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T RIBECATRIB

A legal limbo for church in Battery Park City’s P.S. 89

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Will curtain rise for a Downtown community theater?

Digitized kids help Pace students sharpen teaching skills

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MARCH 2012

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Vol. 18 No. 7

DOWNTOWN DOGS. THEY’RE ONLY HUMAN. (THEIR NAMES, THAT IS.)

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OTIS

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

M A N H AT TA N | B R O O K LY N | Q U E E N S | L O N G I S L A N D | T H E H A M P T O N S | T H E N O R T H F O R K | R I V E R D A L E | W E S T C H E S T E R / P U T N A M | F L O R I D A ©2012. Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property information, including, but not limited to square footage, room count, number of bedrooms and the school district in property listings are deemed reliable, but should be verified by your own attorney, architect or zoning expert.

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VOLUME 18 ISSUE 7 MARCH 2012

Winner National Newspaper Association First Place, Feature Photo, 2011 Second Place, Photo Essay, 2011 Second Place, Local News Coverage, 2011 First Place, Breaking News Story, 2010 First Place, Arts Coverage, 2010 First Place, Best Photo Essay, 2010 New York Press Association First Place, Education Coverage, 2011 First Place, Photographic Excellence, 2011 Second Place, News Story, 2011 First Place, Arts Coverage, 2010

Publishers A PRIL K ORAL AND C ARL G LASSMAN

VIEWS

Fiber artists express thanks for review

To the Editor: Thanks so much for your lovely story “The Fabric of Art” about the exhibition Crossing Lines: The Many Faces of Fiber, and especially thank you for featuring my work on the cover of the paper. I agree with your one criticism of the show, the nonexistent wall labels listing artist information. This made it difficult for you to give proper credit to the artists and makes it difficult for showgoers as well. The artists deserve individual recognition. Linda Friedman Schmidt 4 20 24

Editor C ARL G LASSMAN

In a Tribeca loft, it’s 1952 on the New York Central Railroad You’re never too young for yoga in Battery Park City

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Associate Editor J ESSICA T ERRELL

T RIBECATRIB

Big facelift coming for leaky Irish Hunger Memorial

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Vol. 18 No. 6

Editorial Assistant E LIZABETH M ILLER

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FEBRUARY 2012

FACE TO FACE WITH THE ART OF FIBER [ PAGE 3 4 ]

Contributors O LIVER E. A LLEN J ULIET HINDELL FAITH PARIS J IM S TRATTON A LLAN TANNENBAUM

Advertising Director D ANA S EMAN The Tribeca Trib Published monthly (except Aug.) by The Tribeca Trib, Inc. 401 Broadway, 5th fl. New York, N.Y. 10013 212-219-9709 editor@tribecatrib.com Subscriptions : $50 for 11 issues The Trib welcomes letters. When necessary, we edit them for length and clarity.

CARL GLASSMAN

Copy Editor J ESSICA R AIMI

To the Editor: I very much enjoyed the article you wrote about the fiber show at the World Financial Center. I’m impressed at your assessment of the various artworks and it’s obvious you spent time examining and researching them. My piece is “Extending the Useful Life,” the bed made of tea bags. I was delightedly surprised that you wrote about it and selected it for one of the images you published. Ruth Tabancay Detail from Refugee Never Free, by Linda Friedman (discarded clothing, hooked)

TRIBECA A PICTORIAL HISTORY

BY OLIVER E. ALLEN

Preview it at TRIBECAPICTORIALHISTORY.COM

Suggestions on how to stop reckless deliverymen on bikes

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To the Editor: Like the letter writer Larry Penner, I believe in supporting our neighborhood businesses. However, to dovetail letters by Carole Ashley and Harriette Rostagno, too many local restaurant managers and owners refuse to impress upon their delivery cyclists that reckless (and illegal) riding endangers people, especially kids and seniors. Unfortunately, the police department is unreliable since it takes no action to enforce laws when it comes to cyclists. As well, our elected officials and community board are just as

unhelpful. So, here are a few smallscale suggestions: Alert the restaurant manager or owner to the reckless behavior of their delivery cyclists; stop ordering delivery or stop patronizing entirely any restaurant that fails to oversee its delivery personnel; and call 311 to make a specific complaint. More needs to be done to address the problem of reckless, irresponsible and dangerous cyclists on our streets, sidewalks and bike paths. If anyone has suggestions, maybe The Tribeca Trib could publish them. Ron Dowd

