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ISSUE #4

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 1


LAUREN NESTER

CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & PHOTO DIRECTOR

ADAM LOWE

CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & DESIGN DIRECTOR

RUCHI SHERIKAR MANAGING DIRECTOR

JAMES VICTORY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

MARISA FLACKS WEB & PR DIRECTOR

MICHELLE KIM

FASHION DIRECTOR

EMILY BECKMAN

FASHION EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

WEB/PR JENN KIM EMILY TANTUCCIO KATRINA LABAYEN KHERMESH BADUSHOV HANNAH GERBER SHELDON NGUYEN SAMIRA ELKHOURY NICOLE KLOCK KAITLIN ROGERS CARLEY CHAN VICTORIA TRIPSAS EDITORIAL ADAM UZIALKO PHILLIP WYTHE KELSEY BOWEN PHOTO JOVELLE TAMAYO GALINA ECCLES ANNIE POLLOCK TENZIN TSEPEL ASHLEY GEORGE RAYMOND CROFT RACHEL FUCHECK WILL CHERRY MOHINI PATEL MICHELLE CHEN DESIGN KATIE BELL ZACH MANNING TAYLOR CARVIN NATASHA GOHIL BRYAN CASTRO TRACY LIU SAM SHAW ALEXANDRIA BELARDINELLI

CONTRIBUTORS: KATELYN MCGINN MJ TREVENS LAUREN HODGES JILLIAN SOLLAZZO SAYO TAKEGAMI KODO NISHIMURA HOWLING WOODS FARM SALTY FOX POPCORN PARK ZOO PRINCETON AIRPORT CHRISTINA NICOLE NATALIE AND ALANNA LALA & SASI ANIKE RABIU GABRIELLE FAITH PADILLA KATHRYN RAMBO HASTY ACRES RIDING CLUB DANIELLE DELGANDIO PAUL JONES ELISABET PAREDES ALLY MANOLIS MIKE PEREZ KEI FURUICHI TIMOTHY PHILLIPS FASHION TATIANA VICKERIE JENNA JORDAN XENIA POLYCHRONIS JASMINE CHEUNG KIMMY GONZALES CARINA WANG JENNA JORDAN SASCHA FERNANDEZ PATRICIA HWANG JUSTIN MAZUR STEPHANIE TURCI GIANNINA RUIZ KRISTINA LISA NADIRAH SIMMONS


LAUREN NESTER

adam lowe

Co-Editor-in-Chief & Photography Director

Co-Editor-in-Chief & Design Director

ISSUE #4

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e understand that you just opened the magazine, but we’d like you to look back at the cover once more and think about what you’d expect to see inside. Based on your first impression would you think we’ve spent a windy day on the runway of the Princeton Airport? Or met the big bad wolf himself? And let’s not forget the afternoon we spent in the power-gym with the Rutgers’ Olympic Weightlifting team! With that being said, we’d like to welcome you to issue #4, what we believe to be our strongest publication thus far! This semester the TRIM team has worked towards providing its readers with a wide variety of interesting stories to cater to all aspects of our diverse community, some from unique places in our lovely New Jersey while others focus on a selection of locals based right here in New Brunswick. All in all, it’s been an exciting few months putting these spreads together... this semester, our new editors team (who, based on the all-nighters, are fantastic at ‘90s karaoke) hit the ground running. Our main fashionistas, Michelle Kim and Emily Beckman, brought great insight in planning out the kickass fashion shoots and putting together some rad articles focusing on the fashion community. James Victory, aka the guy lifting 500 pounds on page 35, proved that you can be just as strong editing as you can in the gym. Marisa Flacks took the bull by the horns and has been working like a crazy woman to give our website and blog a new beautiful face, while also involving TRIM in the community . Ruchi, our powerhouse full of motivation and Caprisun, has kept us anchored and well nourished from our 2am diner runs. In addition to the dedicated staff and contributors, this unique experience of working with wolves, horses, planes, and a camel is one for the books and will only set the bar higher for the next issue. Talk to you then! Lauren Nester & Adam Lowe


IN THIS ISSUE PIES FOR DAYS

QILO

90.3 THE CORE

COVER FEATURE LALA & SASI

LUNATE CANIS

21

29

35

55

HIDDEN GROUNDS

NAIL ART!

BAG RAID

HURRICANE SANDY

24

31

39

67

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

REAL PEOPLE, REAL FASHION

BEHIND THE SEAMS

TWO FOX WHISKEY

26

33

42

74

MODEL CITIZEN

KRU & KRAHN

MAKE IT WORK

HASTY ACRES

DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE

BROTHERS OF IRON


PRE•REQS (N.) STOP! READ THESE BEFORE YOU CONTINUE PAGES 5-14

PRE-REQS PAGE 10

PAGE 07

PAGE 05

PAGES 12-14

DESIGN & ILLUSTRATION BY ADAM LOWE

PAGE 09

PAGE 11

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TECH

FOR YOUR VIEWING PLEASURE

THE EVOLUTION OF HOW WE SEE

Eyes

A LONG LONG TIME AGO

The Monocle

The Big & Tinted

WHEN I WAS YOUR AGE

The John Lennon The Ray-Bans

F

or decades, visual display systems have served as a cornerstone for operating state-of-the-art machinery. Developers have constantly implemented “heads-up display” systems in their products - from BMW’s minimalistic window displays, to the United States Air Force’s electronic fighter jet visual display program, information user interfaces are constantly implemented for user accessibility. However, Google Inc. looks to capitalize on these visual display systems by implementing an electronic display interface into glasses lenses. Called “Google Glass,” Google’s new visual data program focuses on convenient, minimalistic information access through stylistic glasses. Google claims their electronic eyewear possess “the [visual] equivalent of a 25-inch high definition screen from eight feet away,” and audio is sent through bone vibrations – privately sending sound data to the user through their cochlea, instead of earbuds or speakers. Likewise, Google Glass’s user interface takes up very little visual space: a semi-transparent, grey digital clock rests on the upper-right hand lens, and remains in the corner while in use. Similarly, Google provides a variety of other hands-on features which allow users to quickly navigate their Google Glass without visual clutter. For instance, after saying,

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The Harry Potter

“Ok glass” to Google Glass, the built-in input interface allows users to access video recording, camera options, GPS directions, and video chats The Millenium with mere vocal commands. Google Glass’s abilBALLIN’! ity to understand its user’s input also cooperates with the user’s environment - providing ease-ofaccess data for all users. For instance, thanks to Google’s recent acquisition of speech recognition company “DNNresearch,” Google has embedded real-time translation software into Google Glass. This allows users to immediately translate local audio into their native language - bridging The Kanye linguistic gaps in foreign countries, and allowing individuals to understand one another through real-time translation teams. Yet, Google Glass still possesses many preliminary flaws. After Google Glass’s photo and video Google Glasses recording features were first introduced, privacy activists argued that Google Glass recordings may prove extremely intrusive. Likewise, many the life of, or even just prove useful to, the averpreviewers complain that Google Glass’s features age consumer? That’s doubtful.” Combined with simply transfer various existing smartphone feaa $1,500 price tag for a pre-release developer’s tures onto a visual display system - leaving many build, Google Glass’s practicality seems relatively customers concerned with the device’s practical debatable. Although Google Inc’s new invention purpose. When online technology website definitely brings interesting features to the table, “TechRadar” tested out the Google Glass, a rethe average consumer’s need for cheap necessities viewer quipped, “Is Glass cool and entirely novel? might ultimately dictate Google Glass’s success Yes, it certainly is. Is it a device that will change or lack thereof.

STORY BY PHILIP WYTHE // DESIGN BY TAYLOR CARVIN & KATIE BELL // ILLUSTRATION BY KATIE BELL

Heads-Up On Google Glass SHADES OF THE YEAR

YOUNG BLOOD


OPINION PATRIOTS AROUND THE WEB The Internet thrives on the satire that its members create. Below are just a few examples of the Internet’s political - and, occasionally, accidental - humor.

STORY BY PHILIP WYTHE // DESIGN BY TAYLOR CARVIN // ILLUSTRATION BY KATIE BELL

July 4th might be the most important day on the calendar, but it’s important to remember who created America in the first place. Last summer, one twitter poster wrote, “its crazy to think that god made america #2013 years ago :) happy birthday #america!” For a 2013 year old, our God-given America is still kicking ass military-industrial style.

For America’s wealthier patriots, money isn’t just a commodity - it’s also a gourmet dish. In 2011, one redditor deep fried an American dollar, and posted the results on /r/pics. Although the dollar bill isn’t quite an American food staple, there’s nothing more refreshing than eating a plate filled with deep-fried freedom.

On the Canadian-centric tumblr community “FUCK YEAH CANADA,” our friends up North share a variety of Maple Leaf-centric quotes and images. One billboard from the Canadian tourism industry remarks, “Hey, stop being so STUPID and visit CANADA!”

PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN? HOW THE INTERNET VIEWS IT

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n the social blogging website “tumblr,” there’s a novelty account entitled “amurrica fuck yeah.” Across the main page, patriotic posts riddle the blog roll. “Why do they teach our kids the whole alphabet in school?” one post asks. “The only 3 important letters are u, s, & a.” Although undeniably true, every post allows users to add a slice of America onto their blogs, and even contribute their own patriotic messages - as long as they “have a birth certificate.” Defining American patriotism has always been key to 21st century American comedy. For nearly a decade, Stephen Colbert’s titular “Colbert Report” has thrived on criticizing America’s more enthusiastic patriots. Satire writers, such as “The Onion,” have constantly poked fun at the vehement political patriotism found on both sides of America’s political spectrum.

However, tumblr’s satire operates differently from these professional comedians. While “The Colbert Report” and “The Onion” are staffed with dozens of writers - or, as their resumes say, “English Majors” - tumblr’s patriotic memes are rooted in varying backgrounds across the USA. Unlike “Comedy Central,” “amurrica fuck yeah’s” jokes are crafted by your average, teenaged, freedom-loving American. This sort of satire culture is not coming from a corporation, but from your neighbor down the hall (who probably chose a better major than “English”). According to political science (note: also not an ideal major), these cultural satires can be explained through our anger towards American political culture. According to Stanford professor David Laitin, political parties manipulate cultural values in order to control John Doe. Exploring political hegemony, he claims, “cultural identity becomes a political resource... [which] can

easily attract mass followings.” Politicians “[modify] cultural identities” for election results. As Laitin explains, American politicians abuse our love for freedom; at times, diluting our country’s God-given, freedom-loving culture. Weightless phrases - like “God-given” and “freedom-loving” - turn into sound bites that convey a hollow patriotic sentimentality in American politics. Yet, when tumblr users create these ironic jokes, these posters are not poking fun at politics - they’re also critiquing its vapidness. Hidden inside each of these American-centric jokes is a sly nod to our national discourse - or, lack thereof - with reality. Poking fun at zealous Americanism is its own culture. And when these posts spread throughout tumblr, Internet users begin to formulate their own culture around these patriotic quips - an alternative political culture, which exposes modern politics through biting and vernacular satire.

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 6


PIES FOR DAYS 3 PIE RECIPES TO LAST YOU THROUGH THE SEASON MAKING THE CRUST Ingredients: 2-1/2 cups unbleached, all purpose flour 1 tsp. salt 1/2 cup vegetable shortening (Like Crisco) 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter Small bowl of ice cold water 1. Make sure the butter is cold to room temperature and the shortening is cold. 2. In a bowl, mix together the flour and salt and then crumble the cold shortening into the flour. 3. Cut the stick of butter into tiny cubes and mix that into the flour as well. 4. With a wooden spoon (or your hands), mix the flour in with the shortening and butter. 5. A crumbly dough will form. 6. Sprinkle 3-4 teaspoons of the ice cold water over the flour mixture and use your hands to mix everything together. Dough will form. 7. Put the dough out on a work surface to knead it into a disc. 8. Cover disc with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before forming the pie crust (the longer the better!).

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9. To make mini pie crusts, roll out the pie dough into a very thin sheet (a tiny bit thicker than a flour tortilla). 10. With a round cookie cutter (a cup works too), cut out circles. Do this in small batches, if you find it easier to cut a few and roll up the dough again. There should be 24 discs all together, enough for 12 mini pies, plus a little dough left over to munch on. FILLING THE PIES For the apple pie filling, peel and core the apples, and then cut them into small 1/2 inch cubes. Next, in a bowl, mix the apples with rest of the ingredients. For the pumpkin pie filling, just mix all the ingredients in the list together. 1. Put 1 circle into the bottom of each cupcake tin on a cupcake sheet. Make sure that it is molded into the shape of the tin. Fill 1-1/2 tablespoons of filling into each tin. Then cover each pie with the top crust. 2. We put hearts and stars in the middle of our pies by cutting out little shapes in the middle of the top crusts with a knife. 3. You could cut out leaves to put on the pumpkin pies too. Enjoy and have a beautiful holiday season!

