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feature-image

Page 1

the

GYPSY Warriors

M AG A Z I N E

from MASON GROSS to MONEY MAKERS!

p33

FOR THE GUYS,

beer p10

& SOME GOOD

l iste n up SCAR LE T K N I G H T S ,

pizza

FASHION i s

BACK

you’d kill to try!

A

Model citizen Fresh Faced

p31

student doing “the modeling thing”

The Premier Issue!

flip to the back of the magazine!


JUSTIN EPSTEIN jepstein61491@yahoo.com | "Florrie" | pastel on paper| twitter = @justintoby


MAGAZINE

WELCOMES

you

to the

Your college years are supposed to be the time when you dare yourself to do crazy shit and actually do it. So we set out to create an art and fashion magazine, and we did. Early Fall 2011, I remember looking for a platform to express my love affair with editorial design and couldn’t find one. I realized quickly that there wasn’t a safe place for people who were obsessed with Marni (as seen in Fashion Director Laura’s picks in page 18), The Black Keys (talked about by Deputy Creative Director Kana in page 9) and lots of high caloric food (by our fantastic food editor Jake in page 12) can just style / design / write about stuff they like! So in this first issue, we wanted to talk about all the things that we loved like good beer page 10, techie stuff page 16 and awesome men’s shorts all guys from RU should wear as seen in page 17. Our inaugural issue is not only filled with fantastic fashion picks from Senior Accessories Editor Victoria Natenzon as seen in page 19, but is also filled with illustrations by Senior Designer Zach Manning. Within the 5 months of working on the magazine, this project was a journey of self discovery for most, if not all of us. Photo director Lauren Nester discovered that her

SSUE lovely 5 foot 3 frame is capable of carrying massive photo equipment for our gorgeous fashion story in page 33. Associate Art Director Adam Lowe found out that kerning and tracking is the single most important lesson a dorky designer should know (check out one of the awesome pages he designed in page 15). Senior Editor Mike Morton learned that some written pieces can be quite reactive but that just means it is well felt and has a clear point of view as seen in the opinions piece of Caroline Fabian in page 15. Our web editor Sandra Pavleska, the brains behind our fantastic website (www.trimzine.com) and facebook page (like us!!/trimzine.com) also found out that coding and blogging stuff can be fun if you mix it up with love life convo’s with a special partner in crime i.e. me. After weeks of preparation, it has now come down to this. Our everything laid out for all to see and we’re quite proud of it! They say that with great risk comes great reward; well I sure can attest to that. We may have done a fantabulous job with this passion project but it is the friendships and memories that we have built that I consider the single greatest return in this whole experience.

Enjoy the issue. - Gino

SPRING 2012 | TRIM MAGAZINE • 3


TALI ROSE glg120@aol.com | "Aleph" | oil paint | www.facebook.com/talitkrose


TABLE of CONTENTS SPRING / SUMMER 2012

33

17

PIZZA? WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

MASON GROSS MONEY MAKERS!

10

MATCH THAT PIZZA ALONG WITH THESE 3 AWESOME BEERS

15

17

SEVEN PAGES OF SHOPPING!

OPINIONS. TRUST US, YOU’LL WANT TO READ THIS

27

KEY WORD:

AFFORDABLE!

SPOTTED PRINTS FOR THE SPRING

40

MUSIC MEN, THE FRONT BOTTOMS

31

MODEL CITIZEN, A CLOSER LOOK AT STUDENT MODELS SPRING 2012 | TRIM MAGAZINE • 5


GERALDSON CHUA EDITOR - IN CHIEF & DESIGN DIRECTOR

KANA ABE DEPUTY CREATIVE DIRECTOR & EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

DAVID ROTHSTEIN DEPUTY EDITOR

LAURA PULGARIN FASHION DIRECTOR

LAUREN NESTER PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

ALLEGRA KETTELKAMP TREASURER

fashion

editorial

VICTORIA NATENZON

MICHAEL MORTON

SENIOR ACCESSORIES EDITOR

SENIOR EDITOR

REGINALD DUPREE

SANDRA PAVLESKA

SENIOR MEN’S FASHION EDITOR

WEB EDITOR

STEPHANIE CASTANO

JAKE WEINSTOCK - GALLAGHER

FASHION MARKET EDITOR

FOOD EDITOR

art ADAM LOWE ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR

ZACHARY MANNING SENIOR DESIGNER

KEVIN HAU DESIGNER

JILLIAN SOLLAZZO FINE ARTS EDITOR


the

CONTRIBUTORS Writers

INDEX GERALDSON CHUA

KEENAN WITTY

[ as seen on page 10 ] Keenan is a Senior English Major with plans for a roadtrip across the country this summer and job hunting! keenanwitty@gmail.com

CA R O L I N E FA B I A N

[ as seen on page 15 ] Caroline Fabian is a Senior Majoring in Art History. She is moving to Boston, MA and is in hopes to enter Grad School this coming year. carolinefabian@hotmail.com

geraldsonchua@gmail.com

KANA ABE kanakoabe5@gmail.com

DAVID ROTHSTEIN drothstein21@gmail.com

LAURA PULGARIN laupul2056@gmail.com

N I C K A L FA N O

[ as seen on page 16 ] Nick Alfano is a rising senior majoring in creative writing and is avid text guru. nick.alfano@gmail.com

LAUREN NESTER laurennester.photo@gmail.com

ALLEGRA KETTELKAMP allegrak@eden.rutgers.edu

Artists

VICTORIA NATENZON

JUSTIN EPSTEIN

[ as seen on page 2 ] jepstein61491@yahoo.com

NICHOLAS MISCIAGNA

[ as seen on page 13 ]

misc.nicholas@gmail.com

TALI KRUPKIN

the

[ as seen on page 4 & 8 ]

glg120@aol.com

natenzvi@gmail.com

REGINALD DUPREE redjr23@gmail.com

STEPHANIE CASTANO stcastan@eden.rutgers.edu

MICHAEL MORTON mmorton@eden.rutgers.edu

SANDRA PAVLESKA

Fashion Shoots makeup artist:

S H A N A JA N E L L E S WA I N

pavleska@eden.rutgers.edu

JAKE WEINSTOCK - GALLAGHER jacobwg@eden.rutgers.edu

ADAM LOWE

shana@shanajanelle.com www.shanajanelle.com/

adamwlowe@yahoo.com

hair stylist:

ZACHARY MANNING

KEILA SONE colormodels@gmail.com www.keilasone.com/

zmanning@rutgers.edu

KEVIN HAU kevinleehau@gmail.com

wardrobe styled:

G Y P S Y WA R R I O R shopgypsywarrior@gmail.com www.gypsywarrior.com/

JILLIAN SOLLAZZO Jsollazz@eden.rutgers.edu

SPRING 2012 | TRIM MAGAZINE • 7


TALI ROSE glg120@aol.com | oil paint | www.facebook.com/talitkrose


MUSIC

CATER TO YOU

There are so many festivals to choose from this summer! Which is the best fit for you? Take our quiz below! Answer the questions and follow the path! BY KANA

UPCOMING ALBUMS

MAY/JUNE/JULY

ABE

Roam a sophisticated city or be one with the outdoors?

That’s right, the much loved electro-house duo Simian Mobile Disco will be releasing their third LP May 14th. The album’s alleged 9-track album is sure to be a huge hit. It includes a throbbingly addictive track called ‘Put Your Hands Together’ which layers trickling synth lines with the perfect amount of house influenced vocals.

Looking for a forest rave or an open spiritual journey?

Remain in the states or explore beyond the border? inter national!

SIMIAN MOBILE DISCO Unpatterns (5/14/12)

Camping, yeah!

E

USA!

Acid

THE TEMPER TRAP The Temper Trap (6/5/12)

Now, Who am I?

More about The Rock and Roll or Ritual and Self-Expression?

Phish!

Sure!!

Do you love The Disco Biscuits?

Who??

Fresh

Disintegration

Disintegration

Wise

Something New? or Solid Since the 90’s

The Cure or The Black Keys

OZA PA L O A L L LO ) - 8/5 I L (8/3 o AROO ag , L B O N N F E S T I VA L Chic IGUE OUND M N C SA A S MUSI 6 / 1 0 ) AV E R T A L PA S T I VA L A 7 ) PRIM / C r, T N 3 6 / ( - 6 este ain C FE h I S c U n ) (5/30 l o n a , S p 9 M Ma - 6/2 e Barc (6/28 o r k , N Y Y New AG A CO O S H E F E S T I VA P BIS C CA M 14) Y / MUSI 8 / 5 ) 2 - 7 da ke, N 1 a / n 7 3 ( a e La l C l (8/ i , l v a trea N Mari Mon G MA REST O F RNIN C I U R ) B T 3 / NV - 9 ) ELEC C i t y, 8/27 - 7/1 k ( c 8 2 o I / (6 k R , M Blac bury Roth

The Australian band will be back with their sophomore album via Glassnote Records. Their first single, ‘Need Your Love’ is another powerful greater-than-life indie rock track. The track is more rock-heavy with pounding drums. It’s not as slow burning as ‘Sweet Disposition’ but is sure to be a hit at festivals this summer. They’ll be touring all summer and you can catch them at Terminal 5 on their US release date on June 5th.

AESOP ROCK Skelethon (7/10/12) It’s been five years since None Shall Pass was released and now this July 10th you can catch Aesop Rock’s latest solo LP via Rhymesayers. It looks like a promising 15 tracks with the features leaning more towards the indie rock side including Rob Sonic, Kimya Dawson, and Hanni El Khatib.

FLYING LOTUS Until The Quiet Comes (Sometime after June) It’s been too long since Cosmogramma LP and Pattern+Grid World EP came out in 2010 but this summer we can finally hear new material from California producer Flying Lotus. In the works are collaborations with R&B singer Erykah Badu. This is definitely one of the most anticipated albums of the year.

WATC H OU T F OR ED I TO R K AN A A B E’ S R AD IO S H OW W ITH CO-HOST KINA ABE ON 90.3FM THE CORE, SUNDAY’S 6 - 8 P M

Shower, please!


the beer

DRINKING

REVIEW Written by Keenan Witty Illustrated by Zachary Manning

[1] Start the summer season right at home with River Horse Summer Blonde Ale. This beer is brewed locally, in Lambertville, NJ. The mission of this brew is to capture the essence of summer, a season of simpler times. This beer boasts light flavors extending from bread yeast to mild spice. It has a crisp finish, with a little lemon zest and a touch of bitterness. No one flavor stands out amongst the rest, making it uncomplicated and refreshing when you’re looking to cool off. The back of the bottle states: “When life gets complicated, keep it simple with our Summer Blonde Ale.” To which I’d like to add, when life is uncomplicated, why not keep it that way? 4.5 ABV [2] Dogfish Head’s “Midas Touch”: A beer fit for a King. Some say beer has been a part of our history since the agricultural revolution in 9000 BC. In fact, some historians believe what spawned domestication was barley used specifically to make beer. Dogfish Head is known for it’s curiosity with ancient beer recipes, which they spend much time heavily researching. One worth trying is their highly awarded Midas Touch. The ingredients used are meant to reproduce an ancient recipe discovered in the old tomb of King Midas in Turkey, dating back to around 700 BC. They use similar ingredients of barley, honey and plums, trading out hops which didn’t exist yet back then for saffron. When looking to try something a little more unique, uncap the time-honored ale King Midas once enjoyed. [3] Brew Love with Southern Tier’s “Choklat” When looking for a rich, sensual beer that will wow the taste buds of both you and your loved one, look no further than Southern Tier Choklat. It pours black, the color of most imperial stouts and yields aromas of decadent chocolate, roasted coffee, and vanilla. It’s richest flavor of bittersweet chocolate is complimented with a perfect amount of roasted coffee, cherries, I am just some filler text by Z.Manning

and malty goodness. With a thick body and an ABV of 11% it’s almost as if it were made to be shared.