To the Editor: As treasurer of Southbridge Towers, I would like to thank you for your comprehensive and balanced online presentation of the consideration that SBT had given to renting space to a wine and spirits store. (See story, page 6.) But I take issue with the statement that SBT is a “financially strapped middleincome co-op.” While it is true that we had an operating loss in the current and previous fiscal years, we are budgeting operating profits for 2012–2013. This is the result of projected increases in rental income and reductions in major expenditures. These include the new Key Food, which will bring over $1M in annual rent; income from renting space to a veterinarian; lower electricity and gas expenses from locking in lower unit prices; awarding the security contract to another firm at a lower cost; and a new garage contract that pays SBT more rent over the term of the contract and that avoided the multimillion-dollar garage renovation (the operator performed and paid for the work.) Normally a cooperative that is losing money from operations would raise maintenance—this would have resulted in a 15-20 percent increase. Fortunately Southbridge has a large reserve fund (over $15M) and is able to borrow from these reserves (to be repaid) and avoid an unnecessary maintenance increase. Southbridge is well run by a board

able to balance the business side while providing a safe and well-maintained facility and keeping maintenance at a reasonable level. Ronald Guggenheim Treasurer, Southbridge Towers, Inc.

Story on Southbridge Retail Rental Issues Sparks Responses

To the Editor: I was happy to see the story about Southbridge Towers and the pizza store that has been in the complex for over 30 years. Mike and his dad have been fine tenants and excellent neighbors. Key Food has been working on their new premises for months and it looks as though it will take several more for it to be ready. I do not know why Southbridge did not put up a “for rent” sign to try to rent the Key Food space. Instead of brokers telling us we will have a “hard time” renting the space without the pizza store, why didn’t we at least try to rent it alone during all this time? It seems to me that the same broker who could not rent the new Key Food space has now been hired to rent the old Key Food space. In the meantime, it is now going to cost us over $100,000 to get a new tenant whom we know nothing about, while putting out a loyal, trustworthy tenant of many years. I know we need money, but I think Southbridge has to review their “good neighbor” policy. Karen Glasser Southbridge Towers shareholder

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

A Legal Limbo for Church in BPC Battle over churches in schools hits home for congregants who meet Sundays in P.S./I.S 89 BY JESSICA TERRELL

February was a month of uncertainty for the many churches that meet in school buildings across the city, their fate hinging on the twists and turns of a prolonged church-state court battle. In an event space in northern Tribeca, Ryan Holladay, the pastor of Lower Manhattan Community Church, which usually holds services in Battery Park City’s P.S. 89, stood before his parishioners on the last Sunday of the month and tried to reassure them. “We have a lot of peace about God taking us where he wants us to be,” the 27-year-old pastor and law student said before launching into his sermon. “Thanks for being along for the ride.” The congregation—mostly Battery Park City residents—made the trek with small children in tow to the Desbrosses Street space for the church’s first meeting outside of P.S. 89, their home for nearly 10 years. “I don’t know much about the legal process,” said Allison Vance, a Battery Park City parent who said she wanted the church to stay at P.S. 89, but would follow it wherever it goes. “I just don’t understand why it’s back and forth, back and forth, why a decision isn’t just made and then we move forward.” More than 50 churches in the city are waiting for an outcome in the 15-year legal battle between the city’s Department of Education and the churches. (See sidebar on page 5.) “The Department of Education is legitimately concerned about public schools being affiliated with a particular religious belief or practice,” the city’s attorney, Jane Gordon, said in a statement last month, underscoring the DOE’s commitment to enforce its ban on worship services in public schools. The fight over that ban heated up in February, when the DOE was set to evict the churches, based on a court ruling in December. The religious groups appealed and, after several rounds in court with the DOE, they received permission to stay in the schools until a ruling on their appeal. That is expected by June. A COMPLICATED CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUE On one side of the legal argument are those who believe that allowing worship services in schools is a violation of the constitutional separation of church and state. On the other is a coalition of lawyers for more than 50 churches who say that the DOE’s policy is unconstitutional because it singles out religious expression. “When the Pope holds mass in Central Park, it doesn’t mean that Roman Catholicism is the state religion of New York City, it’s merely government accommodation of private speech,” said Jordan Lorence, a lawyer for the Alliance Defense Fund, a Christian coalition that

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

Top: Lower Manhattan Community Church congregants sing during a service in the P.S./I.S. 89 auditorium. Above left: Pastor Jacob Lange delivers a sermon in the school. Above right: On Feb. 26, the congregation meets in a Tribeca event space on Desbrosses Street.

has been fighting against the DOE’s policy since the mid-1990s. Some opponents of the churches’ use of public schools also argue that children might be confused by seeing their school

schools for non-worship meetings as long as they do not include proselytizing, he said. “I’ve always believed that the separation of church and state is the best way to

lieves have a more rightful claim to the space. “Churches and synagogues and mosques should not be in public school buildings because of logistics,” said Bob

