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IMPACT REPORT

Trident United Way

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GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.

MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT & BOARD CHAIR

Our Mission Trident United Way is a catalyst for measurable community transformation through collective impact in education, financial stability and health.

Our Vision Our Tri-County region is extraordinary! It is engaged, inclusive and thriving, and demands a high-quality educational system and economic conditions to eliminate the cycle of poverty, inspire graduation and foster lifelong good health. All residents achieve their highest potential. Individuals, organizations and institutions are aligned and commit their human and financial resources to ensure this quality of life.

This year, Trident United Way’s (TUW) Impact Report includes community impact and finance reporting for financial year 2015–2016. It reflects back on what we accomplished and highlights our current and future efforts to build a stronger community. Because of your personal investment, Trident United Way and its network of community partners were able to impact the lives of approximately 150,000 individuals during 2015–2016. With your investment, we are working to create bold community change by strengthening the education, financial stability and health of individuals and families in our community. When young adults graduate from high school, we know they will earn 43 percent more than their non-graduate peers.* When our neighbors are better educated and financially stable, they have the means to obtain and take advantage of needed healthcare, provide their families with nutritious food and live in safe and healthy homes.** We recognize these ‘building blocks’ are deeply interconnected and we recognize that it takes us all working together to build a better foundation for individual and community prosperity. As you read our report, you see how we are making a measurable and long-lasting impact. The stories you will see featured are just a few of the many examples of how TUW is working to strengthen partnerships, improve systems and build capacity to change lives and help our neighbors fulfill their hopes and do better for themselves.

100% 100% of your donation directed to TRIDENT UNITED WAY HELPS PEOPLE IN OUR COMMUNITY.

You will also encounter features highlighting new, emerging work in each of our impact areas. We have included examples of how we fulfill our varied roles as a community connector, strategic partner, volunteer engager and funder as we make good on our commitment to bring partners together to affect bold community change. We thank you for entrusting your time, talent and treasure to TUW. With your support, we are able to help neighbors like Rhayden, James and Leslie – all featured on the following pages – gain hope and chart a path for a better future. We know that working together is the most efficient way to solve complex community issues. As we look back at our collective successes, we are also looking ahead to build a brighter future. Together…we will get it right.

0% of your donation GOES TO FUNDRAISING AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS OR GOES TO NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS,

GUARANTEED.

Chris Kerrigan President and CEO, Trident United Way

Ed Rose Board Chair, Trident United Way

*The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, Ending the silent epidemic: A Blueprint to Address America’s High school Dropout Crisis, 2008. **Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Commission to Build a Healthier America, Education Matters for Health, Issue Brief 6: Education and Health, 2009.


OUR DIRECTION Trident United Way is proud to work with all its donors, partners and volunteers. Your commitment and contributions make a positive difference in people’s lives through education, financial stability and health in the Tri-County region. Our collaborative efforts are more than simply philanthropic – they are also strategic and data-driven. We know that the MORE educated, financially stable and healthy individuals are, the MORE our communities benefit. Our ‘More-is-More’ approach gives everyone involved the opportunity to unite and make real strides in creating lasting change right here at home.

WHO WE ARE A COMMUNITY CONNECTOR • A STRATEGIC PARTNER • A VOLUNTEER ENGAGER • A FUNDER

Success in life often depends on a solid foundation built upon education, financial stability and good health. Keep reading to see how adding building blocks to the sturdy foundation can help the tower grow taller…

FY 2015–2016

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REAL RESULTS EDUCATION FINANCIAL STABILITY HEALTH

4,075 CHILDREN

1,443 STUDENTS

received services to support learning in and out of school through 16 of Trident United Way’s (TUW) funded programs* *Includes Links and non-Links funded partners

453 individuals completed WorkKeys, GED or other technical/higher education

through nine funded programs

received weekend food assistance and mental health services through TUW’s Links to Success Initiative

PROSPERITY CENTERS

Berkeley County Dorchester County

2,683 individuals received financial stability services in the Prosperity Centers

287 individuals obtained employment

with the help of eight funded programs

14,697 individuals

received health services with the help of 12 funded programs 2

215 individuals obtained employment with the help of the Prosperity Centers

$742,000

in estimated economic impact for the Tri-County region through tax filings in the Prosperity Centers*

*Calculations based on estimated $461,000 in refunds plus $281,000 in waived preparers’ fees from 1,047 returns filed during 2016 tax season.

