from behind to beat archrivals UCD in the final of the outdoor Open Intervarsities on March 25, retaining the title they won in similar fashion a year ago. 8-7 down when the 75 min time-cap was called mid-point, they fought hard to level the scores at 8-8 and force a sudden-death point. Despite UCD forcing their way to the front of their endzone, Trinity’s defence held firm and forced a turnover, punishing UCD for their mistake with a score to take the game and the title 9-8. Last year’s tournament also saw Trinity overcome a deficit at the last moment, needing to score two consecutive points in a tight game in order to wrest the trophy from the hands of the UCD team, who had won it for the previous three years. This year’s outcome was considered too close to call beforehand, as with the loss of some players to graduation and to study abroad, the Trinity squad that travelled to the University of Limerick were by no means favourites this time around. UCD had picked a talented, physical squad which contained arguably more strength and depth than their Trinity counterparts, and retention of the title was always going to be difficult. Indeed, with UCD having beaten Trinity in their Winter League game in

In Trinity Trust News in 1991, Dr West pointed out that the cycling club which set up here in 1987 stuck to the colours of the 19th-century DU Bicycle Club: brown and pink. For some reason, however, the latest incarnation of the cycling club is using neither the old name nor the old colours. It is not acceptable that the club should use new colours and a new name so that the person who rejuvenated the club can use his favourite colours and not seem archaic. The Central Athletic Club should insist that, before recognition, the club correctly call itself the DU Bicycle Club and the club use the historic colours of that club.

February was a busy month for karate kids

DU Ultimate Frisbee Club

David Rickard

Cycling club should stick to tradition

January, the Belfield boys appeared to have the edge and everyone predicted a tough game. Both teams came through the opening pool stages unscathed, Trinity notching up victories against Cork and DCU amongst their four games on the Saturday. The seeding had resulted in Trinity’s half of the draw featuring three of the four semi-finalists, and UCD went unchallenged for the first day, conceding only a handful of points in four games. After the crossovers, it was DCU’s turn to test them, and despite a shaky start UCD ran out comfortable winners from their first really competitive game. Trinity were able to beat UCC a second time, despite the Cork team upping their game considerably from the previous day. Formalities completed, as it were, it was down to the Trinity-UCD final that everyone had predicted. A nervous start saw Trinity trailing 31 before finding their feet and with captain and man-of-the-match Dave Misstear outstanding in his marking of UCD’s best handler, Dara Hayes, Trinity pulled ahead to lead 6-4. Some lapses in concentration gave UCD a lifeline and they were quick to take it, picking up the pace and going 7-6 ahead. With the clock running down Trinity could not afford to let them get any further out of reach. Relying heavily on their well-drilled offence as the pressure mounted, Trinity switched between

Back Row: David Misstear, David Rickard, Robbie Semple, Donal Carey, Cian O’Morain, Sam Mehigan. Front Row: Clive Curley, Andrea Fagan, Linda Barry, Ann Booker, Ian French. Photo: DU Ultimate Frisbee Club patient cross-field swinging of the disc and long hucks which had threatened the UCD defence throughout the game, either earning points or gaining position. Trading points with UCD, the Trinity defence was forced to deal with the com-

bination of Enda Naughton and Dave McAllester, two of the best receivers in the Irish university game. UCD’s offensive structure could have been better, and the formation they employed was dealt with by Trinity with more ease than UCD

would have liked. Failing to make the most of their strengths they were forced to switch formation, with little improvement in performance. Time was called mid-point with UCD leading 8-7, meaning the next score would set the game at 8-8 with a game to 9, or 9-7 to UCD with a game to 10. A lengthy point with multiple turnovers ended in a huck from Cian O Morain to David Rickard, who just managed to outpace McAllester to score and secure a tie. The final point, then, would begin with UCD having possession and both teams needing a single point to win. Nerves were jangling as UCD worked the disc calmly up the pitch, getting right to the front of the end-zone before intense pressure on the handlers forced a turnover. Taking advantage of the swing in momentum, Trinity gained yards quickly before O’Morain spotted Misstear breaking away from his marker and another 50metre pass was gathered in safely by Misstear to secure victory. The UCD players, thoroughly gutted after letting this one escape, will surely be gearing themselves up for revenge in the upcoming Colours game on their home ground. Having shown that last year was no fluke, the Trinity team can now look forward to securing intervarsities again next year and going ahead in the all-time table of winners of the competition.

The annual Phil-Hist soccer match took place on Good Friday in Deer Park, with 22 current and old hacks taking the field, including a ninth appearance of the Priestly brothers for the Hist. The Hist took an early start in the opening minutes with goals from Marq O’Neill and Carl Cullinane, and the Phil struggled to recover despite some questionable decisions in their favour from a referee who was eventually sent off in the second half. There were tense moments towards the end when great play from Brian O’Beirne and Andrew Payne created two goals in quick succession for the Phil, but the Hist bounced back and finished with a comfortable 9-6 win after 90 minutes.