“Perhaps nothing short of a Herculean effort would permit the Board [of Education] to sail unscathed through the constitutional strait that pits the Religion Clauses against one another.” – JUDGE LORETTA PRESKA regularly taken over by a church. Some also see it as a government endorsement. Opinions among local representatives are divided. State Sen. Daniel Squadron voted against a bill that would overturn the DOE policy. The bill passed, but is held up in the Assembly, where Speaker Sheldon Silver has said he is waiting for a final court decision. Squadron said the Senate bill was too broad and could have allowed the churches to use the city-owned facilities even during the school day. But religious organizations—like other community groups—should be allowed to use public

protect religious institutions,” Squadron said. “You want there to be a real distinction and that bill dealt with it in a far, far from thoughtful way.” For Community Board 1’s Youth and Education Committee, the issue is not just about the Constitution, but about the use of a rare commodity: available community space in Lower Manhattan. The committee, and later the full board, passed a resolution supporting the city’s ban. Along with its call to “keep church and state separate,” it also expressed concern that the churches would displace community groups that it be-

Townley, executive director of Manhattan Youth, which uses the public school for a variety of programs. “If they get a permit, it is very hard to take it away after a while.” City Councilwoman Margaret Chin, who has at least two churches in her district that occupy public schools on Sundays, said there should be a way for schools to accommodate all community groups—including churches. “The schools are huge,” Chin said. “If another group wants to use the school they can work it out.” In her ruling on Feb. 24 that would


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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012 allow the churches to remain in the schools during the appeal process, U.S. District Court Judge Loretta Preska noted the conflict between competing rights is a difficult one. “Perhaps nothing short of a Herculean effort would permit the Board [of Education] to sail unscathed through the constitutional strait that pits the Religion Clauses against one another,” she wrote. FINDING A PLACE TO WORSHIP Founded in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks with the help of the Southern California evangelical megachurch Saddleback, Lower Manhattan Community Church (formerly called Mosaic Manhattan) has met at P.S. 89 on Warren Street since its beginning. Their weekly

A 15-Year Legal Saga Continues

The city’s church vs. school battle dates to 1996, when a Bronx church challenged the Department of Education’s policy barring religious institutions from renting school facilities. The courts upheld the DOE’s policy until 2001, when the Supreme Court decided in another case that, because the school rented space to other community groups, it could not discriminate against religious groups seeking to use the same space. The Bronx church sued the city again, and in 2002 a court ordered the DOE to allow churches to use the schools until the case was settled. The DOE changed its policy to say that religious groups could use facilities for meetings, but not for worship services. And in 2011, when the DOE appealed a previous ruling against it, the court upheld the new policy. The DOE was set to evict the churches on Feb. 13, when the latest bout began. The churches appealed, and won a temporary restraining order preventing the DOE from evicting them. A day later, a different judge ruled that the DOE only had to issue a permit to the lead church in the case. Then, on Feb. 24, a judge issued an injunction allowing the churches back into the schools until their appeal is concluded. That injunction was upheld on Feb. 29, and the churches are expected to be allowed in the schools until the judge rules on their larger appeal.

rent and the cost of a security guard and custodian is between $300 and $500, one-fifth the cost of the Desbrosses Street event space. Under Holladay’s leadership over the past two years, the church has focused on serving the area’s booming number of families. It has a membership of about 150, including 50 children who take part in a youth program in the school cafeteria while the adults attend services upstairs. According to a membership roster provided to the Trib by the church, most of the 118 adults and children who have joined the church in the last three years live in Battery Park City; nearly all the others live in nearby Tribeca. About 25 members live in other parts of the city. “It’s definitely a very family-oriented church,” said Heather Bilderback, a church member who is also an officer of the P.S. 89 PTA. “[The church] is just a really good group of people that seek to make the community stronger, and that I think is what drew us in.” Bilderback said she hasn’t heard complaints about the church’s use of the school from other P.S. 89 parents. But the church, as Mosaic Manhattan, was the center of controversy a year after it was founded when its staff handed out candy and balloons to students who were participating in a back-to-school event. P.S. 89 Principal Ronnie Najjar said she initially had mixed feelings about the school’s use by a church. “I really didn’t know what the impact would be on the school,” she said, “what it meant to have a place of worship here in a school building.” But Najjar said that, with the exception of some of the early issues with the PTA event, the church has been a good tenant and has not been a topic of discussion among school parents. “We have very clear boundaries,” Najjar said, adding that she and I.S. 89 Principal Ellen Foote had explained to previous pastors that they couldn’t use the school as though it were their own space, forbidding them to store equipment or have mail delivered. “[We] held very firm about that, that ‘this is not your space, you come on Sunday.’” Holladay, a father of two, said that the school’s location was important to the church’s mission of serving Downtown families. But he said he bears no bad feelings toward those who want the church to move. “I don’t feel persecuted

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

Top: Each Sunday, the church sets up tents in the P.S./I.S. 89 cafeteria for the children’s ministry. Above: The service concludes with music and communion.

at all and I don’t even think the [DOE’s] decision is ludicrous—it’s not. There is some basis for it,” he said. “But it’s not as if there are tons of places we can go.” Since December, Holladay estimates, his church contacted about 70 venues below Canal Street, searching for a new meeting place. About 10 of them denied space to the church on religious grounds, Holladay noted. Only the management of 10 Desbrosses said yes. And so 10 Desbrosses is where the church ended up meeting on the last Sunday of February, in what could be a dress rehearsal for a permanent move if the churches lose their appeal. The commitment to meet there came on Friday

night, an hour before the DOE ended up granting it a permit for Sunday. The event space, used mostly for weddings and parties, felt more like a church than does the school’s windowless auditorium, parishioners said. They enjoyed the sunlit room with its movable furniture and pitch-perfect acoustics— but they still liked the school better. “All that natural light was fantastic,” said Brian Vance, who lives in the apartment building above P.S. 89, and walked to Desbrosses with his two young daughters. “But the church community is weighted way more in Battery Park City. I think being rooted in our community is more important.”