FY 2015–2016


COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS SC THRIVE–THE BENEFIT BANK

The Benefit Bank is a web-based system that allows counselors to help clients apply for multiple resources in a single interview.

2,420

$1,997,914

FREE State and Federal

received in refunds through filings at

tax returns completed

approximately 40 sites in the Tri-County area

CharityTracker

A free system for communication and coordination between service providers

$1,110,741 in monetary assistance

8,454

applications for financial assistance completed through the Benefit Bank Application Tool

2-1-1 HELPLINE

A one-stop resource for finding assistance in the Tri-County area

14,043 total cases were assisted

32,810 calls

13,390 households with a total of 27,638 members were assisted

139,065 referrals TUW PARTNERS

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

FAITH BASED

4.25 average referrals per call

6,005 Day of Caring participants for 2016 including volunteers, agency and TUW staff Day of Caring 2016 provided $553,868 in in-kind volunteer labor to the community* *Amount calculated using the SC volunteer hourly rate as determined by Independent Sector and the number of volunteer hours.

FY 2015–2016

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EDUCATION

RHAYDEN’S STORY

From ‘Learning to Read’ to ‘Reading to Learn’ When you meet Rhayden, a sixth grader at Morningside Middle School, you would never guess that his fourth grade teacher described him as quiet and introverted. With individualized support from Communities in Schools (CIS), a Trident United Way (TUW) funded partner, Rhayden’s reading level improved by a grade and a half in two years. His confidence has soared as a result, helping him make the transition to middle school. Born premature and underweight, Rhayden’s mother Charis describes her son as playing catch up both physically and academically ever since. Shy and hesitant to socialize with his classmates at Burns Elementary School, he was also reluctant to read in class and often felt discouraged with his schoolwork. In third grade, CIS Student Support Specialist Ms. Sacco stepped in after overhearing Rhayden’s younger brother worrying over his broken shoe in the car pickup line. She introduced herself to Rhayden’s family and outlined the different kinds of services CIS and other TUW partners could provide, including basic needs, bill assistance and academic supports for Rhayden. Ms. Sacco is an in-demand resource who manages a caseload of more than 40 students in a school where all 400 could easily benefit from assistance and resources. Despite her workload, she knows every child’s name and develops personal connections with each of them. In addition to enrolling Rhayden in resource services to improve his reading and writing skills, Ms. Sacco also paired him with a Lunch Buddy. He joined a social skills group to help improve his self-esteem. “Before, Rhayden wanted to quit, but now he is confident and wants to read,” Charis explains. “It is thanks to the supports he received he was middle school-ready.” While Rhayden still faces challenges as he continues to close the gap in his reading skills, his smile illustrates the confidence he has as he moves forward in school and prepares for a productive future.

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Trident United Way was able to help CIS provide academic support to 327 students in 10 schools in the 2015–2016 school year.


KINDERGARTEN READINESS

Ready Children

=

Ready Communities

+

EDUCATION: EMERGING EFFORTS Ready Services

+

Ready Schools

+

Ready Families

Graphic borrowed from Charleston Regional Business Journal

By Spring 2016, nearly

1-in-3 kindergartners

Visit www.tricountycradletocareer.org to view Regional Education Report: Chapter 3.

did not meet the reading benchmarks students are expected to meet by the

end of kindergarten and start of 1st grade. *

PURPOSE In partnership with Tri-County Cradle to Career Collaborative (TCCC), Trident United Way (TUW) is facilitating the Kindergarten Readiness Network aligning community partners and volunteers committed to ensuring every child has the skills needed to succeed in Kindergarten. WHAT WE ARE DOING ABOUT IT ⚫⚫TUW is developing a three-to-five-year strategic framework that will promote systems supporting the whole child through focused strategies for families and caregivers, early childhood practitioners and communities. ⚫⚫The Kindergarten Readiness Guiding Team leads catalytic projects that support resource hubs, such as physical locations and networks of access as well as home visitation programs for families with infants. *“During the 2015-2016 school year, teachers assessed Kindergarten students on key elements of early reading using the Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA 2.) (TCCC Chapter 3 Report.) “The DRA 2 is an individualized reading assessment that enables teachers to systematically observe, record, and evaluate changes in student’s reading performance over time.” (South Carolina Department of Education. DRA 2+ Training, Slide 4, Aug. 04, 2015, available at http://ed.sc.gov/scdoe/assets/File/instruction/early-learning-literacy/SC_DRA_Training_Presentation_August_2015.pdf) Note: The data provided is based on the first year of administering the DRA 2 and may be affected by test administration protocols.

