TRIBEZA November 2021 Art Issue

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Art The

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CONTENTS

NOVEMBER

AUSTIN CUR ATED N OV E M B E E R 2 02 1

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Carrie Crowe

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

DIGITAL EDITOR

Meher Qazilbash

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

DEPARTMENTS

Tribeza Talk p. 20 Social Hour p.  24 Kristin’s Column p.  28 Karen’s Pick p.  100 Dining Guide p.  102 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p.  107 FEATURES

Austin Eye View: Artists p. 54 Aerial View p. 62 Non-Traditional Galleries p. 76 ACL’s Jack and Jim Gallery p. 86 GUIDES

All They Want For Christmas p. 68 Gifts That Keep On Giving p. 91

THIS PAGE Fluorescent Lighting Installation by Courtney Blanton

YEARS

David Clough

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen O. Spezia WRITERS

Holly Cowart Darcie Duttweiler Sam Lauron Veronica Meewes Laurel Miller Tolly Moseley Bryan Parker Meher Qazilbash Amanda Eyre Ward

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PUBLISHER

Mark Fisher

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Julia Grisemer

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Paul Krushin

ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Dylan Sack

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman – CEO Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

COPY EDITOR

Ashley Brown

PHOTOGR APHERS

Gregg Cestaro Holly Cowart Phil Kline Jenna McElroy Brittany Dawn Short Drew Anthony Smith CONTRIBUTING ARTIST

Shaylin Wallace

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2021 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

ON THE COVER Artwork by JR Rapier A Few Of My Favorite Things 36”x36” Oil on Canvas

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OCTOBER 2021 | tribeza.com


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Accolades are independently determined and awarded by their respective publications. Neither UBS Financial Services Inc. nor its employees pay a fee in exchange for these ratings. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. For more information on a particular rating and for designation disclosures, please visit ubs.com/us/en/designation-disclosures. CIMA® is a registered certification mark of the Investments & Wealth InstituteTM in the United States of America and worldwide. As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, UBS Financial Services Inc. offers investment advisory services in its capacity as an SEC-registered investment adviser and brokerage services in its capacity as an SEC-registered broker-dealer. Investment advisory services and brokerage services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate arrangements. It is important that clients understand the ways in which we conduct business, that they carefully read the agreements and disclosures that we provide to them about the products or services we offer. For more information, please review the PDF document at ubs.com/relationshipsummary. Private Wealth Management is a division within UBS Financial Services Inc., which is a subsidiary of UBS AG. © UBS 2021. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. VIP_09232021-1 Exp.: 09/30/2022


The Dara Luxury Group is a real estate group affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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HOME

IS WHERE THE

HEARTIS Khani Zulu REALTOR , PRINCIPAL

3314 Westhill Unit A, Seller Represented

7701 Sandia Loop, Seller Represented

Michelle Hendrix REALTOR , PRINCIPAL

Agent portrait photos: Felicia Reed Photography | Property photos top to bottom: JP Morales & Bryan Parker

HENDRIXZULUGROUP.COM | 512-436-0640


SOUL

IS WHERE THE

ART

IS

BY: MICHELLE HENDRIX

At the Hendrix & Zulu Group, we are passionate about the arts—especially with a celebrated oil painter, renowned tattoo artist, author and professionally trained dancer in the family. We are thrilled to take this opportunity to highlight Khani Zulu, founding partner of the Hendrix & Zulu Group, and Roni Zulu, her soulmate / Renaissance husband, who will soon celebrate their 20th wedding anniversary! Khani, who graduated from UT with a degree in dance, was recently voted in as the President of the Board of Directors for the Andrea Ariel Dance Theatre. Zulu (Roni) works tirelessly crossing mediums and genres throughout the art world. He also makes time for falconry, bee keeping and many other fascinating hobbies. The two find so much inspiration and joy in their South Austin home, featured here, which is every bit as eclectic as they are. Winding down under their massive Heritage Oak tree in a beautifully curated outdoor casbah is the "perfect happy hour,” if you ask them. Best described as a soulful and creative partnership, Khani and Zulu embrace their community and thrive in any environment where they can support the arts near and far. Having spent so many years establishing a well-known tattoo business and endless philanthropic efforts in LA, it is no surprise that the couple is invested in so many ways here in Central Texas. "Austin is a brilliant and beautiful place to live, love and grow within. It is so energizing!" according to Khani. Everyday, whether it be for business or pleasure, is an artful adventure for Zulu, Khani and the entire HZG team.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: JULIA BENNETT


W NO

UT O LD SO


Love yo� c�ls aga�. Eth� K�g

WWW.RONKINGBEAUTY.COM

@SLICKBACK_BUTTAHTOAST

TEL: 512-615-1500


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From coveted estates to downtown new development, LE T U S H E LP YO U F I N D YOU R PL ACE I N AU STI N .

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Jennifer Ladner

$ 1 8 0 M + I N C LO S E D T R A N S AC T I O N S S I N C E 2 0 1 9.

512.827.9255 jennifer@thomajanladnergroup.com

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity. Thomajan is a team of real estate agents affiliated with compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local laws. Equal housing opportunity.


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VERYONE’S DEFINITION OF “ART” IS DIFFERENT. FOR SOME,

art is anything that evokes a feeling or emotion. Others define art by specific categories — painting, sculpture, literature, dance and music. This month’s art issue pushes these boundaries even further. In “Aerial View,” three aerial artists show us what it’s like to express their art form through various apparatuses — silk, sling, cube, trapeze, cyr wheel and lyra — at Laché Movement. “Opening a studio is such an amazing way to create an opportunity for as many people as possible to start their version of healing — improving lives through movement,” says Sonnie Boyson, co-owner of Laché Movement. I highly recommend you learn what it feels like to fly, and pop in for a class and Laché Movement, Bat City Circus, Blue Lapis Light or Sky Candy. Continuing our discussion on art, we’re highlighting four galleries that are anything but traditional. Mesmerize, Big Medium, Wonderspaces and Royal Turkey allow you to explore art through structural exhibits, interactive art, light installations and furniture/décor. “Our whole mission with Mesmerize is to innovate with storytelling and create multi-sensory experiences that inspire joy and community,” says artist Clayton Lillard.

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Mesmerize opened pre-pandemic, and is currently looking for a permanent space. Learn what it’s like to immerse yourself in an art-meets-storytelling environment. For our more edgy readers, we’re taking you inside ACL’s Jim Marshall rock gallery, where Jim turns icons into humans with casual, compassionate portraiture. Legends of jazz, blues and folk line the walls of this gallery, and one in particular is not afraid to give us the bird. “My favorite photo from the current collection is probably the infamous one of Johnny Cash, flipping the bird at San Quentin Prison,” says Happy Mercado, Director of Brand Partnerships at ACL Live at Moody Theater. Other singers include Miles Davis, Muddy Waters, John Coltrane and Janis Joplin. Jim aimed to capture the artists in a different way, so you — the viewer — feel like you are part of the photograph itself. You’ll also want to peruse our “All They Want For Christmas” gift guide, featuring locally made and sold wares. Whether you’re buying for your favorite fashionista, food fanatic, pet lover or picky mother-in-law, we’ve got you covered! Carrie Crowe Executive Editor

P H OTO B Y P H I L K I L I N E AT L AC H É M OV E M E N T

EDITOR’S LETTER



AMBER MOORE The Real Estate Navigator

An Austin native, Amber grew up familiar with the “way Austin used to be.” As a lover of “off-leash parks, BBQ smoke in the air, iconic venues, no dress-codes, no line” Austin, Amber can still show you where this Austin exists. After years of experience as a runway model across the U.S. Amber became interested and pursued studies in fashion merchandising and advertising at Texas State University. She has owned a catering company, has spent 11 years as a licensed massage therapist, has taught body pump, and now lives and breathes everything real estate as a realtor with Twelve Rivers Realty. Seven years ago Amber was ready for a real challenge and moved to the US Virgin Islands and became a co-captain on a sailboat. Amber tells the amazing story of how she learned to tell if there are sharks in the water. “The dive master could tell I was anxious,” she says. His Photographer: DJ Ferno Hair: Megan Wallet question, “Do you want to know how to Makeup: Jacqui Moore tell if there are sharks in the water?” was met with a resounding, “Heck, yes!”. “First,” he said, “take this spoon. Dip the spoon in the water and taste it. Does the water taste salty?” He finally asked, “Well, yes,” Amber replied. “OK,” he said, “Then there are sharks in the water.” Amber is smart, both “street smart” and intellectually gifted. Amber can talk with you about everything from cosplay to quantum physics. She is able to navigate dangerous places like a sailboat at night–trusting the waves, the process, the boat, the crew. Real estate is like this, too: complex, dangerous, and rewarding. Back home in Austin, Amber is known to be on a different energy level. She returned embracing the change she’d accepted in herself, and mutually respected the change she has seen in Austin. As a master at showing others that it’s ok to be themselves, Amber is not only helping people find their homes, she is also helping people to find themselves.

AMBER MOORE | Realtor® | 512.751.4512 | ambermoorerealtor@gmail.com


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T R I B E Z A TA L K

Skill Set LE ARN FROM PROFESSIONALS AND DISCOVER NEW PASSIONS WITH A COMMUNIT Y OF CR AF TERS AT THESE LOCAL WORKSHOPS

Whenever I ask folks about their favorite reason to live in Austin, I’ve noticed a pattern in their replies: community. It’s not just the invaluable resources offered, but the individuals committed to sharing their knowledge through workshops and digital guides so that others can thrive in their passions and pastimes. And here, there’s no shortage of talented and creative minds sparking joy through design and art. Maybe you’ve been thinking about joining a class but haven’t known where to start. Maybe you’ve seen something cool online you want to try or are looking for ways to turn your hobby into profit. Well, this is your sign to finally sign up for that workshop and discover a crafty new skill! Unleash your curious and playful side and get inspired with this distinctly Austin list of makers and shakers that prove inspiration is just a click away.

Creative Box Studios LINE DRAWING, OIL PAINTING & EMBROIDERY It’s possible you’ve already heard of The Cathedral and maybe even had the chance to visit one of their many exhibitions, live performances or intimate mixers that uplift the voices of local female artists. But you might not know the coworking space also regularly collaborates with sister company Creative Box Studios to hold interactive workshops. Catie Lewis’ line drawing sessions are perfect practice for artists of any level while Mary Rochford brings the basics to life with oil painting and embroidery. Plus, it’s a proven fact that crafting is way more entertaining with bottomless cocktails and tasty snacks! thecathedralatx.com/pages/workshops creativeboxstudios.com

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Amanda Reid Designs MODERN CALLIGRAPHY “For me, calligraphy is more than just pretty letters,” explains Amanda Reid. “It is an EXPERIENCE.” Updating the time-honored process of hand lettering with modern technique, the owner of eponymous Amanda Reid Designs finds the act of creating elegantly written sentiments to be a rewarding form of self-care. Her approachable virtual and live classes cover all of the fundamentals while giving aspiring letterers a dynamic learning environment and expert advice. Reid is also the creator of an online community called Calligraphers of Color, which provides essential resources and celebrates diversity within the industry. amandareiddesigns.com

AMANDA REID DE SIGNS PHOTOS BY C ARHART PHOTOGR APHY

By Holly Cowart


B UTLER CENTER FOR DANCE & FITNE SS PHOTOS BY ANNE MARIE B LOODGOOD CULTURED GR A ZING COMPANY PHOTOS BY EMILY SALLTZB ERG

Butler Center for Dance & Fitness DANCE Located inside the beautiful Ballet Austin, there exists a place to unleash your inner Dancing Queens and Kings! Movement is a powerful expression of art and culture, and what better place to learn than with leaders of Austin’s performing arts industry? Shake up your routine with an assortment of classes from the Butler Center for Dance & Fitness like hip-hop, jazz, contemporary and, of course, ballet. There are also tons of international styles to discover from West Africa to Latin America and beyond. Here, accessibility is key, with nearly 100 lessons available virtually, including dance fitness classes for those searching for a different way to work out. Find your fit and get moving! balletaustin.org/dance-fitness

Mercedez Rex SILK MARBLING Artist Mercedez Rex’s distinct method of water marbling came from creative experimentation, which led her from dyes to pigments and textiles to silk and paper. Specializing in the process of monoprinting, every captivating pattern is completely one-of-akind and transferrable onto your preferred material, resulting in functional works of art that can be worn and used daily. “I love how user-friendly and intuitive the medium is,” she says. “It allows people to move past their preconceived notions of being ‘not creative’ and leave with a new idea about what is possible for themselves.” Rex is available for art parties, individual workshops and virtual sessions, with DIY marbling kits found in the online shop. Follow @mercedezrexdesigns on Instagram and subscribe to her mailing list to stay up to date with future schedules, including upcoming holiday-themed lessons. mercedezrex.com

Cultured Grazing Company GRAZING BOARDS If you’ve ever seen the incredible mosaics of meat and cheese on social media and wished you knew how to compose your own stunning display, Colette Wetzel is here to help. The charcuterie board master and founder of Cultured Grazing Co. hosts hour-long digital and in-person classes that teach inquiring minds how to craft the perfect spread from curated, locally-sourced ingredients. A minimum of eight guests are required for the personal or branded workshops, which come with every delicious treat you’ll need. The colorful creations also offer the opportunity to gather with friends and spend time doing something that’s as enjoyable to make as it is to eat. culturedatx.com tribeza.com

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T R I B E Z A TA L K S

Atelier Dojo FIGURATIVE REALISM Have you been dreaming of furthering your arts education and honing your talents in a professional setting? Located in the Canopy complex in East Austin, Atelier Dojo was formed in 2018 by local artists Jennifer Balkan, Denise Fulton and Karen Offutt to help committed artists become masters of their craft. With its rotating roster of skilled instructors, the school offers a range of course options that dive into classic approaches to drawing and painting in figurative realism. Students can choose from six-week-long intensives that oversee the completion of a project to one-time virtual open studios and in-person workshops. For those looking to take things a step further, there’s even a full-fledged, three-year academic program with specialized curriculum leading from long pose figure drawings to color theory. atelierdojo.com

Silk & Sage Design Studio HOME FURNITURE PROJECTS If you’re a fan of all-things DIY or are constantly scrolling Pinterest for new projects, Silk & Sage Design is a must. Co-founded by Katie Lang Brown and Brian Brown in 2015, the brand has assisted numerous Austinites with custom furniture projects, color consulting and quality home goods. Next to informative guides and digital how-tos, they also instruct clients on how to upgrade their furniture themselves with sustainable materials and durable processes. Find endless home inspo and mark your calendars for more paint-focused classes starting January 2022, including useful techniques for updating furniture and interior finishes with colorful boho flair. silkandsagedesign.com

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Austin School of Film FILM & TECHNOLOGY Austin is one of the ultimate cities for movie buffs, so it’s no surprise that it’s home to an award-winning organization devoted to helping independent filmmakers thrive. Nonprofit Motion Media Arts Center, which is also behind alternative coworking venue Austin Cinemaker Space, shares an extensive list of resources for those looking to break into the cinematic world. Whether you prefer to be holding the camera or behind the scenes, this is a conducive place to develop your passions and projects with tools for everything from pre- to post-production. The school also has an array of youth programs for fine-tuning your future movie stars. austinfilmschool.org

Mud Studio CERAMICS Sometimes the creation process is better when you can get your hands dirty. Mud Studio collaborates with top notch Austin ceramicists to teach makers of all ages and ability levels how to build masterpieces from the ground up with one-time workshops, six-week classes and membership programs. The Bouldin Creek facility comes complete with 10 potters wheels, in-house glazes, hand tools, an electric kiln and plenty of clay. Once you’ve gotten enough experience under your belt, stop by for open studio hours to work on enviable projects at your own pace. mudstudioaustin.com


T R I B E Z A TA L K

SOMETHING COOL STUDIOS PHOTOS BY A SHK AN FOROUZ ANI (MOSAIC) AND ANGEL A INTRIAGO (SPR AY PAINT). PAPER + CR AF T PHOTO CREDIT IS COURTE SY OF PAPER + CR AF T. THE FLOWER SOCIAL PHOTO BY GABY DEIMEKE

Something Cool Studios MOSAIC & STREET ART This eastside arts collective is run by an impressive panel of muralists, street artists and more, including founder Luis Angelo, better known to some as ULOANG. The community-driven organization doubles as a rentable studio and workshop space, forming a dedicated place for creatives to connect, learn and sell their work. Every skill level is welcome to the hands-on courses, which cover cool topics like graffiti, guitar set up and mosaics — something that immediately piqued my interest. The mesmerizing collages are taught through The Mosaic Workshop and can be applied to coasters, clay pots, stepping stones and more, surely to stand out as gifts and keepsakes. somethingcoolstudios.com

Paper + Craft Pantry ARTS & CRAFTS This charming stationary studio and retail shop in Springdale General is dedicated to independently designed paper goods. Pei Sim, who founded the small business back in 2015, loves sharing her passion for crafts while supporting the community around her. Workshops in the past have vastly varied from bullet journaling and candle pouring to book binding and embroidery. But be warned, these spots can fill up quickly. Check in during November for the 2022 Q1 calendar release to snag your place and don’t forget to pick up some pretty stationary along the way. thepapercraftpantry.com

Artists Screen Printing Co-Op SCREEN PRINTING Screen printing is an ancient practice that involves applying ink to stenciled designs and transferring them onto a variety of materials with mesh. Housed inside a 1200-squarefoot studio in East Austin, ASPCO gives new and experienced screen printers a communal space to expand on their personal work. What began as an ad on Craigslist from founder James Tootle has evolved into a volunteer-based network of dedicated artists, and everyone’s welcome. No prerequisites are needed for the fourweek-long intro classes that come with access to professional tools like a six-color press and washout booth. There are also four membership types, with part owners getting an opinion on how the facility operates. aspco.org

The Flower Social FLORAL DESIGN & ARRANGEMENTS Nothing brightens up a home or day like eloquently arranged bouquets of fresh flowers. For those looking to find a unique hobby, step up their hosting game or even break into the industry, this community truly lives and breathes floral design. Owner and expert Mel Frontino guides fun and flexible seminars that are offered in both private and community settings, teaching different ways to turn foliage into stunning centerpieces and flower crowns. Prefer to learn from the comfort of home? Check out a Masterclass by Mel or view a pre-recorded online class to get insider tips on your own time. And make sure to keep an eye out for exciting future plans from seasonal wreath workshops to a two-day floral design immersion in January. theflowersocialaustin.com tribeza.com

| NOVEMBER 2021

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Social

HOUR CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN FALL EXHIBITION VIP PREVIEW The Contemporary Austin hosted a VIP preview at its Jones Center on September 10 for the highly anticipated exhibitions Daniel Johnston’s I Live my Broken Dreams and Crit Group Reunion. Guests mingled with featured artists and soaked up the moving works of the late Austin icon Daniel Johnston while enjoying DJ jams, spirits and stunning views from the museum’s rooftop.