THE SWEET STUFF APPLE PIE FILLING 1-1/2 granny smith apples 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tsp. ground nutmeg 1 tbsp. all purpose flour 3 tbsp. brown sugar 1/2 tsp. lemon / orange juice

PUMPKIN PIE FILLING 8 oz. can of pumpkin puree 1 whole egg 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg 1/2 tsp. ground ginger 1/2 cup of brown sugar

CHERRY PIE FILLING Purchase an 8 oz. can of cherry pie filling from your local grocery store. I used Target’s Market Pantry brand.

WRITTEN BY RUCHI SHERIKAR // DESIGN BY ZACHARY MANNING // PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEY GEORGE

FOOD


STORY BY ADAM UZIALKO // DESIGN BY KATIE BELL // PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHELLE CHEN

DRINKING

BEER, SPORTS & QUEENS A LOOK AT NEW BRUNSWICKS’ OLDE QUEEN’S TAVERN

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lde Queens Tavern, as its namesake suggests, has been a long time fixture at Rutgers University. While its name only dates back to the 1940s, the tavern itself has been serving drinks on the corner of Easton Avenue and Mine Street for a bit longer ever since the repeal of prohibition in 1933. “Tavern” is certainly the word for the place. Upon entering, one feels much more at home than at the typical college bar. The main bar is a large, wooden structure stocked with beers and booze and overlooked by flat screen televisions, giving Olde Queens the appearance of a classic pub. Myriad photos of merry bar-goers are plastered on the walls and above the bar. Beneath the still revelry of patrons past, a daunting treasure trove of liquors shimmer with the reflection of overhead lights. Further down, a charming wooden dining room accompanies a small-

CRAFT DRAFT

er bar. Supplying the food is BlitzBurgers, a restaurant which has leased space from the tavern for five years and doubles as a kitchen for bar attendees. Olde Queens is distinguished by its cozy, sociable atmosphere, harkening back to the ideals of the “Cheers” theme song: “...sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows your name.” Though the bar has changed hands throughout its history (current owner Frank Sciotto purchased it in 1988) it has retained a nostalgic traditionalism in its character. The rich history of the tavern is to thank for that, made evident by the 1930s photograph of a bartender that hangs proudly on the wall. Sciotto was an employee for seven years before purchasing the bar, giving him a connection to the more recent past. While the tavern is very much a “Rutgers bar,” as Sciotto puts it, Olde Queens also caters to the surrounding community at large. “It’s very much a neighborhood

In keeping with the theme of community, Olde Queens Tavern has become quite the purveyor of craft beers. The Brewers Association defines craft breweries as “small, independent and traditional,” and Olde Queens is the perfect fit for their products. Craft beers are higher quality brews using rich varieties of ingredients that bigger

spot during the day time,” Sciotto said. “We’ll have [administrators] from the hospital come in – we have doctors, we have nurses, we have police officers – they commingle with the students.” Sciotto said Olde Queens is distinguished by its ability to connect the community, a not so easy task in a college town. “What sets us apart is not so much coming here to just have a drink, but coming here to meet friends and hang out,” Sciotto said over the slow drawl of easy, midday country music. “It’s the other place… it’s the place you go to relax and feel at home.” Whether it is to watch the game or shoot the breeze, patrons will find a bar and good company waiting for them. Sciotto credits the customers for that: “It’s our patrons that make it what it is,” Sciotto said with a nod and a grin. “We have great customers here, and it feels like everybody kinda knows everybody. That’s really what makes it a fun place.”

companies don’t. And, not for nothing, they have more alcohol in them. Owner Frank Sciotto said one of the most popular promotions is $4 craft beers on Monday nights. To name just a few of the featured beverages, Olde Queens offers Pipeline Porter, Wolaver’s Oatmeal Stout and Allagash Belgian White.

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 8


SPORTS THE TOP TEN HEADING TO BIG TEN

A UNIFORM RENAISSANCE KNIGHTS IN SHINING ARMOR

E

very Scarlet Knight knows that Rutgers football season is synonymous with tailgating, scarlet clad co-eds, and RU RAH-RAHs, but this year there has been another topic floating around Rutgers Football: uniforms. As an addition to the uniforms that were originally unveiled in May of last year, the team adopted an all white helmet with a chrome block “R” and center stripe to match the all white uniform. The helmet’s chrome works with the red borders and facemask to create a visually arresting look that reflects light differently depending on the time of day. “No one else can wear that helmet,” Mike Kuzniak, the director of player services and one of the designers of the uniforms tells nj.com. “It doesn’t match anybody else’s story in college football. That’s us. To me it’s unique.” Mike Kuzniak took on the mission over a number of years to gather inspiration for the uniforms. He drew up a binder full of color combinations and jersey designs and a year later Nike had a final design. The uniforms featured Pro Combat System of Dress technology, providing the players with lightweight performance, ultimate protection, and breathability. It is clear to onlookers who see the beveled edges of the screen printed numbers and the pant stripe, the

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battle scars on the helmets, the chainmail texture in the numbers, and the shoulder ribbing that this design was meticulously thought out. The uniforms provide the impression of wearing battle armor with the battle being on the football field against the opposing team. Along with the new uniforms, Rutgers joining the Big 10, and the new helmet design, came an increased amount of media coverage surrounding the school. Rutgers was put in the limelight on September 14, 2013 when Eric LeGrand became the first player in the 144 years of Rutgers football history to have his jersey retired. LeGrand wore number 52 and

was injured during a game against Army in 2010 was left paralyzed from the neck down. He is an inspiration not only to the students, but also to Rutgers University as a whole. BELIEVE, a word associated with Eric LeGrand’s inspirational work toward recovery after his accident can be seen on the front of the helmet. He is an inspiration not only to the students, but also to Rutgers University as a whole. The uniforms have proven to be an extension of the character, morale and style of the students and faculty of Rutgers University. The strength behind the structure of the uniforms are exactly what Rutgers University Scarlet Knights exhibit everyday on and off campus.

STORY BY ELISABET PAREDES // ILLUSTRATION & DESIGN BY ZACHARY MANNING

An article ran on bleacherreport.com last year that ranked Rutgers uniforms #4 out of 10 well known and highly respected college football team uniforms. The big names that Rutgers beat out on the list were: Oregon Ducks, Maryland Terrapins and the Nebraska Cornhuskers. Rutgers scored the high ranking due to the sleek look of the all-black uniforms and overall appearance. With Rutgers football due to have its first season in the Big Ten next year, the fans can prepare to see the team being held to a higher caliber. The crowd in High Point Stadium as well as viewers surrounding their televisions at home will first see the two competing teams’ uniforms before the players’ talents are even put to the test. The uniforms add a specific flare and boost morale more than anything. Whether the players want to admit it or not, there is definitely a competitive drive in college football fashion. Recruitment and uniforms are becoming much more intertwined as the years go on. Branding and unique designs are what draw recruits into the program and create energy towards the game. There are different views on the topic, but most of the head coaches in predominant universities and college football programs agree that uniforms have become a top priority when recruiting and creating a fan base for the team. The look of the team has become such a dominant topic that many schools are overhauling their programs and making the players into walking billboards for the University. The uniforms are no longer just about the functionality, but instead they are a statement, a marketing tool, and an overall mood booster to fans and players alike.


STORY BY EMILY TANTUCCIO // DESIGN BY BRYAN CASTRO & TAYLOR CARVIN // PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMILY TANTUCCIO

MUSIC

BLINK 182 ALL THE SMALL THINGS

C

elebrating the grand reopening of Starland Ballroom and the fact that pop punk is anything but dead, Blink 182 performed their smallest show in ten years on September 10 before a crowd of 2,500 of their most dedicated tri-state area fans. The foul-mouthed California trio, widely regarded amongst today’s youth as the founding fathers of the genre, played a truly dynamic 22-song set of old favorites mixed in with new releases from their most recent full length record and EP. There’s a lot to be said for a band that can still pack a venue from wall to wall with teenagers, despite the fact that they’ve been playing shows since before some of the audience was born. The band still managed to capture an infectious energy that had every fan in the audience up and off their feet as soon as the first few notes to “Feelin’ This” were audible from the stage.

It was tough not to smile as the band broke out their typical inappropriate humor in between songs, greeting the audience with a few choice four-letter words before transitioning into “Up All Night” and “The Rock Show.” Taking the time to remind the crowd that the show was taking place to honor and benefit victims of Superstorm Sandy, with part of the ticket proceeds being donated to local efforts to rebuild, Hoppus and Delonge exchanged some inappropriate banter to lighten the mood once more before performing more past hits, including “I Miss You”, “Always”, and “First Date.” Though the audience did respond well to the newer songs such as “After Midnight” and “Ghost on the Dancefloor”, they just didn’t quite generate the same roaring excitement as the older tracks that many of the kids in the room had been listening to for a good portion of their young adult lives. Though the band kept the audience on their toes throughout the night, it wasn’t until Travis Barker began his famously jaw-dropping drum solo that we were all truly reminded of one thing. Blink 182 may have aged, but their sense of humor and musical abilities have only improved in time. The band did not disappoint at any moment over the course of the evening, leaving fans screaming for more even after performing a three-song encore and promising to be back in Jersey soon enough.

NEXT GENERATION Intense profanity and a penchant for public nudity may not be listed as the building blocks to a successful career in most music business handbooks. However, this is probably why Blink 182’s impact on punk music is being felt over twenty years after their first show inside a California high school. Despite the fact that the trio is now as old as the parents of current high schoolers, it hasn’t stopped the current generation of NJ’s homegrown artists from drawing influence from the group. While not many new bands can match Blink’s fast paced riffs, or lyrical styling’s about friendship and falling in love with the wrong girl, it is clear that pop punk is definitely not dead. HERE ARE A FEW EXAMPLES:

1. IN CASE YOU HAVEN’T LEFT BATTEN DOWN THE HATCHES

2. NIGHT FEELINGS MAN OVERBOARD

3. COLD COFFEE CROSS TOWN TRAIN

4. DISMANTLING SUMMER THE WONDER YEARS

5. PERFECT ON YOUR MARKS

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 10


SHOPPING

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6

3

7

5

2 1 Avantgard Boots $99 www.modcloth.com 1

8

3 Button-up Military Blouse seaNY $417 www.oxygenboutique.com

2 Bulletproof Stone Ring Vincecamuto $28 www.nordstrom.com

5 Crystal Velocity Braided Bracelet Erickson Beamon $855 Barneys 7 Leather Watch Anneklein $65 www.zappos.com

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MILITRAY QUEEN

4 Double Ankle Boots Go Jane $33 www.gojane.com 6 Gold Necklace HM $9 www.hm.com 8 Zara $79.90


SHOPPING 3

4

5 7

1

8

2

EMERALD CITY 1 Goldtone Stainless Steel Watch Marc Jacobs $225 www.saksfifthavenue.com

2 Nail Polish in Holly Zoya $8 www.zoya.com

4 3 Perspex Box Clutch Suede Anklebooties Chinese Laundry Kristin Cavallari $169 River Island $70 www.riverisland.com www.nordstrom.com

6

5 Snake Cutout Body-con Dress Topshop $90 www.topshop.com

6 Hayden Satchel GiGi $475 www.giginewyork.com

7 Ring Urbanoutfitters $16 www.urbanoutfitters.com

8 Stone Necklace Zara $29 www.zara.com

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 12


SHOPPING

2

4

1

men’s coats 1 Canada Goose $795

2 HM $79

3 Marc by Marc Jacobs $830

4 Neil Barrett $2450

3

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SHOPPING 6 5

1

3

2

4

2

SCHOOL RULES 1 HM $49

2 Obey Clothing $94

3 Super GA $54

4 Topman $80

5 True Religion $1158

6 Yes Style $40

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 14


LET US DESIGN IT!

CONTACT US AT ZINE.NET INFO@TRIMMAGA

M AG A Z I N E


LET US DESIGN IT!

CONTACT US AT ZINE.NET INFO@TRIMMAGA

M AG A Z I N E


LET US DESIGN IT!