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FINANCIAL STABILITY

JAMES’ STORY The Ambition to Thrive The relationship between Trident United Way’s (TUW) Shakelia LeBlanc, coordinator of the Berkeley County Prosperity Center, and her clients always begins with a conversation. Most individuals who walk through the center’s doors are initially looking for help with a basic need like food or clothing. Oftentimes, a combination of circumstances present numerous challenges and make it difficult for them to succeed. While working with other area nonprofits at the center to address immediate needs first, LeBlanc also engages in a broader conversation to help clients envision a path to a more stable future. “Once you start a conversation, people will begin to share more details about what’s going on in their lives,” she said. “It’s not usually a one-time fix. People often need to come back and we’ll continue to help them along their journey until they get to where they can be stable.” James has seen firsthand how establishing a long-term plan can set a person up for success. After losing his job and having his car repossessed, James felt he had hit rock bottom. Encouraged by a former colleague, he visited the Prosperity Center where LeBlanc and other center collaborators were able to assist with basic needs by finding temporary housing, prescription aid and car assistance. LeBlanc also helped James create a resume and apply for jobs. “I was going to give up,” James remembers. “The Prosperity Center gave me hope; they gave me encouragement and they strengthened my faith. I have ambition and I want to get things done because people took the time to help me.” Thanks to the collaboration of Trident United Way and other Prosperity Center partners, James has moved from survival mode into self-sufficiency with a full-time position and permanent housing. James continues to visit the Prosperity Center on a regular basis to serve as a source of encouragement and guidance for others who are beginning their journey there.

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James is one of 2,683 people who visited one of the two centers in Berkeley and Dorchester counties in FY 2015–2016.


$10.96

IO

1 Adult

1 Adult + 1 Preschooler

1 Adult + 1 Preschooler + 1 School-age

2 Adults + 1 Preschooler + 1 School-age

HOURLY WAGE TO BE SELF-SUFFICIENT varies by family type

7C HILD C A R E

$12.35

(per adult)

Expenses = $3,975 per month

86

$21.35

3 $ 5 3 AT RT TRANSPO

$18.20

$486 HE AL

Tri-County Estimate*

TH

$919 HO U

NG SI

THE SELF-SUFFICIENCY STANDARD

$361 MISC

$

N

$80

9 FOOD

FINANCIAL STABILITY: EMERGING EFFORTS Visit www.uwasc.org/ scstandard to view the full report.

2 ADULTS + 1 PRESCHOOLER + 1 SCHOOL-AGE Housing and child care typically account for half of the family budget

PURPOSE The Self-Sufficiency Standard (The Standard) presents, analyzes and calculates, based on family composition, how much income a family must earn, in any given place, to meet their basic needs without public or private assistance. The Standard assumes that all adults work full time and includes costs associated with employment as well as the net effect of taxes and tax credits. It also takes into account variations of region, family size and composition as well as age of children and the fact that various costs increase at different rates over time. WHAT WE ARE DOING ABOUT IT ⚫⚫Trident United Way (TUW) is working with nonprofits in the Tri-County area to create a universal application of The Standard as a tool for service delivery and to inform quality improvements for program managers by using it to evaluate financial stability programs’ effectiveness. ⚫⚫TUW will use The Standard as a tool to create and track paths to self-sufficiency in its Prosperity Centers.

*All values are estimated values for the Tri-County area based on the mean of the self-sufficiency totals for Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties.