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TYLER’S DAM THAT CANCER

The 12th anniversary of TYLER’s Dam That Cancer took place on September 13. Two hundred paddlers worked their way through Lake Austin for 21 miles all to benefit the Flatwater Foundation, an organization dedicated to providing access to mental health therapy and family support to those touched by cancer. The stand-up paddle event raised a record-breaking $1,136,000 for the incredible nonprofit.

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44 East Ave, the brand new luxury condo tower located in the Rainey Street District, celebrated its topping out on September 24. The ceremony, which also served as a fundraiser for The Trail Foundation, offered guests an exclusive opportunity to gaze at the city from the 49-story building while taking in the live music, cocktails and delicious bites served from Top Chef winner Gabe Erales. CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN FALL EXHIBITION VIP PREVIEW 1. Mormon Ahmad & Alexandra Arteaga 2. Fatima Sadaqat & Joseph Fabian 3. Ashley Gregg, Courtney Goforth & Jess Odom 4. Gus Baldwin 5. Lily Keepers & Jordan Pape 6. Shaun Dickerson, Riley Sklar & Rankin Fetzer TYLER’S DAM THAT CANCER 8. Erin Hood & Collin Bland 9. Lauren Johnson & David Callejas 10. Emma Sablatura & Katie Castellano 11. Jeremy Thiel 12. Rebekah Shear 44 EAST AVE TOPPING OUT 13. Maria Ybanez & Brad Stein 14. Shonda Mace & Jason McClelland 15. Simon Cawley, Susan MacDonald & Allan MacDonald 16. Kevin Burns, Shawn Walker & Jocelyn Gamble 17. Stacey & Larry Speck 18. Merrill Alley, Bernardo De Alba & Kevin Burns

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44 EAST AVE TOPPING OUT


delysia.com


Social

HOUR On October 2, Women & Their Work invited art lovers for brunch and an illuminating discussion with art advisor Susannah Morgan, who spoke on the importance of understanding art pricing, maintaining collections and more. A part of the annual Red Dot Art Spree, the event also included an exhibition and silent auction, with proceeds helping 1,000 underserved students in Austin experience the joy of art.

JACK AND JIM 10TH ANNIVERSARY

3Ten ACL Live hosted a gathering on October 4 to commemorate ten years of the iconic partnership between Jim Marshall, Jack Daniel’s and ACL Live. The evening included a toast to Jim, the U.S. premiere of Show Me the Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall documentary film and a special Q&A with executive producer Amelia Davis.

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PARTY FOR THE PARKS

Austin Parks Foundation’s annual fundraiser, Party for the Parks, took place on October 6 at ACL Music Festival. This year’s celebration welcomed the beloved band Black Pumas for both an in-person and online concert. Festival goers made unforgettable memories while raising an astounding $332,609 for Austin’s cherished parks, trails and green spaces.

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11 RED DOT ART SPREE 1. Alexis Hunter & David Sandoval 2. Renee Lai 3. Francés J. Jones & Laura Garanzuay 4. Susannah Morgan & Chris Cowden 5. Paige Booth, Chris Cowden, Meena Matai & Katie Conley JACK AND JIM 10TH ANNIVERSARY 6. Tom Koerner & Molly Koerner 7. Michelle Magetts, Bevis M. Griffin, Amelia Davis, Benita Passareli, Eli Reed & Mary Alice Harper 8. Dave Maguire, Kiki Litchfield, Jen Keyser, Robert Rixman & Ken Bardsley 9. Carol Mead & Mary Alice Harper PARTY FOR THE PARKS 10. Eric Burton 11. Chuck Foster & Sheenagh Lee 12. Saga & Patrick 13. Trevor Scott & Taylor Ellison 14. Patrick & Lauren Clark 15. Patricia Jones & Jason Raynor

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R E D D OT A R T S P R E E P H OTO S B Y A L I VA N D E R H I D E R . J AC K A N D J I M A N N I V E R S A R Y P H OTO S B Y J U S T I N S T I D H A M . PA R T Y F O R T H E PA R K S P H OTO S B Y G A B Y D I E M E K E .

RED DOT ART SPREE & COLLECTOR’S BRUNCH


JEREMY BROWNE  THAWING OUT  16x20  ACRYLIC

TERESA ELLIOTT  HILL COUNTRY CALF  48x48  OIL

FINE ART FOR THE WELL CURATED HOME 214 West Main St. | Fredericksburg, Texas | 830 9 . 97 9 . 920 | insightgallery.com

JILL CARVER  THE SUN WILL RISE AGAIN  30x60  OIL


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

The Art of a Do-Over By Kristin Armstrong Artwork by Shaylin Wallace Portrait by Laura Doss

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VER SINCE MY KIDS WERE SMALL, WE HAVE HAD A FAMILY code to help us get back on track whenever we mess up. The words, “Can I have a do-over?” signified awareness, an apology and an intention. Let’s say I was on my last nerve and raised my voice at my favorite (and very active) little people, and immediately regretted losing my shit. I would say, “Guys, can I please have a do-over? I’m sorry I raised my voice. If I could go back and do this better, I would ask you nicely to stop dumping out all the clean laundry I just folded and using the basket as a cage for your sister … .” Something like that. Do-overs were a common occurrence at our house. The more I modeled do-overs, the more my kids did the same. To this day, when there is a tense situation or an impasse in our family of grown children, that code still holds. To my knowledge, no one has ever been denied a do-over. Now that I have some clients with small children, and I share this method of circling back and clearing the air, I realize how powerful it really is. I love hearing later how their kids responded and how good it felt to ask for, and receive, a do-over. The odds of doing it better the next time are far higher because the intention is already pre-paved. Trust and connection are often fostered more deeply by a do-over than if one had handled something perfectly the first time. A do-over is defined as a new attempt or opportunity to do something after a previous attempt has been unsuccessful or unsatisfactory. Nowhere does the idea or the art of a do-over seem more powerful than in the arena of love. For anyone who has loved and lost, survived a break-up, death or a divorce, the idea of trying to love again can seem like the most daunting, even foolish, notion in the world. Why would one knowingly subject oneself to the potential pain of loss or disappointment … again? Some hearts never really reopen, which to me is more tragic than tragedy itself. Others rush in, eager to circumvent the arduous path of healing, which is where all the lessons lie. This often leads to repeated lessons, and the futile sense that love is elusive, or a struggle. Some people are blessed to weave a blended family together, and the tapestry can sometimes be stronger than the original fabrics. My marriage ended when I was 32, and I always expected that I would marry soon after and have more children. I sobbed years later when I cleared out the attic and parted with old cribs and dusty boxes of baby things. Some

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beautiful (and some not-so-beautiful) men entered and exited my life as I learned more lessons about myself, and about what I wanted … and what I did not. For a few years I loved a man I could imagine blending with, which is saying a lot because my criteria for a man to be my kids’ man were even more rigorous than the standards I held for a man to be mine. As it turned out, I couldn’t play small enough to make him feel big, couldn’t love him enough to make him feel lovable. It was time to let that go. I savored the last stretch of time with my chicks in the nest, and then they flew. And I thought about my do-over. What does love look like when you don’t need someone to heal your broken heart, or pay your bills, or fill your emptiness, or make babies, or raise the children, or be the disciplinarian, or cook the steaks, or take out the trash, or make the plans, or make a house feel like a home, or make a tradition meaningful, or do the taxes or investments, or hang the Christmas lights? What if you have been doing all this, and everything else, for many years? What would it look like to find Love for me, today? What would it be like not to need things, but want to share them? To feel entirely whole, healthy, happy and do life with someone in the same zone? To not blend a family as much as create more space around the table? To widen and deepen treasured friendship circles? To go on adventures? To expand life that was full and beautiful to begin with? To multiply every form of abundance? To put in practice the idea that when you know better, you do better? To be more accepting, tolerant, easy-going? To know exactly how rare it is to find your person, so you don’t squander the treasure of time or connection? To create vision, share purpose and passion? To understand that there is nothing broken, therefore nothing to fix? To laugh, deeply and often? To have reciprocity and mutual respect for each other’s gifts? To support the other’s goals, dreams and desires? To travel the spiritual path? To know how lucky you are, and believe that your lover is pretty lucky too? To multiply joys and divide burdens? To make a collective impact? To know that someone is not just in your corner, they are your corner? To live in freedom, the beautiful balance of intimacy and autonomy? To have authenticated your voice and honed your power to choose, and from that place to choose each other? To be young enough to feel the heat of the fire, and old enough to kindle a slow and steady burn? When you least expect Love, suddenly, there it is. At long last. My do-over is no longer overdue. Thank you, thank you, thank you.


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An Online Exhibition

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

JR RAPIER jrrapier.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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fter working for 20 years as an art director for advertising agencies, and then experiencing the loss of someone close to her, Dallas-born JR Rapier decided life was too short to not make her dream job her day job. Now, painting isn’t just her career, but a means of storytelling and spiritual transformation. JR depicts emotions and archetypes as fantastical physical entities brought to life in large-scale oil paintings that are as stunning as they are thought-provoking.

Studio Tour (E.A.S.T.). People wanted to buy my work, so I had to say goodbye to many of my favorite pieces. It was a weird feeling, but also rewarding, for someone to want something that I loved into existence. Following that first show, I continued with my day job, painting in my free time for the next year’s show. Then tragedy hit. My ex-husband and father of my child died unexpectedly at age 40. My entire paradigm shifted into a new reality. I sold my house, quit my day job and moved in with my boyfriend (now husband). I realized I couldn’t waste another billable hour working in advertising. I wanted to paint all day long. I needed my dream job to be my day job … before I die.”

What is your definition of art? “Whether expressing the human condition, or representing a person, place or thing, I view art as an energetic way to tell a story that evokes emotion, a mood or an idea.” When did you know you wanted to become

How would you describe your body of work? “My work today is guiding me into a highly-tuned consciousness of listening to the human condition by expressing emotion through figurative entities. I’m painting the portraits of emotions that we all feel. Whether it be our inner child, grief, fear, shame or joy, I’m giving

an artist? “As far back as I can remember, I’ve always made art — whether it was a diaper rash cream wall fresco, or a crayon abstract behind the recliner. I was born an artist. As a teenager I had aspirations of becoming an architect, but because I had to drop out of trigonometry to graduate high school, I jumped back on my path of becoming an artist.”

these emotions faces and bodies to exist and be seen. My figurative body of work elicits emotion through a fantasy-like representation of the human figure. Emotions are tricky: something you feel isn’t always you. For example, if I am grieving, perhaps the feeling of shame has come to visit me, but I am not a shameful person. I can paint ‘Shame’ her very own portrait, and I know she is separate from me.”

Can you talk about your path to becoming a working artist? “In those years, painting full-time was out of the question because I believed I would starve without my day job. Painting was just a thing I did at night to put art on my own walls. Eventually I had the nerve to enter into the East Austin

Where do you find your inspiration? “It’s hard to say where I find my inspiration because I believe it finds me. On occasion, I will ask permission to observe a modern dance class and photograph the human body in motion. Most times, I sit down in front of a blank canvas and paint what comes to my mind. Perhaps a feeling

from a moment I’ve experienced. Or something as simple as the wonder and beauty of the human figure.” Is there a particular place in Austin you like to get your creative juices flowing? “I’m a hermit and homebody! I don’t usually leave my home and studio, but when I do, I enjoy people-watching at various places around town. This activity is usually coupled with a good margarita from an outdoor bar like Cosmic Cafe, or a fine wine from one of any street facing tables, like Enoteca. My creative juice flows best though through meditation and nature walks on the greenbelt.” What’s your advice for aspiring artists? “Tune out the inner critic that keeps you doubting your abilities to create. Instead, keep creating, and do it often, even when you aren’t inspired, or not in the mood and you wish you were. Don’t be afraid of creating work you aren’t proud of. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. If you have an idea, try it out, because ideas choose you. And if you let

the idea go, it will find someone else to manifest it. I think the biggest reason why an artist doesn’t progress is because they don’t believe in themselves, and they don’t believe they are good enough. Always make art. Always make art that you enjoy creating. It is the artist’s therapy.”

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

FLIP SOLOMON flipsolomon.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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lip Solomon grew up in an art-loving family, and she was winning awards for her paintings and sculptures by the time she was in kindergarten. She followed a path to art school, where she ended up switching tracks to study anthropology, travel and have her daughter. After an 18-year hiatus, she returned to her easel, more inspired than ever, and now she spends much of her time in her Canopy studio, where she works on large-scale pen-and-ink drawings — inspired both by nature and her own lucid dreams — as well as clothing and bedding lines. What is your definition of art? “I have a very wide definition of art. I think anything that involves the trifecta of inspiration, creativity and discipline can be considered an artform, no matter how droll the finished product may be perceived by the viewer. I think if someone has passion while they are creating, that

is in itself an artform — to be in that place where you’re in the flow and magic happens. Can you talk about your path to becoming a working artist? “Toward the end of that 18 year hiatus from doing art, I started to strongly desire a creative outlet. I was a single mom who had developed a difficult neurological condition called narcolepsy that affected me daily, usually several times a day, and had insidiously crept into every aspect of my life. I knew I needed to pivot if I wanted a good life, so when my daughter turned eight and got more independent, I found a studio space where I could have a separate creative space just for myself. It came to me to invert my disability into an ability and to use my strong dreaming

and in-between states of consciousness from narcolepsy as fodder for my artwork. I’m someone with a very flexible belief system, who’s 95% ruled by logic and pragmatics, so I really had to consciously choose to believe that perhaps what was happening to me was happening for a reason and perhaps it was my purpose to bring those concepts into the 3D. Once I started drawing, it was like no time had passed. There was really no backpedaling; if anything it felt like I had integrated something during the hiatus and had more passion and confidence to create large works. In my youth, I was a classically trained graphite artist. Now I’ve transitioned to pen and ink, which felt more dramatic and in tune with the Dream World. I started working large-scale, standing up on my desk and working against the wall, which helped with my wakefulness.” How would you describe your body of work? “My body of work reflects the subconscious world. It’s contrasty, moody, representational and dream-like. Symbols play a big part in my work. As a Solomon, I’d always thought of myself

as a Keeper of Seals and had always collected and drawn symbols. Before verbal communication, we learned from symbols. Symbols are a thought or idea simplified down to an abstract design. Our brains love to fill in the details, so some think that when we look at a symbol, our consciousness is still understanding the meaning behind it and learning from it. To recreate a symbol is a form of magic, as if you are doing a spell. So I really love to incorporate beneficial symbols into my artwork, and I was doing a lot of dream training at the time to become more lucid in my dreams in order to actively seek out symbols in DreamTime. I’m also a huge fan of the Decorative Arts — I love artists like William Morris, Mucha and Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The Art Nouveau of both Western and Eastern Europe is

some of my favorite art, and the patterning really lends itself to working symbols into it. I also find patterning very meditative, so you will see a lot of that in my work and that is usually my favorite thing to work on.” Where do you find your inspiration? “My inspiration comes from the natural world, urban landscapes and my very vivid dreaming. I also get inspired by ancient civilizations and other cultures and the arts and crafts of their societies. Sometimes if I have a heightened experience that feels complex, like it has many layers and it is also compelling, I’ll feel called to draw it out. Mostly, I think because I feel the need to process it thoroughly and that is the best way I know how to do that. Sometimes my pieces take months to complete due to their large size and level of detail, so I really start to be in a relationship with that piece. And I have a lot of time to think about things during the process and sometimes have epiphanies or breakthroughs. I’m usually up working all night when I draw and I think it’s easier to process deeply at night. The

quietness and lack of distraction is good for that, plus it’s easier for me to connect to magic with the nocturnal energies.”

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

ALLISON GREGORY allisongregor y finear t.com

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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llison Gregory was about to pursue graphic design, but knew she’d always regret it if she didn’t at least try making a career out of her true passion: painting. She left California to begin her art career here in Austin, where collectors and art dealers immediately took notice of her colorful work, presented in a variety of mediums. Twenty-two years later, she has sold art to celebrities, participated in many non-profit public art projects and charity auctions, and has a following of supportors across Texas and beyond.