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

15,000 Will Race to Finish Line in Seaport BY JESSICA TERRELL For the first time in its seven-year history, the thousands of runners in the annual NYC Half Marathon will be dashing for a finish line in the South Street Seaport, instead of Battery Park City. The decision to move the March 18 event to the Seaport was made by organizers and the police department in an attempt to placate Battery Park City residents who have complained about being inconvenienced by the giant event in their neighborhood. But the route change was made without input from Community Board 1, and now the board is so incensed that it wants to see the marathon end in Brooklyn instead. “They aren’t particularly good neighbors to us,” board member Roger Byrom said. “They don’t come to us when we could actually influence the outcome.” In its vote on Feb. 29, the board unanimously called on marathon officials to make Brooklyn Bridge Park, on the other side of the bridge, the finish area of the race. Organizers for the marathon said they had requested permission to go across the Brooklyn Bridge in the past, but the request had been denied. “They said [the bridge] has never been closed for a special event,” said Philip Santora, senior manager of volunteers and community outreach for the New York Road Runners.

CARL GLASSMAN

Runners in last year’s half marathon end their run on Chambers Street in Battery Park City.

Santora earlier told the Seaport Committee that the Seaport was better equipped to handle this year’s estimated 15,000 runners. Last year, organizers needed two days in Battery Park City to set up for the race. Santora said a change to the Seaport would only require closing streets to parking on the day of the race. “We expect to have everything cleaned up by 3:30 p.m. on the day of,” Santora said. This is the second year in a row that the New York Road Runners had angered the board by presenting its plans just a month before the event, and only after

the Police Department had issued all the necessary permits. Neither the group nor the police had contacted the Community Board office before changing the route, said District Manager Noah Pfefferblit. “The Police Department should have gotten some input from us before actually signing off on a permit,” said Seaport Committee Chair John Fratta. “I think it was disrespectful.” Because the marathon goes through many areas of the city, it is not required to seek community board support for the permits, which are issued by the Police

Department. Organizers promised last year to come to the board earlier, but then failed to do so. “We certainly always take into account the neighborhoods we are in,” said New York Road Runners spokeswoman Drea Braxmeier. “We always try to leave our neighborhoods in the best condition we can.” Fratta said he would have liked to see the marathon go to Brooklyn this year, but it wasn’t practical to change plans in less than a month. “They came to us too late,” he said. “Everything was already set.” This year’s finish line will be set up at Water Street and Maiden Lane. Runners will then head to Pier 16 and 17, where there will be a stage for live music, as well as tents for the charities involved in the event. The marathon raises about $4 million for 75 charities, Santora said. “We are really excited about being able to bring the course to the Seaport,” Braxmeier said. “We think it’s going to be a good opportunity for the runners to take in the sights and have brunch, go shopping in the area.” Before voting to send the marathon to Brooklyn, Byrom expressed doubt about the financial benefits to the community. “As someone who used to run with them all the time, the runners don’t spend money to have lunch at these things,” he said. “They go home.”

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Residents Try to Save a Popular Pizzeria BY JESSICA TERRELL Seated in his Fulton Street restaurant, Pizza & Pasta Delight owner Michael Magliulo Jr., pointed proudly to a customer standing near a simple seven word petition: “We need your support for a lease.” “We are getting 50 signatures a day,” he said with a smile, calling out to the customer, “You can sign the petition if you like.” As it happens, the woman was using the petition table to rest a slice as she sprinkled it with pepper and Parmesan cheese. “I already did,” she said, grinning back at him. “But I can sign again if it would help.” Popular among locals for its pizza but also as a friendly place to gather, Pizza & Pasta is operating on a month-to-month lease and in danger of losing its spot in the Southbridge complex at Fulton and Gold Street. The eatery’s plight was a source of anger to many in the community who flooded a Southbridge board meeting last month to plead for the restaurant. “I know this whole community,” said Magliulo, who was 17 when his father opened the pizzeria in 1979. “Why get rid of a store that everybody needs and everybody congregates at and knows each other? I think that’s very important to make a community.” So far customers’ efforts have had

CARL GLASSMAN

Michael Magliulo and son Michael, Jr., in front of their restaurant. To the right is Key Food.