CONTACT US AT ZINE.NET INFO@TRIMMAGA

M AG A Z I N E


Rutgers Radio is Emancipating Electronic Music COMMUNITY RADIO AND THE STATE OF DANCE MUSIC ON THE CORE FM STORY BY PAUL JONES PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILL CHERRY DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 18


W

alk a few blocks behind the Rutgers Student Center on the right nights and you’ll notice there’s something in the air. Of course, there’s the smell of a nearby pizzeria, but that’s not quite what it is. Perhaps there’s even the faint smog we’ve become accustomed to, but that’s also not what I’m talking about. Notice instead that low, muffled, repeating thud coming from ... everywhere. The youth of every generation since the rise of the middle class have had their dance music: their swing, their soul, their twist and shout, their disco. From disco’s use of the synthesizer came the seed of today’s dance music, and the rise of the personal computer and digital audio workspaces provided the necessary fuel. We have electronic dance music. Alternatively, tune-in to 90.3 The Core FM on Sundays beginning at 4:00PM and you’ll hear a much clearer and more coherent sound, beginning with SQUO, followed by DJ Soma with Straight to the Hard Drive, then with Lauren Jefferson with Eclecticism, and ending with DJ Psy with Electronic Phonix. This style of electronic music is not necessarily of the variety of the Netherland’s top 40 house hits, but a sound that’s much more home-grown and personal. With his show, SQUO retains that hard-hitting urge to dance from the music of house parties and nightclubs while adding an underground, undiscovered, up-and-comingness into his mix; the sound is unapologetically electronic.

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His style is not the polite bass of electronic music has become known for, but rather the grittier, more soulful bass of artists like Branchez, Trippy Turtles, and Victor Niglio. When not DJing for The Core, SQUO is brewing his own entries to the electronic music scene. “I’d love to be able to reach out to more budding artists,” says SQUO, who like the rest of the station, is intensely committed to the community over the commercial, “I’d like to develop a mixshow of my own,

to the New Brunswick area and beyond. “I am about inclusion, not exclusion,” says the General Manager Josh Kelly. With both a New Brunswick community focus and World Wide Web presence is consistent with the General Manager’s commitment to a broad and diverse audience and Rutgers’ slogan, “Local Roots, Global Reach.” The show that immediately follows SQUO also exemplifies this attitude, with DJ Soma’s

“We try to keep commercialization out of the equation, we want to find and showcase music that is for kids by kids, not by a big budget producer.” bringing on unknown DJs, featuring their mixes, and having a discussion about their music.” You can learn more about SQUO on his website, DJSQUO.com. This emerging, soulful variety of electronic artists is sponsored and broadcasted by The Core FM, a purely student-run organization. Coming to your radio dial at 90.3 FM and from their website thecore.fm, The Core FM is available

show, “Straight to the Hard Drive”. DJ Soma resists the commercialization of his music in both the sense that it isn’t from a massive label, but also that the music is free and legal, with links on DJ Soma’s blog, dj-soma.tumblr.com. “The beauty of electronic music too is the fact that almost anybody with access to the technology can create something unique, and distribute it to a possible audience of millions,” says DJ Soma. His


ISIT

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FM ORE. E C E H V T EN LI IST

TO L

timbre cadences flows well, with ambient soundscapes, gritty drums, and psychedelic synths. The electronic music’s soul emerges from guitar riffs, turntablism, and occasionally samples from music, movies, and radio circa 40’s and 50’s. “I am really into keeping my ear to the streets”, says Kelly, who is keeping his focus on the community aspect of The Core. Not limiting themselves to a single medium to share music, The Core FM recently worked with New Brunswick to organize a free and public show in Boyd Park that showcased local talent. This is The Core’s categorical attitude, as Josh says, “If it takes lots of money to get somewhere, then it isn’t part of a fair system, and people are systematically left out in the cold in terms of participating.” Lauren Jefferson continues electronic music on Sundays with her show “Eclecticism” at 8:00. As the name suggests, her style is much more varied, retaining the electronic tone and dance-inspiration while producing excitement from novelty. Lauren is deeply committed to bringing her listeners both a high-quality and novel listening experience, “It hurts when I hear people say they can never find good, new music,” says Lauren. On some occasions, “Ecclectism’s” timbre can be downtempo and soulful with tracks from labels like, Ghostly International. Alternatively, the show can take on an entirely more catchy and upbeat vibe with offerings from French label Kitsuné.You can keep up with Lauren on her blog, eclecticism1.blogspot.com. Concluding electronic music on Sundays is DJ Psy with his show, Electronic Phonix which has been broadcasting since 2008, and his sound has grown with the station, with the genre, and with the technology.Very excited with the state of the genre, “The cost of production equipment is now as cheap as a laptop and some software,” notes Psy, “...We’re seeing the biggest growth in a ‘genre’ since amplifiers, guitars, and 4-tracks became commodities, forever changing rock’n’roll.” Electronic Phonics is glittery, shiny, and bassy, with beats that move your feet, featuring artists like The Magician, RAC, Joe Goddard, LCD Soundsystem, Coleco, and Classixx. The artists at The Core FM are challenging the music industry from two sides, offering their community high-quality and non-commercial radio on one front and sourcing and broadcasting their music using the Internet on the other. As more and more people come to have control of the means of electronic music production (computers and audio software), there will be less and less possible or needed involvement from the aptly antiquatedly named record industry. The Internet has emancipated an entire generation of people wanting to express themselves, and The Core FM is a manifestation of that. From Josh Kelly’s point of view, “We want to find and showcase music that is by kids for kids, and not by a big budget producer.”

dj psy

SUNDAYS 10:00PM

DJ SQUO

SUNDAYS 4:00PM

DJ soma

SUNDAYS 5:00PM

lauren jefferson SUNDAYS 8:00PM

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 20


HIDDEN GROUNDS A DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH

STORY BY KELSEY BOWEN DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE PHOTOGRAPHY BY TENZIN TSEPEL

21 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


O

n July 20, 2013, Spoorthi Kumar and Anand Patel opened up the Hidden Grounds coffee shop at 106 Easton Avenue in New Brunswick. In contrast to other coffee houses in the area, Owner Spoorthi explained the inspiration for the quaint little shop’s unique personality: “We wanted to not just open up a coffee shop, but to provide good quality,” she said. “Part of the idea was to also support the community.” Much of the decor was purchased from local businesses and the coffee beans are from an organic supplier just outside Philadelphia. Searching for a spot set apart from the college bar scene, location was a major priority for the shops innovative owners. With a sunken staircase leading down to the entrance located below ground level, the shop certainly lives up to its name. Upon entering the shop, guests are greeted by soothing music and the smell of freshly ground coffee beans. “We wanted the place to have an earthy feel,” said Spoorthi. The shop supplies a rustic charm and a natural ambiance with hanging mason jars and glass bulbs filled with succulent plants. Within the cozy atmosphere, caffeine lovers can enjoy a variety of coffee flavors, such as the recommended Ethiopian blend. “You can actually taste the hints of basil in it,” Spoorthi said, explaining the surprising burst of flavor in the light roast. All the food served at Hidden Grounds is homemade, complimenting their pour-over coffees, which are ground, filtered, and mixed by hand right in front of you. So on your next study break, come grab a rejuvenating coffee and curl up with a novel or play a game of Jenga provided by Hidden Grounds. Other perks include outdoor seating, free Wifi, and a pet friendly environment. In fact, customers are encouraged to bring their dogs inside where free treats are available. Compared to franchise coffee shops that are often overcrowded and noisy, this cozy café is certainly a pleasant change of pace.

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 22


LET US DESIGN IT!

CONTACT US AT ZINE.NET INFO@TRIMMAGA

M AG A Z I N E


alumni spotlight

FEATURING MICHELLE ROFRANO INTERVIEW BY ADAM UZIALKO DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE PHOTOGRAPHY BY GALINA ECCLES

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 24


M

ichelle Rofrano was just a young child when she first felt a deep connection to classical music. The 22-year-old Mason Gross graduate and Flemington, NJ native said her maternal grandfather had a passion for classical music and Italian opera, and that his enthusiasm for music marked her early childhood. “More than his other grandkids I would kind of sit around and listen to his stories about [the operas], and he’d [tell me] about the plots because they were in Italian and I couldn’t understand them,” Rofrano said. “He would tell me about the composers and I would… listen to his old records with him.” Rofrano’s grandfather grew up in a poor family in Italy just before World War II broke out. His passion was music and he hoped to pursue it someday; however, as money grew even tighter and the war raged across Europe, a harsher reality set in. Instead of becoming the musician he had dreamed of being, he had to work to help provide food for his family and ultimately he immigrated to the United States. His love of music did not wane though. Before he passed, he instilled that love in Rofrano, who has been polishing her skills as a pianist ever since and now is pursuing a career as a conductor. The young, olive-skinned girl’s big brown eyes betray the apparent determination and seriousness she exudes. Though her frame is tiny, Rofrano may well be a giant when discussing her life’s work. “I wanted to play an instrument when I was 6 or 7, and we had a hand-me-down piano from our relatives, so my mom got me piano lessons,” she said. “I really liked it, but I didn’t know as a kid I wanted to be a [professional musician.]” Rofrano decided toward the end of her high school years that she would pursue a career in music, but she also had a strong inclination toward writing and initially intended to double major in English and Music. However, Rofrano quickly realized that performing was her true focus and, despite maintaining an interest in Literature and English, dropped the major to direct her attention to music. “I felt that I needed more time to practice and focus on music if I was going to perform professionally,” she said, and added, “I’m still very interested in English, I still read a lot, and I still hope to write at some point.” Rofrano’s time at Mason Gross was valuable to her; she learned how to “set a higher standard” for herself and developed discipline under the wing of piano professor Min Kwon. Kwon taught Rofrano how to be self-critical, how to analyze and learn from her mistakes, and how to keep frustration out of that equation. She also dissected music and its history, connecting it to broader subjects through analytical discussions with piano professor Daniel Epstein. Through these conversations, she said, she gained valuable insight into her field. Perhaps the professor who had the biggest influence on Rofrano was conducting professor Kynan Johns. “[Johns] was always very encouraging of me. He loves opera, he works very hard to prepare his scores and is great at rehearsing,” she said. “He’s just very excited about music… and he gave me a lot of opportunities as an undergraduate even though I wasn’t pursuing a major in [conducting].” One of those opportunities included conducting Claude Debussy’s orchestral work,

25 | TRIM FALL/WINTER

Prelude to the Afternoon of the Faun, which she called “one of the most beautiful things ever written” with a whimsical smile. She performed it with the Rutgers Symphony Orchestra, Mason Gross’s graduate orchestra, which is atypical of an undergraduate. Rofrano’s time at Rutgers was not without its troubles, though. When she first started, Rofrano said she practiced constantly but improperly, which led to severe muscular tension in her arms and the buildup of scar tissue that inhibited her ability to play effectively. After working through many physical and technical problems (with the help of Professor Kwon) she went on to win the annual undergraduate concerto competition – this qualified her to perform with the Rutgers Sinfonia the following year. However, the opportunity would be missed due to a bike accident, which saw Rofrano’s right elbow severely fractured. She

really just having that discipline to bring the music to the highest form it can possibly be off the page.” She also noted legendary conductors such as Leonard Bernstein and Carlos Kleiber as inspirations. “Listening to [Kleiber’s] recordings and watching videos of his past performances; he just had this very nuanced way of communicating with the orchestra,” she said. “And Leonard Bernstein had this energy for his musicians - and for the audience, to engage a lot of people who might not appreciate the music otherwise, or didn’t know how to appreciate it until he brought them in.” Aspiring to be a conductor herself, Rofrano views the position as one of interpretation. It is the conductor’s job, she says, to guide the orchestra in conveying the emotions and ideas that the composer wanted to impart when

“You have to know your score even better to the point that not only do you know the notes [that are being played] but that you have an artistic idea for [the composer’s original intent],” had to withdraw from the honor she had earned and undergo reconstructive surgery and physical therapy before returning to the ivory keys. Rofrano stayed optimistic anyway and said she used the incident to strengthen her resolve and utilize her time more valuably, turning the literally bone-crushing negative experience into motivation to advance her art. Now, she is in seemingly peak condition. Since graduating from Rutgers University, Rofrano has kept a full schedule. She is the Music Director at Six Mile Run Reformed Church in Franklin Park, NJ, bringing together a musical community of various ages, tastes, and abilities. She also teaches piano lessons to elementary students at Hunterdon Academy of the Arts. Additionally, she is hard at work as the conductor for an upcoming production of Giacomo Puccini’s Suor Angelica with the Wing for Vocal Artist Development of the Opera Project, also based in Hunterdon county, NJ. The opera’s performance is scheduled for the end of November. Rofrano said she draws inspiration from performers such as Japanese-English pianist Mitsuko Uchida, whose work ethic has struck Rofrano as admirable. “I just think [Uchida] is a brilliant artist,” she said. “Obviously there is her attention to detail and her immense connection with [the music… and] she devotes so much time to studying and

writing the piece. “You have to know your score to the point that not only do you know all of the notes [that are being played] but that you have an overarching artistic idea for [the composer’s original intent],” she said. “…you have to go through that process with the entire piece so that you can advise the players and work with [them] to bring it to life.” For Rofrano, a successful career is one that emphasizes the importance of expressing a wide range of emotions through music. She believes classical music best encompasses the full range of human emotion because of the numerous instruments and subtleties that are specific to the genre. She says that for a piece to go from near silence at one moment to a full booming orchestral sound the next is proof of its ability to express almost any conceivable feeling across the entire human spectrum. “[Classical music] is important for listeners, and it’s important for people to continue to write it and continue to play it, so we can address that side of ourselves,” she said. “We have such a huge range of ideas and emotions and thoughts as human beings.” To help people realize this, Rofrano says, would be the ultimate success. For her late grandfather, no doubt, Rofrano’s ability to passionately seize the opportunities he was never afforded has already made her a success.