Can you talk about your path to becoming a working artist? “I had just received my second degree out in California, where I had planned to ‘play it safe’ and be a graphic designer. However, it haunted me that I had to work behind a desk, creating art on a computer. I left California and went straight to Austin to begin my career as a full-time artist. I taught myself how to market my work, and I hit the pavement. I took every opportunity presented to get my work out there and seen by people. Collectors started to notice, and galleries were asking to represent me. By the second year in Austin, I was showing in every major city in Texas plus New York City, Boston and California. It sort of catapulted from there, and I had my first international exhibition at age 27.”

What is your definition of art? “Art, in the purest sense of the word, is a form of communication. It is also an act of expressing your feelings or thoughts through a technique. Art implores you to express yourself creatively. It is all about imagination, originality and skill.

How would you describe your body of work? “There are many facets to my art, as I don’t like to be pigeonholed into one category. I am extremely versatile and have been known for many styles throughout my career as an artist. I usually do about a dozen different series a year. The

It is also quite simply the reason I wake up every morning, excited to create again!”

mainstay to my pieces are bright colors — I’m a color fanatic! Often I will use over 75 shades of color in one piece alone.”

When did you know you wanted to become an artist? “Always! Even at a very young age of five, I was already painting and drawing anything I could get my hands on. My mother had to replace the carpet in my bedroom twice, before the age of 12, due to acrylic paint splattered all over the floor. I was constantly in trouble in elementary school, because instead of taking my tests or doing homework, I was drawing in the margins of all the papers, covering them with doodles. I can’t tell you how many talks various principals had with me, about not drawing in class, let alone all over my tests.”

Do you have a fun fact about your artwork? “I was selected to be a part of the legendary Cow Parade when it came to Austin years ago. After two of my designs were chosen, they asked me to do four more cows! I ended up painting six cows total, more than any artist in the world had ever been asked to complete. The CEO/founder of Cow Parade loved them so much, he reproduced them as figurines and small sculptures. They now sell in the Louvre and other major art museums all over the world.”

Where do you find your inspiration? “I get inspired by keeping abreast of what’s going on the art world, what other artists are creating, what collectors are acquiring and what trends are taking place. I suppose studying the work of my contemporaries inspires me alone to be a better artist. I love going to galleries. Two fabulous galleries in Austin I’ve been fortunate enough to show with in the past are Art on 5th Gallery and Austin Art Garage. Owners Joe Siegel and Jake Bryer have been instrumental in keeping good art on view for the city.” What’s your advice for aspiring artists? “My motto has always been that there’s no such thing as luck! Luck is persistence meets opportunity. I cannot emphasize enough how important it is to market yourself. When I started out, there was no social media. You had to have slides of your work and mail them out to galleries, just praying for a reply. These days, through Facebook and Instagram, the world is your oyster. You have the ability to interface with thousands of potential collectors all in one post! It’s brilliant

— but it’s also tough to keep up with the Jones’s. There is a lot of amazing art being posted these days. You must have confidence in your work, and continue to keep getting it out there — open to the critiques of your followers.”

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AUSTIN EYE VIEW

JAKE BRYER austinar tgarage.com/collections/jake-br yer

By Veronica Meewes / Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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fter working in corporate sales for Dell and marketing for Austin Business Journal, Jake Bryer felt a strong urge to leave the corporate world for more creative pursuits. He’d already developed an eye for (and love of) street photography during annual holiday trips he would take to explore other parts of the world. He also noticed, while seeking out artwork to decorate an apartment with his girlfriend at the time (now wife), that there was a severe lack of affordable and original art in Austin. So fifteen years ago, he decided to take the plunge and open Austin Art Garage, a welcoming gallery featuring reasonably priced artwork in a variety of mediums by different artists (now over 40). And a few years after he opened the space, Jake started producing his own composite photography, made by layering and collaging digitally manipulated images. When did you know you wanted to become an artist? “I have gravitated toward creativity my entire life, in writing, music and graphic design, but I always looked at it as a hobby. As much as I wanted to choose a creative path in life, I always chose practical paths, like business school over liberal arts, and office jobs over artistic trades, and then pursued my creative activities after work and school. Nevertheless, as I grew into adulthood, I realized that having creative outlets was essential to my happiness, and yet, I had less time to be creative. I was 28 years old and in my seventh year working in advertising and marketing at the Austin Business Journal, and I was ready for a career change, but I didn’t want to follow

the same path. I was in a slump; something was missing. After returning from a solo trip through Western and Eastern Europe, urban exploring, visiting amazing art museums and geeking out with travel photography, it was clear to me that I needed a career change that combined my business skills with my creative hobbies. The Austin Art Garage was the answer. I could use my business talents and be surrounded in a world of creativity, with the hopes of eventually creating my own art for the gallery. It was always in the back of mind that I wanted to become a working artist, but at first, my main focus was creating a successful gallery.” Can you talk about your path to becoming a working artist? “Ironically, I didn’t actually try creating art until about four months after opening the Austin Art Garage. Running the gallery, I was immersed in art every day. It was infectious, and I wanted to participate. I tried my hand at painting, but in the end, I honestly wouldn’t have accepted my art in the gallery without feeling bias, as it wasn’t up

of photography to look like surreal painterly landscapes, which I called composite photography (layers). My body of work is diverse and yet can be lumped into two design categories — composite photography, and digital mixed media (sometimes combined). However, I would also categorize my art in series, such as the Austin series, space or sci-fi series, pulp collage series, 80’s movie poster series, nature series and experimental digital collage series. The Austin series is the largest, but I’m always trying to progress in other unique and creative designs and themes.” Where do you find your inspiration? “My main source of inspiration is movies, music and sometimes video games. These really influence the style of the art. For instance, If I’m really into a new creative sci-fi show with great cinematography, my art gets really epic looking. If it’s a drama or true crime, it gets a little darker. Same goes for music — the vibe of the music can sometimes influence the style.”

to snuff. Then I remembered how much I loved travel photography. So I purchased a printer and some frames and starting making five to six small titles that I sheepishly installed around the gallery. After a few days, they had sold out, and I guess that’s when I realized I was a ‘working’ artist. It was a great feeling and something that I felt contributed to helping other artists succeed. Knowing the process of selling art, as an artist and gallery owner.” How would you describe your body of work? “I thought a lot of photography around Austin looked the same (the same angle shot of the 360 Bridge comes to mind). I wanted my art and photography to be different, so I decided to use my graphic design skills to create layers

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By Darcie Duttweiler

Photos by Phil Kline

Much like pole dancing, which caught on a decade or so ago as an alternative workout, in recent years aerial classes have also become a fun way to move your body instead of hitting the gym. However, unlike Montreal and Seattle, which are the homes to Cirque du Soleil and Acrobatic Conundrum respectively, Austin isn’t quite bursting at the seams with aerial exhibitions. In the capital city, there are a handful of studios and performance groups, but the art form is still relatively under the radar compared to the plethora of live music, dance and theatre shows Austinities enjoy year-round. These three aerial artists are hoping to change that.


Sonnie Boyson at Laché Movement


SONNIE BOYSON: THE COMMUNITY BUILDER LACHÉ MOVEMENT CO-OWNER Sonnie Boyson admits

she bounced around from friend group to friend group until she found herself involved with the Austin aerial community. “I just have all these people that I know now, and we all work together to create fun things and be a part of things together,” Boyson says. “They shifted my whole perspective on humanity and how humans connect.” It was that connection that drove Boyson to seek out pole dancing at first, before gradually taking lyra lessons, simply to find out what else her body could physically do. Eventually, she began teaching classes, while still working as an engineer at National Instruments, before being approached to become a co-owner at Laché Movement. “Dmitri Gonzalez was starting a parkour studio and wanted to include aerials because there was such a demand for it. I am so in love with this community, so it was important for me to create that space for them,” Boyson says. Now, she’s working full-time at Laché Movement, managing the gym while also teaching pole and lyra lessons to both kids and adults, as well as managing to find some spare time to still perform on several different apparatuses — including lyra, flying pole, cube, sling and infinity lyra (which looks like a figure eight) — with her own aerial company, Fly Unfeathered. Boyson’s goal is to not only entertain Austinites, but also educate her fellow performers on how to not BEING A WRITER opens up Tolly Moseley to more than just be a starving artist and push the market to understand how much training and her body movements when it comes to performing. It’s dedication goes into the art. Aerials can be quite expensive, so it’s challenging that aspect of storytelling as an aerialist that most excites to perform an art that the city hasn’t quite realized the demand for yet. her after performing for more than 10 years on various ap“We’re getting all these new, young aerialists, but it’s hard to find those opparatuses. She got her first taste of what mediums marry portunities to perform, so we’re trying to find businesses who want to give that well with the art of aerial during a 2016 Rapt Aerial Dance space. It’s the type of art our weird, fun city can support,” she explains. show called “Bedpost Confessions,” which juxtaposed aeIn addition, Boyson also teaches others how to become better coaches and rial silk performances with personal narratives being told consults with people trying to open their own studios across the state. Before on stage. she left her job at National Instruments, she took an aptitude course to discover “It was so cool to be able to bring writers and aerialists what her core principles were, and she discovered that was helping others in as in and put them in conversation in a show like that,” Mosemany ways as she could in a healthy, supportive community. ley says. “It was unique in the aerial world to combine text “Opening a studio is such an amazing way to create an opportunity for as and aerials at that time.” many people as possible to start their version of healing and improving lives Since then, Moseley has been finding other interesting through movement,” she says. “This is what I’m supposed to be doing — helpways to combine more art forms in her works. From actors ing people and guiding this community so that they can then go create their to musicians and even to videographers, she’s constantly communities.” striving to push the envelope and create a whole new per-

TOLLY MOSELEY: THE INTERSECTIONALIST

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Tolly Moseley at Laché Movement


LEILA NOONE: THE ATHLETE

formance art centered around aerial routines. More recently during COVID, she worked with local actors, Erica Lies and Ted Meredith, as well as her musician husband Ross Carnes, and videographer Jared Sosa, to direct a video project called “How Are You?” where she twists and twirls to great heights while exploring those three little words that seemed to take on new weight in 2020. “Most people think of aerial as this kind of a whimsical work, but I try to find collaborative entities that are not aerialists and bring them together to create an interesting experience for the audience,” Moseley explains. “Every aerialist wants to tell a story, but the audience members don’t know the story, so bringing in the spoken word or actors with the movement is really exciting.” While she continues to teach and practice, Moseley is looking for her next big project, where she can introduce another medium: food. She’d love to create a dinner theatre focused on the relationship between pain and pleasure that the audience would experience while eating. She’d also love to incorporate more live music in her pieces and is itching to work with local band Golden Dawn Arkestra in the future. As for the audience heading to an aerial performance, she recommends to “come in with an open heart and mind. Be present. Presence creates an energetic conversation between the performer and audience member.”

IT COMES AS no surprise that Leila Noone loves to fly. As a child,

the former level 10 competitive gymnast and three-time “American Ninja Warrior” finalist spent hours upon hours in the backyard, where her dad rigged a giant rope swing. She always loved being in the air and climbing on things, so it was a natural fit that she would discover the world of aerial arts and become so entrenched in its community. Noone has been a gymnast since she was three years old, but it wasn’t until she took theatre classes in college that she became interested in performing. As a “circus artist” Noone is a trained acrobat, hand balancer, dancer, contortionist, aerialist, stunt woman and part of an acro duo. While she loves gymnastics and discovering new ways to move her body, aerial arts allow her to propel herself into something completely different: storytelling. “I was a monkey since birth, but when I found this medium, it took my athleticism to a completely different level,” Noone explains. Noone loves pushing the boundaries athletically and is known for her high-level tricks, such as balancing on her hands and shooting a bow and arrow with her feet. And many of her routines involve her being very, very high in the air. She’s performed an aerial rope number off a hot air balloon for the “The Aeronauts” premiere and also highlined across a canyon in Moab, Utah, while performing aerial silks 500 feet off the ground. “That’ll make your heart pound,” she chuckles. But it’s her softer side that Noone currently is most looking forward to exploring with her performances, like her current show “Unspun Tales,” which is a serene aerial fairy tale where she performs four different apparatuses set to Celtic music. “I’ve always been one to see how far I can go, but the flip side is compassion, empathy and vulnerability,” Noone explains. “And so, marrying that with my athleticism and then really tapping into my heart space is what I love about aerials. It’s not just physical, it’s therapeutic and it teaches you how to connect with humans through storytelling.”

LEARN THE ROPES Bat City Circus Silks and sling, cube, trapeze, cyr wheel, and lyra batcitycircus.fit

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Blue Lapis Light Silks and harness bluelapislight.org

Laché Movement Pole fitness, lyra, silks, and parkour lachemove.com

Sky Candy Bungee, circus fitness, lyra, rope, silks, sling, pole, and trapeze skycandyaustin.com


Leila Noone at Laché Movement


MAKE ALL THEIR WISHES COME TRUE WITH GIFTS FROM AUSTIN ARTISANS AND LOCAL BOUTIQUES By Darcie Duttweiler and Carrie Crowe

Let’s be honest, it’s boring to shop off of an Amazon wish list for your loved ones. There’s no thought or care involved, and the whole thing lacks pizazz and oomph. Instead, take a cue from our guide of locally made and sold wares that includes everything from incense to sapphires. This holiday season, whether you’re shopping for the most ardent music fan in the family or your picky mother-in-law, we’ve got you covered.

1. Lovard Mini Croissant Bag ($395) shoplovard.com 2. Covet Rye Hat ($795) covethats.com 3. Miranda Bennett Studio Bundle Dyed Neckerchief ($39) shopmirandabennet.com 4. Maison Louis Marie Eau de Parfum No.04 Bois de Balincourt ($92) The Garden Room

5. Understated Leather American Woman Jacket ($890) understatedleather.com

Featured Items: • This cute, small purse is reminiscent of a baked good Kanye West once rapped about — and we mean that as a compliment. Snag a bubblegum pink version for the ultimate statement piece. • If your gal is channeling her inner Kacey Musgraves, she’s definitely already coveting this amazing leather jacket for her finest golden hour selfie.

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OUTDOOR VOICE

Austin is one of the most outdoorsy cities in the country, so you definitely have one loved one who’s an avid hiker, biker or camper. Here’s some ideas on how to fill their stockings this year. 1. Yeti Tundra Haul Hard Cooler ($399.99) yeti.com 2. SUAVS The Zilker Sneaker ($95) suavshoes.com 3. Slow North Not Today Bugs Citronella Spritz ($20) slownorth.com 4. D esert Door Camp Blanket ($40) cargo.desertdoor.com 5. Pure Jerky Co Tripi’s One Pound Variety Gift Box ($75) purejerkco.com

Featured Items: • This cool gift box comes filled with a variety pack of handcrafted beef jerky made from 100 percent U.S. Angus beef. Yum! • While Harvest Red is the newest color of this classic Yeti cooler, you can’t go wrong with any of the hues. This rugged chiller will stand the test of time and be welcome on any camping (or glamping) trip.

L E AT H E R J AC K E T P H OTO B Y J A N E L L L S H I R TC L I F F. P U R S E P H OTO CO U R T E S Y O F LOVA R D .

For the girl who has everything, no graphic t-shirt is going to cut it. Splurge on your trendsetter with a luxurious bag or hat — or even some perfectly sultry sandalwood perfume.


C AP PHOTO BY T YLER HOOD. GROWLER PHOTO BY C AT PHOTO BY A SIA EIDSON . JAR PHOTO COURTE SY OF BARKIN ’ CREEK .

BREW BUD In addition to the Live Music Capital of the World, Austin is also well-known as a big beer and coffee town. Whether your BFF is a hop head or a pour over pro, these offerings are sure to give them ample buzz. 1. Blue Owl Brewing Fancy Ass Growler ($64) blueowlbrewing.com 2. Willie’s Remedy Hemp-Infused Dark Roast Blend Coffee ($25.50) shop.williesremedy.com 3. Son of a Sailor Saguaro Bottle Opener ($72) sonofasailor.co 4. Easy Tiger Classic Mug ($15) easytigerusa.com 5. Austin Beerworks Leather Beerdrop Cap ($30) austinbeerworks.com

Featured Items: • Every beer snob needs a fancy-ass growler, and Blue Owl Brewing’s 64-ounce vacuum-insulated container is BPA free and bound to keep their beer cold for at least 24 hours. • Austin Beerworks has some of the best merch of any brewery in the city, so get them something good with this custom stamped leather cap that’s also water repellent.

PETS ’ BEST FRIEND For the ones who say, “I didn’t rescue them, they rescued me,” these presents are the next best thing to actually buying them a new “fur baby.” 1. Barkin’ Creek Treat Jar with Baked Snacks ($21.95) bcdk.store 2. Annie Digs Laura Park Dog Pillow ($250) anniedigs.com 3. Svetlana Novikova Custom Pet Art Print (From $500) svetlananovikova.com 4. Boots & Arrow Grey Diamond Dog Poop Bag ($35) bootsandarrow.co 5. Made by Cleo Bow Tie Cat Collar Set ($27.95) etsy.com

Featured Items: • Cats are always dapper, but this floral Made By Cleo bowtie will turn any cat into a total Don Draper wannabe. Meow! • Fido won’t even know what he’s tasting when he chomps down on these delicious (we hope) hand-crafted snacks. Fill this gift jar with various flavors, including apple crackers, canine crackers, peanut butter cookies or pumpkin molasses cookies.