Trinity take top prize at Queen’s Regatta Last Friday’s Irish University Rowing Championships took place at Castlewellan, hosted by Queen’s University. The members of DU Boat Club were hoping to take home the Wylie Cup, a feat not achieved in almost ten years. To win the Wylie, the Club needed to win both the novice and intermediate eights, or just the senior eight if the novice and intermediate wins were split between two clubs. The novice eight did its duty, beating UCD to take the eights win. It wasn’t to be a Wylie win, however, as both intermediate and senior crews lost their finals. The senior eight lost to NUI Galway by half a length in what was a challenging race. Saturday’s Queen’s Regatta was not restricted to universities, and the first eight faced a rerun of their intermediate championship win of last July. The crew beat Belfast Rowing Club by just six inches; an absolutely minute margin. Belfast were undoubtedly hoping to avenge their secondplace finish to Trinity at the Irish Championships, but thankfully they did not get their way. The novices were unlucky on Saturday, losing to UCD after a hard day’s racing.


20 SPORT

TRINITY NEWS TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2007

DU Boat Club

UCD losers again as rowers set their sights on Henley Regatta Eoghan Kerlin Saturday 10 March saw DU Boat Club take to the waters of the River Liffey for what would be their most important outing of the year to date, the annual Colours race, or Gannon Cup. The Gannon Cup is an event steeped in tradition, dating back almost 60 years. The race was sure to be a tantalising encounter and one Trinity had no intention of losing. The novice men from UCD and Trinity fought it out in the warm-up race for the main event, the Dan Quinn Shield. Having beaten UCD in all previous meetings this year, the novices were hoping to secure yet another victory. However, things seemed to fall apart for the Trinity men from the start. Having not heard the starting call, they were down almost immediately, and despite their most valiant efforts, they just could not claw the UCD crew back. In the end, they suffered a crushing defeat. However, the season is long and, no doubt, the boys will take their revenge on UCD. Earlier, the novice “B” event took place above the weir at Islandbridge with UCD also coming out on top, a margin of one length being recorded. The main event of the day, the men’s senior eight, took place at 3.15. The roads were blocked off and the banks of the Liffey were lined with people. This was what they had all been waiting for. The Trinity crew were firm favourites for the race and were trying to make it three victories on the trot after sucesses at both Lagan and Erne Heads. New boy Eoghan Kerlin occupied the stroke seat having impressed in his two previous races. One change had been made to the successful Lagan and Erne Head crews with the more experienced Robert Swift coming in to replace the sheer power and raw aggression of second-year novice, Henry Tindal, who has impressed thus far this season. The crews were called to the starting line. All on the bank went quiet waiting for the call: “Attention. Go!” The crews were off and Trinity were shocked to find UCD in the lead after only 20 strokes. It was then that they realised that this was not going to be the walk-over that they, and many others, had expected to witness.

Eoghan Kerlin, Joseph Calnan and Edward Roffe-Silvester get a little bit excited after their win over UCD in the annual Colours race, the Gannon Cup. The crews were unnervingly level for half of the race, but Trinity pulled ahead to take the win. Photo: Martin McKenna 500 metres in and the race was neck and neck. Each crew battled hard stroke for stroke to gain some sort of an advantage. All oarsmen urged on by the masses of people cheering them on from the bank. Neither crew looking to disappoint. Then it happened. Right on half way. The Trinity crew put in an almighty push and edged out in front. UCD were starting to tire and the Trinity crew could sense it.

After an almighty push, Trinity took the lead. Only half a boat length separated both crafts. This was it. Trinity thought they were going to power through and cruise home to victory but UCD had a lot of fight still left in them and they were certainly not going to roll over and give up. They responded to the Trinity push and their counter attack began. UCD

started to edge back, no one knowing how the race was going to turn out at this stage. The crowd was mesmorised and enthralled by the spectacle unfolding in front of their eyes. With little over 500 metres to go and Trinity still half a length to the good, Joseph Calnan gave the call to take it home. A call that was echoed to the rest of the crew by Trinity coxswain, Gabriel Magee. One final push saw the

DU Bicycle Club

“powerhouses” in the engine room, Rory Horner and Edward Roffe-Silvester, lay down some massive stokes which resulted in Trinity taking a commanding lead. This was the end. Finally UCD had broken. They had nothing left and were unable to respond. David Cummins, sitting in the bow seat, was first over the finish line, winning his third Gannon Cup in four attempts. Trinity cruised home with a

comfortable eight second lead. All the hard work and training had paid off and Trinity were to have their day of glory, crowned victors of the 2007 Gannon Cup. The regatta season is now in full swing, with the Trinity eight’s goal being the Temple Challange Cup for university eights at Henley Royal Regatta in July. Colours race team photo: page 18.