Jasmeet Bawa

is Our Model Citizen INTERVIEW BY PHILLIP WYTHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY RACHEL FUCHECK DESIGN BY TRACY LIU ILLUSTRATION BY KATIE BELL

istening intently to her fellow editors at “The Anthologist’s” weekly meetings, Rutgers undergraduate Jasmeet Bawa might not stand out in a crowd. As a Neuroscience Major and School of Arts and Sciences Junior, her quiet disposition occasionally lets her slip into the background.Yet, inside Jasmeet rests a collegiate role model who has fought for her education. A Jersey City native, Jasmeet’s home life never granted her the freedom that her peers experienced. “Friends are bad for you,” Jasmeet’s parents claimed. “[My parents asserted] you’re suppose to stick to your core values,” which involved strict parental control over financial matters and social interaction. Abuse marked her domestic life: verbal harassment, financial dependence, and social isolation became home life staples throughout her childhood. Crushed under her abusive household, Jasmeet’s depression began to grow. While browsing colleges, Jasmeet realized that student organizations might free her from social isolation. From the tutorship education initiative “Scholars Organizing Culturally Innovative Opportunities,” to Rutgers University’s “The Anthologist” literature magazine, to a lead role formulating the Mabel Smith Library’s “Curating Guantanamo” exhibit, Jasmeet devoted herself to extracurricular life. Her voice empowered students across campus. Now, Jasmeet hopes to amplify the voices of socially isolated groups across America. “I want to work with youth groups,” she admits, “and work on community reform through words and expression.” By educating and inspiring young Americans, Jasmeet hopes that her future career can help oppressed youth finally share their own stories. In her own life, Jasmeet has come face-to-face with the silence created by domineering control. Realizing that her home life would inherently disrupt her collegiate successes, Jasmeet left Jersey City and became a self-supporting student. Now, finally receiving the psychological support she needs, Jasmeet Bawa claims her “isolation feels so ridiculous” after all these years.

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 26


“More than anything, all of these experiences connect me to beautiful people and movement.”

TRIM: Hello, and thanks for stopping by to meet with TRIM. What’s your name? Jasmeet: Hi TRIM! My name is Jasmeet Bawa. I like when people call me Jas. Trim: What are you studying at Rutgers University, and what year are you at RU? Jasmeet: I’m studying Cell Biology and Neuroscience with a minor in either Philosophy or Cognitive Science and taking course work in education for future master’s or graduate school applications. TRIM: Interesting! Where did you grow up? Jasmeet: I grew up in Jersey City. It’s all over the news lately for being a “vibrant” city, filled with great food and art. Hopefully it doesn’t induce reverse white flight like we see in Brooklyn; the amount of diversity encountered in Jersey City is the number one way my identity was shaped, from culture to ethnicity to experience. The memories I have attached to the city are positive and negative- I went to schools where teachers tried their hardest to make the best of a bad situation, but there was no denying the dissonance from the gauntness of gang culture and impoverishment juxtaposed by the more towering, affluent parts of the city. I see glimpses of that in New Brunswick, walking up and down George Street and tutoring the city’s youth.

27 | TRIM FALL/WINTER

TRIM: I see where you could draw that comparison. What was home life like growing up? Jasmeet: I was lucky in numbers of way: my parents put my education first and wanted the best for me. Best, though, was culturally defined, as my parents are immigrants, and for me, that was a box too small. I think a lot of children of immigrants and first-generation students can relate to the cultural confusion growing up like this generate. But, as with anything as broadly defining as “first-generation” or “children of diaspora,” I, like others, had my own set of complex factors that make things easier or more complicated. In a simplified notion, they can be distilled and magnified to an instance of sexual abuse years and miles always and its manifestation as the shadow of depression. I couldn’t get the emotional or psychological support I needed for that at home, so any controlling behavior - such as withdrawal from my bank account of money I worked for, shutting off my phone on whim, or implying that if I hung out with any boy at any time of the day, something “bad” might happen to me - wounded me like hail instead of the rain I would have normally perceived it to be. TRIM: Home life sounds like it was very difficult for you, but Rutgers University offered a significant change. Was Rutgers University your first choice? What was your original opinion about Rutgers before you came?

Jasmeet: I didn’t want to go to Rutgers; everyone from my high school went here, or at least that was the negative assumption made about the school, and I wanted to leave New Jersey to somewhere small. It took a year and a half to find my niche and rhythm, now I wouldn’t want to leave the wonder I am building here. TRIM: Like any Freshman, transition to Rutgers must have been difficult. What were some of your initial obstacles in coming to Rutgers? How was your first and second semester? Jasmeet: I was well aware of that old trope that the girl who is sheltered in high school goes wild in college. So, my first year, I didn’t want to drink at all, unless it was with a few friends somewhere calm. I wasn’t ready for how many nights of isolation that would lead to as the people I had been socializing with enjoyed the frat-hopping life. There was no judgment; I was just craving something else. I found it with Rutgers University Debate Union my first semester, but public speaking was the extreme out of my comfort zone, so I wanted to take a break from it and explore other organizations at Rutgers. My first semester went fine; I remained optimistic about my second. Upon returning home for winter break, though, and being confronted with the same emotional torment as before, I buckled and upon returning that


semester I did horrendously academically and socially. I thought repeatedly of going to counseling, but mostly I slept and escaped to Maine, where my then-boyfriend went to school. I’m still repairing the damage. TRIM: Your past few years at Rutgers have certainly been very busy. Across Rutgers, you’re known for your active Involvement within the Rutgers community. What are some of the clubs and organizations you’ve worked with over the years? And what work have you done with these various organizations? Jasmeet: I floated for a while after I decided to not do debate with orgs like PCRF, JHR; I tried finding my way into the Targum, with no avail. I eventually stumbled upon The Anthologist and worked for Tutoring Plus at the GSE. I started volunteering at Elijah’s Promise, and at the Women’s Center at the DCC, and writing for The Examiner. I went to a lot of open mics, performed a slam poem at the Brower Steps for Climate Change. Through Aresty, I worked on research on Guantánamo Bay, gave tours at the Guantánamo Public Memory Project exhibit at the Douglass library and organized an awareness event.

ing to Rutgers. I created a crowdfunding page and shared my story. It’s still hard to express my gratitude and astonishment at the amount of people, from Rutgers and outside, that came through. I wouldn’t be here without them. Currently, I work a lot and I’m in a constant struggle trying to figure out proper documentation. But if it’s honest, hard work and it propels me closer to my dreams, I have no qualms with it. I wish I could sleep more, though. TRIM: I see.You’ve certainly come a long way, Jasmeet. Now that you’re halfway through your

Junior year at Rutgers University, how do you feel about the Rutgers and New Brunswick community? Jasmeet: I love Rutgers and I’m looking towards further integration with the New Brunswick community. The Anthologist is hoping to plan events in the future to showcase New Brunswick talent. TRIM: We’ll be looking forward to seeing more of your work across the community. Thank you so much Jasmeet - Best wishes!WW Jasmeet: Thanks Phil! And thank you, TRIM!

TRIM: Each of these various projects and extra-curricular clubs seem to serve a wide range of fields. What is your biggest motivation for working with these projects? Are there any clubs or opportunities that have really shaped your experience with Rutgers University? Jasmeet: All of them? [laughs] SOCIO, the educational non-profit I volunteer for now, and previously worked for, motivates me to try harder for myself by showing me the future work I want to be doing - working with at-risk youth. The Anthologist is the creative outlet I need after long days of asking customers if they want chips or soda with their burrito at Chipotle, and Guantánamo reminded me that inaction and idleness is not a choice for me. More than anything, all of these experiences connect me to beautiful people and movement. TRIM: Indeed, a lot of these projects connect you with a diverse spectrum of individuals from various walks of life. And many of these organizations are time-consuming ventures. How have you balanced your academic career and student involvement throughout your undergraduate years? Jasmeet: Learning to cut through the bullshit: mine and others, when I can push myself and when I should sleep, who I associate myself with and what we do together. The academic struggle is real and hard for me because throughout my previous schooling, I breezed through with honors and pins. I never developed a work ethic - taking notes and making study plans is a real thing, and I commend anyone with that talent. TRIM: After your Spring semester, I understand that you began living on your own. How did you support yourself? How did your independence affect you in the coming years ahead? Jasmeet: My ex-boyfriend and my friends were an unmistakable support, emotionally and sometimes financially by helping out with groceries, a place to stay, a ride. I had to and have to work, a lot. Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough in this society with tuition skyrockets and minimum wage not enough to survive on, even if I could manage to work full time. This summer, I risked not return-

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 28


1

Start with dry clear base coat and two coats of white polish.

2

nail this trend

Dip a toothpick in black nail polish, or use black nail art polish with a thin brush. Use this polish to draw triangles on each nail, alternating sizes and leaving one of the three corners disconnected. For a more sophisticated look, you can draw triangles inside of triangles.

INSTRUCTIONS BY NADIRAH SIMMONS PHOTOGRAPHY BY MOHINI PATEL DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE

3

Allow black designs to dry for ten minutes and finish off with a clear top coat. Be sure that you give your nails ample time to dry before you apply the top coat, as the top coat can cause the black to bleed very easily.


4

Using the same black polish, fill in the surrounding area with zig-zag lines, squares, or any other straight lines. Be sure not to use squiggly lines, as they can mess up the plane of your design.


REAL PEOPLE. REAL FASHION. STORY BY NATASHA GOHIL DESIGN BY NATASHA GOHIL PHOTOGRAPHY BY RACHEL FUCHECK

Real college students, with real fashion statements. The college campus is a playground for risk and adventure. In a diverse community the fashion realm amongst the student body exemplifies trendy styles with flares of individuality.

NICOLE HASALAN

JULIO RODRIGUEZ “Anything looks good with confidence. With confidence, even sweats exude sexiness!”

31 | TRIM FALL/WINTER

“I give high priority to my daily skincare routine. When I have clear skin, I’m more confident in my apprearence and comfortable enough to go out with no makeup.”


STEPHANIE KARANEVSKII

YUSEF ABDUS

“Applying a little white eyeliner to the inner corners of my eyes make me appear more awakeespecially after those all-nighters!”

“I always go with what feels right. To me, it’s perfectly fine to have a unique sense of style, In fact, I use my gauges as a personal form of expression.”

CESAR RODRIGUEZ

CESAR RODRIGUEZ “I keep in mind that style is everlasting yet fashion is a fad. Although my style will always be a part of me, the fashion I choose to express my personality will continuously be updated.”