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PICKY MIL Sure, she raised your significant other, but will you ever please her? Spoil her rotten with these absolutely luxurious gifts and find out. 1. Hotel Saint Cecilia Kimono Robe ($220) hotelsaintceciliastore.com 2. August Sage Chunky Wool Blanket ($400) augustsage.com 3. Milk + Honey Milk Bath No. 05 ($32) milkandhoney.com 4. S quare Feathers Bombay Tiger Pillow ($262.50) shop.squarefeathers.com

ROCKSTAR From musician to record collector, we’ve all got a music man (or woman) in the family. Brighten the soundtrack of their life with these four gifts.

Featured Items: 1. Mondo: The Art of Soundtracks ($50) bookpeople.com 2. Waterloo WL-JK Guitar ($2,650) austinvintageguitars.com 3. Drive-By Truckers Live from Austin, TX Colored Vinyl ($26) store.newwestrecords.com 4. Scott Newton Willie Nelson 1974 Print (From $600) modernrocksgallery.com

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• Local art and collectible company Mondo started producing vinyl records more than 10 years ago, and this book is a musthave for any collector of posters, music or art. • Scott Newton is world-famous for his Willie Nelson black-andwhite prints, so snag this newly released 1974 print for any “redheaded stranger” fan.

5. Korman Fine Jewelry 18KT Emerald Cut Rainbow Sapphire Tennis Stretch Bracelet ($13,480) kormanfinejewelry.com

Featured Items: • If you really want to outdo any other family member this holiday season, go wildly extravagant with this gorgeous rainbow tennis bracelet from one of the city’s top jewelers. • Handcrafted from natural wool fibers from the mountains in Peru and looped entirely by hand, this lush, extra-chunky throw will have her feeling like she’s snuggling a cloud.

WILLIE NEL SON PHOTO BY SCOT T NEW TON . MONDO PHOTO COURTE SY OF MONDO. B L ANKET PHOTO BY EMMA MOREM .

WANT FOR CHRISTMAS


WANT FOR CHRISTMAS

SAUCE PHOTO BY CORY RIVADEMAR . COOKBOOK PHOTO COURTE SY OF AB R AMS . SWEETENE S COVE PHOTO COURTE SY OF SWEETENE S COVE. FL A SK PHOTO COURTE SY OF VE SPER AND VINE.

BEST DAD EVER No matter if he’s your dad or the father of your children, the man is impossible to shop for. So, treat the fella to some killer goods this holiday — and don’t forget the whiskey. 1. Sweetens Cove Blended Straight Bourbon Whiskeys ($199.72) sweetenscovespirits.com 2. Made In Tecovas Carving Knife ($169) madeincookware.com 3. Rogue Territory Supply Jacket ($398) stagprovisions.com 4. A lvies The Manchaca Boots ($345) alvies.com 5. Vesper and Vine Hammered Round Copper Flask ($140) vesperandvine.com

FOODIE: For the person who won’t let you touch your brunch without snapping a pic for the ‘Gram first, pick up some of the city’s best foodie finds.

Featured Items:

1. La Barbecue Sweet & Tangy Barbecue Sauces ($12/each) labarbecue.com 2. Frankie Jean You + Me + Tacos Pennant ($14.50) frankiejean.com 3. Round Rock Jelly & Co. Hot Pepper Jam ($10) roundrockjellyandco.com 4. Dai Due Chipotle Sambal ($10) daidue.com 5. T he Austin Cookbook: Recipes and Stores from Deep in the Heart of Texas ($29.99) bookpeople.com

• Finally in its own brick-andmortar shop in East Austin, it’s never been easier to grab some of the most delicious barbecue sauce in town. Since you won’t be able to decide between sweet and tangy, you’ll just have to get both bottles of La Barbecue’s finger-licking-good nectar. • One of the original Eater Austin editors, Paula Forbes knows her stuff. Your foodie friend can learn fun stories from some of the most famous Austin eateries and master a recipe or two in their own kitchen.

Featured Items: • Sweetens Cove is a blend of straight Tennessee bourbons that was inspired by the ritual of a shot of whiskey on the first tee at the golf course of the same name. Owned by Andy Roddick, Peyton Manning and others, this bottle was named the “No. 1 celebrity spirit in the world,” making it a fun gift for any golf aficionado. • He’s going to need something swanky and cool to sip that bourbon out of, and this retro-looking round hammered copper drinking vessel fits the bill. This flask is handmade in Austin from 100% recycled copper, which is said to have Ayurvedic health properties.

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WANT FOR CHRISTMAS

BIBLIOPHILE

1. E llsworth Kelly: Austin ($50) bookpeople.com 2. T he Midnight Assassin: The Hunt for America’s First Serial Killer ($18) bookpeople.com 3. God Save Texas: A Journey into the Soul of the Lone Star State ($16.95) bookpeople.com 4. T he Souvenir Museum: Stories ($26.99) bookpeople.com 5. Invisible in Austin: Life and Labor in an American City ($24.95) bookpeople.com

Featured Items: • The capital city is one of America’s most economically segregated cities, and this important sociological study explores the lives of those working at the bottom of the social order, including house cleaners, cooks, cab drivers and more. • No matter if they’ve seen the Ellsworth Kelly Blanton Museum of Art’s installation in person or not, the beauty and majestic use of color is bound to amaze them on the pages.

HOSTESS WITH THE MOSTEST If you can never last two seconds in their home before they offer you a snack (with a pressed serviette, naturally), the following items would definitely be welcome in their well-stocked abode. 1. Eliana X Stampworthy Goods Tiled Tray ($304) elianabernard.com 2. Katie Kime Cheetahs Folded Notecards ($28) katiekime.com 3. Tawa Threads Sunburst Summer Rays ($124.99) tawathreads.com 4. V oChill Perfect Pair Wine Chiller ($84.99) vochill.com 5. Noah Marion Leather Coasters ($60) noahmarion.com

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Featured Items: • No hostess is complete without a gorgeous tray to serve their famous cocktails or hors d’oeuvres on, and this bright and festive pink tiled one with gold accents is practically dripping in opulence. • You wouldn’t dare rest a glass on their table, so the gift of these luxurious-yet-sturdy leather coasters from Noah Marion is basically a gift to yourself.

ELL SWORTH KELLY BOOK PHOTO COURTE SY OF B L ANTON MUSEUM OF ART. TR AY PHOTO BY K ATIE JAME SON PHOTOGR APHY. COA STER S PHOTO BY PHILIP HARDER .

If they dream of floor-to-ceiling bookshelves in a home library to rival the one in Beauty and the Beast, they can obviously use more books. Head to BookPeople and pick up some tomes from famous ATX writers or intriguing non-fiction reads on a plethora of interesting topics.


WANT FOR CHRISTMAS

KIDS BIG AND SMALL

APRON PHOTO BY CR AIG NIGH .

From toddlers to kids at heart, there’s a little something for everyone, whether they’re learning to ride a bike for the first time, exploring their love of cooking, or trying to master a brand-new card game. 1. The Heart of Cthulhu Card Game ($39.99) emeraldtaverngames.com 2. Texas Musicians Coloring Book ($25) hotelmagdalenastore.com 3. Woom Bike ($359) us.woombikes.com 4. Pool Burger Best Buns in Town Toddler Tee ($20) mcguire-moorman-hospitality. myshopify.com 5. Austin Nature Works Kid Friendly Flower Press ($46) austinnatureworks.com 6. Erin Condren Dreams in Bloom Notebook ($15) erincondren.com

7. Savilino Mini Myung Kids’ Apron ($50) savilino.com

Featured Items: • Created by Austin-based artist and conservation biologist Patrick Kelleher, this new card game was a smash hit on Kickstarter earlier this year. Inspired by classic tabletop card games, this indie adventure game includes more than 200 original works of art and is allegedly easy to master … if you dare. • Got a sous chef in the making? Nurture their interest of helping in the kitchen with this adorable Savilino apron, which matches the exact same style for adults.

WITCHY WOMAN No matter if she’s going to cast a spell or not, these trinkets are ideal for anyone oozing Stevie Nicks vibes. 1. Roux Saint James Dreamer Fragrance ($105) rouxstjames.com 2. Apothecary Made Palo Santo Incense ($13) apothecarymade.com 3. Carrie Moss Harmonize Your Chakras Gift Certificate ($325 for two sessions) carriemoss.world 4. 7 th Street Candle Gardenia Mint Wooden Bowl Candle ($40) 7thstreedcandle.co 5. Karacotta Ceramics Ocean Abalone Smudge Dish ($36) karacotta.com

Featured Items: • Not only do the scents from Roux Saint James smell, dare we say, dreamy, but the small perfumery creates intention-based botanical compounds with all-natural ingredients, adding in a dose of aromatherapy. • Inspired by the sea, this abalone dish, crafted for use with a smudge stick or bundle, would also make the most adorable jewelry holder.

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Claire Puckett

Austin Classical Guitar Inspires Hope and Artistic Vision STUDENTS FIND LIFELONG BENEFITS THROUGH MUSIC By Bryan C. Parker Photos by Phil Kline

A

USTIN IS A CITY BURSTING AT THE SEAMS WITH MUSICAL talent, and some of its youngest residents tap into their abilities in grade school thanks to the work of Austin Classical Guitar. Formed in 1990, the non-profit organization works in around 50 Austin-area schools to teach the fundamentals of guitar and the joy of artistic expression through music. Travis Marcum, ACG’s Director of Education since 2005, says the program’s primary function is inspiring and motivating students, both within music as well as their lives generally. “Being creative and making music with your peers, performing classical guitar, writing songs, and composing — these are things that are fundamentally nourishing and have all kinds of positive benefits,” he says. ACG performs dozens of concerts per year, and instructors sometimes

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Angelica Campbell

provide private lessons, but most of the program’s work is in Central Texas schools, where they assist band and orchestra directors or teach their own guitar classes. That instruction is free of charge to districts and is funded through individual donors, grants and foundations. Marcum’s first project with ACG was working to establish a guitar program at McCallum High School — an experience he calls “awe-inspiring and energizing.” The nascent program lucked into two incredibly talented students, Fabi Reyna and Claire Puckett. Young adults are prone to skepticism with any newcomer, and Reyna was no exception when Marcum arrived. But after a few weeks, something began to change. “When you put a guitar in your lap and sit face to face, we let our collective guard down,” says Marcum. Reyna fell in love with guitar and went on to found She Shreds, a magazine devoted to women and gender non-conform-


power of music as a teen struggling with depression while attending Travis High School. “The only time I really felt happy was when I was doing something creative with my time, my favorite use of time being guitar,” she says. Guitar led her to UT’s Butler School of Music, where she furthered her musical training. Along the way, her former ACG teachers stayed in touch with her and offered supportive encouragement. That connection turned into a career when Campbell accepted a communications role with ACG at the beginning of this year. Alumnus Justice Phillips says ACG gave him “real performance opportunities in great halls,” tangible experiences that many young musicians don’t have. His role has come full circle, as he now composes music for ACG students to perform for special projects in public performances and in classes at school.

MY GOAL IS THAT WE ESTAB LIS H A RELATIO N S H I P TO ART, SO IT MAKES TH EM B ETTER H U MAN S AN D B ETTER AT CO PI NG WITH LI FE I N GEN ER AL

Justice Phillips

ing musicians. She’s currently on tour with Sleater-Kinney, one of indie rock’s most famous bands. Puckett also pursued a music career, first by performing original music in Austin bands such as Mother Falcon and Hikes and, more recently, by joining the staff of ACG. Puckett says being a guitar student gave her patience and a strong work ethic, but more importantly, it provided stability. “My teenage years were a bit tumultuous, but when I was in ensemble or preparing for a solo performance, I felt there was a clear path,” she says. Now, she fosters that same emotional clarity as the Program Manager for the Music and Healing department of ACG, a sector of the organization that helps people use music to process challenges like poverty, homelessness, or physical and mental health diagnoses. Former ACG student Angelica Campbell experienced that same healing

One branch of ACG’s education program works with incarcerated youth in facilities such as Gardner Betts Juvenile Justice Center in Austin and the Williamson County Juvenile Detention Center. Students in such facilities continue their high school coursework, but offerings can be limited. According to Jeremy Osborne, the Juvenile Justice Program Director for ACG, the only option for an arts elective credit was computer-based until ACG initiated their program. Many of the young adults in these facilities have little agency in their lives. “Everything is mandated, scheduled, watched over,” Osborne explains. But precious moments in guitar class offer opportunities for expression and creativity. In short, it’s an escape from the confines of the walls around them. Osborne begins teaching students to perform songs on the first day of class, asking individual students to play a single note in rhythm to craft an ensemble piece together. That immediate success is transformative, especially for students trying to rebuild their lives. Osborne doesn’t approach teaching with the goal of making students into career musicians or concert guitarists. Instead, he says, “My goal is that we establish a relationship to art, so it makes them better humans and better at coping with life in general.” Ultimately, working with guitar affords all of the program’s students similar benefits. Whether incarcerated or enrolled in an arts magnet school, Osborne says learning guitar “helps them to be more introspective and gives them a voice for themselves.” austinclassicalguitar.org tribeza.com

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ART BREAK

By Tolly Moseley Photos by TBD

FOUR CREATIVE SPACES THAT BREAK FROM TRADITION BY TOLLY MOSELE Y

Here in Austin, innovative artwork abounds. Throw a rock and hit a gorgeous mural; throw another, and hit a casually amazing band poster. But don’t get it twisted: we’ve got galleries! And museums! It’s just that our idea of “art” is expansive, and doesn’t always fit on a white wall. So in that spirit, here are four spaces that expand the concept of a gallery: these places are designed for immersion, and perfect for exploration.

Installation by Mesmerize Photo by Dalton Sessumes

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Installation by Mesmerize Photo by Zac Miles

ROYAL TURKEY

MESMERIZE What do you get when you take veterans of Austin’s live music scene, pedigreed by the laser light show concerts of the 2010s, and give them an art-friendly space like Native Hostel? You get a reality-bending, maze-slash-art-game, where futuristic rooms coalesce into an overarching narrative about an amateur tinkerer named Mesmer who’s accidentally stumbled into one or several parallel universes. Was that not obvious? Jokes aside, artist duo Clayton Lillard and Mateo Gutierrez, along with Antonio Madrid, creative collaborator and founder of Native Hostel, have a bold vision for Mesmerize. All three love art parties; all three have a background in artistic event production. Together, Clayton and Mateo run Independent Event Creatives, a creative production company with clients like Netflix and Fender Guitars; Antonio is a partner in HOPE Outdoor Gallery and has helped facilitate several immersive art shows, spanning SXSW to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. But with Mesmerize, they’ve taken all of their art event chops, and turned them into something special: a mystery story. “Our whole mission with Mesmerize is to innovate with storytelling to create multi-sensory experiences that inspire joy and community,” says Clayton. And they were successful: Mesmerize opened pre-pandemic at Native Hostel, and stayed open (safely) to provide some desperately needed wonder. Now, they’re looking to the future: Clayton, Mateo and Antonio are sourcing a permanent home for Mesmerize, where they can take their immersive art-meets-storytelling vision to the next level. Announcement coming soon, and in the meantime, savor their social media, where neon lights, outer space and hidden clues transport you to, dare I say? An alternate universe. thisismesmerize.com

There’s an art to putting together a beautiful home, as Royal Turkey founders Courtney Blanton and Claudia Geoly are well aware. That’s why their home goods store, Royal Turkey, feels decidedly “gallery” in presentation, with furniture and collectibles made for ogling. Love wood-heavy, French antiques? Got ‘em. How about art deco Miami? Yup! The ultra-democratic approach to curation makes Royal Turkey a fresh face in Austin, where — let’s face it — mid-century modern has had a stranglehold over our home decor for a while now. Not that it’s bad! It’s just that, with all due respect to Danish-style simplicity, there are lots of ways to be stylish. Royal Turkey gets it. “It’s just a fun, funky space, with ‘fun’ as the keyword,” says Courtney. “We have a hot pink bathroom with neon lights,

we have a littles’ room entirely for small accessories, we love color, we love the 80s. Everything we source is a true collector’s piece, but in addition to Italian, French and Spanish influences, we love working with local artists. We’re trying to keep Austin weird.” In that vein, be on the lookout for work by decorative artist Caroline Lizarraga, a west coast painter who’s graced the pages of Architectural Digest and ELLE Décor, and will be designing the entrance to Royal Turkey. On November 12 from 5-8pm, you can catch an exhibition of her piece and a spotlight on local Austin artist Robert Wymer, accompanied by bubbles and brew. On November 13 from 12-5pm, enjoy a single day showing of their work. theroyalturkey.com

Fluorescent Lighting Installation by Courtney Blanton “El Loco” by Pepe Mateo Mas 1945 - 2007 Painting Photo by Brittany Dawn Short tribeza.com

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WONDERSPACES What started in San Diego as a pop-up concept in 2016, Wonderspaces is now a national arts organization with spots all over country ... including one right here in Austin, just over a year old. Wonderspaces seeks to fill a gap in the art world: their artists play with light, sound and ideas, creating multi-sensory experiences that on-site staff are trained (hard) to install. But if you’re anything like me, meaning Wonderspaces has already targeted you via Instagram ads, let me disabuse you of my former notion: it’s more than a light show! (Though the light shows are fantastic.) They’ve got new pieces every four to six weeks, and some that are not only interactive, but straight-up crowdsourced. “Our Top 100” by Jody Servon, on display now, is a community-built playlist that asks vis-