success. Facing a groundswell of opposition from residents, the Southbridge Towers Board of Directors voted early last month to scrap plans to boot the restaurant and replace it—and the soonto-be-vacant Key Food store next to it— with what it was describing as a “high end wine and spirits” store. That doesn’t mean Pizza & Pasta will get to stay. With the next door Key Food relocating down the block to 55 Fulton St. this spring, Southbridge needs to find a new tenant. The board is not convinced it will be able to do so without packaging

it with the Pizza & Pasta space. “One of the things that was told to us by brokers—and we interviewed four different brokers—was that while they would attempt to market the Key Food space as an individual space, it would be a difficult space to market alone,” Southbridge Board President Wally Dimson told a packed meeting of the board earlier in the month. “The more likely scenario would be that it would have to be marketed with Pizza & Pasta.” In part, that is because Key Food, which is set back from Fulton Street and

hidden behind a small park, has little visibility. Pizza & Pasta Delight’s corner spot is far more desirable, Dimson said. “We think that this is not going to be an easy space to rent,” Dimson said, adding that he was concerned about the impact of losing the Key Food rent and letting the space go vacant. “We are trying as best we can to bring in as much revenue was we can,” Dimson said. The middle-income co-op receives about $360,000 in annual rent from the two shops (the pizzeria pays $96,000.) The liquor store would have brought in about $60,000 less, but it would have moved immediately and signed a 15-year lease. And Dimson said the co-op would save up to $200,000 in brokers fees. Magliulo Jr. submitted a proposal to the Southbridge board at the end of February to renovate the store by installing a new ceiling, lighting, floor and doors, in exchange for a lease. But Dimson said it was too soon to consider Magliulo’s plan. “We have to market the space first,” Dimson said. “We are not prepared to consider the proposal until we see where we are.” Magliulo, who said he had collected some 1,500 signatures by the time he submitted his proposal, was optimistic. “I feel pretty confidant [the board] will give me a chance,” he said.

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BY CARL GLASSMAN The ham in all of us may get to shine if three Downtown leaders have their way. Rosalie Joseph, the spirit behind years of Battery Park City events and a veteran casting director, is teaming up with Manhattan Youth’s Bob Townley and Theseus Roche to launch a Lower Manhattan community theater. Will the show go on? Only if there is enough interest, the organizers say. An exploratory meeting for people of all ages interested in performing, crewing or helping to steer the effort is being held on Monday, March 5, at 6:30 p.m. at the Downtown Community Center, 120 Warren St. (Those who can’t make the meeting can email Joseph at rosaliebpc@gmail.com.) Rehearsals would take place at the Community Center and performances would probably be staged at P.S./I.S. 89 or Stuyvesant High School. Joseph, who had extensive community theater experience in the Scranton, Pa., area before coming to New York, said she found amateur theater to be rewarding personally as well as a benefit to the community. “People have a dream but they’re not going to be professionals; it’s not in their

life plan,” she said. “But when there is an opportunity to be involved in theater, to do something that’s creative and communal, there’s a payoff. It feeds the soul.” Theseus Roche, head of Manhattan Youth’s after-school programs, began his professional life in acting and directing, and for many years ran Manhattan Youth’s after-school theater program. Roche envisions the theater group as an opportunity for graduates of that program to return to (or behind) the stage. “I would love to have a community arts program with the same kind of purity of intention as the after-school theater program,” he said. Townley, who is Manhattan Youth’s executive director, said his inspiration for the theater came from fond memories of a group that performed in the Queens neighborhood where he grew up. “It’s no different than the TriBatteryPops and no different than a group of fellows who get together every Monday to play basketball. That’s their passion.” With the idea for the theater in its infant stage, the organizers hope that much of the creative energy will come from those who share their passion for the theater. “We’re open to great ideas,” Townley said.

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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

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Far left: The building at 7 Harrison Street, corner of Staple, that is slated for development and facade restoration. Left: The building seen from the rear on Staple Street. Above: Rendering of glass penthouse that would be visible from the same vantage point. This is architect Jordan Rogove’s modified design. CARL GLASSMAN

CB1: Penthouse Too Visible for Staple St. BY JESSICA TERRELL A full restoration is proposed for the weathered 1893 Renaissance Revival building at 7 Harrison Street, giving a fixed-up, cleaned-up look to the weathered building’s red brick facade. But it’s what will be seen from the back of the building that has Community Board 1 turning thumbs down to the plan. Developers plan to add a 2,400square-foot, glass-walled penthouse atop the seven-story structure. As presented, the addition would mar the view from

scenic Staple Street, members of the board’s Landmarks Committee said. Based largely on that complaint, a resolution passed by the board on Feb. 28 advised the Landmarks Preservation Commission to turn down the proposal. Bruce Ehrmann, co-chair of the Landmarks Committee, said he applauds much of the project but not its impact to Staple Street, “probably the most significant alley in Manhattan.” The committee liked a lot of what the developers have in mind for the building,