JASON ZOMBACK “I’ve learned how important it is to buy good quality clothing. I might have to spend more for quality, but it’s worth it when the clothes last forever!” TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 32


STORY BY XENIA POLYCHRONIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILL CHERRY

33 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


n July 15th of this past summer, New Brunswick was graced with a new boutique known as Kru and Krahn. Located on Hamilton Street, it is especially convenient for the large population of Rutgers students looking to find fashionable deals nearby. Immediately, I was impressed by the store’s chic and trendy décor. I was instantly greeted by the warm smile of a beautiful woman, Saymah Nah, who happened to be one-third of the Kru and Krahn trio. Lucky for me, I was able to sit down with her and get the exclusive scoop regarding this newly established boutique paradise. Saymah Nah, the buyer and creative director, works with her brother, Joseph Johnson and his wife, Ralonda Johnson, who owned an online jewelry store prior to the opening of Kru and Krahn. The family is from Liberia, a country in West Africa and the African heritage is noticeable throughout the store, adding palpable personality to every corner. The catchy, alliterated name of the store also reflects cultural significance in relation to the family. Kru is a tribe in Liberia from which Saymah is from and Krahn is the tribe from where Joseph is from. Saymah, who began by stringing haphazard names together that sounded

interesting, credits Joseph for insisting on a name that holds meaning for the family. After many rejected name ideas, it was finally settled - Kru and Krahn was born. Saymah claims to have never worked in fashion before, though you would never be able to tell judging by the creative and eccentric ways the display windows are designed as well as the beautiful organization of the space. The store is divided into two parts. Krahn, located in the front of the store, is geared toward a more conservative woman. Saymah described it as “chic, modern, sleek, and business casual.” In the back of the store, behind two big red doors is the creative and funky, Kru. Neon colors, bright prints, and ripped denim leaves Kru to attract the younger, more daring women. Additionally, Kru includes an exclusive vintage section, “Kru of a Kind”, containing a variety of secondhand items to make your wardrobe pop with personality! Overall, the store exudes a very relaxed and humble atmosphere filled with everything a bonafide shopaholic could wish for. With a perfect combination of trendy and classic, you’ll find unique home décor, novelty gifts, colorful shoes, perfect posters, and much more. With clothing ranging from hipster high-waisted denims to classic blazers and printed skirts, each item is

awakened with some sort of twist whether it be a pop of color or cut-outs. To make this place even more accessible to the average woman, Kru and Krahn carries a variety of sizes, making their garments suitable for any body type. When asking Saymah about her personal style, she expressed that it can be business casual one day yet very colorful the next. She said, “sometimes when I go out with my friends, they tell me [I’m dressed] too much!” She laughed and went on to say that her style is very “spontaneous”. When I asked her if her style is reflected in the way that she arranges the clothing and dresses the manikins, she said that it most definitely seeps its way in from time to time. Admittedly she said, “I tried to pull back from that but I guess I can’t help myself.” That doesn’t seem like it would be a problem though, since each outfit is put together so professionally. When asked if there were any other Kru and Krahn’s, Saymah said with an ear-to-ear grin, “No…not yet!” So now that you’ve had an exclusive inside look at the new boutique, it is time to go grab your friends and shop your hearts out at 191 Hamilton Street! Also, don’t forget to follow Kru and Krahn on Instagram and Twitter @KruandKrahn!

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 34


vanity to go PHOTOGRAPHY BY MOHINI PATEL STYLING BY JENNA JORDAN DESIGN BY SAM SHAW

35 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


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pastel crossbody $55 Forever 21

yves saint laurent le teint touche eclat illuminating foundation $55 Nordstrom

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STRAIGHTEN UP Jack Black Daily Facial Cleanser $12 Macy’s

Victorinox Swiss Army watchchrono classic $575 Swissarmy.com Anthony Oil free facial lotion $32 Sephora

ricci club cologne $65 99perfume.com

Wahl Groomsman Beard & Mustache Trimmer $22 Bed, Bath, & Beyond

37 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


PHOTOGRAPHY BY MOHINI PATEL STYLING BY JENNA JORDAN DESIGN BY SAM SHAW

Got2b Glued $6 Soap.com

black comb $10 Target

crest 3d white strips $50 Target

Allure Homme Sport $62.00 Chanel

TRIMMAGAZINE .NET | 38


behind the seams The

Gla Sid mou eo r-l f ess F sto a ry shi by jas on min ec he ung

39 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


y

ou are shopping in the clearance section of your favorite clothing store when a black striped tank top catches your eye. Reaching out to feel the fabric, you pull out the red price tag to find that it has been marked down to $4! The inside label reads “Made in Bangladesh”. Hey, that sounds pretty exotic, you think to yourself as you throw the top over your arm and head towards the cashier. While walking out of the store, you feel quite pleased by the remarkably good deal and immediately begin brainstorming outfits to match your new top. Chances are you probably did not need another cheap addition to your already bursting wardrobe, yet it was that discounted price again influencing you to proceed with the purchase. The design was plain while the stripes did not match up on the side seams, an indication of poor quality. Unfortunately, the astoundingly low cost may reflect a deeper issue − one that raises the question of whether saving a few bucks on your new top is even the right thing to do. Most people do not think about the gravity of human exploitation that may be involved in manufacturing the clothing they buy. Whether it is in harvesting raw materials, textile production, or the construction of the garment, workers at every level of production may be enduring substandard conditions and excessive work hours. These hardships include extremely low wages, long hours, unsafe working conditions, severe exhaustion, forced overtime, and mental stress. Additionally, workers do not have the freedom of association, thereby prohibiting them from being able to create or participate in unions for protection. Unfortunately, the low retail price of clothes that attracts so many shoppers perpetuates a vicious cycle that keeps workers and their families below the poverty line. Not only are the adult workers paid unfairly, but so-called “sweatshops” also bring in children to work, preventing them from attending school to receive a proper education, which in turn prevents them from obtaining a better job to escape poverty. Thus, in many places worldwide, this pattern of exploitation has continued on for generations. In terms of American history, there have been significant efforts made to increase safety in U.S. factories. This was largely triggered in response to the New York City Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire of 1911.The fire killed 146 employees and set the precedent for the creation of fire safety and building codes. Unfortunately, over a hundred years later, conditions have not improved in many factories around the world. Last April, a poorly constructed Bangladesh garment factory collapsed, taking over 1,100 lives and injuring another 2,000. Regrettably, many of the clothes made within the Rana Plaza building were intended for Western retailers. To this day, the 4,000 affected families are still waiting for compensation, while unsafe practices still continue in other nearby factories. What can we do to address these disturbing ethical issues? There are small changes shoppers can make in their purchases to help support the cause of the industry’s mistreated workers. One option is to purchase Fair Trade certified clothing. The Fair Trade organization advocates international labor rights enabling workers to be paid proper wages while additionally guaranteeing safe working

conditions. Fair Trade certified clothing in the U.S. is clearly marked with the logo below. Another way you can help is to resist the temptation to buy items that were likely made in factories with poor labor conditions. This may mean budgeting for higher quality brands, but these brands often have firm policies in place to prevent them from procuring garments from substandard or illegal sweatshops around the world. Take the time to research where clothing companies manufacture their garments and look into their policies on partnering with overseas factories. Websites such as “Labour Behind the Label” (available at: www.labourbehindthelabel. org) can provide details on those companies taking action to reduce and eliminate unacceptable manufacturing practices. A grading system is used to help easily identify the most compliant companies. By comparing companies and brands, you can feel better shopping for clothing that does not result from unsafe working conditions and unfathomably low wages. If your budget simply does not allow you to purchase higher quality brands that respect human rights, consider thrift shopping. Second-hand shopping will help chip away at the exploitation of workers in the fashion industry while being gentle on your wallet.Vintage will never go out of style so explore a local thrift shop where you can build a personalized wardrobe that is uniquely you! If you are feeling ambitious, you might even want to try your hand at sewing. This alternative not only eliminates any labor issues, but also ensures that your clothes will be one of a kind. One of the great things about clothes is how they make us feel inside, whether it is confident, sporty, sexy, flirty, serious, or casual. One thing it should never make us feel is guilty or sad. Every small step we take chips away at the unacceptable conditions for factory workers around the world. Thus, if you do decide to buy that tank top, at least make sure all the seams line up.

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It is one of those shows that gets you hooked immediately. And you do not have to be a fashionista to watch it. Add überjudges Heidi Klum, Michael Kors, and Nina Garcia along with man-about-town Tim Gunn and you’ve got a spicy recipe for success. It is no wonder then that Project Runway has just finished its twelfth season and is gearing up for number 13. While we know what a rush it is to watch, we wondered what it is like to experience the show firsthand working with often-quirky and sleepdeprived designers who compete for fashion spreads and a shot at Fashion Week in NYC. Thankfully, we were able to receive the inside scoop from the beautiful and talented, Alexandra Wynne, a professional designer and model competitor featured on Project Runway’s Season 10. Alex, as she likes to be called, shared her personal perspectives on Project Runway, working in the fashion industry, and life beyond modeling. Trim: Project Runway must have been a unique modeling job. What was that like? Wynne: Project Runway is a lot of fun, and it was nice to have consistent work throughout the summer. The other girls are a blast to hang out with and having 12 hour days meant you hung out a lot. The designers were super sweet and creative, also way more genuine than portrayed. The hair and make-up team are there to calm your nerves and make you laugh, and the judges seem more real and refreshing when met in person. They also care a whole lot more than you see on television about how hot your garment is or how bad your feet hurt during the judging. They often let you take breaks or a quick sip of water for a 4-hour judging. Trim: What were the most difficult parts about being a model on the show? Did you expect these challenges or did they come as a surprise? Wynne: I think the most difficult part about being on Project Runway, besides the 6 a.m. call times, was seeing the people you’d been spending countless hours with go home and knowing that they wouldn’t be back to have lunch with you the next episode. This, of course, is expected. The biggest unexpected challenge to overcome was realizing that your outfit was extremely difficult to walk in, too heavy, uncomfortable, or you would need to be sewn into it and having to figure out ways to rest your body or use the ladies room without moving. For instance, the second episode was the design challenge to make a garment out

of candy. Candy is very, very heavy and it’s sticky. It starts to just become so uncomfortable that all you can do is wish for it to be ripped off of your body after 3 hours, not 10. There were also times when shoes were shoved into your hand last minute, in the wrong size, and walking without tripping in front of Heidi Klum was all you could think of. Trim: Every model’s biggest fear seems to be tripping on the runway. Have you ever had any embarrassing moments like that during your career as a model? Wynne: Of course there are times when you can’t help but have your heel get caught in the hem of your gown, but all of my recoveries have been quick, painless, and virtually unnoticeable, so I can’t say I’ve had too many embarrassing moments. I guess one would be once when I wore a dress that literally required baby steps on the runway, so it took me forever to get to the end where I posed, turned, and then realized it was going to take me forever to get back. Trim: What was your favorite outfit that you had to wear on the show? Wynne: I had a few favorite outfits from the show that my designer Sonjai Williams created. The Michael Kors Challenge dress had to be my favorite by far. It was extremely comfortable, didn’t wrinkle so I could catch a catnap in it after lunch, and won the challenge. I absolutely love that dress and maybe some day Sonjai will make me another to keep. Trim: You built such a strong relationship with your designer. Was it hard to make friends with the other models on the show due to all of the intense competition? How did you handle the stress? Wynne: Pretty much all of us girls didn’t factor in “competition” during our season. We never had the opportunity for designers to switch models so we were pretty much set with our original designers. I am still very good friends with Sonjai and when you’re spending 12 hours every other day with the girls you pretty much enjoy cuddling up in the freezing waiting room watching a movie and gossiping about your boyfriends or latest roommate drama. I’m not a very stressful person, so I pretty much handled the stress by meditating or taking a quick nap… there is a lot of sleeping going on backstage.

Trim: Let’s talk about your life beyond Project Runway. Where are you from? Favorite color? Favorite food? We want to hear it all! Wynne: I grew up in the Midwest, being one of the first mixed babies born in Montana (along with my identical twin sister who does not model) and spent the most of my years in Indianapolis. Morgan is my twin sister and she’s the coolest person I know, maybe because I’ve known her forever, but no matter how far apart we are, since she lives in Seattle, we always manage to know what each other is thinking. My favorite color is blue, any shade, but I’m also super girly and all of my cases for electronics range from pink to purple. I grew up with my Korean and AfricanAmerican mother creating most of my meals, so Korean food, specifically Bulgogi is my favorite dish. My Caucasian (Southern Californian) father made a mean enchilada though, so that comes second best.  Trim: Where do you live currently? Wynne: I have lived in New York for almost seven years now and I haven’t made it past the Chelsea/Flower District, except for a few random months here and there in Paris and Miami. Trim: Without your seemingly close-knit family nearby, do you have any pets to keep you company? Wynne: Unfortunately, I do not have any pets. I left my Beta fish, Oscar Wilde, in Miami since you are not allowed to fly with fish, but my Instagram feed has countless puppies that belong to my amazing friends, who happily allow me to puppysit for numerous days. Trim: Do you have any hobbies for your spare time? Wynne: Recently I just started creating custom EL wire costumes for attendees of the amazing Burning Man Festival, so my primary hobby and now booming profession - is sewing and designing costumes for my amazing clients. I love spending time with my friends at various events across the city, many of which include jazz clubs, film screenings, music/art festivals (like Burning Lamb in Woodstock) or even going an hour outside of the city to Storm King, an amazing sculpture museum. Basically, my hobbies stem from art, film, music, travel and good company and I am fortunate enough to know some of the most creative and well-respected people in New York City and across the globe.