I am just some filler text by Z.Manning

1 River Horse Summer Blonde Ale

12 FL oz Alcohol?

1 10

• TRIM MAGAZINE

2 | SPRING 2012

3

2 Dogfish Head’s Midas Touch 3 Southern Tier’s Choklat


PERSONAL STYLE


FOOD!

PIZZA Gourmet at Home Witten by Jacob Weinstock-Gallagher Illustration & Design by Zachary Manning

Jim Jahey’s No Kneed Pizza Dough Makes four 12 inch pizzas 3 cups all purpose flour ¼ teaspoon active dry yeast 1½ teaspoon salt

Sauces

Hand Crushed Canned Tomatoes Jared Tomato Sauce Pesto Olive oil with garlic, rosemary, and basil

Cooking Instructions 1.Preheat oven to highest setting (500˚-550˚) 2.On floured work station shape dough into 10-12 inch disk.

1½ cups of water 1.In a large bowl mix flour, yeast, and salt. Add water and gently mix until well incorporated. Form dough into a ball and transfer to a clean bowl. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature for 18 to 24 hours. 2.Place dough on floured work surface and gently shape into a square. Divide

Cheeses

To shape dough start out by pushing

down on the dough in an outward,

Soft Mozzarella Ricotta Feta Provolone

Toppings

of each individual portion. Lay it fold side

down on floured baking sheet.

Vegetables Onion (red adds c olor) Artichoke hearts Thinly sliced Brussels sprouts Eggplant

Meat Pepperoni/Or any other salami Grilled Chicken Bacon or Pancetta

be made up to three days ahead of time by individually wrapping each portion in plastic wrap and refrigerating. To use, unwrap dough, lay on floured work surface, cover with plastic wrap for 2-3 hours.)

12 • T R I M M A G A Z I N E | S P R I N G 2 0 1 2

3.Place dough on baking sheet and

4.Place baking sheet on middle rack until bottom of pizza is crispy and top is blistered (approximately 10 minutes).

by gathering the four corners in center

damp towel for 1 hour until pliable. (Can

inches.

top with desired toppings.

Hard Romano Parmesan

into four equal portions. Shape into ball

3.Cover dough balls in plastic wrap or

and circular motion until the disk is 12

5. Carefully transfer to cutting board, slice, and enjoy. Don’t forget herbs like oregano, basil, and rosemary. Adding a little garlic before cooking or salt after can take a pizza to a new level. For more delicious recipes, on to request a recipe, visit our blog at trimzine.com


THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT In October 2008 The Impossible Project saved the last Polaroid production plant for integral instant film in Enschede (NL) and started to invent and produce totally new instant film materials for traditional Polaroid cameras. In 2010 Impossible saved analog instant photography from extinction by releasing various, brand new and unique instant films. Therewith Impossible prevents more than 300.000.000 perfectly functioning Polaroid cameras from becoming obsolete, changes the world of photography and keeps variety, tangibility and analogue creativity and po sibilites alive.

TITLE: EMBERS. MEDIUM: PX680 FIRST FLUSH COLOR SHADE FILM BY THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT

TITLE: APPLES. MEDIUM: PX680 FIRST FLUSH COLOR SHADE FILM BY THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT

WWW.THE-IMPOSSIBLE-PROJECT.COM

TITLE: UNTITLED. MEDIUM: PX680 FIRST FLUSH COLOR SHADE FILM BY THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT

T I T L E : PA R K AV E N U E . M E D I U M : P X 6 0 0 U V + S I LV E R SHADE FILM BY THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT

N I C H O L A S M I S C I AG N A misc.nicholas@gmail.com | www.flickr.com/photos/nmisciagna/


PERSONAL STYLE

14

• TRIM MAGAZINE

| SPRING 2012


OPINIONS

THE NEW UNDERGRAD A N O P I N I O N P I E C E B Y C A R O L I N E FA B I A N I L L U S T R AT I O N & D E S I G N B Y A DA M L OW E

W

hen you hear the word “college kid”, or even the more sophisticated terms “undergrad” or “undergraduate,” what is the first thing you think of? Even those of us who are undergraduates live in the same society as the rest of Americans. We know

exactly which connotations are associated with our demographic, but us students understand that we live in the same society as the rest of America. Chances are that if you are an undergraduate, you have hit roadblocks in the job market and faced stereotypes in social situations. When people think of us, they think of fraternity parties, keg stands and even the occasional all nighter of hard studying. Students are expected to have only two goals during these oh-so-important four (or five, or six) years: to party and to pass. However, in recent years, the college stereotypes have begun to be challenged by certain rapidly growing groups within the community. Although the remnants of the old college lifestyle are still prolific, some of us are beginning to notice a growing counter-culture within ourselves and our peers. We are navigating

away

from

jungle

juice and prolonged adolescence and coping with the future in ways which are not only unexpected, but sometimes unwelcome. Of course, college is still the way it has always been for the majority of students, but what is driving those who are battling to overthrow the stereotypes? If we compare our childhood to those of people born even a decade earlier, we are faced with the overwhelming changes which occurred during our own adolescence. According to Women’s and Children’s Health Network, from a psychological standpoint, what a child learns around the age of ten or eleven is vitally important to the way they will see the world throughout their lives. For those born in the late ‘80s, the major event hitting newsstands was the Columbine High School massacre. Two years later the September 11th attacks on our country occurred. After that followed a seemingly endless stream of war, economic collapse and political discord. The children raised in this environment are now in college and we are not as complacent as our predecessors. We learned early on that the world would not protect us or nurture our mistakes. We grew up knowing that this was a scary place and that we would have to be self sufficient. As we near our full adulthood, away from the safety net of student loans and our parents, we are faced with a choice. To quote the movie Zombieland, “nut up or shut up.” S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 | T R I M M A G A Z I N E • 15


TECHNOLOGY

PERSONAL WORLD

that people will flock to support things that they

B Y N I C K A L FA N O D E S I G N B Y K E V I N L . H AU

A

lmost

like. It isn’t just limited to video games, though. There’s a wide variety of accepted projects: arts and crafts, films, electronics, music – even

fifty

years

ago,

NASA

distributed computing. Anyone can join in and

Rutgers’ own a capella group, Deep Treble –

launched three men to the Moon,

help out. Its’s like that massive jigsaw puzzle. One

have all seen success on this model.

a feat that has yet to be matched

small piece of the folding process of a protein

A given project will set an end goal for itself

or outdone. Guided by computers

gets assigned to a connected computer, while

- Deep Treble assessed that a live album would

loaded with then-mindboggling 2

other computers are assigned sections of that

take a minimum of $1500 to produce. They then

megahertz processors, we were propelled into

same protein.