including newly cast replacements for broken terra-cotta elements and extending the cornice along the Staple Street facade. Fire escapes, added in the 1980s, and unsightly cell phone antennas on the roof, would be removed. The proposed penthouse would be set back 15 feet from the front of the building and have a mostly glass facade. “We wanted a clear delineation of old and new,” the project’s architect, Jordan Rogove, told the committee. Rogove modified the design after

meeting with the committee, including raising the building’s parapet wall by three feet to further mask the one-story addition. That was an improvement, the committee said, but not enough. “We laud them for their efforts,” said Landmarks Committee Chair Roger Byrom. “But we would like to see more done to reduce the visibility.” Rogove said he expects to present plans to the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission this month without making any additional changes.

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Can Downtown Boathouse Return to Pier? BY JESSICA TERRELL

The Downtown Boathouse, the city’s largest free kayaking organization, has come a long way from its humble beginnings at Tribeca’s once-crumbling Pier 26. Exiled since the pier closed for rebuilding in 2005, the Boathouse helps 30,000 people a year paddle out on the Hudson from three mid-and uptown locations. Yet the thought of coming home has always been on the minds of Boathouse volunteers. Now they are setting out to make a case that the Boathouse still belongs Downtown. This summer, the Hudson River Park Trust, which operates the five-mile-long stretch of river park, is expected to issue a request for proposals (RFP) for the operator of the new boathouse, now under construction and anticipated to open in spring 2013. But the Downtown Boathouse leaders now worry that they will be priced out of the new, fancier facilities that will replace the former produce warehouse they previously occupied. “The Pier 26 boathouse is still the most popular boathouse that has ever been in Manhattan,” Graeme Birchall, the boathouse’s secretary, told Community Board 1’s Waterfront Committee last month. “No other boathouse has ever proved as popular.” “Depending on how they built the boathouse and operate it, it may be far

HUDSON RIVER PARK TRUST

Above: Rendering of the building that will house a boathouse and restaurant. It is expected to be completed in spring, 2013. Right: The boathouse and restaurant building, now under construction, on Pier 26.

above our total income,” Birchall added. “We can’t make a commitment at this point that we will cover all the operating costs.” The boathouse has a annual budget of just $30,000, nearly all of which comes from small public donations. There is no charge for kayaking at any of the organization’s three Hudson River locations. There are no corporate or private sponsors and no suggested donation for the services. The nonprofit boathouse is run by a large cadre of volunteers. “We do a lot of dumpster diving,” Birchall said. “When Tribeca converted

from industrial to condos we picked up a lot of good stuff.” Interest in the boathouses and nonmotorized activities on the Hudson has increased in the last few years, and the purpose of the proposal request is to give all groups—both for-profit and nonprofits—a chance to apply, said a spokeswoman for the Hudson River Park Trust. Birchall said the Downtown Boathouse intends to apply for the lease, but concedes that it cannot afford to pay rent or high utilities costs. And there are other potential problems. The docks, he said, are not built for the kind of high traffic

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that the Downtown Boathouse expects. Waterfront Committee Chair Bob Townley lauded the Downtown Boathouse as an almost “utopian model” of what a community organization could be. But said it would not be right for the committee to support one group’s request to run the boathouse over another. Nicole Dooskin, the Trust’s assistant vice president for planning and real estate, who also attended the committee meeting, said she would be speaking with the current tenants of the boathouses while working on the RFP, but could not say when it would be issued. CARL GLASSMAN


TRIB bits

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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

Irish Films for All Ages

Although the annual CRAIC Festival is for moviegoers 21 and over, this year the sponsors are also offering a program for kids ages 3 to 12. Award-winning Irish shorts, Irish Step Dancing and storytelling will take place at Tribeca Cinemas on Saturday, March 10, starting at 11 a.m., followed by refreshments. $10 for adults; $5 for kids. The regular film and music festival runs from Thursday, March 8, to Saturday, March 10. Tribeca Cinemas, 54 Varick St. For a list of shows, go to thecraicfest.com.

Television Comedy

Comedians from the “Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” including “Daily Show” writer and producer Rory Albanese, Oren Brimer, Adam Lowitt, Jenna Kim Jones and Al Madrigal, will perform standup at the 92Y Tribeca at 9 p.m. on Thursday, March 8. Tickets are $15 and available online at 92ytribeca.org.

W. B’way Greenmarket

The Zuccotti Greenmarket, which relocated to West Broadway between Barclay and Park during the Occupy Wall Street protests last fall, reopened last month. For now, Migliorelli Farm and Meredith’s Bread will have stands at the market (renamed the “Downtown PATH Greenmarket), which will be open be from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesdays.

For 60 and Over

Want to learn to paint? Do gentle exercises, dance or stretch? These activities and others are available at The Independence Plaza Senior Center, which is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There are also nutrition lectures, blood pressure screening, podiatry care and computer assistance. Lunch is served at 12:30 p.m. The center is at 310 Greenwich St., 2nd floor. For more information, call Nicole Brown at 212267-0499.