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HEALTH

LESLIE’S STORY

Springboarding to Self-Sufficiency with a Smile With few exceptions, individuals navigating a crisis face several challenges at once. Working with its partners, Trident United Way (TUW) invests in comprehensive approaches designed to address challenges on multiple fronts. At the heart of this work is understanding about the interconnectivity between education, financial stability and health, and how challenges in one area affect a person’s ability to succeed in others. Leslie’s journey with East Cooper Community Outreach (ECCO) is one example of the coordinated approach TUW and its partners use to address complex challenges. A widowed mother of three whose husband passed away from the disease facing her two eldest children, Leslie struggled to stay employed while caring for her family’s health. Originally requesting ECCO’s help with clothing and bill assistance, Leslie also attended a MoneySmart workshop, but it was a visit to ECCO’s dental clinic in 2015 that most dramatically changed her life. Like many struggling to care for ill family members, Leslie did not make her own care top priority. Unfortunately, eight teeth extractions later, she felt insecure about her appearance and knew it impeded her ability to secure stable employment. Thanks to the clinic, she received partial dentures boosting her confidence and helping to springboard her to financial stability with a new job. “These dentures are, without a doubt, the best present I’ve ever gotten,” Leslie said. “You won’t believe the difference they’ve made in my life!” ECCO is among a network of TUW partners collaborating to provide individuals like Leslie with tools to achieve greater stability and health for their families. TUW also facilitates ongoing partner improvement through collaborative best practice and data sharing. “It’s been helpful to see what other nonprofits are doing to provide opportunities for individuals and improve the community overall,” ECCO Director of Health Services Meredith Johnson said. “Bringing us together helps us know what each other’s challenges are and how we can work better together.”

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ECCO was able to see 2,708 patients in its dental and health clinics during FY 2015–2016, thanks in part to a grant provided by Trident United Way.


HEALTHY TRI-COUNTY

HEALTH: EMERGING EFFORTS

2016 COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT (CHNA) Trident United Way (TUW), Roper St. Francis and MUSC Health partnered to conduct a Tri-County Community Health Needs Assessment in spring 2016.

TOP SIX HEALTH ISSUES IDENTIFIED BY CHNA RESPONDENTS

1

4

ACCESS TO HEALTH SERVICES

2

CLINICAL PREVENTATIVE SERVICES

3

MENTAL HEALTH

OBESITY/NUTRITION/ PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

5

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

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Visit www.tuw.org/health to view the full report.

MATERNAL, INFANT AND CHILD HEALTH

PURPOSE Healthy Tri-County is a multi-sector regional initiative to improve health outcomes in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties. WHAT WE ARE DOING ABOUT IT ⚫⚫The highest priority of Healthy Tri-County is the development of a regional health improvement plan, which will chart a seven-year vision (2018–2025) for improving health outcomes in the Tri-County area. ⚫⚫TUW, Roper St. Francis and MUSC Health held a groundbreaking Health Forum Series with participation from 322 community members representing 84 organizations to learn community members’ feedback to the CHNA and help inform their collective effort to improve Tri-County residents’ health. ⚫⚫The primary outcome of the collaborative efforts of TUW, Roper St. Francis and MUSC Health was the launch of Healthy Tri-County in January 2017.

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BUILDING CAPACITY, IMPROVING SYSTEMS, STRENGTHENING PARTNERSHIPS

TRIDENT UNITED WAY: COMMUNITY CONNECTOR Trident United Way’s (TUW) Health Forum Series began in 2016. As two of 84 organizations attending, the Shifa Free Medical Clinic and Charleston Dorchester Mental Health Center (CDMHC) identified a way to connect a need with a service. As a result, uninsured individuals between the ages of 19-64 with incomes at or below 250% of the Federal Poverty Level can now access CDMHC mobile mental health service at Shifa clinics twice a month. This is just one example of how TUW assembles the necessary partners to align shared goals to create real change. We do this to improve the lives of individuals and families in our community and build a brighter future.

In our role as a community connector, TUW recognizes that no single organization or institution can tackle the complex issues facing our community. Together we can make a difference. Dr. Reshma Kahn “The Health Forum Series is a great resource which helps different organizations collaborate to better serve the community better. It is through this forum that Shifa Clinic developed a partnership with CDMHC to expand its programs to provide mental health services, which has helped the community to have access to the much-needed care.” Dr. Reshma Kahn, Medical Director and Founder, Shifa Free Medical Clinic

Heather Lloyd

“Our hope is that through our collaboration with Shifa, patients will benefit from a “one-stop-shop.” Patients can be identified during a routine medical visit for mental health services and immediately referred to these services. Individuals can potentially see their doctors and counselor on the same day, meeting the patients’ needs and overall satisfaction.” Heather Lloyd, Clinician, CDMHC Highway to Hope

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FY 2015–2016


WHO WE ARE A COMMUNITY CONNECTOR We bring partners together to develop and deliver collaborative solutions for complex community problems.