Trim: So when did you start modeling? Wynne: Funny enough, my first modeling gig was when I lived in Kansas at the ripe age of three or four. I didn’t officially start modeling as an actual profession until I moved to New York City. Trim: How did you decide you wanted to be a model? What or who inspired you? Wynne: I never actually decided I wanted to be a model; it has just become something that I thoroughly enjoy. It allows me to follow my passion for art, fashion, and film all while becoming an actual profession. My biggest inspirations in modeling are the incredibly talented people I meet through work. Not only can these people transform a person’s appearance, but they do it by combining talents with others to tell a story. Even my agents inspire me with their persistence and determination to make a simple girl into a known face. All around, the people I work with have so much more going on in their lives, whether it be owning restaurants, humanitarian work, auditioning for Broadway musicals, or dating someone completely outside of their background, each person I have met through this work has given me a taste of their life for my inspiration. Trim: What is your personal style like? Wynne: I attended the Fashion Institute of Technology, so I like to think that I actually have knowledge of style, which certainly helps in this profession! I am a strong believer in vintage stores, thrift shops, and second hand shops. If it’s been worn it has a history, kind of like one man’s garbage is another man’s treasure. I like the beauty behind that. Since it’s quite impractical to purchase everything vintage/second hand, I usually pair with something new and basic that is a classic. I love wearing skirts and dresses, and my style is feminine with a “cool factor” as a statement. I do appreciate designer labels, but mainly because they do have a quality of wear and tailoring that cannot be found in “cheaper” garments. I’m also blessed to have so many amazing friends who are talented designers in both the shoe and clothing industry, so I wear their designs on a normal basis. Trim: What is your favorite kind of shoot to do? Wynne: I love a shoot that usually results in a cool editorial, but some of my most favorite shoots end up being when a bunch of friends and I get together to collaborate a random

test here and there. Not only does it give us a chance to hang out, but also we get to give each other advice and feedback on the shots, which is harder to do when it’s not a group of people you know. I guess for me it’s more about the people you work with than the kind of shoot it is. Trim: So what is the biggest challenge of being a model? Wynne: I think the biggest challenge in being a model is determining a hobby or passion outside of modeling that you can focus on and that will hopefully lead to a profession when modeling is finished. I think so many people just pick modeling and when a shoot is over or a week is slow they dwell on the fact that there is nothing to do, and this happens a lot. I also think it’s challenging to compete with so many different options these days. With the introduction of social media, there are a lot more faces out there, and the number of people attending castings just keeps growing.  Trim: What is the biggest achievement you have reached in your modeling career thus far? Wynne: I don’t know whether or not I have a “biggest achievement” in my career. I have worked with some of the most talented photographers in the world, and I guess those are huge achievements. Of course being on Project Runway was a great achievement, but I think all around just being able to accept my defeats and accomplishments without reading too much into why or when is a huge achievement… if that makes any sense. Trim: What are your goals for the future? Wynne: While I love modeling and I would love to keep doing it until I’m older and doing things like low blood pressure prescription commercials, I am very eager to see where my costume design takes me. I’ve also started getting involved in some humanitarian work. A friend of mine has started Ayiti Boks a non-profit boxing gym for the displaced and unfortunate children, women and men of Haiti and I am eager to assist in the growth of this great endeavor. Modeling is such a beautiful profession and I thoroughly enjoy it, but my outside hobbies have just started to grow along with modeling. My ultimate goal is to be able to do all three things I believe strongly in while all around being content, if not extremely happy.


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STORY BY ALLY MANOLIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNIE POLLOCK DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE TRIM FALL/WINTER | 46


Q

ilo, a fashion company that produces one of a kind five-panel hats and accessories, presents limitless possibilities for Jerrell Chalmers, Michael Stein, Alex Babatunde, and Dean Flamio. The Rutgers students create eye-catching designs and turn out their products while maintaining the hectic schedule of the average student. Their five-panel hats, which are similar to snapbacks but with a more fitted style and slimming fit, have become Qilo’s ultimate claim to popularity. They are new, innovative, and classy, allowing a tighter fit to the head and a more structured look. Their most popular five-panel hat is detailed with small pineapples, which has become their recognizable symbol. Their goal was to choose an icon that would be young, fun, and happy, contrary to the urban gothic trends that have been taking over the fashion world. Along with their five-panels, the group has also created one-of-a-kind crowns, made of leather with a silk interior and come in a variety of colors. The line of crowns is labeled “Colin King,” named after the designer that has recently collaborated with Qilo to create these funky accessories. Chalmers knows the trials and tribulations of the risky fashion industry on a personal level. In 2012, he started a t-shirt company called “Thousand Miles” that generated quite a lot of online buzz and spread his shirts further than he ever expected. There was only one problem: the demand was intense and Chalmers could not find enough time to keep up with his fast spreading designs that were even getting attention overseas. Unfortunately, Chalmers was forced to say goodbye to making t-shirts in order to keep up with school and his personal life. When Stein, Babatunde, and Flamio heard about Chalmers’ troubles they wanted to help. Working together, the four young men started

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brainstorming ideas based on their different backgrounds and experiences. Inspiration blossomed and the creation of Qilo was in the works. Qilo, an ancient Chinese proverb, is derived from the measurement kilo, meaning thousand. “The journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step, and that was the single step that we took,” explained Chalmers. Their first designs dropped in fall of 2012 and it didn’t take long for their styles to find their way onto the heads of young adults across the map. On Rutgers Campus alone, the streets and hallways are always scattered with Qilo designs on both men and women, specifically their pineapple speckled five-panel hat. Their youth is their weapon of choice, because it gives them a head start that many designers don’t have. Babatunde explained that young age gives them an “edge of cuteness and edge of respect at the same time.” Being young has allowed them to make a name for themselves early in hopes of developing Qilo into something truly spectacular. “We are what is coming up next. We have so much time ahead of us,” Stein added. The group stressed the fact that they wish they had started even earlier. Balancing college and a personal life can be stressful on its own; add business management, marketing and design and the results are quite chaotic. The guys behind Qilo, however, have been working endlessly in an attempt to master the practice. Since they have launched their designs, the group has made sure to attend many events in New York City, such as the Diesel Launch Party, Mercedes Benz Fashion Week, Glamour Magazine mixers. They have also visited the Tumblr headquarters to get acquainted with professionals in the business. Although they claim that it hasn’t been easy to

find a balance, they have found a way to work their business hours into the only time slots left after classes, studying, and socializing. “Anything bad can happen at any moment, and anything good can happen at any moment. What makes it easy is the hunger, the drive,” Chalmers said. The hunger that Chalmers spoke of is the yearning and need to succeed in a business that is so sporadic. “There is no predictability and there is no security. There is only dealing with the things that pop up when they do,” added Stein. Being students at Rutgers University has given them the chance to let their name spread at a rapid pace. Word of mouth has allowed Qilo to become common knowledge to a large portion of the student body on the New Brunswick campus. Stein stressed that, “You never know who you’re going to meet or run into, whether it be at Brower dining hall, in class, or at the bus stops.You don’t know who they might be or who they might know.” Stein agreed adding, “I’m glad we can start here because you can be a big fish in a small pond. It’s much easier here at Rutgers to make a mark and be seen.” Although their business is currently stationed in New Brunswick, they see themselves selling their designs out of New York City in the future. The love and dedication that these young entrepreneurs have for their company is obvious. When asked for advice to other students their age trying to make an imprint in the fashion industry, they were all quick to throw out helpful hints. Chalmers said it’s important to “believe in yourself and in your dreams. Don’t underestimate your ideas.” Stein agreed, adding, “If you’re thinking about doing it and you’re truly dedicated, have the inspiration, and have the passion- do it. Just go for it.” As for Babatunde, his advice stems from not giving up when the going gets tough. “Even if you fail, always keep going at it. If you want to be an entrepreneur everything is not going to be perfect. Work towards your ultimate goal and work with the roadblocks that come your way.”


“There is no predictability and there is no security. There is only dealing with the things that pop up when they do�


A LOOK INTO THE WORLD OF STRENGTH STORY BY JAMES VICTORY ART DIRECTION & DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOVELLE TAMAYO

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o the strength athlete and the iron mind, the gym will always be there. It will be there when one is happy, sad, built up or broken. To some, the gym is a way to simply get in shape, or to blow off steam after a long day at work. However, in the mind of the weightlifter, or the powerlifter, the gym and the barbell are a way of life in and of themselves. Training and the challenges that accompany it from day to day and year to year embody the spirit with which to approach life itself. The lessons learned in the gym and under the bar are not restricted to just that one place. This is because the characteristics of patience, intensity, and mental fortitude are exemplified in the daily actions that stem from this endeavor and lifestyle choice. Yet, even within the strength community, different sports teach a slightly different dynamic, or a different attitude or approach.

WEIGHTLIFTING: Weightlifting is a sport consisting of the competition lifts of the snatch, and the clean and jerk. The goal of the snatch is to move the bar from the floor to overhead in one movement, while the clean and jerk is broken down into two movements. In weightlifting, the bar moves around you, and you around the bar. Therefore, weightlifting has a Zen all to itself. Technique in the snatch and in the clean and jerk require a highly technical approach compared to that of a normal gym lift, such as a squat or bench press. The lifts require flexibility, explosiveness, timing, precision, and complete awareness to complete effectively. In order to obtain these characteristics with the bar, it takes a significant amount of time and practice. Nick Occhipinti is a former Rutgers University graduate in exercise science with a focus in applied kinesiology, and biomechanical movement, and he is also a certified coach with USA Weightlifting. Occhipinti said, “Experts believe that it takes roughly ten thousand hours to become a master, roughly equating to ten years. It takes time to get these (the lifts) right, and it takes time to learn these skills under sub-maximal loads…these skills are continually refined.” Therefore, given the complexity of the competition lifts and the time it takes to learn them correctly, attention to detail is paramount to success. If an individual cannot maneuver into a certain position, or execute the lifts with correct technique, they will eventually become injured or never attain their potential. He further stated, “The first thing newcomers need is a lot of patience, there are many newcomers who see video footage of a famous lifter and think ‘wow I’ll go do what I’ve just seen in that YouTube video,’ but the fact is that these athletes have been lifting for many years. It’s the basics that are important, the squat, the press, and learning to become aware of your own body.” Because of the serious need to get the movements correct, it is important to find a qualified coach. Occhipinti said, “At Rutgers we have the power gym, and people who work there are always willing, able, and are going to help anyone who walks through the door that is in need of assistance.” While weightlifting is a highly technical sport that involves a great deal of patience, practice, time, and devotion, it is also a sport of great intensity. Speed and intensity provide the gas that makes the bar move. Occhipinti pointed out that, “Olympic Weightlifting is a balance between serenity and rage.You have to be amped up and have your adrenaline pumping but the mental clarity to complete the movements and hoist heavy weight overhead in a split second requires that clarity.”