Student Sounds

The Tribeca Barnes & Noble at 97 Warren St. hosts a performance by the Stuyvesant High School A Capella and Jazz Band at 4 p.m. on Friday, March 16.

School Supplies Needed

Trinity Wall Street in Lower Manhattan is collecting essential classroom supplies for distribution to K-12 public schools in the Lower Manhattan area. Donations can be purchased from a wish list posted at Amazon.com or dropped in collection baskets inside Trinity Church (Broadway at Wall), St. Paul’s Chapel (Broadway at Fulton) or 74 Trinity Place. Requests include binders, dry-erase markers, art supplies, hand sanitizers, filler paper, calculators, paper towels and ballpoint pens. The deadline for donations is March 16. For information, contact Ariella Louie at alouie@trinitywallstreet.org or call 212-602-0714.

Dive into Fitness

Manhattan Youth Senior Swim Program offers free pool access and classes for community residents 65 and older at the Downtown Community Center, 120 Warren St. The heated pool is open for senior swimming Monday through Friday, 12:30 to 2 p.m., and has swim aerobics classes and clinics every month. For more information, go to manhattanyouth.org or call 212-766-1104 ext. 221.

Tsunami Film

Dance New Amsterdam will host a free film by the Banana Gakuen Theater Company of Japan in remembrance of the one-year anniversary of the Japanese tsunami. The screening, which will take place Sunday, March 11 at 7 p.m., will be followed by a discussion with Toco Nikaido, the company’s director and Ryo Kabasawa, the curator. There will be a cash bar and all proceeds will be donated to the disaster area in Japan. Dance New Amsterdam is at 280 Broadway (entrance on Chambers St.)

Now a senior vice president, yet always your neighbor. I am honored and excited to announce my promotion to Senior Vice President at Corcoran, and that honor goes hand in hand with my pride in being part of the Lower Manhattan community. This is where I live, and what I know. If you are thinking of buying, selling or renting, allow me to put my experience to your advantage. Selling our neighborhood is the easiest part of my job. It would be my pleasure to meet with you and discuss your real estate needs.

Emily Stein S E N I O R V I C E P R ES I D EN T / A S S O C I AT E B RO K ER

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The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker. Owned and operated by NRT LLC. All material herein is intended for information purposes only and has been compiled from sources deemed reliable. Though information is believed to be correct, it is presented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. Equal Housing Opportunity

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

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Community Board

The following is a partial list of the board’s agendas. For updates, go to the CB 1 website. Meetings start at 6 p.m. and are held at 49–51 Chambers St., Rm. 709, unless otherwise noted. Call 212-442-5050 to confirm all dates. An ID is needed to enter the building.

• WTC Campus Security Plan Environmental Impact Statement. Resolution Combined WTC Redevelopment Committee and Arts & Entertainment Task Force • Update by Joe Daniels, President, National September 11 Memorial & Museum

3/6 BATTERY PARK CITY 6 PM

3/13 YOUTH & EDUCATION 6 PM

Location: Battery Park City Authority, 1 World Financial Center, 24th Floor • Special events permit application by Occupy Wall Street for Saturday, March 17, at the Irish Hunger Memorial. Resolution • Sailboat Show Oct. 24–28 at North Cove. Presentation by Michael Fortenbaugh • 102 North End Ave, Site 25, application for renewal of wine and beer license for Shake Shack. • 28 West St., renewal application for a sidewalk café license for Osteria Casano. Resolution

3/6 SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING 6–8 PM Location: Lower Manhattan Construction Command Center, One Liberty Plaza, 20th Fl. • Construction Activity John Street • Application for restaurant liquor license for

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IPNTA on Nov. 12, Whitehall bet. Stone and Water; Sons of Italy Freedom on August 10, Liberty bet. Broadway and Trinity; Chabad of Wall Street on July 13, Liberty bet. Broadway and Trinity; ZIUA on April 29, Broadway bet. Fulton and Battery Place; Leman Manhattan Preparatory School on May 19, Morris bet. Broadway and Greenwich. Following notices have been received for renewal, upgrade or transfer of wine and beer or liquor licenses and sidewalk cafe applications: 1 Hanover Square for Harry’s; Wall Street Court for Fino Ristorante; Rector St. for Masterpiece Pizza Inc.; 11 Wall St. for Compass; 47 Broadway for TGI Fridays; 55 Wall St. for Cipriani 55 Wall Street; 70 Pine St. for Captains Ketch; 75 Nassau St. for The Diner; 81 Pearl St. for Beckett’s

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3)287 Broadway, application for cast-iron facade restoration, replacement of windows, replacement of rooftop HVAC and storefront renovation. Resolution • New Proposed Rule by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. Discussion