A STRATEGIC PARTNER

We work with other organizations to make data-driven decisions and respond to our community’s most pressing needs.

A VOLUNTEER ENGAGER

Over 100 volunteers are trained to make funding decisions. On TUW’s Day of Caring and throughout the year, thousands of volunteers come together to give back and help our local nonprofits and schools.

A FUNDER

We invest in programs that deliver the kinds of real results that transform our community.

WE ARE CREATING BOLD COMMUNITY CHANGE IN EDUCATION / FINANCIAL STABILITY / HEALTH Together, we are working to: Improve educational outcomes for all students. Every child will be supported from birth, to be prepared for school, meet grade-level standards and graduate from high school prepared for employment or higher education. Improve the opportunity for all people to enjoy a quality standard of living. Our neighbors have an opportunity and the tools for personal advancement; from crisis, to financial stability, to self-sufficiency. Improve the health of all individuals. Our neighbors will have access to healthcare, know how to lead healthy lives and be empowered to live and participate in environments that promote good health.

FY 2015–2016

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THANK YOU! YOUR INVESTMENT MATTERS.

Trident United Way (TUW) brings together partners who have the passion, expertise and resources to create lasting bold community change. Throughout 2015–2016, TUW mobilized $10,475,018 to make a real impact in our community. These funds were invested in programs and initiatives that support education, financial stability and health to build a brighter future in the Tri-County. The financial year 2015–2016 was a transition funding year, enabling TUW to move toward a robust community investments application process for the 2016–2019 funding cycle.

TOTAL REVENUE & INCOME $10,475,018

TOTAL EXPENSES & DONOR-DIRECTED DESIGNATIONS $10,980,870*

11% 18%

8%

74%

7%

64%

13%

3% 2%

CAMPAIGN

COMBINED FEDERAL CAMPAIGN GIVING $1,131,984

GRANTS

INVESTMENT & OTHER $776,036

$7,771,085

$795,913

12

PROGRAM SERVICES $7,044,814 Goes directly towards the mission of TUW DONOR-DIRECTED GIVING $1,922,145 Specific gifts directed by donors to other nonprofits SUPPORTING SERVICES Fundraising $1,490,067 General and Administrative $301,247 Building expenses $222,597 Covered by our Cornerstone Program and other generated income

*Board-approved deficit for community initiatives including Tri-County Flood Recovery Fund

FY 2015–2016


COMMUNITY INVESTMENTS Real, long-lasting change requires us to work together to make a bold impact on our community. Trident United Way (TUW) invests in programs and initiatives focused on education, financial stability and health, for these are the necessary building blocks needed to thrive. In financial year 2015–2016, TUW provided support including grants, infrastructure and guidance to 29 partner nonprofits operating 45 programs. COMMUNITY INITIATIVES

Metanoia MUSC Family Literacy Center St. James South Santee Senior & Community Center

EDUCATION FUNDED PARTNERS

FINANCIAL STABILITY

PROSPERITY CENTER PARTNERS

Alston Wilkes Society AmeriCorps* Family Services, Inc. (now Origin SC) Palmetto Goodwill**

Trident Literacy Association *provide staffing support **cost-sharing partner for Berkeley and Dorchester Prosperity Centers

Alston Wilkes Society Berkeley Seniors, Inc. Dorchester Seniors, Inc. East Cooper Community Outreach Family Services, Inc. (Now Origin SC) Helping Hands of Goose Creek Lowcountry Food Bank, Inc.

Metanoia One80 Place Our Lady of Mercy Community Outreach Services, Inc. SC Thrive St. James South Santee Senior & Community Center Tricounty Family Ministries Trident Literacy Association

FINANCIAL STABILITY FUNDED PARTNERS

INTEGRATED COMMUNITY SYSTEMS

Guiding Team for Health

Access Health TriCounty Network East Cooper Community Outreach Lowcountry AIDS Services, Inc.

CONNECTING THE COMMUNITY CROSS-CUTTING STRATEGY SUPPORTS

1,500,000

COMMUNITY INITIATIVES HEALTH FUNDED PARTNERS

COMMUNITY INITIATIVES

2-1-1 Helpline Day of Caring

2,500,000 2,000,000

CharityTrackerTM SafetyNet Assistance Network SC Thrive - The Benefit Bank

HEALTH

3,000,000

1,000,000 MUSC Foundation Tricounty Family Ministries

500,000

35%

34%

6%

12%

CROSS-CUTTING STRATEGY SUPPORTS $881,295

Carolina Youth Development Center Dee Norton Lowcountry Children’s Center Dorchester Children’s Center Florence Crittenton

CONNECTING THE COMMUNITY $865,824

Family Services, Inc. (now Origin SC) Healing Species Lowcountry Food Bank, Inc. Reading Partners Tricounty Family Ministries Wings for Kids, Inc.