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itors to share their favorite songs — and more importantly, the memories they attach to them. The result? A displayed set of stories about music and its meaning, accompanied by a real-life Spotify playlist. New this month, you can check out “Arc” by Ian Brill: an audiovisual piece that invites visitors under an archway of twinkling digital creations, constantly in a state of disruption. It’s pieces like these that epitomize the success of Wonderspaces: to host art that’s playful enough for kids, contemplative enough for grownups. Speaking of grownups: there’s a bar! Enjoy a signature cocktail while traipsing around Wonderspaces, giggling and selfie-ing to your heart’s delight. wonderspaces.com

BIG MEDIUM Big Medium enjoys something of a bridge status here in Austin, elevating the contemporary art community with shows and gallery space, while carving out funky, feelgood events that allow you to walk right into an artist’s backyard (they produce the annual Austin Studio Tour). But at their gallery proper, housed in Canopy Austin, an art and business collective on Springdale Road, they source evocative pieces from the world over. “We strive to help artists play,” says Coka Treviño, Big Medium’s Curator and Director of Programming, who tells me about EPCOT: Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, a multi-media work by artist Jerónimo Reyes-Retana. One of her favorite recent pieces at Big Medium’s gallery, EPCOT shone a light on Playa Bagdad, a fishing community near the U.S.-Mexico border, situated perilously close to the launch site of SpaceX. EPCOT is an “ongoing field research process throughout the community of Playa Bagdad,” where environmental protections are scarce, SpaceX rages on, and in the quest to colonize Mars, a piece of Earth is treated as more or less disposable. The artist made recordings of a launch from Playa Bagdad, so that visitors can experience what locals experience: shaking glass, caused by eardrum-pounding engine noise. This month, you can check out work by Ariel René Jackson and Michael J. Love, winners of the fourth annual Tito’s Prize. For their work (running through January 8, 2022), they both interviewed their grandmothers, and use their words to inform a unique piece set with animation and lighting. It’s a reflection of Big Medium’s vision: to make space for art that utilizes every available human sense, and invites us into artists’ process of discovery. bigmedium.org


Programmed Underworld by Jerónimo Reyes-Retana 2021 Dimensions Variable Photo by Ted Martinez tribeza.com

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Sharon Keshishian

Austin Glows Up THESE ARTISTS ARE KEEPING NEON ALIVE IN OUR CHANGING CIT Y By Veronica Meewes Photos by Drew Anthony Smith

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T’S NO SECRET THAT AUSTIN LIGHTS UP AT NIGHT, BUT SOME WILL TELL YOU it burned a lot brighter back in the day. And we’re not talking about the buzz of nightlife (that is surely alive and well), but rather the neon giving life to its streets. These glowing signs sparked joy and awakened a calling for Todd Sanders on his first visit to Austin in 1990. “As I drove through the city, I saw that neon, and all of a sudden I knew: this is where I want to live,” he remembers. “This is what I want to do. I want to make neon signs.” The Art Institute of Houston graduate hooked his Spartan trailer up to his truck, drove it to Austin and found work at a neon shop called Ion Art, located then in downtown Austin. Artist Sharon Keshishian founded the studio in 1986 with her husband Greg after learning the art and science of neon bending at a small shop in Houston. Now, Ion Art occupies a 20,000-square-foot space in South Austin and employs 35 artists, designers, fabricators and project managers. Neon bending consists of delicately blowing into different sized glass tubes while bending the molten glass into shapes. Natural gasses (neon, argan, mercury and helium all produce different colors) are added to the tubes and sealed off with electrodes on each end. The electrodes are then hooked up to transformers, which amp the power up to a high voltage to illuminate the tube. Keshishian has been the only female tube bender in

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Austin for the last 35 years, and one of few in the country — and now she’s teaching the art to her two daughters, ages 24 and 26. “We started off as an art company, but then it evolved into a signage company because people started asking us for signage and architectural decor,” says Keshishian, who is best known for the colorful ATX sign outside of Whole Foods’ flagship store, but has designed and fabricated signs and sculptures (both with and without neon) all over the city. “Now it’s kind of circled back to being more of an art company again, which is very exciting.” After Sanders honed his craft working for Keshishian, he branched out and opened Roadhouse Relics, a commercial neon sign shop of his own, in a rundown fruit stand on South 1st Street. His very first customer was Eddie Wilson, the owner of Threadgill’s. “He’s like a father to me,” says Sanders. “He gave me a chance early on. I pulled into the parking lot of Threadgill’s and said, ‘Eddie, my name is Todd. I’m the only guy in town that loves neon as much as you and I want to start restoring and repairing it for you.’” Sanders went on to restore and maintain hundreds of signs for Threadgill’s and a roster of other clients over the course of 25 years. But in 2005, thanks to the encouragement of his now-wife (who he proposed to in neon, of course!), he decided to turn his commercial sign shop into an art studio and gallery showcasing his own flawlessly distressed, vintage-inspired western Americana works. “If you want one of my neon signs, it has to look like it’s been on Route 66 for 50 years,” he says. “And I don’t think I could have started that anywhere but Austin.”

I HAVE O FTEN SAI D THAT N EO N S IGN S ARE A SCU LPTU RE, CLOAKED I N A PAI NTI NG, U N D ERN EATH A LI N ED R AWI NG - I N - LIGHT. TH ERE IS NO OTH ER M ED I U M LI KE THAT For the first couple years after the rebrand, he focused on building props for movie sets, commissioned by directors like Robert Rodriguez and Terrence Malik. Then The New York Times listed Roadhouse Relics as a must-see gallery in Austin, and business blew up. Now he ships his large-scale neon art pieces all over the world. He’s created commissioned artwork for celebrities like Kasey Musgraves and Willie Nelson, and he’s shown in galleries alongside artists from Shepherd Fairey to Jasper Johns. “I became interested in [neon] as a ‘folk art’ back in the seventies, especially after an esteemed Yale architecture professor de-


clared that neon signs were in fact both art and architecture, and were worthy of academic study as such,” remembers Evan Voyles. “I have often said that neon signs are a sculpture, cloaked in a painting, underneath a line-drawing-in-light. There is no other medium like that!” When Voyles grew up in Austin, he remembers his mom referring to Burnet Road as “the neon jungle” (which inspired his design company of the same name). He returned to the city after graduating from Yale as an English major, teaching himself the craft by dissecting and reassembling his extensive vintage neon collection. He built his first sign in 1991 and has now crafted over 500 more, including most of the iconic pieces that light up South Congress Avenue. Though illuminated signs are just as popular as ever, proper neon is becoming a bit more obsolete, as many businesses are turning to less expensive LED lights for commercial signage. Furthermore, neon artists are finding it harder and harder to source the materials

Todd Sanders

they need to keep creating; there is a shortage of colored glass tubes, which need to be imported from Murano, Italy, and many of the companies that used to sell neon components have gone out of business. “In the ‘golden age’ of neon — the 1930s, 40s, and 50s — neon wasn’t just evocative: it was the dominant technology available,” explains Voyles. “Now we have plastic faces and vinyl graphics and fluorescent lamps and LEDs to compete, but none of those is in any way as evocative as genuine, handmade neon signage — probably because it is handmade and produces a light and an intention and gut feeling that no latter-day technology can match.” “There’s something about neon — the gas and the glass — that kind of speaks to a more primal part that LED can never match,” Sanders agrees. “I always think of neon like a modern campfire or a full moon: it really affects you spiritually.” Besides being replaced by newer technology, neon has been threatened through the years by dark sky ordinances and increasing regulations in cities across the U.S. While Austin hasn’t entirely outlawed it, the Historic Commission has implemented a lengthy and costly permitting process that makes it a lot more difficult to install new neon signage, particularly in certain neighborhoods — like downtown Austin. “Back in the 1950s, the petroleum industry started trying to outlaw neon because a lot of the new plastic faces were made from petroleum,” explains Sanders. “So they started demonizing neon and it went from this elegant light form to becoming symbolic of the seedy part of town. And it’s unfortunate because, when neon left downtown Austin, that’s when a lot of downtown started dying.” “All those downtown buildings used to have neon signs so it really is historical; if you look at some old pictures of Congress from the 40s through the 60s, nearly every other sign was neon,” says Keshishian, who says she has debated with the Austin Historical Society on multiple occasions and continues to advocate for what she calls a dying art form. But Voyles sees things differently: “Neon — at least in Austin — is not a dying art, per se. It is thriving in the hands of the craftsmen and craftswomen who pursue it. There are fewer of us than ever, certainly, but we are busy.” “I think what’s gonna really happen with neon is it’s going to be more used as an art medium in the future,” predicts Keshishian, whose most recent projects include a sculpture for The Rolling Stones latest tour and several neon installations for Elon Musk’s Starbase community in Boca Chica, Texas. She’s also bringing neon to the people in other forms; from 2017 through 2019, Ion Art built dozens of fantastical, interactive neon installations and sculptures for a party called Surreal, which they hosted on their six-acre property. Though last year’s event was cancelled due to COVID, the next Surreal will be a 10-day neon extravaganza held at Zilker Botanical Garden this April, with funds supporting the city’s parks. What better way to illuminate this unparalleled urban art form? “I got a good feeling about Austin from the neon, so I’m proud to have been a part of giving other people that feeling,” says Sanders. “What it does is create this identity, where the whole city becomes its own collective work of art.” ionart.com roadhouserelics.com tribeza.com

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Photo by Clay Grier

The Jewel of Music Lane LOCAL JEWELRY RETAILER NAK ARMSTRONG OPENS ITS FL AGSHIP STORE IN SOCO By Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Brittany Dawn Short

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F

ROM THE SIDEWALK, IT’S NOT EASY TO TELL WHAT’S IN STORE FOR you as you walk into the new Nak Armstrong flagship at the SoHo House development on Music Lane. Nestled next to a greenery wall neighboring Aba, the shop is practically a jewelry box in itself. When you step inside, you’re greeted by a 10-foot-tall, freestanding chartreuse velvet pod that’s reminiscent of a luxurious gift just waiting to be unwrapped. (Interestingly enough, it houses the showroom’s restroom.) Once past the box, you’ll find gorgeous hand-cut mosaic marble tiles at your feet, evoking a Milanese vibe. A peppering of terracotta tiles reduces the stuffiness and lends a slightly more casual feel. Farther in, in the center of the store, deep green and walnut display cases proudly show off the colorful pieces from both the eponymous line and Armstrong’s newest


M UCH O F TH E STO RE’S D ES IGN I N S PI R ATIO N WAS D R AWN FRO M A VIS IT NAK AN D H IS S POUS E WALTER MAD E TO M I LAN Nakard collection. Farther in the back of the space, a comfortable kidney-shaped couch, embroidered chair, a Fort Lonesome framed upholstered art piece, along with green succulents make you feel like you’re in a downtown condo of a close friend who has exquisite taste, which was by design, according to Armstrong. “We wanted to have a classic design but also a residential feel. It’s intimate, but you’re a part of a community,” he says. “It’s a mixture of luxe and casual. Mixture of masculine and feminine. It should be comfortable for men and women to shop in here.” Much of the store’s design inspiration was drawn from a visit Nak and his spouse Walter made to Milan, which instilled a love for the city’s mid-century Brutalist architecture and use of muted jewel tones. That aesthetic is echoed throughout the store, from the floor to the velvet trimmings, all of which make the showroom

the perfect vessel in which to peruse the gorgeous jewels. “Our jewelry has a lot of layers and details, so we decided that we need to show the layering of the store, but in a more subtle, monochromatic way because we don’t want to compete with the jewelry. We want to highlight the stones and all the work, but we’re in a small space so it can easily become overwhelming,” Armstrong says. Quietly opened last winter, the flagship space was three years in the making with Austin’s Ann Tucker and her team at Studio A Group. Although CFDA-winning fine jewelry designer Armstrong has been selling out collections at luxury stores like Bergdorf Goodman, Moda Operandi and Barneys for 10 years (and for longer with his previous award-winning line Anthony Nak), having a space all his own was important to him so that he could dictate how his jewelry was displayed. “This was an opportunity to say who we are as a brand, from top to bottom, in every detail,” Armstrong explains. “This is how we want to show our brand. The store is the center of the universe where everything radiates.” While the Nak Armstrong collection is goldbased with precious gemstones, the new diffusion line Nakard aims to make Armstrong’s pieces more accessible to a younger crowd who might just now be starting their own jewelry collections. “It serves as an entry to the brand,” he says. Although the two lines are separate with different metals and stones, the intricate designs can clearly be seen in every piece. Using his signature stone plissé technique in several pieces (in which the metal is pleated and almost appears in waves), Armstrong shows off his background in both architecture and textile designs beautifully. “Our jewelry is made to be worn like a piece of clothing. It should feel of your body and not something apart from it,” Armstrong describes. Along with the unique silhouettes and the unexpected use of color, Armstrong’s designs are distinctively his. And, unlike most jewelry designers, the majority of the stones used in the two collections are hand-cut to each specific piece, instead of the other way around, which he likens to an interior designer creating their own wallpaper. “It gives us something entirely our own,” he says before laughing. “I never do things the easy way!” nakarmstrong.com tribeza.com

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Hot Times in the City E XPLORING THE ART OF GL ASSBLOWING AT GHOST PEPPER GL ASS By Amanda Eyre Ward Photos by Gregg Cestaro

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FIRST SAW GLASSBLOWING WHEN I WAS NINE YEARS OLD,” says Katie Plunkard, the owner and manager of Ghost Pepper Glass, a wonder of an art studio and classroom in East Austin. “I was on a family trip — a cruise. One of the ports was Malta. We toured around the island and ended up at a glass studio. I kind of got fascinated with it. I just got hooked.” Plunkard stands in front of her studio’s main melting furnace, which burns at two thousand degrees Fahrenheit and is named “Beyonce.” Along with Education Coordinator Shara Funari and a team of fellow artists and instructors, Plunkard maintains the studio to teach glassblowing and have a chance to create.

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Her dogs, Archer and Ghost, lounge on cots far enough away from Beyonce to feel a bit of the cool Austin night. The studio is named after Ghost, a white German Shepherd. “I love spicy food, so Ghost is affectionately called ‘ghost pepper,’” she says. “Our logo has a fiery pepper, but on our t-shirts and business cards and everything, there’s a very subtle kind of hidden silhouette of Ghost in all the imagery.” My husband and I have come to Ghost Pepper Studio to take an evening glassblowing class. We’ve been married for twenty years, so we jump at the chance for a “hot date” when we can find it. When I told him I had planned an adventure and to wear closed-toe shoes and bring lots of water, he smiled — ever game. Now, we stand in Katie’s studio, preparing to make our own treasures — I’m making an ornament, and Tip, a terrarium. The studio hosts a variety of classes, from one-night dates

and private lessons to team-building workshops to weeks-long craft seminars. (All the classes are listed on the website; Katie says her favorite groups are work gatherings where people start out nervous and end up laughing.) Ghost Pepper is also a gallery featuring the work of local artists like Michael W. Hall, Chaos Woods and Love Studio Ceramics. Katie’s own artwork is breathtaking. “I play with patterns,” she tells me. “I love the type of glassmaking that utilizes something called cane, like candy cane — so sticks of glass, kind of ribbons of color. You create a pattern, and then you stretch it. Then you bundle it, twist it again.” Katie shows us a video of this process, and we admire her affordable and intricate glasses. She also designs cups and vases that inspire thoughts of peacocks, trying to “emulate the feather pattern and the peacock eye and put it onto something.” Her favorite pieces (and mine) are sculptures she calls “urban aviaries.” They’re large vessels that Katie fills with scenes of birds and branches and flowers on the inside. In the sweltering studio, my husband and I put on safety goggles, and I hoist a blow pipe. With Katie supervising carefully, I insert the metal rod into a furnace filled with glowing, molten glass. I turn the pipe, “scooping” up glass and then (again, with Katie’s help) moving it to a metal table where I twist the malleable orb in color. Jamming metal pliers into the glass blob to move the color around is immensely satisfying. Then I place my masterpiece back into the maw of Beyonce to heat the glass again. Katie explains there’s no thermometer because you can tell “from the movement and color” of the glass how hot it is, how hot it needs to be. (It seems important to point out here that I could not tell … clearly this knowledge, second nature to Katie, is earned through years of work.)