Once finished, each of those

set pledge tiers (specific amounts of money one

an age of innovation and wonder. Most smart-

pieces gets beamed back to the Stanford labs

could give with attached bonuses to incentivize

phones coming out now are approximately fifty

for their scientists to put together. It’s an amaz-

donation). Their lowest tier, $1, offered admission

times more powerful than those glorified calcu-

ing use of resources, and it’s only possible be-

to a reception before their April 29th concert,

lators. This is to say that the phone that you pre-

cause computers developed down to the per-

while the highest tier was $400, promising that

sumably have in your pocket is singularly more

sonal level.

the group would dye their hair scarlet for the

powerful than the entirety of the NASA of 1969.

As technology continues to evolve, it has be-

concert. These tiers play into the “all-or-nothing”

And to think that all that power, even on a lap-

come increasingly easy for one’s voice to be

funding principle: if the goal isn’t met in the al-

top or desktop, gets used mostly on Facebook

heard. YouTube revolutionized video, Facebook

lotted time, usually two weeks to a month, the

and email.

connects more people daily than ever before,

people have spoken and no money changes

Scientists, realizing that the average com-

and now, with Kickstarter, good

puter sits with the majority of its power unused,

ideas that might not catch the

developed the principles of distributed comput-

eye of companies find the op-

ing and crowdsourcing. It’s like taking a 50,000

portunity to see the light of day.

piece jigsaw puzzle and handing out smaller

Kickstarter saw that people

sections of the box to your little cousins. Stanford

have ideas worthy of produc-

University of Medicine took this idea and ran

tion, but their projects need

with it, creating Folding@home, an initiative to

more money than the average

study protein folding and its relations to diseases

person can afford. Double Fine

like Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s.

Games, an independent video

hands. It’s the old consumer

THE PHONE THAT YOU PRESUMABLY HAVE IN YOUR POCKET IS SINGULARLY MORE POWERFUL THAN THE ENTIRETY OF THE NASA OF 1969.

“vote with your wallet” mantra perfected. As technology continues to become more affordable, computers have clearly cemented themselves as a cornerstone of society. With 5.9 billion registered cell phone contracts as of the end of 2011, a figure found by

Folding is the process by which proteins as-

game developer, recently saw

semble themselves – a complicated job that

87,142 individual people back-

is prone to error. Requiring an astronomical

ing their new game to the tune

is connected. Now more than

amount of power to simulate, Stanford turned to

of $3,336,371. It just goes to show

ever, the world is personal.

16

• TRIM MAGAZINE

| SPRING 2012

the International Telecommunications Union, almost everyone


EDITOR’S

CHOICE SHDOuPPdIeNsG FOR THEM

BY REGINALD DUPREE JR D E S I G N E D B Y A DA M L OW E

2

LL Bean Leather Rucksack, $229, LL Bean

1

Bracelet Set, $20, Topman USA

4

3

1. Daniel Steiger Techmaster Timepiece, $229, Timepeices USA 2. Rodarte “Rohearte” T-Shirt, $115, Opening Ceremony 3. Blue Oxford Tailored Short, $70, Topman USA 4. White & Navy Aztec Short, $60, Topman USA 5. Clarks Weaver Boot Low, $117, Hanon Shop 6. Y-3 Honja Low, $250, Y-3 7. Comme Des Gracons x Concerse, $125, Dover Street Market

Bill Amberg Leather Laptop Sleeve, $228, Bill Amberg

5 Victorinox Swiss Army Knife w/ USB, Swiss Army

6

7


EDITOR’S G N SHOPPI

CHOICE

Ladies FOR THE

B Y L AU R A P U L G A R I N D E S I G N E D B Y A DA M L OW E

Ellsworth striped cotton and taffeta dress, $460, Marc by Marc Jacobs Metallic leather high-top sneakers, KARL, $405, net-a-porter