DU Equestrian Club

Riders perform Cyclists take joint-first at well at varsities Irish intervarsity competition Michael Barry The DU Bicycle Club put itself firmly on the Irish cycling map with its first victory of the Irish Inter-Collegiate Cycling Championships. Despite the club being in only its second year, Trinity came joint-first with Queen’s University Belfast for Best Overall Team, and easily beat a larger UCD team on points to claim a Colours victory over its rival university. Held outside Belfast at Nutt’s Corner, the annual race saw over 40 riders converge on the roads of Antrim for a hotlycontested competition, consisting of a 5.75-mile time trial, and a 46-mile road race. Windy conditions made the going tough in the time trial, where pedalling technique and aerodynamics play a huge role. Undaunted, Trinity’s six riders posted some admirable times, notably aided by triathletes Tim Downing and Donal Bailey who stormed through the course in 13:40 and 14:06 respectively. After fine-tuning the bikes and recharging on pasta and Lucozade, all the riders lined up for the road race. To the uninitiated, a 46-mile course is relatively short for competitive cyclists, so to make proceedings interesting, the group leaders decided to set a blistering pace. Five minutes after the off, eventual winners Adam Armstrong of Queen’s and Eoghan Clifford of NUI Galway launched an attack to separate the strong riders from the weak, and quickly created a gap. Not

to be outdone, Tim jumped out of the saddle and set off after them. The main bunch set an altogether more leisurely pace after realising there was no free ride to be had drafting off the stronger riders. An enterprising few (including Trinity’s Michael Barry and Nick Cosgrave) took it upon themselves to step things up, and reduced a bunch of 20 to a knot of 6 through successive attacks and breaks, which only the dedicated could hold on to. Credit must go to Thibault Luckel of France who, despite blowing a tyre in the first lap, proceeded to charge his way single-handedly back from last to 14th place and so put himself back in the running. Given that it was his first competitive race, Eoin McCarthy also put in a commendable performance. In the final standings, Tim managed to hang on to the leaders to secure a well deserved fourth place, with the other Trinity members all finishing in the top 20. Due to ambiguous time-keeping by the race organisers, it was unclear whether Trinity’s top four men posted a quicker overall time than Queen’s, but a gentlemen’s agreement was reached where the two universities agreed to share joint first. In addition, the cycling clubs of Trinity, UCD and DCU resolved in the post-race festivities to host the intervarsities in Dublin next year. This, combined with a significant win so early in the racing season, will ensure that the future will be very bright for Trinity’s cyclists.

Orlaith Carr

Trinity’s Tim Downing during the time-trial.

On 16 February, the DU Equestrian Club travelled to Newbridge, Kildare, to compete in the 2007 Equestrian Intervarsities. The competition was hosted by the UCD equestrian team at the Coilog Riding Centre. Having placed fifth in the overall standings at the 2006 Intervarsities, the team was determined to improve their position in the rankings this year. The weekend began on Friday evening with a Toga party held in the Keadeen Hotel in Newbridge. The evening was a great success and ran into the early morning hours, despite the impending 6am wake-up call. On Saturday morning, the first round of competition began. The intervarsities competition is comprised of three events: show-jumping, dressage, and prix-caprilli. There were two events taking place on Saturday; dressage and show-jumping. Trinity had two show-jumping teams and two dressage teams, as well as two individual dressage riders. After the first round of show-jumping, four Trinity participants qualified for the second round; Tara Browne, Sean Cleary, Nikki Fitzgibbon and Laura Murphy. Unfortunately, nobody made it through to the third round but everyone rode well enough to secure a high position in the standings. The two dressage teams were competing against 21 teams from other colleges. The level of competition was quite

high but Trinity’s riders rode well and came out with fine results. Liz Dore was one of the riders to proceed to the later rounds of competition and ended up coming 15th in the individual standings. The competition lasted late into the evening on Saturday so the festivities didn’t begin until late that night. It was a great party, and there were plenty of people celebrating their accomplishments from the day of riding. However, just as many were subdued as the finals were still to come on Sunday and the PrixCaprilli division was yet to take place. Sunday morning began early for the Prix-Caprilli riders. Trinity had one team competing out of the 21 teams in the division. Marie-Claire Gallagher, EmmaJane Heneghan, and Anne-Marie Wallace produced an excellent result, ending up 7th in the division and adding more promise to Trinity’s overall standing. After supporting the Prix-Caprilli team, many participants headed back to the hotel to relax and take a short nap before the black-tie Ball. That evening, the teams crowded into the ballroom at the Keadeen Hotel to enjoy dinner, the award presentations and dancing. Trinity College did very well in the awards. The team of Orlaith Carr, Nikki Fitzgibbon and Laura Murphy came second in the show-jumping division and Sean Cleary, Lisa Egan and Tara Browne took fourth place. Liz Dore, Carol-Ann Eberle and Micheal O’Reilly placed 10th in the dressage team competition, while Tyrone Croome-Carroll, Mike Finnegan, and Mary Ingleby came 15th.


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