GHOST PEPPER IS ALSO A GALLERY FEATU RI NG TH E WO RK O F LOCAL ARTISTS Eventually, we use a pump on one end of the rod (“No blowing during Covid,” Katie explains wryly) to inflate my glass into a sphere. Katie twists a “hook,” and we set my gorgeous object aside to cool. I love the way it turned out — a blue orb shot through with white I twisted a bit, like a dreamy winter blizzard. Relaxing afterward at a picnic table in the side yard of the studio, I tell Katie how exhilarating and fun I thought it was to work with hot glass, to stand so near to Beyonce. “She’s a beast,” says Katie, grinning. ghostpepperglass.com tribeza.com

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WHERE EVERYBODY KNOWS THEIR NAME JIM MARSHALL’S ROCK PHOTOGRAPHY AT ACL LIVE By Tolly Moseley Photos by Gregg Cestaro and Jim Marshall

Johnny Cash flipping the bird, San Quentin Prison CA 1969

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Jim Marshall in his apartment, San Francisco early 1970s

IT’S

a funny thing, rock photography. Here in Austin, photos of musicians on stage are something of a backdrop everywhere we go: the sweat-streaked hair, the wide open mouths, the fingers mid-strum. Yeah, yeah, we think … another rock god — or, another marketing campaign / I-35 billboard / targeted Instagram ad, playing on our music sensibilities with the hottest young thing. Been there, done that. Nice try, national beer conglomerate! But then ... there’s Jim Marshall. A self-taught photographer bopping around San Francisco, Jim bought his first camera in 1959, before there was such a thing as rock n’ roll. He went on to become one of rock’s most relied-upon documentarians, turning icons into humans with casual, compassionate portraiture. But his first subjects? The legends of jazz, blues and folk, whose images line the walls of The Jack and Jim Gallery, at ACL Live at Moody Theater. tribeza.com

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THERE WAS A REAL TRUST THERE, BECAUSE JIM TREATED THEM LIKE PEOPLE

Janis Joplin on her psylodelic Porsche, Palace of Fine Arts SF 1968

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“Muddy Waters backstage at some club in a small town near Chicago,” Jim’s inscription reads under one photo. “Columbia Records sent me there. Johnny Winter was producing a live album for him. I shot Muddy a lot before. He was a real gentleman and a very influential musician. Probably got cheated out of millions over the years, like a lot of the blues guys,” says Jim. It’s the 10th Anniversary of The Jack and Jim Gallery, a longstanding collaboration between the theater and Jack Daniel’s. And in both his photos and his words, you get a sense of the intimacy Jim enjoyed with the musicians he shot, snapping carefully while carrying on a conversation. Maybe it’s because he never left home without a camera, treating it more or less as an extension of his body. “Jim wasn’t lugging around lighting equipment; he only used what was available to him,” says Amelia Davis, Jim’s assistant for the last 14 years, and executive producer of the new documentary, Show Me the Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall, now available for streaming on Apple TV. “Musicians forgot the camera was there, and they knew he would never publish or release a compromising photo of them,” says Amelia. “There was a real trust there, because Jim treated them like people. He could get starstruck, of course — he was starstruck around Miles Davis.


But his relationship to fame was an interesting one, because he very quickly learned how to treat stars like people.” On that note, let’s talk about Miles Davis. One of Jim’s first big photography subjects was John Coltrane, who in the early 60s, was looking for a ride to Berkeley out of San Francisco. By chance and circumstance, Jim offered to drive him — and then, proceeded to take a slew of photos of the interview itself. John loved them, a bond was formed, and Jim very quickly established himself on the west coast as a go-to music photographer. But then ... not all musicians are so forthcoming. “Jim was intimidated by Miles Davis, and tried to work up the courage to talk to him,” Amelia chuckles. “One night after a show, Jim called to him and said, ‘Hey Miles, why do you have a green trumpet?’ And Miles Davis yelled back,

Peter Frampton Day on the Green, Oakland 1976

Jimi Hendrix burning his guitar, Monterey Pop Festival 1967

‘Hey motherf*cker, I didn’t ask you why you had a black camera.’” The relationship was off to a rocky start. But Jim, who according to Amelia always felt like an outsider — he was poor, and came from an immigrant family — gravitated toward underdogs. In the early 60s, that was black musicians, and Jim wanted to use his camera to elevate their work. (Miles, by the way, eventually relented — only after seeing Jim’s beautiful portraiture of Miles’ own idol, John Coltrane.) In 1962, Jim moved to New York to establish himself, a venture that proved successful: seven years later, he was Woodstock’s chief photographer. But despite his success shooting live shows — he was Life Magazine’s official photographer for the Rolling Stones in 1972, and The Beatles’ photographer for their final show in Candlestick Park — it was the backstage, after-show moments that he especially loved. Moments we can see, too. “My favorite photo from the current collection is probably the infamous one of Johnny Cash, flipping the bird at San Quentin Prison,” says Happy Mercado, Director of Brand Partnerships at ACL Live at Moody Theater. “The story is that Jim asked Johnny to take a photo for the warden, and that’s how Johnny reacted. But in a previous collection, my favorite is a large color photograph of Janis Joplin perched

on top of her psychedelic painted Porsche 356C. The vivid colors of her car and the emotion in her face will forever bring a smile to my face.” Currently, The Jack and Jim Gallery has a virtual gallery available to the public, until the theater’s full gallery update coming 2022. But even there, you can see Jim’s tenderness toward his subjects — like in a particularly warm photo of Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillespie and Gerald Wilson during the 1963 Monterey Jazz Festival. “In the 1950s, when the Civil Rights movement was heating up, Dizzy served as an official ambassador for the U.S. State Department,” Jim writes. “He toured the world showcasing jazz, America and humanity. Look at the two buttons on Dizzy’s coat: one stands for equality, and the other is Freedom Now, which was the cry of CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) during the 1960s Civil Rights movement. During the 1964 presidential campaign, Gillespie put himself forward as an independent write-in candidate.” It’s inscriptions like these that belie Jim’s admiration for the artists he shot. Artists that, to the world, seemed larger than life. But for Jim, who made you — the viewer — feel like you were part of the photograph itself, he aimed to capture artists in a different way. As shy. As confident. As kind. As circumspect. In other words, as life-like. jackandjim.acl-live.com tribeza.com

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The Cathedral That Combines Art With Experience THIS WOMEN-RUN INCLUSIVE GALLERY OFFERS INVENTIVE WAYS TO SUPPORT LOCAL ART By Meher Qazilbash

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our shows feeling really inspired just being able to talk to our artists and learn about their process, in a party-like atmosphere, rather than having it be so serious.” Creating a welcoming atmosphere for artists is also a priority — providing them with a judgement-free network of emerging women artists that challenge, inspire and guide each other. All experience levels are welcome, giving talented and driven new artists a space to grow alongside creative people that are further into their career. The community is incredibly valuable in terms of giving a support system that may not have otherwise existed for emerging female talent in Austin. When it comes to giving advice to other Austin creatives, Ceniceros urges them to speak with other artists in their field and take advantage of living in the digital age. “Artists have a lot more flexibility to be independent entrepreneurs and not have to rely on galleries to make a living”, she explains. “Really work on connecting with the right people and also building your brand through social media … it’s so important to be around people who are going through the same thing that you’re going through for advice and just to support each other and keep each other inspired.” With each of its programs and activities, The Cathedral cheers on Austin artists and invites us all to join in. thecathedralatx.com

T H E C AT H E D R A L I N T E R I O R P H OTO B Y N I CO L E G E L L . C AT H E D R A L W I N D O W P H OTO B Y A L I S O N N A R R O . E N T R A N C E P H OTO B Y B R E E Z Y R I T T E R . V E N TA N A B A L L E T P H OTO B Y B RYA N L A R A

T

HE IDEA FOR THE CATHEDRAL CAME WITH THE DESIRE to uplift underrepresented artists. Founder Monica Ceniceros, an accomplished painter herself, noticed a lack of opportunities for younger women artists in the Austin art scene and decided to change this by putting on all-women art shows. Eventually, the series of very popular pop-up shows led to the creation of The Cathedral. The Cathedral’s name pays tribute to the space’s original existence as a historic church. Now it functions as an art gallery, boutique, co-working space for artists and an event venue. By day, artists gather to work in a peaceful and supportive environment with natural light pouring through the gothic-inspired windows. By night, a plethora of entrancing events take place including intimate music shows, ballet performances, pop-up dinners, unique art shows and more. While these events take place, visitors can treat themselves to the open bar, view the artwork that ornaments the walls and tables, and purchase pieces if they please. Ceniceros created this unconventional gallery setting for artists to display their work, as she hoped to make art more inviting to the public. “The shows I was doing at the time, for example, were just not very approachable or fun for spectators that were coming in,” says Ceniceros. “The whole idea was to make art celebrated again, and on top of that, giving women artists more exposure and recognition.” Accessibility plays a huge role in the philosophy of The Cathedral. Not only are event prices affordable, the energy of the space strays from the typical intimidating gallery setting and instead encourages community engagement. “When you feel more comfortable in an environment, you are able to truly connect with the art and the artists. You’re able to ask questions without feeling like everyone in the room can hear you or worrying if you’re asking the right question or not. People have left


Delysia Chocolatier

Gifts

Giving

that Keep on

Let us help take some of the stress out of holiday shopping, with these gift ideas from local businesses.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

JOY at Castle Hill

Joy at Castle Hill has a curated selection of gifts from local to around the world with an emphasis on beautiful things that bring happiness to all. Liberty Puzzles are a throwback to the golden age of jigsaw puzzles. With hand drawn whimsical pieces, A Texas Parade by Hightower Suttle is the perfect gift to spark a holiday tradition. Creativity and quality are the core of Lettermade cocktail and dinner napkins. From RBG to Coco Chanel, the Legend & Icon series are the perfect gift for your gal pal. Need e say more? Start your day off soft and cheery with one of these signature handmade animal rugs from Doing Goods. Made with 100% tufted wool, these beauties will brighten any playroom, bedroom or home office. May your holidays be full of Sparkle and JOY! joyatcastlehill.com @joyatcastlehill

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Delysia Chocolatier Pumpkin Spice Mocha Servings: 1 | Prep time: 5 min | Cook time: 5 min

Ingredients: 6 ounces brewed coffee 6 ounces 2% or whole milk 3-4 tablespoons Delysia Chocolatier Pumpkin Spice Drinking Chocolate mix Toppings: cinnamon stick, whipped cream, Delysia marshmallows Instructions: 1. Brew your favorite cup of coffee, reserving 6 ounces to use for the Pumpkin Spice Mocha. 2. Shake the Delysia Chocolatier Pumpkin Spice Drinking Chocolate tin carefully, holding the lid in place, to redistribute the spices, sugar and chocolate within the mix. 3. In a small saucepan, over medium low heat, heat 6 ounces of milk. Stir often to ensure the milk doesn’t scorch or burn. Bring the milk to a simmer. 4. Add 3-4 tablespoons of the Delysia Chocolatier Pumpkin Spice Drinking Chocolate mix to the saucepan. Stir gently until the chocolate is completely melted and dissolved into the warm milk. 5. Add 6 ounces of brewed coffee, stirring well to incorporate all of the spices and ingredients. 6. Pour the Pumpkin Spice Mocha into your favorite coffee mug. Top with a cinnamon stick, whipped cream or Delysia Chocolatier marshmallows. 7. Enjoy! delysia.com @delysia_choc tribeza.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Blue Door Dental Design

Blue Door Dental Design is excellence in cosmetic and restorative dentistry. With an elevated experience in a lounge-like setting, patients can see their dream smile using non-invasive, 3-D technology to test drive their transformation. With 15 years of experience, Dr. Robin Bethell and his team of expert designers and master ceramists are bringing world-class, evidence-based dentistry to Austin. Give the life-changing gift of a dream smile to your loved one this holiday season through a Blue Door Consultation and Smile Test Drive. They will help you be the best you can be with a beautiful, healthy smile. Their work comes with a 10-year guarantee and can be gifted through their website. bluedoordentaldesign.com/gift @bluedoordentaldesign

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

The White House Historical Association

Since 1981, the White House Historical Association has designed and manufactured the Official White House Christmas Ornament to commemorate an individual president or a significant White House anniversary. Collecting and sharing these beloved ornaments has become a cherished annual tradition for millions of Americans. Elegant, unique and brimming with Texas pride, the Official 2021 White House Christmas Ornament features the presidency of Lyndon Baines Johnson and is one of the most memorable gifts you’ll give this year! shop.whitehousehistory.org @whitehousehistory

Oak & Eden

Crafted in collaboration with some of America’s most notable personalities, the Oak & Eden Anthro Series is a collaborative product line of one-of-a-kind whiskeys created by one-of-a-kind people. Their latest chapter, The Troubadours, features five talented artists spanning a variety of genres including two Austin-based duos, Jamestown Revival and Penny & Sparrow. Each artist worked alongside the brand to curate their very own custom bottle — from the base whiskey, the proof, the wood species of the Spire to the final infusion — personally crafting a finish that truly embodies who they are as an artist. oakandeden.com/anthro @oakandeden tribeza.com| tribeza.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Living In Stereo

Living In Stereo features the most meticulously selected and restored pieces of stereo equipment and unique, fun selections of mid-century modern furniture and home decor to accompany the equipment. They bring 20 years of combined expertise to provide an invaluable experience to their customers and offer the best of the best at an affordable price point. livinginstereoatx.com IG: @living_in_stereo

Solid Soaps

Solid Soaps is a line of artisan goods that changes a mundane task into a luxurious ritual. Based in Austin, Texas, this woman-owned business creates small-batch, consciously crafted soaps using natural ingredients. Solid Soaps are the perfect, practical and consumable gifts for everyday use. solidsoaps.com @solid.soaps

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Refine Aesthetics

Give the gift of beauty this holiday season! Refine Aesthetics hopes to help you achieve your personal version of beauty. They offer an array of cosmetic services from skin care to injectables to lasers and more. The providers at Refine Aesthetics will customize a beauty roadmap to help you and your loved ones feel more refreshed, rejuvenated and refined. Treat yourself, beautiful! refineaesthetics.com @refineaestheticsatx


Charm School Vintage Petticoat Fair

Petticoat Fair is a family-owned business that celebrates all women with personalized bra and swimsuit fittings. Their in-store and online collection is filled with chic, on-trend and price-inclusive pieces. Stop in this holiday season for a gift for that special someone ... or to treat yourself! petticoatfair.com / @petticoat_fair

Katie Kismet

Katie of Austin’s Katie Kismet handcrafts kiln-fired glass accessories, featuring fresh bolo ties and hat bands, bold statement rings, the Earring of the Month Club and joyful everyday styles. Small batch, sustainably-minded and accented with custom sterling silver and 14k gold-filled finishes, Katie Kismet has a unique gift for every loved one. katiekismet.com @katiekismet

Clothing changes how you carry yourself, shifts your mood and invites conversation. Charm School Vintage is more than a clothing store, offering the best curated designs from every decade, modern jewelry, apothecary, home goods and unique crystals. Come discover distinctive gifts that evoke beauty, power and connection to culture. charmschoolvintage.com @charmschoolvintage

Tribeza

Give a gift subscription of Austin’s leading locally-owned and printed arts and culture magazine. tribeza.com/subscribe @tribeza

tribeza.com tribeza.com | NOVEMBER | OCTOBER 20212021 9797


Artist Kevin at Art From the Streets

Art for All THESE FOUR NON-PROFITS ARE ON A MISSION TO

Sage Studio

MAKE ART MORE ACCESSIBLE By Sam Lauron Photos by Jenna McElroy

T

HE ART WORLD CAN OFTENTIMES FEEL EXCLUSIVE. But the process of creating and sharing art is a practice everyone should have access to, which is an undertaking each of these art non-profits are committed to. Anyone who joins the Art From the Streets community is an artist first and foremost. Once you’re here, nothing else matters — not your background, experience level or even your living situation. For 29 years, Art From the Streets has provided a safe and welcoming space for Austin’s homeless and at-risk population to retreat to and create art. Through a combination of open studio time and public art shows — where 95% of sales go back to the artist — Art From the Streets has built a supportive community for people experiencing homelessness as they work toward positive goals.

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Now, the non-profit has secured its first-ever permanent space to call home. The space will continue to host open studio as well as public events in hopes that the community can open its eyes to a population that is often misunderstood. “When you meet someone who has been homeArtist Rick at Sage Studio less or is in transition and get to see their artwork,” says executive director of Art From the Streets, Kelley Worden, “you get a different perspective of what homeless looks like.” This integration of communities is also at the root of another local non-profit’s mission. Founded in 2016 by Katie Stahl and Lucy Gross, Sage Studio is an art studio and gallery for artists with disabilities. Stahl, an art educator, and Gross, a social worker, met while working at an art-based day habilitation center for adults with disabilities. It was here where they noticed a gap between their artists and the contemporary art world. “One thing we really lamented was that when we would have art shows [at the center], it was really limited as far as who would come; it was mostly


families of the artists and friends that we invited,” Gross recalls. “We wanted these artists with disabilities to be part of the contemporary art world.” Sage Studio recently moved into Canopy, the artist studio community in East Austin, where it offers dedicated studio space for artists with disabilities and a gallery to exhibit their work. By integrating their artists within an established art community, Gross hopes to finally bridge the gap that they set out to address. “We hope to create an exhibition space where the work of artists with and without disabilities are shown together,” says Gross. “It’s not as if our artists exist tangentially with the contemporary art community, but they’re really a part of it.” When it comes to having a space to creUT Artist at E4 ate, access to affordable studios is one of the biggest challenges of being a working artist in Austin. And not just because of the city’s recent growth. Affordable studio space has

ArtUs Co

Maggie and Josh at ArtUs Co

long been an issue; just ask Joshua Green, co-founder and executive director of ArtUs Co. In 2005, Green, along with a group of artists, founded Pump Project Art Complex, a 12,000-square-foot warehouse in East Austin that offered affordable studio space and exhibition opportunities for artists just starting their careers. After a long run on the east side, the non-profit found a new home at The Arboretum in 2019 and rebranded as ArtUs Co.