Faux fur jacket, Helene Berman, $114, the-outnet

Marni for H&M Printed Pants, H&M, $79.95

Comme Des Fuckdown Beenie,$30, www.store.ssurempirestate.com

Jerry PVC-sleeve cotton-jersey logo sweater, KARL, $185, net-a-porter

Emma rabbit and brushedleather ankle boots, ASH, $157, the-outnet

Peplum-waist striped cotton jacket, $495, net-a-porter

Lined Wedge, Zara, $69.90 www.zara.com

Croc-effect glossed-leather passport holder, Miu Miu, $215, net-a-porter

18

• TRIM MAGAZINE

| SPRING 2012


Enameled giraffe bangle $98

COLOR

SAFARI

BY VICTORIA NATENZON Rory Kate Spad $128

Bubble Necklace J. Crew $150, Jcrew.com

Orange Bag www.asos.com

Fluro Skinny Belt Asos $10.74, Asos.com

Wide Hand enameled bangle $35, j.crew

Jane T-Strap ballet $178

ACCE

! S E I SSOR

Fluro Skinny Belt Asos $10.74, Asos.com

SHOPPiIeNsG FOR THE

Lad

Blushing Bangles $8.84

Le Pavillion Iphone Case $40

Prada ww.prada.com


SPRING

FEVER

SHOPPiIeNsG FOR THE

Lad

FULL SKIRTED PLAYSUIT, $96.00, TOPSHOP LACED BLOUSE, $54.99, MANGO

KARA ROSS PYRAMID NECKLACE, $515, HENRI BENDEL

EDITOR’S CHOICE BLOSSOM FLORAL TEE, $ 353, MARY KATRANTZOU WWW.BOUTIQUE1.COM

KONG CROPPED TROUSERS, $404, JOSEPH WWW.BOUTIQUE1.COM

GUAVA DARLA COMBO DRESS, $211, MILLY WWW.MY-WARDROVE.COM

PRINT SILK SHORTS, $295.63, CARVEN WWW.MY-WARDROVE.COM

THREE-TONE LEATHER SANDALS, $680, BOTTEGA VENETA, NET-A-PORTER WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

ANNETTE BLUE & ORANGE SHIRT, SESSUN, $206 WWW.COGGLES.COM


HEADER AMERICAN B Y L AU R A P U L G A R I N D E S I G N E D B Y A DA M L OW E

EVA PRINT ANKLE SKINNY CARVEN TEXTURED-LEATHER TROUSER WITH SEAM DETAILS, MINI SKIRT $820 DKNY, $259.88, WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM www.my-wardrove.com

HERE ANTHEM

CARVEN ISSA, Lace dress, $1,445, TEXTURED-LEATHER MINI SKIRT $820 www.matchesfashion.com WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

SHOPPiIeNsG FOR THE

Lad

CARVEN Tillary tote in canvas stripe, TEXTURED-LEATHER $228, J.Crew MINI SKIRT $820 WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

Betsey Johnson CARVEN Earrings, TEXTURED-LEATHER Stripe Bow Drop Earrings , MINI SKIRT $820 $40, Macys WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

CARVEN Printed silk crepe de chine pants, TEXTURED-LEATHER $460, Sonia Sonia MINI by SKIRT $820Rykiel WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

CARVEN TEXTURED-LEATHER Clark twill shorts, MINIby SKIRT $820 Marc Marc Jacobs, $200 WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

CARVEN Faux pearl-embellished TEXTURED-LEATHER wool cardigan,$495, MINI SKIRT $820 Moschino Cheap and Chic WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

CARVEN Star-print silk-crepe shorts, TEXTURED-LEATHER MINI SKIRT $820 $240, MIH Jeans WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

CARVEN STRIPED SHORTS, SoniaTEXTURED-LEATHER by Sonia Rykiel, MINI SKIRT $820 $79, www.mytheresa.com WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

CARVEN Riviera starfish-print canvas wedge TEXTURED-LEATHER sandals, Yves Saint Laurent, MINI SKIRT $820 $745, net-a-porter WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

Selima Sun® for J.Crew Sophia CARVEN sunglasses, J.Crew,MINI $128.00 TEXTURED-LEATHER SKIRT $820 WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM

22 M M MA AG I NI N G G2 021021 2 1 • • T TRRI IM G AA ZZI INNEE | | S SP PR R

Rhinestone Star Earrings, $3.80,CARVEN Forever 21 TEXTURED-LEATHER MINI SKIRT $820 WWW.NET-A-PORTER.COM


SHOPPiIeNsG DENIM B Y L AU R A P U L G A R I N

FOR THE

LAMB SLEEVE PRINTED WOOL-BLEND COAT, ETRO, $4330, NET-A-PORTER

Lad

DAYS

BLAKE CHAMBRAY JACKET, ACNE, $530, NETA-PORTER

FAUX FUR COAT, MICHAEL MICHAEL KORS, $225, NETAPORTER

LEATHER TRIMMED STRETCH SATIN-TWILL PANTS, TIBI, $295, NET-A-PORTER

HIGH RISE WIDE LEG COTTON CANVAS PANTS, YVES SAINT LAURENT, $990, NET-A-PORTER

FEATHERED SILK-CREPE TOP, $2425, ANTONIO BERARDI, NET-APORTER

COTTON-JERSEY AND ORGANZA PEPLUM TOP, CARVEN, $265, NET-A-PORTER

TEXTURED-LEATHER MINI SKIRT, CARVEN, $820, NET-A-PORTER ORIGAMI SATIN PUMPS, CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA, $1,195, NET-A-PORTER

3.1 PHILLIP LIM CLUTCH. NOT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE YET.


PERSONAL STYLE


PRIMAL

INSTINCTS

BY VICTORIA NATENZON

YELLOW REBECCA MINKOFF $78.00

LIZZIE FORTUANTE NECKLACE - SHOPBOP.COM $460

4 TIER BRACELET WITH GREEN STONES - FOREVER 21 $8.80

ACCE

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S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 | T R I M M A G A Z I N E • 25


ART

ALEX GREY

BY VICTORIA NATENZON D E S I G N B Y K E V I N L . H AU

If you don’t already know the name Alex

discovered LSD - a drug that changed his life

Grey as the artist responsible for the Nirvana

as an artist. This brilliant man studied at Harvard

and Beastie Boys album art, or from his Chapel

Medical School for five years where he worked

of Sacred Mirrors (CoSM) gatherings then you

in the anatomy department. Grey studied every

are in for quite the learning experience. And if

detail of the body. At this point Grey had all the

you already know a little about this fascinating

training that he needed to create the master-

man, I am sure that there is still plenty to learn.

pieces that he is well known for today.

Having dropped out of the Columbus Col-

Putting together his knowledge of the human

lege of Art and Design , he painted billboards

body and his experiences while on LSD, Grey

in Ohio for a year. He then decided to go back

creates paintings that are intricate in every

to school and studied under artist Jay Jaroslav

meaning of the word. The majority of his works

at the Boston Museum School. This is where he

include a human body that is portrayed as if someone is looking at it with x-ray vision. Every in Grey’s paintings. Every vein and blood ves-

Want to know about other artists who work in

sel is in its correct spot. The LSD enters the pic-

similar ways? These artists see hallucinogens as

ture – well I’m sure you can all understand how.

a way to get in touch with their most spiritual

The psychedelic colors, beams of light and – in

side and their paintings are a representation of

some instances – creatures that can only be

everything they see while they are tripping. In a

found in the imagination of the mind on drugs,

recent exhibition at the American Contempo-

make appearances in Grey’s art.