POWERLIFTING: Compared to the zenful approach of weightlifting, powerlifting has more of a brute force type of flavor. Powerlifting is more essential, featuring the competition lifts of the squat, bench press, and deadlift. Technique is always at the forefront of big numbers, but volume of work, brute strength, and just burying the lifts also play a large role. More often than not, the individuals that participate in powerlifting have to be just a little bit crazy to get under such big weights. However, this perceived craziness is born of a great desire and passion for constant improvement in mind and body. The approach to powerlifting must be an objective one, similar to that of weightlifting. It takes experience and common sense to realize what sticking points there are for an individual and how to surpass them. Often these sticking points come and go because of new knowledge the lifter has discovered. When asked about the logical approach

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to weightlifting and powerlifting, Occhipinti revealed. “Lifting is extremely scientific and so much research has gone into it because of weightlifting in the Olympics, the popularity of powerlifting as a sport, and how beneficial the Olympic lifts are in sports performance. So when people apply this information to themselves they have to be very analytical and think about what they’re doing in terms of programming, periodization, and becoming in tune with their body. You’ll find that many lifters taking on the sport from a performance standpoint could give you a lesson in basic anatomy.” All of these steps are part of the process behind lifting and the objectiveness in the operation. It is this objectiveness, scientific approach, and logic that produces big numbers on the platform. When asked about his experience with powerlifters, and weightlifters, Rutgers University Vice President of the Weightlifting Club Dylan Wolff compared, “Weightlifters have to find the perfect mental state to fire their muscles at maximum capacity while executing the perfect motor pattern. Powerlifting has the luxury of much less intricate form, so while crucial, it does not demand the same focus and requires more of an insane sort of bravery to get under the weights they are moving mixed with absolute rage and aggression to overcome the weight.” This is the distinction that characterizes weightlifters and powerlifters. While similar, the two have their slight differences in technique and in attitude. Perhaps one of the more astounding facts about powerlifting is the emotional growth an individual experiences. Powerlifting is more than just being strong or having physical size, these things are the goal, but powerlifting is maturity, understanding, and humbleness. An iron mind is pervasive throughout all powerlifters that have a drive to become successful and lift mind-boggling weights.

The people that take part in strength sports such as weightlifting and powerlifting hold themselves to a higher caliber and live with purpose. Those that lift are nerds and are analytic through and through. The lifestyle is not an easy choice, and is often a path of most resistance (no pun intended). Lifters are often thinking ahead about what they need to do during the day and during the week. Training, meals, study time, and work must be planned or else success will not fall into place. “This (the lifestyle) takes up a large portion of your time; in the morning you think of everything you have to do in terms of school and work, but you realize you have to get to the gym and perform your movements. This changes the way you live your life, and you live for it. This is where mental fortitude comes into play,” states Occhipinti.

A PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: For me, lifting has been, and continues to be an enjoyable pursuit in my life. The weights have taught me, nurtured me, and made me a better person. The bar has taught me how to be committed, how to stay disciplined, and how to be mentally strong. I’ve come to realize that regardless of the challenges inside and out of the gym, I am accountable, and I am in control. Whether I am studying for an exam, reading, writing, editing, or lifting weights to prepare for a powerlifting meet, the same relentlessness will permeate all that I do.

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THIS CHANGES THE WAY YOU LIVE YOUR LIFE, AND YOU LIVE FOR IT. THIS IS WHERE MENTAL FORTITUDE COMES TO PLAY


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COUNTY, NJ, TOWN, ZIP PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOVELLE TAMAYO DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE

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MIDDLESEX,NJ,AVENEL,07001 HUDSON,NJ,BAYONNE,07002 ESSEX,NJ,BLOOMFIELD,07003 ESSEX,NJ,FAIRFIELD,07004 ESSEX,NJ,CALDWELL,07006 ESSEX,NJ,CALDWELL,07007 MIDDLESEX,NJ,CARTERET,07008 ESSEX,NJ,CEDAR GROVE,07009 BERGEN,NJ,CLIFFSIDE PARK,07010 UNION,NJ,CRANFORD,07016 ESSEX,NJ,EAST ORANGE,07017 ESSEX,NJ,EAST ORANGE,07018 ESSEX,NJ,EAST ORANGE,07019 BERGEN,NJ,EDGEWATER,07020 ESSEX,NJ,ESSEX FELLS,07021 BERGEN,NJ,FAIRVIEW,07022 UNION,NJ,FANWOOD,07023 BERGEN,NJ,FORT LEE,07024 BERGEN,NJ,GARFIELD,07026 UNION,NJ,GARWOOD,07027 ESSEX,NJ,GLEN RIDGE,07028 HUDSON,NJ,HARRISON,07029 HUDSON,NJ,HOBOKEN,07030 BERGEN,NJ,NORTH ARLINGTON,07031 HUDSON,NJ,KEARNY,07032 UNION,NJ,KENILWORTH,07033 UNION,NJ,LINDEN,07036 ESSEX,NJ,LIVINGSTON,07039 ESSEX,NJ,MAPLEWOOD,07040 ESSEX,NJ,MILLBURN,07041 ESSEX,NJ,MONTCLAIR,07042 ESSEX,NJ,MONTCLAIR,07043 ESSEX,NJ,VERONA,07044 HUDSON,NJ,NORTH BERGEN,07047 ESSEX,NJ,ORANGE,07050 ESSEX,NJ,ORANGE,07051 ESSEX,NJ,WEST ORANGE,07052 BERGEN,NJ,WALLINGTON,07057

SOMERSET,NJ,WARREN,07059 UNION,NJ,PLAINFIELD,07060 UNION,NJ,PLAINFIELD,07061 UNION,NJ,PLAINFIELD,07062 UNION,NJ,PLAINFIELD,07063 MIDDLESEX,NJ,PORT READING,07064 UNION,NJ,RAHWAY,07065 UNION,NJ,CLARK,07066 MIDDLESEX,NJ,COLONIA,07067 ESSEX,NJ,ROSELAND,07068 SOMERSET,NJ,WATCHUNG,07069 BERGEN,NJ,RUTHERFORD,07070 BERGEN,NJ,LYNDHURST,07071 BERGEN,NJ,CARLSTADT,07072 BERGEN,NJ,EAST RUTHERFORD,07073 BERGEN,NJ,MOONACHIE,07074 BERGEN,NJ,WOOD RIDGE,07075 UNION,NJ,SCOTCH PLAINS,07076 MIDDLESEX,NJ,SEWAREN,07077 ESSEX,NJ,SHORT HILLS,07078 ESSEX,NJ,SOUTH ORANGE,07079 MIDDLESEX,NJ,SOUTH PLAINFIELD,07080 UNION,NJ,SPRINGFIELD,07081 UNION,NJ,UNION,07083 HUDSON,NJ,WEEHAWKEN,07086 HUDSON,NJ,UNION CITY,07087 UNION,NJ,VAUXHALL,07088 UNION,NJ,WESTFIELD,07090 UNION,NJ,WESTFIELD,07091 UNION,NJ,MOUNTAINSIDE,07092 HUDSON,NJ,WEST NEW YORK,07093 HUDSON,NJ,SECAUCUS,07094 MIDDLESEX,NJ,WOODBRIDGE,07095 HUDSON,NJ,SECAUCUS,07096 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07097 HUDSON,NJ,KEARNY,07099 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07101 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07102

ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07103 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07104 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07105 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07106 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07107 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07108 ESSEX,NJ,BELLEVILLE,07109 ESSEX,NJ,NUTLEY,07110 ESSEX,NJ,IRVINGTON,07111 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07112 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07114 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07175 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07184 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07188 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07189 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07191 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07192 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07193 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07195 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07198 ESSEX,NJ,NEWARK,07199 UNION,NJ,ELIZABETH,07201 UNION,NJ,ELIZABETH,07202 UNION,NJ,ROSELLE,07203 UNION,NJ,ROSELLE PARK,07204 UNION,NJ,HILLSIDE,07205 UNION,NJ,ELIZABETHPORT,07206 UNION,NJ,ELIZABETH,07207 UNION,NJ,ELIZABETH,07208 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07302 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07303 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07304 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07305 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07306 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07307 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07308 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07310 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07311

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HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07395 HUDSON,NJ,JERSEY CITY,07399 BERGEN,NJ,ALLENDALE,07401 BERGEN,NJ,ELMWOOD PARK,07407 BERGEN,NJ,FAIR LAWN,07410 BERGEN,NJ,FRANKLIN LAKES,07417 BERGEN,NJ,HO HO KUS,07423 BERGEN,NJ,MAHWAH,07430 BERGEN,NJ,MIDLAND PARK,07432 BERGEN,NJ,OAKLAND,07436 BERGEN,NJ,RAMSEY,07446 BERGEN,NJ,RIDGEWOOD,07450 BERGEN,NJ,RIDGEWOOD,07451 BERGEN,NJ,GLEN ROCK,07452 BERGEN,NJ,SADDLE RIVER,07458 BERGEN,NJ,WALDWICK,07463 BERGEN,NJ,WYCKOFF,07481 BERGEN,NJ,MAHWAH,07495 BERGEN,NJ,HACKENSACK,07601 BERGEN,NJ,HACKENSACK,07602 BERGEN,NJ,BOGOTA,07603 BERGEN,NJ,HASBROUCK HEIGHTS,07604 BERGEN,NJ,LEONIA,07605 BERGEN,NJ,SOUTH HACKENSACK,07606 BERGEN,NJ,MAYWOOD,07607 BERGEN,NJ,TETERBORO,07608 BERGEN,NJ,ALPINE,07620 BERGEN,NJ,BERGENFIELD,07621 BERGEN,NJ,CLOSTER,07624 BERGEN,NJ,CRESSKILL,07626 BERGEN,NJ,DEMAREST,07627 BERGEN,NJ,DUMONT,07628 BERGEN,NJ,EMERSON,07630 BERGEN,NJ,ENGLEWOOD,07631 BERGEN,NJ,ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS,07632 BERGEN,NJ,HARRINGTON PARK,07640 BERGEN,NJ,HAWORTH,07641 BERGEN,NJ,HILLSDALE,07642 BERGEN,NJ,LITTLE FERRY,07643 BERGEN,NJ,LODI,07644 BERGEN,NJ,MONTVALE,07645 BERGEN,NJ,NEW MILFORD,07646 BERGEN,NJ,NORTHVALE,07647 BERGEN,NJ,NORWOOD,07648 BERGEN,NJ,ORADELL,07649 BERGEN,NJ,PALISADES PARK,07650 BERGEN,NJ,PARAMUS,07652 BERGEN,NJ,PARAMUS,07653 BERGEN,NJ,PARK RIDGE,07656 BERGEN,NJ,RIDGEFIELD,07657 BERGEN,NJ,RIDGEFIELD PARK,07660 BERGEN,NJ,RIVER EDGE,07661 BERGEN,NJ,ROCHELLE PARK,07662 BERGEN,NJ,SADDLE BROOK,07663 BERGEN,NJ,TEANECK,07666 BERGEN,NJ,TENAFLY,07670 BERGEN,NJ,WESTWOOD,07675 BERGEN,NJ,TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON,07676 BERGEN,NJ,WOODCLIFF LAKE,07677 BERGEN,NJ,TETERBORO,07699 MONMOUTH,NJ,RED BANK,07701 MONMOUTH,NJ,SHREWSBURY,07702 MONMOUTH,NJ,FORT MONMOUTH,07703 MONMOUTH,NJ,FAIR HAVEN,07704

57 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


MONMOUTH,NJ,RED BANK,07709 MONMOUTH,NJ,ADELPHIA,07710 MONMOUTH,NJ,ALLENHURST,07711 MONMOUTH,NJ,ASBURY PARK,07712 MONMOUTH,NJ,BELMAR,07715 MONMOUTH,NJ,ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS,07716 MONMOUTH,NJ,AVON BY THE SEA,07717 MONMOUTH,NJ,BELFORD,07718 MONMOUTH,NJ,BELMAR,07719 MONMOUTH,NJ,BRADLEY BEACH,07720 MONMOUTH,NJ,CLIFFWOOD,07721 MONMOUTH,NJ,COLTS NECK,07722 MONMOUTH,NJ,DEAL,07723 MONMOUTH,NJ,EATONTOWN,07724 MONMOUTH,NJ,ENGLISHTOWN,07726 MONMOUTH,NJ,FARMINGDALE,07727 MONMOUTH,NJ,FREEHOLD,07728 MONMOUTH,NJ,HAZLET,07730 MONMOUTH,NJ,HOWELL,07731 MONMOUTH,NJ,HIGHLANDS,07732 MONMOUTH,NJ,HOLMDEL,07733 MONMOUTH,NJ,KEANSBURG,07734

MONMOUTH,NJ,KEYPORT,07735 MONMOUTH,NJ,LEONARDO,07737 MONMOUTH,NJ,LINCROFT,07738 MONMOUTH,NJ,LITTLE SILVER,07739 MONMOUTH,NJ,LONG BRANCH,07740 MONMOUTH,NJ,MARLBORO,07746 MONMOUTH,NJ,MATAWAN,07747 MONMOUTH,NJ,MIDDLETOWN,07748 MONMOUTH,NJ,MONMOUTH BEACH,07750 MONMOUTH,NJ,MORGANVILLE,07751 MONMOUTH,NJ,NAVESINK,07752 MONMOUTH,NJ,NEPTUNE,07753 MONMOUTH,NJ,NEPTUNE,07754 MONMOUTH,NJ,OAKHURST,07755 MONMOUTH,NJ,OCEAN GROVE,07756 MONMOUTH,NJ,OCEANPORT,07757 MONMOUTH,NJ,PORT MONMOUTH,07758 MONMOUTH,NJ,RUMSON,07760 MONMOUTH,NJ,SPRING LAKE,07762 MONMOUTH,NJ,TENNENT,07763 MONMOUTH,NJ,WEST LONG BRANCH,07764 MONMOUTH,NJ,WICKATUNK,07765