IT’S B EEN GREAT TO PROVI D E SO M E O F OU R ARTISTS WITH ANOTH ER I N CO M E SOU RCE AN D A CO M M U N ITY

Though there’s quite a contrast between their former east side neighborhood and The Arboretum area, the new location continues to offer affordable studio space, an Artist Resource Center, and even operates a public storefront. “If you had asked me a few years ago, I never would have thought I’d be running a local artist store,” Green laughs. “It’s been great to provide some of our artists with another income source and a community.” While many art non-profits support working artists, E4 Youth aims to effect change at the beginning of a creative person’s journey. Founded in 2009 by Carl Settles, E4 Youth is on a mission to bridge the gap between underserved youth and creative careers. Settles, a former teacher, saw firsthand how limited access to creative activities is for students and how it can impact their careers. “Even though the creative economy is what’s driving our prosperity, creative people don’t always get respect,” says Settles. “If a young person of color says, ‘I want to be an engineer’ people get excited. But if they say, ‘I want to make films’ or ‘I like to draw,’ they’re often discouraged from that.” Guided by its foundational pillars, E4 aims to cultivate a pipeline of creative development for Carl, Executive Director high school and college-age youth. The non-profit’s at E4 Youth programming is designed to engage students where their interests lie, educate them on how to harness those interests into employable skills, connect them with employers and empower them to pursue their creative goals. “We’re giving them a process that they can take themselves through to really help them reach their full potential,” says Settles. artfromthestreets.org / sagestudioatx.com / artusco.com / E4youth.org tribeza.com

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KAREN'S PICK

Aba MUSIC L ANE’S MEDITERR ANE AN RESTAUR ANT THAT INCORPOR ATES A LIGHTER ST YLE OF COOKING WITH INFLUENCES FROM ISR AEL, LEBANON, TURKEY AND GREECE By Karen O. Spezia Photos by Holly Cowart

W

HEN YOU THINK OF SOUTH CONGRESS, WHAT COMES to mind? Great shopping, dining and live music, of course. But also crowded sidewalks, whizzing scooters, double-parked Ubers and roving bridesmaid parties. It can be a bit much at times. But what if I told you there was a place that was close to all the action, yet removed from the chaos and clamor? Welcome to Aba, an enchanting oasis just steps from the heart of South Congress. Tucked behind the glass and concrete facades of Music Lane’s swanky boutiques, this beguiling Mediterranean restaurant offers delicious food and cocktails in a lovely, laid-back environment, mostly al fresco. Aba is as much a tropical outdoor lounge as a tantalizing restaurant. Its indoor and outdoor spaces flow seamlessly to create a sprawling destination for dining, drinking and people watching. Its centerpiece is a magnificent Heritage Oak tree that provides a canopy for the multi-level patio, terrace and outdoor bar. The indoor dining room is sheltered and inviting, yet maintains Aba’s airy vibe with ivy climbing up an indoor trellis and hanging plants dangling overhead. The mezzanine breezeway, lined by a greenery wall, offers

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more intimate seating. Throughout the restaurant, there are options of standard dining tables or relaxed, lounge-style rattan seats and sofas. Vibrant area rugs, reminiscent of flying carpets, cover the walkways and wooden decks. Twinkle lights, amber candles and decorative Moroccan lanterns illuminate the alluring space. Aba, meaning “father” in Hebrew, is inspired by cuisines from the Mediterranean, including Israel, Lebanon, Turkey and Greece. The food is served on exotic, colorful plates that are as bold as the flavors. Start with the creamy hummus, served traditionally or topped with artichokes, lamb ragù or crispy short ribs. My favorite is the Smoky Garlic Hummus, infused with Aleppo and Urfa peppers, preserved lemon and garlic. There are also a variety of tasty spreads, perfect for accompanying the hummus and slathering onto warm pita. The spreadable Whipped Feta is delightfully tangy and briny and garnished with crushed pistachios, Aleppo peppers and lemon zest. And don’t miss the complex and earthy Muhammara spread, a spicy blend of roasted pepper, isot chili, walnut and pomegranate molasses. Chilled starters include a Greek salad and marinated green beans with shitake mushroom aioli, plus several raw seafood options like silky slices of King salmon scattered with slivered red onions and crispy capers, then drizzled with a citrus vinaigrette. Kebabs are often an uninspired dish, but at Aba they’re exceptional. Offered in beef, lamb, chicken, salmon or vegetarian cauliflower, these grilled skewers are succulent and flavorful. Yogurt marinade elevates prosaic chicken to new heights with a side of zippy herbaceous zhoug dipping sauce and tender basmati rice.

Other entrees include crispy pork belly, grilled skirt steak, heirloom chicken thigh and a slow-braised leg of lamb wrapped in eggplant. This complex dish is seasoned with cinnamon and dates, then served atop a subtle tomato sauce topped with melted Greek graviera cheese. Be sure to order some of the hot mezze side dishes, like the addictive crispy potatoes, bite-size nuggets of smashed potatoes seasoned with rosemary and dusted with grated Greek mizithra cheese and served with a side of velvety scallion crema for dipping. If there’s room for dessert, the Frozen Greek Yogurt is a refreshing finale. Or go for the dense and moist Double Chocolate Cake topped with caramel sauce and whipped cream. With Aba’s loungey vibe, drinks are given equal attention, and its inventive bar program showcases rare Mediterranean-inspired wines and spirits. We paired our meal with an outstanding bottle of bubbly, Yarden Blanc de Blancs from Israel, and kicked off our night with a couple of terrific cocktails—the tart and tropical Kiwi G&T and the tasty No Spoon Margarita. Aba is part of the Chicago-based Lettuce Entertain You empire, an independent, family-owned restaurant group that boasts over 130 restaurants nationwide. But this is its first foray into Texas. Don’t let its corporate lineage dissuade you: Aba feels authentically Austin with its shabby-chic ambiance, friendly staff and diverse, convivial crowd. Sometimes you’ve got to hunt for the good stuff. Peek around corners. Look behind walls. Step away from the maddening crowds. Aba is worth seeking out as a sultry escape and culinary sanctuary from the cacophony of South Congress. abarestaurants.com/austin tribeza.com

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24 DINER

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

This intimate restaurant serves up mouth-watering pizzas,

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order up

consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The fa-

the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

mous Neapolitan technique is executed by the Stefano Ferrara

breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

wood-burning ovens, which runs at more than 900 degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage

34TH STREET CAFE

of cheese on this menu!

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 This neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up soups,

CAFÉ NO SÉ

salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the chicken piccata.

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

The low-key setting makes it great for weeknight dinners and

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor and a

weekend indulgences.

range of seasonal foods to make it the best place for weekend

ARLO GREY 111 E Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 478 2991 Arlo Grey is the debut restaurant from “Top Chef ” 10 winner and “Fast Foodies’’ star Kristen Kish. Found inside the LINE

brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

CICLO 98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300

Hotel, the picturesque lakeside spot has received praise for its

Ciclo is a modern Texas kitchen featuring locally inspired

intentional design and elegant, French-and-Italian-inflected

flavors and ingredients with a Latin influence, all brought

take on Texas ingredients.

to life through a unique collaboration between Chef de Cuisine James Flowers and world-re- nowned restaurateur, Richard

ASTI TRATTORIA

Sandoval. Ciclo’s name reflects its focus on menu offerings

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

that change seasonally from ceviches, crudos and grilled and

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes

smoked meats to inventive cocktails.

ELDORADO CAFE

3300 W. Anderson Lane | (512) 420 2222 eldoradocafeatx.com Eldorado Cafe exemplifies old school Austin, resonating the beat of the early 90’s, sending out hot plates of the most decadently delicious and sometimes healthy eating you will find in Austin. Mexican style comfort food with a deep honor towards the historical eateries that have made Austin great. Come see us.

EASY TIGER 3508 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 964 8229

along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

6406 N I-35 Frontage Rd., Ste. 1100 | (512) 494 4151

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2413

1501 E. 7th St. | (512) 839 8523

BARLEY SWINE

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive caviar and oyster

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

menu, sharp aesthetics and excellent service make it a re-

delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer garden down-

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourag-

freshing indulgence on West Sixth Street. Chef Larry McGuire

stairs. Sip on some local brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel.

es sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingre-

brings East Coast-inspired vibes to this seafood restaurant.

Complete your snack with beer, cheese and an array of dipping

meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

sauces.

dients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

COMEDOR 501 Colorado St. | (512) 499 0977

ÉPICERIE

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

Hiding in plain sight on one of downtown’s busiest street

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

3663 Bee Cave Rd. | (512) 306 1668

corners, Comedor is a restaurant full of surprises. Lauded

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sensibili-

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

chef Philip Speer delivers a menu that is equally clever and

ties by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah McIntosh. Lovers of

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share a

unexpected, with contemporary cuisine riffs on Mexican

brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays.

bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

culinary traditions.

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FONDA SAN MIGUEL

HANK’S

2330 W. N Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

At Fonda San Miguel, authentic interior Mex-

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing

ican food is lovingly served inside a colorful

waitstaff and a kid-friendly patio all work

hacienda-style restaurant. The art-adorned

together to make Hank’s a favorite neighbor-

walls and indoor, plant-filled courtyard

hood joint. With happy hour every day from

provide a pleasant escape in North Austin.

3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing be-

Visit the Sunday brunch for a new menu with

tween their frosé and frozen paloma.

the most delicious interior Mexican brunch cuisine.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North

porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates

Loop area serving unique dishes. Chefs-own-

and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by

ers Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley serve

chef Sonya Cote.

thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early

HOPFIELDS

on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s

and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s

provides modern spins on American classics.

famed steak frites and moules frites.

Dig into a fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry-thyme cocktail.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

GRIZZELDA’S

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarks-

This charming East Austin spot lies some-

ville favorite has maintained the execution,

where between traditional Tex-Mex and

top-notch service, and luxurious but wel-

regional Mexican recipes, each fused with a

coming atmosphere that makes it an Austin

range of flavors and styles. The attention to

staple.

detail in each dish shines and the tortillas are made in-house daily.

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JOSEPHINE HOUSE

JUNIPER

LENOIR

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

2400 E Cesar Chavez St #304 | (512) 220 9421

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and

Uchi Alumni Chef Nicholas Yanes fuses central Texas influenc-

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix fixe

organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Jo-

es and local farm produce with Italian fare. Start with puffy

meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes locally

sephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

potatoes and the Chef ’s Brand New Cadillac Negroni.

sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal spe-

Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

cialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy

JUSTINE’S BRASSERIE

hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions

4710 E. 5th St. | (512) 385 2900

in the world.

JUNE’S ALL DAY

Justine’s is a quaint French brasserie deep in East Austin.

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

Don’t let the short drive deter you — the experience of eating

LIN ASIAN BAR + DIM SUM

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious

traditional French plates among exquisite works of art and

1203 W. 6th St. | (512) 474 5107

cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. Inspired

decorative string lights makes for one idyllic evening with a

Located in a vintage West Sixth Street bungalow, Chef Ling and

by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban wine bars,

significant other.

her team create sophisticated Chinese dishes that draw enthusi-

June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering.

astic crowds day and night. Make sure to stop by during week-

KEMURI TATSU-YA

end brunch to taste the full mouthwatering dim sum menu.

2713 E. 2nd St. | (512) 803 2224 Kemuri Tatsu-Ya is a Japanese-Texan mash-up that injects se-

LICHA’S CANTINA

riously good food with a sense of humor. The East Austin joint

1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960

features Asian-inspired smoked meats and seafood, along with

Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the

yakitori, ramen, and izakaya classics meant for sharing. Drinks

interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large

are also an integral part of the meal, so come thirsty.

range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will

LA BARBECUE

get you ready for a night out on the town.

22401 E Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN + WINE BAR

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue

LORO

joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer,

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up clas-

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole and Aaron

sic barbecue with free beer and live music.

Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive indoor-outdoor space, designed

LAS PALOMAS

by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming and open,

4800 Burnet Road | (512) 458 1100 gustoitaliankitchen.com

3201 Bee Cave Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889

and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant

out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green

Nestled in the Rosedale neighborhood of north-

and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophisti-

curry or those potent boozy slushies.

central Austin, Gusto captures the warm,

cated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh

comforting, every-day flavors of Italian cuisine.

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

MATTIE’S

Dishes range from house-made antipasti to hand-

811 W. Live Oak St. | (512) 444 1888

formed pizzas, salads, panini, fresh pasta, entrees

Mattie’s is a glorious urban paradise offering upscale American

featuring Texas farm raised meats, and scratch

classics. While the cocktails are top-notch and the cuisine is

desserts. Craft cocktails, beer on tap, and boutique

nothing short of outstanding, Mattie’s ambiance and atmo-

wines.

sphere are unmatched.

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ODD DUCK

POOL BURGER

1201 S Lamar Blvd | (512) 433 6521

2315 Lake Austin Blvd. | (512) 334 9747

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mortar, Odd Duck is

Tiki meets Texas in this neighborhood burger bar. Located

the first venture from acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect

behind Deep Eddy Cabaret, crunchy crinkle-cut fries and juicy

seasonal fare and drinks with a strong Texas influence sourced

burgers are served from the window of a 1968 Airstream Land

locally whenever possible.

Yacht.

PARKSIDE

RED ASH ITALIA

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

303 Colorado St. #200 | (512) 379 2906

Patrons flock to this downtown hideaway for its wide selection

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality

of oysters and other modern-American specialties. The 6th

food and enticing ambiance. This Italian steakhouse is led

Street locale is filled with industrial details and plenty of natu-

by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit

ral light, so it’s no wonder that reservations are often necessary

back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

WATERLOO ICE HOUSE Escarpment Boulevard: 9600 Escarpment Blvd | (512) 301 1007

to get a table in the inviting space.

ROSEWOOD GULF COAST CHOP HOUSE

Burnet Road: 8600 Burnet Rd | (512) 458 6544

QI AUSTIN

1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205

360 & 2222: 6203 N Capital of Texas Hwy | (512) 418 9700

835 W 6th St. #114 | (512) 474 2777

Housed in a historic East Side cottage, this spot is quickly be-

Created by visionary chef Ling Qi Wu, also the owner of the

coming a staple. Chef Jesse DeLeon pays outstanding homage

esteemed Lin Asian Bar, Qi Austin dazzles with its top-notch

to his South Texas roots with seasonal offerings from Gulf

Chinese cuisine and vibrant artwork. Located in Shoal Creek

Coast fishermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers.

Walk, Qi Austin is a restaurant that pleases the eye as well as the stomach.

SUERTE 1800 E. 6th St. | (512) 953 0092

THE PEACHED TORTILLA

Helmed by executive chef Fermín Núñez, Suerte was inspired

5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439

by extensive travels through Central Mexico. Artisanal masa

This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with

is the highlight, made from local heirloom corn and used in

friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably

distinctive dishes rarely found on Austin menus. Order the de-

priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world

lectable Suadero Tacos, perfect for sharing with friends.

with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

TEXAS FRENCH BREAD PICNIK

2900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 499 0544

4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644

For decades, TFB has been a go-to destination for high-quality

1700 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 293-6118

European-style breads, pastries and seasonally inspired bistro

A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary

meals. Whether grabbing a coffee and pastry on the fly, having

restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives

casual business lunches with colleagues or enjoying the charm-

out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly

ing patio for an alfresco dinner, this neighborhood spot is an

options and thoughtfully sourced ingredients.

Austin favorite.

Southpark Meadows: 9600 S IH 35 Frontage Rd | (512) 292 7900 waterlooicehouse.com

Waterloo Ice House is an Austin original restaurant, serving up scratch-made breakfast, lunch, and dinner options as well as Insta-worthy drinks for friends, families, and couples alike since 1976. Come see how we keep Austin’s good vibes alive at one of our four locations nearest you.

THAI FRESH 909 W. Mary St. | (512) 494 6436 A restaurant, cooking school and market all in one place. When you’re done dining on traditional Thai favorites, stop by the adjoining coffee bar for freshly brewed joe, homemade ice cream and an array of baked goods.

TINY BOXWOODS 1503 W. 35th St. | (512) 220 0698 This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and delicious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood. Favorites include house-ground burgers, salmon Provencal salad and their chocolate chip cookies.

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The Kilroy Star THE STARS AT NIGHT ARE BIG AND BRIGHT, DEEP IN THE HE ART OF DOWNTOWN AUSTIN By Meher Qazilbash

I

N THE MIDST OF A PANDEMIC THAT CAUSED MANY OF US TO gle in darkness, the Kilroy Stars appeared to illuminate a hopeful path. John Kilroy, real estate developer and dedicated supporter of public art, commissioned the dazzling star structure to return brightness, beauty and shared experiences to its viewers. The brilliant light-art installation intertwines art and architecture while also providing a unique form of community engagement. The journey of the

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Kilroy Star began by sparking wonder into people on the West Coast, with installations in San Francisco, Seattle, San Diego, and Los Angeles. The popup art program continues to spread light as it debuts in Downtown Austin this November and will remain here until March of 2022. For the entire duration of its stay in the capital city, the large shining sculpture will be lit up. Spanning 20 feet in diameter and utilizing over 30,000 individually programmable LED bulbs, the forward-thinking project is as environmentally conscious as it is awe inspiring. From the star itself expect mesmerizing patterns, rhythms and colors to be projected including morse code tributes, twinkling holiday displays, color-coded meteorology reports, partnerships with non-profit organizations, musicians, artists and even more to be announced. Austinite stargazers will be mesmerized, moved and reminded of the importance of public art. Keep your eyes peeled for the Kilroy Star to appear on the corner of 6th Ave. and Colorado St. this winter, and check out other installations of the remarkable light sculpture at TheKilroyStars.com.