rary Artists Galleries, Grey’s works were exhibited

As far as his “CoSM” meetings go – well I have

26

• TRIM MAGAZINE

with those of Pablo Amaringo and Meshiel.

never been, but even the mention brings a smile

Pablo Amaringo was a famous shaman who

to everyone’s face. The meetings that go on

took ayahuasca (a special brew used by the

at the (CoSM) are family friendly and a great

shamans) while painting. His works are a physi-

learning experience for the spiritual. CoSM

cal representation of what he saw while under

spreads far beyond the New York home of Al-

the influence. Fun fact: if you ever have the

lyson Grey. The name is attached to celebra-

chance to be alone with a Pablo Amaringo

tions all over the nation, complete with music,

piece, turn off the lights and turn on a black

seminars and other interactive activities that

light. Some of the paints that he used glow in

help the attendees get in touch with their own

the dark! Meishiel spent 24 years in isolation and

spiritual sides.

while on drugs, he painted his hallucinations.

| SPRING 2012

I M A G E S F R O M W W W. A L E X G R E Y. C O M

tiny detail inside of the human body is pictured


SPOTTED

MATTER Re-imagine spring with these speckled prints

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR KANA ABE PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAUREN NESTER STYLED BY GYPSY WARRIOR FASHION EDITOR LAURA PULGARIN ART DIRECITON & DESIGN BY GERALDSON CHUA WEB CONTENT EDITOR SANDRA PAVLESKA BEHIND THE SCENES PHOTOGRAPHER VICTORIA NATENZON MODELED BY LENKA & ALEXANDRA MAKE-UP SHANA JANELLE SWAIN HAIR KEILA SONE

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S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 | T R I M M A G A Z I N E • 29


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30

• TRIM MAGAZINE

| SPRING 2012


MODEL

CITIZEN INTERVIEW BY

kana abe

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

Lauren Nester DESIGN BY

geraldson chua


PERSON OF INTEREST: KANA- What is the name on your birth certificate? COLIN- The name on my birth certificate is Colin Hanns K- What do people call you? C- I just go by Colin. My nickname is Golden Boy. Ever since I moved I have been called that, and then in New York my friends picked up on it too. K- How old are you? C- I'm 19. K- Where are you from? C- I am from Niagara Falls. I was born and raised in Niagara Falls and I am the third generation of my family that went to the same high school. So everybody has stayed in Niagara Falls and I was offered to move to New York, so I took it and just moved here. K- How did you get started with modeling? C- When I was 17, I went to the city with my aunt just to check it out and she decided to go to a hair salon and one of the hair stylist asked me if I could have my polaroid taken. So I had the polaroid taken and then in the city I went to my first open call. K- What was your first call? C- It was an individual call for B&Y which was the agent that took my polaroid and he contacted him. Then when I moved to New York, I went to Washington Square Park and was scouted to work in one of the fashion weeks. That is how I started. K- You have been around Rutgers and hung out here. How would you describe Rutgers fashion in one sentence? C- I would say that is is an urban take on college apparel. K- I would agree. What has been your craziest Rutgers experience thus far? C- When I first moved here I didn't know anybody. I was here for rush last semester and I had just moved here and I made friends with a couple of different yolkies that I met working at Starbucks and that was the

first time I took the EE bus down College Ave. Once we got to College Ave., I got to see what a college experience is like. Living in the city we don't have anything like that, and here I got a real frat party experience. K- Frat Row? You just went party hopping? C- Exactly. K- Who is your style icon? C- I would say my life icon is Edie Sedgwick. For style icon I would say Ralph Lauren. When I was at F.I.T. I did most of my projects based on Ralph Lauren fashion. K- In three words how would you

describe your morning routine? C- Coffee, dubstep and probably a little dance before I leave. K- Coffee, dub step and dance. I like that. That's a good start. What is your worst habit? C- Chewing ice-cubes. K- Why ice-cubes? C- Because it's cold and refreshing and because I feel that if you eat ice-cubes throughout the day it equates to more than eight cups of water. K- What are your Eat, Pray, Love destinations? C- Amsterdam. I also want to travel to the rain forest and Ger-

COLIN HANNS

many as well. K- Who is your celebrity crush? C- Leonardo DiCaprio. K- Cats or dogs? C- Definitely dogs. I think they are very loving. K- Do you like cold pizza in the morning? C- I think it tastes good, but it would't be the first thing I go to in the morning. K- Last question. What are your plans for the future? C- For the near future I plan on going to boot camp for the NAVY and I will be continuing my education and my modeling career.


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INTERVIEW BY KANA ABE PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAUREN NESTER STYLED BY GYPSY WARRIOR FASHION EDITOR LAURA PULGARIN ART DIRECITON & DESIGN BY GERALDSON CHUA WEB CONTENT EDITOR SANDRA PAVLESKA BEHIND THE SCENES PHOTOGRAPHER VICTORIA NATENZON MODELED BY LENKA & ALEXANDRA MAKE-UP SHANA JANELLE SWAIN HAIR KEILA SONE

CHILLING ENCOUNTER with A

GYPSY WARRIORS

Ten years after graduating from MASON GROSS, Nicla & Michelle, owners and founders of GYPSY WARRIOR share what enchanted them to venture into the tough world of fashion and ultimately emerge victorius.


VINTAGE 60S PAISLEY CAFTAN - $195, FORREST GODDESS EARRINGS - $24, BLACK MAGIC TRIBAL RING - $20 34

• TRIM MAGAZINE

| SPRING 2012


GARCIA TIE-DYE MAXI DRESS - $60, VINTAGE POCAHONTAS SUEDE FUR SHAWL - $72


GIRL ON LEFT: STEVIE KIMONO JACKET - $60, GOLD TRIBAL NECKLACE - $24, CHAIN MAIL SLAVE BRACELET - $32, BLACK MAGIC TRIBAL RING - $20 GIRL ON RIGHT: WHITE CROCHET FRINGE DRESS - $42, VINTAGE 60SBEADED GYPSY BELT - $195, PEACOCK GYPSY JACKET - $200

LAURA PULGARIN: Can you tell us a little bit about your earlier years. How did you two meet and eventually create the brand Gypsy Warrior?