HEALTH $428,543

LINKS TO SUCCESS PARTNERS

AmeriCorps Berkeley Community Mental Health Center Charleston County School District – Adult Education Charleston Dorchester Mental Health Center Communities In Schools of the Charleston Area, Inc. Dee Norton Lowcountry Children’s Center Dorchester Children’s Center

FINANCIAL STABILITY $2,416,815

Tri-County Cradle to Career Collaborative - Kindergarten Readiness Network

EDUCATION $2,452,337

EDUCATION

13%

0 Strategic Volunteer Engagement Capacity-building Systems, Tools and Trainings

PROGRAM SERVICES $7,044,814

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT INITIATIVES Capacity-building Systems, Tools and Trainings Funded Partner Investment and Monitoring Process LINKS to Success Evaluation

Social Solutions-Efforts to Outcomes Public Policy

FY 2015–2016

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TRIDENT UNITED WAY Statement of Activities Year Ended June 30, 2016

“In my years of service with TUW, I have seen a dedicated commitment to accurate financial reporting and transparency in sharing information, as evidenced by the outstanding results of TUW’s annual independent financial statement audits. Donors and grantors can be confident in their investments in TUW.”

CINDY BRAMS Treasurer and Chair TUW Finance Committee CPA, CVA, Shareholder Elliott Davis Decosimo

To read the full 2016 Audited Financial Statements and the filed 2015 IRS Form 990, visit www.tuw.org/ audit-financials

PUBLIC SUPPORT AND REVENUE Campaign Revenue - Current Year Total current year campaign contributions Less donor designations Less provision for uncollectible

UNRESTRICTED

TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED

PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED

$

$

$

Net Campaign Revenue - Current Year Fall Campaign for Next Year Social Innovation Board Contributions Grants and Contracts Other Contributions Service Fees Rental Income Investment Income Miscellaneous Income Contributions released from restriction

TOTAL PUBLIC SUPPORT AND REVENUE

EXPENSES Program Services Community Investment Health Education Financial Stability Connecting the Community Total Program Services Supporting Services General and administrative Building expenses Fundraising Total Support Services TOTAL EXPENSES INCREASE (DECREASE) IN NET ASSETS

408,784 (408,784) -

9,151,903 (1,513,361) (662,360)

- - -

$

9,560,687 (1,922,145) (662,360)

- - - 509,913 371,869 - 214,370 152,627 12,331 8,425,891

6,976,182 4,742 271,000 15,000 30,000 - - 2,867 - (8,386,044)

- - - - - - - (8,028) - (39,847)

6,976,182 4,742 271,000 524,913 401,869 214,370 147,466 12,331 -

9,687,001

(1,086,253)

(47,875)

8,552,873

$

881,295 $ 428,543 2,452,337 2,416,815 865,824 7,044,814

$

301,247 $ - $ - $ 301,247 222,597 - - 222,897 1,490,067 - - 1,490,067 2,013,911 - - 2,013,911 9,058,725 - - 9,058,725 628,276 (1,086,253) (47,875) (505,852)

Net Assets at Beginning of Year

13,922,212

NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR

$ 14,550,488

- $ - - - - -

3,820,250 $

2,733,997

$

- - - - - -

$

881,295 428,543 2,452,337 2,416,815 865,824 7,044,814

614,926

18,357,388

567,051

$ 17,851,536

For pages 14 and 15, see accompanying notes and independent auditors’ report in the 2016 Audited Financial Statements.