P H OTO B Y ZO E T I C

ART PICK


C ALENDARS B E S U R E T O C H E C K W E B S I T E S F O R U P D AT E D I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S A F E T Y P R O T O C O L S

Entertainment MUSIC JESSE MCCARTNEY November 4 Emo’s Austin THE STRING CHEESE INCIDENT November 4 – 6 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater LAUREN DAIGLE November 5 Frank Erwin Center ALABAMA November 6 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park NORTHSIDE ROCKS PRESENTS: QUIET COMPANY November 6 Domain NORTHSIDE Lawn CHRIS BOTTI November 6 Paramount Theatre WALK THE MOON November 7 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater TAME IMPALA November 7 Germania Insurance Amphitheater LUKAS NELSON & PROMISE OF THE REAL November 9 ACL Live at the Moody Theater 24KGOLDN November 10 Emo’s Austin CHVRCHES November 10 – 12 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

DR. DOG November 11 & 13 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

CHRIS LANE November 21 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

ALINA BARAZ November 12 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

CROWDER November 21 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

DIAMOND RIO November 12 Haute Spot

GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV November 21 Paramount Theatre

GIPSY KINGS November 12 Paramount Theatre RAY WYLIE HUBBARD November 13 Paramount Theatre SAN HOLO November 14 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater TOMMY EMMANUEL November 14 Paramount Theatre RAIN: A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES November 14 Bass Concert Hall ASO: ODE TO JOY November 19 & 20 Long Center KRONOS QUARTET November 19 & 20 Bass Concert Hall CORY WONG & THE WONGNOTES November 20 Mohawk Austin PATTY GRIFFIN November 20 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

THE PETERSON BROTHERS POSTTHANKSGIVING BASH November 26 Antone’s Nightclub PAT GREEN November 26 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre POSTMODERN JUKEBOX November 27 Paramount Theatre BOB SCHNEIDER & THE MOONLIGHT ORCHESTRA November 27 ACL Live at the Moody Theater RANDY ROGERS BAND November 27 Nutty Brown Amphitheatre

FILM SOUND UNSEEN FILM FESTIVAL Through November 14 Various Locations + Virtual

THEATER INTO THE WOODS Through November 7 ZACH Theatre

AUSTIN JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL November 1 – 14 Galaxy Highland + Virtual

SPEAK NO MORE: GOLDEN AGE November 5 – 20 Neill-Cochran House Museum

AUSTIN UNDER THE STARS FILM FESTIVAL November 7 Lone Star Court

AUSTIN OPERA: THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO November 6, 11 & 14 Long Center

RUNNING MAN November 10 Central Machine Works

BOLLYWOOD TWELFTH NIGHT November 7 – 21 Long Center

TEXAS FOCUS: LONESTAR November 10 Bullock Texas State History Museum THE DEVIL AND DANIEL JOHNSTON FILM SCREENING November 12 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center THE DUDE ABIDES FESTIVAL November 13 Pioneer Farms

THE FAB FOUR November 28 Paramount Theatre

2021 WATER, TEXAS FILM COMPETITION November 16 AFS Cinema

PURITY RING November 28 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

THE LAST WALTZ November 24 Central Machine Works ANIMALIS FABULA FILM FESTIVAL November 26 – 28 Alamo Drafthouse Mueller

STORIES ON THE LAWN November 11 Neill-Cochran House Museum AUSTIN PLAYFEST November 11 – 15 Virtual OPERA FOR EARTH: BAD GIRLS November 13 Neill-Cochran House Museum A CHRISTMAS CAROL November 17 – January 2 ZACH Theatre THE GAME SHOW November 21 The Contemporary Austin - Jones Center A HIP HOP NUTCRACKER November 23 Bass Concert Hall

THE ROLLING STONES November 20 Circuit of the Americas tribeza.com

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C ALENDARS B E S U R E T O C H E C K W E B S I T E S F O R U P D AT E D I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S A F E T Y P R O T O C O L S

Entertainment NATE CRAIG November 4 – 6 Creek and the Cave PENN & TELLER November 5 Paramount Theatre

JT HABERSAAT November 29 & 30 Creek and the Cave

WURSTFEST November 5 – 14 Landa Park, New Braunfels

BERT KREISCHER December 2 Bass Concert Hall

AUSTIN CELTIC FESTIVAL November 6 & 7 Jourdan-Bachman Pioneer Farms

OTHER

NICK COLLETTI November 5 Big Laugh Comedy

HOUSE OF TORMENT Through November 13 2632 Ridgepoint Dr.

GARRETT GUNDERSON November 7 Creek and the Cave

​​FALL FESTIVAL CORN MAZE AND PUMPKIN Through November 14 Sweet Eats Fruit Farm

HASAN MINHAJ November 7 Long Center

TEXAS RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL Through November 28 Todd Mission, TX

NURSE BLAKE November 7 Paramount Theatre GARY GULMAN November 11 Paramount Theatre RITA BRENT November 11 – 13 Creek and the Cave RON WHITE November 13 ACL Live at the Moody Theater DANIEL SLOSS November 18 Paramount Theatre CARLY AQUILINO & JESSIMAE PELUSO November 18 – 20 Creek and the Cave VIR DAS November 19 Paramount Theatre LAURIE KILMARTIN November 26 – 28 Creek and the Cave

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ALTON BROWN November 5 ACL Live at the Moody Theater AUSTIN FOOD + WINE FESTIVAL November 5 – 7 Auditorium Shores & Republic Square Park

AUSTIN TEQUILA FESTIVAL November 6 Casa Chapala CHAMBERFEST 2021 November 6 Hill Country Galleria IT’S MY PARK DAY November 6 Various Locations LADYGANG November 6 Stateside at the Paramount THE SEAGER ROUNDUP November 6 Central Machine Works THE SOUL RESET November 6 Rancho de Vida

AUSTIN SMILES 35TH ANNIVERSARY November 6 Virtual

HOLIDAY BAZAAR November 19 – December 24 Blue Genie Art Bazaar + Virtual

GAZELLE FOUNDATION: RUN FOR THE WATER November 7 Downtown Austin

WINE & RHYME November 20 Antone’s Nightclub

HOLIDAY WINDOW REVEAL November 8 Hearth & Soul AUSTIN DESIGN WEEK November 8 – 12 Various Locations + Virtual

THE FRONT MARKET POP UP November 20 – December 12 Ani’s Day and Night THUNDERCLOUD SUBS TURKEY TROT November 25 Long Center + Virtual

TASTE AMERICA: AUSTIN November 9 Suerte THE RUMI FESTIVAL November 13 Asian American Resource Center 1​​2 TH ANNUAL CHILI COOK-OFF November 13 Texas Humane Heroes

PEPPERMINT PARKWAY November 26 – December 26 Circuit of the Americas

COMPASS RETREAT November 16 – 18 Various Locations + Virtual

HORROR FOR THE HOLIDAYS November 27 & 28 Palmer Event Center

JLA A CHRISTMAS AFFAIR November 17 – 21 Palmer Events Center

RENEGADE CRAFT AUSTIN November 27 & 28 Fair Market

A U S T I N F O O D & W I N E P H OTO B Y K AT R I N A B A R B E R

COMEDY


Art SPACES

Arts BORDER VISION: LUIS JIMÉNEZ’S SOUTHWEST October 31 – January 16 Blanton Museum of Art POP CRÍTICO/ POLITICAL POP October 31 – January 16 Blanton Museum of Art OWN IT, EXAMINE IT, AND CONFRONT IT HEAD ON Through November 14 DORF

THE KILROY STAR November 1 – March 15 Indeed Tower Plaza TRAVIS HEIGHTS ART TRAIL November 6 & 7 Travis Heights AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR November 6 – 21 West & East Austin

JULIE PELAEZ Through November 27 Art for the People Gallery BLACK CITIZENSHIP IN THE AGE OF JIM CROW Through November 28 Bullock Texas State History Museum LANCE LETSCHER: INTAGLIO Through November 30 Flatbed Center for Contemporary Printmaking KELSEY BAKER & JESUS TREVIÑO: A BECOMING November 1 – December 3 Contracommon

TORI SWANSON SOIREE November 13 Ao5 Gallery

COURTNEY EGAN: SUPERFLORA November 18 – March 6 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum

SMALL ACTS Through November 21 grayDUCK Gallery

LOS PUEBLOS ORIGINARIOS Through November 22 Mexic-Arte Museum

CREEK SHOW November 12 – 21 Waterloo Park

ARTIST TALK: HAKEEM ADEWUMI November 18 AGBS (Virtual)

OWNER’S CHOICE Through November 20 Tiemann Art Gallery

NUESTRA COMUNIDAD/OUR COMMUNITY Through November 22 Mexic-Arte Museum

PANCAKES & BOOZE ART SHOW November 12 Far Out Lounge

ISABEL STENSLAND November 6 – 27 Davis Gallery AMERICA MARTIN: UNDER THE SKY November 6 – 28 Wally Workman Gallery CARA JACKSON November 6 – January 8 Julia C. Butridge Gallery LETICIA MOSQUEDA November 6 – January 8 Julia C. Butridge Gallery ROOFTOP SESSIONS November 11 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center MARGARET SMITHERS-CRUMP November 11 – December 11 Camiba Gallery JON LANGFORD November 11 – December 24 Yard Dog Art Gallery

DESIGN SHINE 2021 November 18 – March 6 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum SARA VANDERBEEK POP-UP SHOW November 20 & 21 Museum of Human Achievement MYSTERY AND BENEVOLENCE November 20 – March 27 Bullock Texas State History Museum CRIT NIGHTS November 27 ICOSA Gallery HOLIDAY ART ON THE LAWN November 28 Neill-Cochran House Museum RACHEL WOLFSON SMITH: EVERYTHING IS EVERYTHING Through December 4 Ivester Contemporary

MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 5482 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 974 1625 Hours: W–Su 12–5 austintexas.gov/department/ elisabet-ney-museum FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 463 7948 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–W 10–6, Th 10–9, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 W. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 974 1398 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. (512) 469 6200 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sa–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

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Art SPACES GALLERIES ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: M–F 10–6, Su 10-2 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ART FOR THE PEOPLE 1711 S. 1st St. (512) 761 4708 Hours: Tu–Th 11–6, F-Su 11–7 artforthepeoplegallery.com ARTUS CO. 10000 Research Blvd., Ste. 118 (512) 761 6484 Hours: M–Su 12–6 artusco.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–F 10–5, Sa 10–4 artworksaustin.com ATELIER 1205 1205 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 434 9046 Hours: Tu-F 11-4 atelier1205.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351 5934 Hours: Tu–Su 11–6 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ARTSPACE 7739 Northcross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 763 0646 Hours: F-Sa 11–5 austinartspace.com

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AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., Bldg. 2 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale Rd., Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Th-Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org

CAMIBA GALLERY 6448 Hwy 290 East, Ste. A102 (512) 937 5921 Hours: F-Sa 12–6 camibaart.com CENTRAL LIBRARY GALLERY 710 W. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 974 7400 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F-Sa 10-6, Su 12-6 library.austintexas.gov/ central/gallery CHRISTIAN-GREEN GALLERY 201 E. 21st St. (512) 471 0254 Hours: T & Th, 1-3 galleriesatut.org CLOUD TREE STUDIOS & GALLERY 3411 E. 5th St. (512) 797 8852 By appointment only cloudtreestudiosandgallery.com CO-LAB PROJECTS 5419 Glissman Rd. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

CONTRACOMMON 12912 Hill Country Blvd. #F-140 Hours: M–F By appointment only Sa–Su 12-6 contracommon.org

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FLATBED CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING 3701 Drossett Dr. (512) 477 9328 Hours: W–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 flatbedpress.com FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com ICOSA COLLECTIVE 916 Springdale Rd. #102 (512) 920 2062 Hours: F–Sa 12–6 icosacollective.com IVESTER CONTEMPORARY 916 Springdale Rd. Bldg 2, ste. 107 (737) 209 0379 Hours: Tu–F 10-6, Sa 10-4 ivestercontemporary.com

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10–10, F 10–6, Sa 10–4 austintexas.gov/jcbgallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Th–Sa 1–5 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com LYDIA STREET GALLERY 1200 E. 11th St. #109 (512) 524 1051 Hours: Sa–Su 12–5, By appointment M–F lydiastreetgallery.com MARTHA’S CONTEMPORARY 4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 695 1437 Hours: W-Su 12-7 facebook.com/ marthascontemporary MASS GALLERY 705 Gunter St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. (512) 296 2447 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 mondoshop.com NEBULA GALLERY 217 W. 2nd St. (512) 239 9317 Hours: Tu–W 1–6, Th–F 1–7, Sa 12–7, Sun 12–6 thenebulagallery.com NORTHERN-SOUTHERN 1902 E. 12th St. Hours: Sa 3–6:30 northern-southern.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 974 1300 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PREACHER GALLERY 119 W. 8th St. (512) 489 0200 By appointment only preacher.co/gallery PRIZER GALLERY 2023 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 575 3559 Hours: Sa 12–5 prizerartsandletters.org ROADHOUSE RELICS 1720 S. 1st St. (512) 442 6366 roadhouserelics.com SOCO MODERN ART GALLERY 2900 S. Congress Ave. #100 (512) 409 9943 Hours: M By appointment only Tu–Su 11-7 socomodern.com


Artist: Valerie Walden

Central Texas Pastel Society Member Show

30 MINUTES NORTH OF DOWNTOWN AUSTIN

Artist: Tim Woolsey

EASY PARKING IN FRONT OF GALLERY Artist: Nancy Lilly

OPEN MON-SAT 10 AM – 5 PM CONTACT: (512)-551-9774 TAGROUNDROCK.COM 1706 N. MAYS ST, ROUND ROCK, TX 78664

Artist: Jan Fazier

Landscapes, Portraits, Figures, Still Lifes, Realism, Impressionism, Abstract, and so much MORE! Opens at Tiemann Art Gallery on Saturday, November 6, 5 PM - 7 PM

AD INDEX Art On 5th............................................................................. 31 arton5th.com ATX Wealth Partners.............................................................3 financialservicesinc.ubs.com/team/atx Blue Door Dental Design .................................................. 94 bluedoordentaldesign.com BOXT.....................................................................................53 drinkboxt.com Charm School Vintage.........................................................97 charmschoolvintage.com Compass - Dara Allen........................................................4-5 compass.com/agents/dara-allen Compass - Hendrix & Zulu Group................................... 6-7 hendrixzulugroup.com Compass - Lisa Matulis-Thomajan & Jennifer Ladner.....11 thomajanladnergroup.com Compass - The West Team..............................................IBC thewestteam.com Delysia Chocolatier..............................................................25 delysia.com Domain NORTHSIDE........................................................ 30 domainnorthside.com Douglas Elliman Real Estate.........................................IFC-1 elliman.com Eldorado Cafe.....................................................................102

eldoradocafeatx.com Ellis Force Art Partners........................................................53 ellisforceart.com Gusto Italian Kitchen + Wine Bar.................................... 104 gustoitaliankitchen.com Hearth & Soul ....................................................................... 31 hearthandsoul.com InSight Gallery......................................................................27 insightgallery.com JOY at Castle Hill.................................................................... joyatcastlehill.com Katie Kismet..........................................................................97 katiekismet.com Korman Jewelers ............................................................ 13, 15 korman.com Kuper Sotheby’s - Shelby Johnson................................16-17 shelbyjohnson.kuperrealty.com Living in Stereo.................................................................... 96 livinginstereoatx.com L Majors Jewelers................................................................113 lmajors.com Maaribu.................................................................................. 19 maaribu.com Oak & Eden.......................................................................... 95 oakandeden.com

Omni Hotels & Resorts .......................................................10 omnihotels.com Petticoat Fair ........................................................................97 petticoatfair.com Refine Aesthetics................................................................. 96 refineaesthetics.com Ron King Salon .......................................................................9 ronkingbeauty.com The Royal Turkey................................................................103 theroyalturkey.com Solid Soaps........................................................................... 96 shop.solidsoaps.com Tiemann Art Gallery........................................................... 111 tagroundrock.com Twelve Rivers Realty - Amber Moore................................ 14 twelveriversrealty.com/agents/amber-moore Urbanspace Interiors & Real Estate..................................... 8 urbanspacelifestyle.com Waterloo Ice House............................................................105 waterlooicehouse.com West Chelsea Contemporary.............................................18 wcc.art The White House Historical Association......................... 95 whitehousehistory.org

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W H AT ’ S N E W O N

TRIBEZA.COM CRYSTAL CLEAR

BITE-SIZED

The Austin in a Pocket series returns with mouthwatering egg rolls, food fundraisers and a can’t-miss pop-up from Chanda Mau in November. tribeza.com/chanda-mau-austin-egg-rolls

Follow us @Tribeza on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. HIDE AND SEEK

Get lost in the magical custom fort installations found at Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center this winter. tribeza.com/fortlandia-wildflower-center-2021

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Stories from this issue are available at tribeza.com, in addition to fresh content daily. Keep up by subscribing to our Tribeza Talk newsletter. tribeza.com/sign-up-newsletter

H I D E A N D S E E K P H OTO B Y A L I C I A W E E L S . C R Y S TA L C L E A R P H OTO CO U R T E S Y O F A S H L E Y K E L S C H . B I T E -S I Z E D P H OTO B Y M AC K E N Z I E S M I T H K E L L E Y.

From red flags to red roses, find inner peace and clarity in your relationships with expert advice from Austin dating coach, Ashley Kelsch. tribeza.com/ ashley-kelsch-red-flags


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Doing real estate The West Team Way

Tara West The West Team tara.west@compass.com 512.632.3110 | thewestteam.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. Photos may be virtually staged or digitally enhanced and may not reflect actual property conditions.


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