M

NICLA: We met at Mason Gross in junior year of college and then we graduated and we realized we both lived near each other in North Jersey. So we worked together.

MICHEL: I managed a few stores and then I started other small graphic design based t-shirt. That pretty much allowed my whole knowledge of the online world and selling and how to create online stores. And I took all of that and brought it with her knowledge of the modeling world and fashion. Together we were able to make Gypsy Warrior.

N

MICHEL: It was much more magical than that. There were fireworks. We met at school; we had a lot of similar interests. We both loved thrifting and traveling and fashion and New York and it turned into a kind of very early dream of once or soon starting a company together and incorporating our lifestyle, fashion, New York, thrifting all into one thing. It didn't start right away. We had met, talked about it, dreamt about it. We maintained a really close friendship and we did live close to each other in North Jersey so after school ended we went our separate ways in career worlds and would always talk about meeting back up to do this. And about five years after school had ended and five years in different perspective parts in the fashion industry, we started small and were able to join and start Gypsy Warrior. And that was about a year and a half ago.

KANA ABE: What were your careers prior to Gypsy Warrior? Nicla: I worked at a modeling agency. I was assistant art directing. I did that for three years and I use a lot of the knowledge that I gained there in what we do now. Which is very fun, but I could not do that any longer. I like being my own boss, and doing my own vision and not having to listen to anybody else.

KA: So where did you get the name Gypsy Warrior?

NICLA: That can actually be explained being tied in with the logo, because the logo kind of explains it a little bit. The gypsy side represents me and my love of 70s, and layers and florals and chiffons and lots of jewelry and sparkles and all of that. Things that come underneath the bohemian lifestyle. Michel represents the warrior, which we consider to be the more rock and roll aspect: lower east side New York, leather, tattoos. And together like the logo its arrows, like warrior arrows and a moon represents the gypsy, the unity of the triangle and all of the pieces come together to form the brand. KA: Who are some of your favorite designers? MICHEL: We are much more inspired by styles. NICLA: The whole thing with Gypsy Warrior is that we want to make fashion fun and not all snooty and pretentious and affordable to like girls in Mason Gross who don't have a big budget but want to look cute. And so, it is not really about the brands or the designers but S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 | T R I M M A G A Z I N E • 37


WHAT YOU DIDN’T SEE

more about the look, what is trending, what we are inspired by from the past. We love Unif; we just brought it into the shop. That is my one plug.

M N

KA: You guys have created this popular boutique online, and this past October opened up a boutique in Ridgewood. How is the shift from online to boutique based? MICHEL: I would say there was no shift. It was more as if we have opened another business. The online store is an awesome way to shop 24 hours a day, seven days a week all around the world, country, everything. If anything the retail store has definitely increased our New Jersey sales online, but the webstore has continued to keep on thriving. It has been allowing local friends and family and people that live in New York more freedom to come and see what we have created. The reason we really opened the boutique besides always wanting to open one, was the fact that everyone was always like “Where else can we go shopping?” We meet stylists and models and would make new friends who would always want to come and see everything and you can’t just invite them to a warehouse and be like “Here it is.” We wanted to set up the tone. So we opened the boutique and in real boutique fashion made it very homelike in that it is very warm and comforting and inviting and there is art and that everything is designed in a very fun way. NICLA: It is all about the experience. You come into Gypsy Warrior and you get the little Gypsy Warrior experience. The boutique exemplifies who we are online but in a brick and mortar space. KA: How do you determine what goes into the store as opposed to the online content? MICHEL: It’s hard. As we’ve grown in the past 3-4 months, and the boom of opening the store, we really have to weigh out what’s worth stocking in the store vs. stocking online. Pretty much everything we stock online we do put in the store. There are a couple of online exclusives. In terms of having additional key pieces in the store, we tried to create the store to be, you can come in and get a full outfit. So there are additional items that might not be on the website to mix to create 38

• TRIM MAGAZINE

| SPRING 2012

a full outfit or they may sell out so quickly in the store that they may not be available online. LP: How about when you are dealing with vintage pieces that are oneof-a-kind? How do you choose? Right now we only have vintage on the website because they are oneoff pieces. We incorporate some vintage revival stuff into the boutique which can be things that we can make. They are still one of a kind and things might differ with them. For example, we do vintage Levi handshredded mini shorts that are studded. We have multiple of those that are not all the same but at least we can stock that more. The spring will add in some more vintage revival dresses and other pieces. KA: It’s interesting to see two people collaborate in this company. How do your styles differ? NICLA: I’m a gypsy and she’s a warrior. We overlap on some things. MICHEL: As we work together and as we’re around each other we overlap even more. Nicla: I guess the base of it and the heart of it could really be in my opinion, brought back to music and Rock and Roll. I am very inspired


N

by the late ‘60’s and early ‘70’s…Rolling Stones and Anita Pallenberg and all these great people from back then. Michel is much more inspired by contemporary music. KA: Did you know as an undergrad that this is the type of work you would eventually do? NICLA: Yes, because I’m psychic [laughs]. I’m not even kidding. We have had conversations about this before it all happened down to: I knew we would have a store years ago. MICHEL: We just didn’t know when it would happen. I’m happy it happened as it did because we have got a lot of experience. We had a lot of experience through school, we both interned, and we met different people and I was in art magazines, while Nicla was in the fashion and modeling world. You know you don’t really know what you want to do. You may know what you want to do but you need to test a lot of things and all this was our dream and we’ve dreamed a hundred times over but we didn’t know how that would fall into place. After a short time, it naturally came together. In literally a month, for both of our lives and talking about it for years it was like: today is the day to start. NICLA: And we haven’t slept since. KA: What did you study at Mason Gross? NICLA: I was a BFA in Photography, Painting and Drawing double concentration. Michel: I was a BA in Visual Arts, and I double majored in Art History. I was like an art history nerd, I still am. We bring contemporary art and post-modern art into things like deciding on the illustration for our logo and everything. LP: What year did you graduate? NICLA: We graduated in 2006. KA: How is it being back at Rutgers and at Mason Gross today? MICHEL: I took so many classes in this room! NICLA: Everything looks the same. Down to the paint everywhere, and everything. KA: Is there anything that is different? NICLA: The environment around here is just so different. NICLA: You would actually be surprised how many people in the art industry know about Mason Gross. People are very impressed with it. MICHEL: I would say that’s very true. It has a good reputation.