MONMOUTH,NJ,EATONTOWN,07799 UNION,NJ,SUMMIT,07901 UNION,NJ,SUMMIT,07902 SOMERSET,NJ,BASKING RIDGE,07920 SOMERSET,NJ,BEDMINSTER,07921 UNION,NJ,BERKELEY HEIGHTS,07922 SOMERSET,NJ,BERNARDSVILLE,07924 SOMERSET,NJ,FAR HILLS,07931 SOMERSET,NJ,GLADSTONE,07934 SOMERSET,NJ,LIBERTY CORNER,07938 SOMERSET,NJ,LYONS,07939 UNION,NJ,NEW PROVIDENCE,07974 SOMERSET,NJ,PEAPACK,07977 SOMERSET,NJ,PLUCKEMIN,07978 OCEAN,NJ,BARNEGAT,08005 OCEAN,NJ,BARNEGAT LIGHT,08006 OCEAN,NJ,BEACH HAVEN,08008 ATLANTIC,NJ,HAMMONTON,08037 OCEAN,NJ,MANAHAWKIN,08050 OCEAN,NJ,TUCKERTON,08087 OCEAN,NJ,WEST CREEK,08092 ATLANTIC,NJ,ABSECON,08201

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CAPE MAY,NJ,AVALON,08202 ATLANTIC,NJ,BRIGANTINE,08203 CAPE MAY,NJ,CAPE MAY,08204 ATLANTIC,NJ,ABSECON,08205 CAPE MAY,NJ,CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE,08210 CAPE MAY,NJ,CAPE MAY POINT,08212 ATLANTIC,NJ,COLOGNE,08213 CAPE MAY,NJ,DENNISVILLE,08214 ATLANTIC,NJ,EGG HARBOR CITY,08215 ATLANTIC,NJ,ELWOOD,08217 CAPE MAY,NJ,GOSHEN,08218 CAPE MAY,NJ,GREEN CREEK,08219 ATLANTIC,NJ,LEEDS POINT,08220 ATLANTIC,NJ,LINWOOD,08221 CAPE MAY,NJ,MARMORA,08223 ATLANTIC,NJ,NORTHFIELD,08225 CAPE MAY,NJ,OCEAN CITY,08226 CAPE MAY,NJ,OCEAN VIEW,08230 ATLANTIC,NJ,OCEANVILLE,08231 ATLANTIC,NJ,PLEASANTVILLE,08232 ATLANTIC,NJ,EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP,08234 ATLANTIC,NJ,POMONA,08240 ATLANTIC,NJ,PORT REPUBLIC,08241 CAPE MAY,NJ,RIO GRANDE,08242 CAPE MAY,NJ,SEA ISLE CITY,08243 ATLANTIC,NJ,SOMERS POINT,08244 CAPE MAY,NJ,SOUTH DENNIS,08245 CAPE MAY,NJ,SOUTH SEAVILLE,08246 CAPE MAY,NJ,STONE HARBOR,08247 CAPE MAY,NJ,STRATHMERE,08248 CAPE MAY,NJ,TUCKAHOE,08250 CAPE MAY,NJ,VILLAS,08251 CAPE MAY,NJ,WHITESBORO,08252 CAPE MAY,NJ,WILDWOOD,08260 CAPE MAY,NJ,WOODBINE,08270 ATLANTIC,NJ,BUENA,08310 ATLANTIC,NJ,DOROTHY,08317 ATLANTIC,NJ,ESTELL MANOR,08319 ATLANTIC,NJ,LANDISVILLE,08326 ATLANTIC,NJ,MAYS LANDING,08330 ATLANTIC,NJ,MILMAY,08340 ATLANTIC,NJ,MINOTOLA,08341 ATLANTIC,NJ,MIZPAH,08342 ATLANTIC,NJ,NEWTONVILLE,08346 ATLANTIC,NJ,RICHLAND,08350 ATLANTIC,NJ,ATLANTIC CITY,08401 ATLANTIC,NJ,MARGATE CITY,08402 ATLANTIC,NJ,LONGPORT,08403

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ATLANTIC,NJ,ATLANTIC CITY,08404 ATLANTIC,NJ,ATLANTIC CITY,08405 ATLANTIC,NJ,VENTNOR CITY,08406 MONMOUTH,NJ,ALLENTOWN,08501 SOMERSET,NJ,BELLE MEAD,08502 SOMERSET,NJ,BLAWENBURG,08504 MONMOUTH,NJ,MILLSTONE TOWNSHIP,08510 MIDDLESEX,NJ,CRANBURY,08512 MONMOUTH,NJ,CREAM RIDGE,08514 MONMOUTH,NJ,IMLAYSTOWN,08526 OCEAN,NJ,JACKSON,08527 SOMERSET,NJ,KINGSTON,08528 OCEAN,NJ,NEW EGYPT,08533 MONMOUTH,NJ,MILLSTONE TOWNSHIP,08535 MIDDLESEX,NJ,PLAINSBORO,08536 SOMERSET,NJ,ROCKY HILL,08553 MONMOUTH,NJ,ROOSEVELT,08555 SOMERSET,NJ,SKILLMAN,08558 OCEAN,NJ,LAKEWOOD,08701 MONMOUTH,NJ,ALLENWOOD,08720 OCEAN,NJ,BAYVILLE,08721 OCEAN,NJ,BEACHWOOD,08722 OCEAN,NJ,BRICK,08723 OCEAN,NJ,BRICK,08724 MONMOUTH,NJ,BRIELLE,08730 OCEAN,NJ,FORKED RIVER,08731 OCEAN,NJ,ISLAND HEIGHTS,08732 OCEAN,NJ,LAKEHURST,08733 OCEAN,NJ,LANOKA HARBOR,08734 OCEAN,NJ,LAVALLETTE,08735 MONMOUTH,NJ,MANASQUAN,08736 OCEAN,NJ,MANTOLOKING,08738 OCEAN,NJ,NORMANDY BEACH,08739 OCEAN,NJ,OCEAN GATE,08740 OCEAN,NJ,PINE BEACH,08741 OCEAN,NJ,POINT PLEASANT BEACH,08742 MONMOUTH,NJ,SEA GIRT,08750 OCEAN,NJ,SEASIDE HEIGHTS,08751 OCEAN,NJ,SEASIDE PARK,08752 OCEAN,NJ,TOMS RIVER,08753 OCEAN,NJ,TOMS RIVER,08754 OCEAN,NJ,TOMS RIVER,08755 OCEAN,NJ,TOMS RIVER,08756 OCEAN,NJ,TOMS RIVER,08757 OCEAN,NJ,WARETOWN,08758 OCEAN,NJ,MANCHESTER TOWNSHIP,08759 SOMERSET,NJ,BOUND BROOK,08805 SOMERSET,NJ,BRIDGEWATER,08807

MIDDLESEX,NJ,DAYTON,08810 MIDDLESEX,NJ,DUNELLEN,08812 MIDDLESEX,NJ,EAST BRUNSWICK,08816 MIDDLESEX,NJ,EDISON,08817 MIDDLESEX,NJ,EDISON,08818 MIDDLESEX,NJ,EDISON,08820 SOMERSET,NJ,FLAGTOWN,08821 SOMERSET,NJ,FRANKLIN PARK,08823 MIDDLESEX,NJ,KENDALL PARK,08824 MIDDLESEX,NJ,HELMETTA,08828 MIDDLESEX,NJ,ISELIN,08830 MIDDLESEX,NJ,MONROE TOWNSHIP,08831 MIDDLESEX,NJ,KEASBEY,08832 SOMERSET,NJ,MANVILLE,08835 SOMERSET,NJ,MARTINSVILLE,08836 MIDDLESEX,NJ,EDISON,08837 MIDDLESEX,NJ,METUCHEN,08840 SOMERSET,NJ,HILLSBOROUGH,08844 MIDDLESEX,NJ,MIDDLESEX,08846 MIDDLESEX,NJ,MILLTOWN,08850 MIDDLESEX,NJ,MONMOUTH JUNCTION,08852 SOMERSET,NJ,NESHANIC STATION,08853 MIDDLESEX,NJ,PISCATAWAY,08854 MIDDLESEX,NJ,PISCATAWAY,08855 MIDDLESEX,NJ,OLD BRIDGE,08857 MIDDLESEX,NJ,PARLIN,08859 MIDDLESEX,NJ,PERTH AMBOY,08861 MIDDLESEX,NJ,PERTH AMBOY,08862 MIDDLESEX,NJ,FORDS,08863 SOMERSET,NJ,RARITAN,08869 MIDDLESEX,NJ,SAYREVILLE,08871 MIDDLESEX,NJ,SAYREVILLE,08872 SOMERSET,NJ,SOMERSET,08873 SOMERSET,NJ,SOMERSET,08875 SOMERSET,NJ,SOMERVILLE,08876 MIDDLESEX,NJ,SOUTH AMBOY,08879 SOMERSET,NJ,SOUTH BOUND BROOK,08880 MIDDLESEX,NJ,SOUTH RIVER,08882 MIDDLESEX,NJ,SPOTSWOOD,08884 SOMERSET,NJ,ZAREPHATH,08890 MIDDLESEX,NJ,EDISON,08899 MIDDLESEX,NJ,NEW BRUNSWICK,08901 MIDDLESEX,NJ,NORTH BRUNSWICK,08902 MIDDLESEX,NJ,NEW BRUNSWICK,08903 MIDDLESEX,NJ,HIGHLAND PARK,08904 MIDDLESEX,NJ,NEW BRUNSWICK,08906 MIDDLESEX,NJ,NEW BRUNSWICK,08933 MIDDLESEX,NJ,NEW BRUNSWICK,08989


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L U N AT E STYLING BY MJ TREVENS A C C E S S O R I E S B Y S A LT Y F OX H A I R & M A K E U P B Y K A T E LY N M C G I N N D E S I G N BY A DA M LOW E PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAUREN NESTER

61 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


TANGO IN THE NIGHT NECKLACE $298.00 LUNA RING $144.00 MOONSHINE RING- GOLD $95.00 ESTA NOCHE BRACELET $88.00 MANY MOONS BRACELET $118.00

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AT DAWN NECKLACE $118.00

63 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


SOLEIL NECKLACE $138.00 SWING SHIFT EARRINGS $88.00 LUNA RING $144.00 MOONSHINE RING- GOLD $95.00 SOLSTICE STACKER SET $210.00

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MOONSHINE RING- GOLD $95.00 LUNA NECKLACE- BRASS $88.00 AFTER MIDNIGHT NECKLACE $110.00 NOCTURNAL NECKLACE $110.00 RISING SIGN BANGLE - ANTIQUE GOLD $118.00

65 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


MOONSHINE RING- GOLD $95.00 SOLSTICE STACKER RING- GOLD $78.00 LUNA RING $144.00

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HAIR & MAKEUP BY CHRISTINA NICOLE ST YLING BY NATALIE AND ALANNA DESIGN BY ADAM LOWE PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAYMOND CROFT FASHION DIRECTION BY MICHELLE KIM FASHION ASSISTANCE BY TATIANA VICKERIE

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LET US DESIGN IT!

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Hasty Acres Photography by Lauren Nester, Design by Adam Lowe, Styling by Kathryn Rambo, Fashion Direction by Michelle Kim, Hair & Makeup by Gabrielle Padilla

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$15 The Eyebrow Sunglasses

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$25 Eyelid Sunglasses

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$25 Steampunk Leather Sunglasses

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STYLING BY MJ TREVENS & LAUREN HODGES STYLING ASSISTANCE BY KEI FURUICHI PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAUREN NESTER & JILLIAN SOLLAZZO MAKEUP BY KODO NISHINURA DESIGN & ILLUSTRATION BY ADAM LOWE HAIR BY SAYO TAKEGAMI 85 | TRIM FALL/WINTER


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Trim Magazine Fall/Winter 2013  

Trim Magazine Fall/Winter 2013 Issue

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