14

TOTAL


TRIDENT UNITED WAY

Statement of Financial Position As of June 30, 2016

ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Short term investments Accounts receivable Unconditional promises to give: Trident United Way Campaign (net of allowance of $591,844) Other Pledge Receivables Combined Federal Campaign (net of allowance of $79,239) Unconditional promises to give: Prepaid expenses Total Current Assets Property, Plant and Equipment Land Building and improvements Equipment and software Vehicle Accumulated depreciation Total Property, Plant and Equipment Long Term Assets: Investments TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Accounts payable Payroll liabilities Deferred compensation Campaign designations payable Total Current Liabilities NET ASSETS Unrestricted Undesignated Designated by governing board Total Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted TOTAL NET ASSETS TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

UNRESTRICTED

TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED

$

$

1,920,769 1,452,435 57,109

$

$

$

- 28,353 -

TOTAL $

2,191,280 1,480,788 57,109

1,434,633 -

2,025,321 266,850

- -

3,459,954 266,850

- 1,434,633 139,873 5,004,819

538,099 2,830,270 - 3,100,781

- - - 28,353

538,099 4,264,903 139,873 8,133,953

- - - - - -

490,000 2,199,707 241,564 (1,191,051) 1,740,220

490,000 2,199,707 241,564 - (1,191,051) 1,740,220

$

270,511 - -

PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED

8,309,166 15,054,205

75,520 95,816 332,381 - 503,717

5,474,890 9,075,598 14,550,488 - - 14,550,488 15,054,205

- - - - - -

$

$

$

79,474 3,180,255

- - - 446,258 446,258

- - - 2,733,997 - 2,733,997 3,180,255

$

$

$

538,698 567,051

- - - - -

- - - - 567,051 567,051 567,051

$

$

$

8,927,338 18,801,511

75,520 95,816 332,381 446,258 949,975

5,474,890 9,075,598 14,550,488 2,733,997 567,051 17,851,536 18,801,511

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RT

L

CIA

PE TS

O REP

Together we raised

AC

IMP

$206,121* thanks to

• • • •

70 individuals Nine companies, agencies and foundations A dollar-for-dollar match of $100,000 from the Trident United Way reserve fund Fundraising efforts at a local concert featuring Grammy-nominated group Band of Horses

All money in The Tri-County Hurricane Matthew Recovery Fund went directly towards enabling 17 nonprofit agencies and faith organizations to serve victims through: • • • • • •

Emergency and temporary housing Food and water Home and roof repairs Household items and supplies Mold prevention Utility assistance

Over 1,400** agents received emergency bulletins containing FEMA updates, immediate needs and available services through CharityTracker™*** Over 950** hurricane-related calls were received from the Tri-County by the 2-1-1 Helpline Over 1,344** referrals were made by the 2-1-1 Helpline

TRI-COUNTY HURRICANE MATTHEW RECOVERY FUND Trident United Way (TUW), in partnership with The Post and Courier, launched the Tri-County Hurricane Matthew Recovery Fund to address the emerging needs created by the impact from the hurricane that affected the Tri-County area October 7–8, 2016.

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FY 2015–2016

*Figures as of March 2017. Trident United Way will underwrite all administrative costs associated with dispersing these funds, and 100% of funds received will go directly to supporting storm recovery efforts. **Oct 1, 2016–Dec 20, 2016 ***A free online tool provided to the community by TUW for communication and coordination between service providers.


BENEFACTORS Trident United Way (TUW) thanks these companies and individuals for stepping up beyond the bounds of traditional giving in 2016–2017 and supporting TUW’s special events and activities.

GOLD

SILVER

Adams Outdoor Advertising Anita Zucker & The InterTech Group, Inc. BP Chemical Company, Cooper River Plant Chernoff Newman The Delta Air Lines Foundation Ingevity Nucor The Post and Courier Publix Supermarkets, Inc. Roper St. Francis Healthcare Santee Cooper SCANA Corporation South State Bank

Albany International Trident Health

BRONZE Bank of America The Bank of South Carolina Boeing CresCom Bank The Office People Tsunami

THANKS TO OUR LOANED EXECUTIVE PROVIDER AND SPONSOR Santee Cooper

www www.tuw.org www.facebook.com/TridentUnitedWay @TridentUWay Success Story Photography: Rebekah Wagner

Design: The Corinne Company, LLC

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Trident United Way

Trident United Way 6296 Rivers Avenue North Charleston, SC 29406 www.tuw.org

ADMINISTRATIVE MAIN OFFICE 843.740.9000 BERKELEY PROSPERITY CENTER 843.761.6033 DORCHESTER PROSPERITY CENTER 843.282.6294 2-1-1 HELPLINE DIAL 2-1-1 OR 866.892.9211

Trident United Way 2017 Impact Report  

Reflecting on our success to build a brighter future

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