M

would come up from Virginia or California, they would play a show here. NICLA: The reason why I picked Rutgers was because I went on a bus tour with my parents, came and visited, and I loved every second of it. I felt like it was a city and then also the frat party experience. I would just that my Rutgers experience was the best time ever. KA: What kind of fashion aesthetic would you describe Rutgers students? NICLA: The thing that I always thought was so interesting about Mason Gross and art students in general is kind of the way that they effortlessly looked cool. With the paintintg aoutfit on, with paint all over them. I always admire everyone for what they want to do. If this kid wanted to wear a duck costume with a dildo on it, he would wear it. Everyone just did what they wanted and follow some trends but mostly wore what they wanted and looked cool doing it. Main campus was a little different. More sweats, more Uggs short dresses, cargo pants. I feel like they cared and Mason Gross didn’t care.

I ALWAYS THOUGHT WAS SO INTERESTING ABOUT MASON GROSS AND ART STUDENTS IN GENERAL IS KIND OF THE WAY THAT THEY EFFORTLESSLY LOOKED COOL.

KA: What does the Rutgers experience mean to you? MICHEL: We had different experiences because didn’t meet until Junior year. I came to school as a very angry teenager. I was super punk rock, I hated everybody, I didn’t want to be friends with anyone in my dorm. I was never one to go to frat parties or anything like that. As the year went on, I opened up a lot and lightened up. I went to basement shows. I saw bands play like four nights a week. I loved Rutgers because there was always music here. If my friends

KA: What do you see in the future for Gypsy Warrior?

MICHEL: I would like to see multiple stores opening around the country. We would like to work on our own line to bring to the boutique and then also to distribute around the country. Build the website. You know, keep growing until there’s no place left to grow. No sleep until we die. µ


UP

LAURA PULGARIN: You guys were just invited to play SXWS how does that feel to be invited to play such a huge festival? Are you guys excited? BRIAN SELLA: We are excited. Yes. We had tried to get in there officially two

FRONT FRONT BOTTOMS with the

our ver y own L AUR A PUL GARIN chats with the fun and fearless duo that is the Front Bottoms. PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAUREN NESTER DESIGN BY GERALDSON CHUA


years ago and they kept saying no. So it is nice to be invited. LP: You have four shows right? BS: Yeah yeah or something like that MATHEW UYCHICH: Apparently we have two but we are going to try and get four. Yes, we are very excited. LP: How did you guys get your name? BS: I got it from a movie. It’s from a movie called Sexy Beast it’s with Ben Kingsley and he uses the term. It was the first time I had heard the term used so I thought it was really funny so that is why I used it. MU: He called me and he was like “I just saw this awesome movie and I heard this cool line and we should make a band” BRIAN SELLA & MATHEW UYCHICH

LP: That is how he asked you to be in the band? MU: Yeap, that is how the band started. LP: Your lyrics are very fun and have a lot of metaphors. What is your writing process like? BS: It’s kind of just like a venting sort of process not to much thought just sort of whatever comes into my head that’s what I do. That’s what I write down. LP: How different are shows at home than other ones in the road? Do you feel more comfortable?  BS: Yeah, definitely MU: Do you? BS: Do you? MU: I don’t feel any more comfortable. I think that to me they are kind of the same I guess. LP: You don’t feel more nervous because of the people?

MU: No not at all, you just know more people that might be there. LP: How different was the recoding process for this album than for the other ones. Since you are signed now. MU: Same exact thing we just did it in base-

AT MAXWELL’S IN HOBOKEN, NJ ments and attics before. We were just lucky enough to have Bar/None put it out for us. The recording process was the same as for everything else. BS: We actually recorded it before we got signed so there was no difference. LP: Were a lot of the tracks that you had done before included in this album? BS: Six of them. MU: We took our older EP and released it with a newer EP as a full CD. LP: What are you musically inspired by? BS: Musically inspired by? Umm Friends. Just our friends, good times, beers. LP: Yeah you do have a song called beers. BS: [Laughs] Yeah you did your research over here. But yeah basically that is about it, right? LP: Any artists you guys look up to? BS: Basically anybody who is doing their thing, who is able to reach an audience of people with what they are doing. MU: Brian looks up to Drake. BS: Oh yeah, I love Drake, yes. LP: On the bio in your website you mention that at that point you couldn't define your sound. Have you found a definition for it yet?  MU: We have not really found a definition for our sound yet. I don’t believe.

BS: It’s just simple music, its not to define. It would just be acoustic pop. MU: Underground BS: Its not something that is so out there, because I feel like if you can’t define your music it should be something that is insane like acid rock or something but its pretty simple music. LP: When you guys are home in Jersey what do you like to do? Where do you hang out in Jersey? BS: I usually hang out at my girlfriends house or the Olive Garden. MU: And I usually work all the time. LP: Where do you work? MU: For a landscaping company so, it is nice to be in the road. LP: What is the coolest city you have traveled to and why?  MU: The coolest city? BS: Ummm let me think. Chica-uhhh. You know it’s hard to point one out they are all amazing. MU: I really like Austin, Texas. South By is there that place is cool. BS: yes, yes. LP: What are your plans for 2012? New album in the works?  BS: Yeah, we are writing, we are writing. We are in the process of writing a new album so it just depends how fast we do it or how natural it comes along. Probably record an album and go on some more tours. Just staying busy really.

S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 | T R I M M A G A Z I N E • 41


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Trim Magazine Spring/Summer 2012  

Trim Magazine Spring / Summer 2012 Issue. Rutgers University.

Trim Magazine Spring/Summer 2012  

Trim Magazine Spring / Summer 2012 Issue. Rutgers University.

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