3/12 WTC REDEVELOPMENT AND ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT TASK FORCE 6 PM Location: New York State Assembly Hearing Room, 250 Broadway, 19th Floor

• Possible New School Sites. Discussion • New Schools in Development Projects • 374 Greenwich St., Ayesha Sushi III d/b/a Hana Sushi. Discussion • 225 West Broadway, application for restaurant liquor license for Tribeca #1, LLC, d/b/a TBD. Resolution • 329 Greenwich St., application for a restaurant liquor license for Max Tribeca • 41 Murray St., application for restaurant liquor license for Eamonn’s Irish Pub. Resolution • 70 Franklin St., application for restaurant wine and beer license. Resolution • 353 Greenwich St., application for alteration of restaurant liquor license for MaryAnn’s. Resolution • Street Activity Permit Application by CB1, August 10, West Broadway bet. Chambers and Barclay. Resolution • 77 Hudson St., new application for a sidewalk café license for Zutto. Resolution • 71 N. Moore St. for a sidewalk café license for Smith & Mills. Resolution • 32 White St. for a sidewalk café license for Tribeca Grand Hotel. Following notices have been received for renewal, upgrade or transfer of wine and beer or liquor licenses and sidewalk cafe applications: 183 Duane St. for Tokyo Bay; 139 Duane St. for Blaue Gans; 351 Broadway for New Fancy Foods; 460 Greenwich St. for Estancia 460; 2 6th Ave. for Tribeca Grand Hotel

3/14 TRIBECA 6 PM

• Update by Lower Manhattan Construction Command Center • Urban Planning Study on bicycle, pedestrian and vehicle conflicts in CB1. Presentation

3/15 QUALITY OF LIFE C 6 PM

3/20 SEAPORT/CIVIC CENTER 6 PM Location: South Street Seaport Museum, 12 Fulton St, Level 5 • 25-27 Peck Slip, application for restaurant wine and beer license for Grandma’s House. Resolution • 36 Peck Slip, renewal application for sidewalk café license for Nelson Blue • Centre Street, application for wine and beer license for Little Town Market • Brooklyn Bridge Project Noise Following notices have been received for renewal, upgrade or transfer of wine and beer or liquor licenses and sidewalk cafe applications: • 15–17 Beekman St. for The Beekman • South Street Seaport Pier 17 for Nautical Gourmet and Cabana Restaurant • 42 Peck Slip for Paris Café • 220 Front St. for Starfish Café • 88 Fulton Street for Bennie’s Thai Café

3/27 CB #1 MONTHLY MEETING 6 PM Location: Pace University (1 Pace Plaza) use 3 Spruce St. entrance, Schimmel Theatre Lobby

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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012 BY PAM FREDERICK he first time Aldajana Adovac stood in front of her tutoring class of five sixthgrade students, she knew right away she’d have trouble. There was Marcus, the smart aleck in the back row, Monique, a chatty know-it-all in front who could hog class time with her ramblings, and Francis, a willing audience for every one of Marcus’ quips. Then there was Maria, in the corner, who was smart but too shy to speak. “Man, this is B.S.,” Marcus sighed, slumping over his desk as Adovac suggested he reread a passage from the lesson. “I already said my words.” With the five of them, keeping this class on track wouldn’t be easy, but Adovac, a Pace University graduate education student who teaches in a girls’ middle school, had an out: her students were digital—avatars animated by an actor in a sound studio in Florida who can see and hear the teacher. If she lost control of the class, or wanted to test an approach with a student, she could simply take off her headphones and try again another time. Meanwhile, her classmates watched from around the real classroom, taking notes. After “teaching” her short lesson, Adovac said she realized that she had given too much attention to the troublemaking Marcus. “The next time I get into a situation with a student who is combative or disruptive, I won’t be so quick to answer everything they say,” she said. Avatars are not just for Hollywood anymore. Pace University’s School of Education is one of 10 campuses around the country using a program called TeachLivE in the classroom to train teachers. Developed by the education and computer science departments at the University of Central Florida, the program’s goal is to allow new teachers to practice on “students” without leaving the building on Spruce Street. “It’s wonderful if you want to try out a strategy or a lesson,” said Sharon Medow, a veteran professor in Pace’s School of Education. “We can teach about a theory, then actually practice it.” The teachers wear headphones to talk to those students, whose images are projected on a life-sized screen. The avatars are given voice by an actor who has studied their personalities, and can react

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

With his classmates observing, Jim Freeman gets to know Maria, the shy, quiet one in the class of avatars.

Virtually a Classroom Pace U. education students learn lessons from their digitized pupils

instantaneously—and in Some Pace students character. The Pace prosaid they couldn’t shake fessors can change stuthe idea that they were dents’ behavior during a “pretending,” and others lesson, cueing the actor felt stymied by the inabilito mumble, speak out of ty to read a student’s facial turn or curse, for examexpressions, or to speak ple. privately with them. “Is this really a betA few of the students ter way to prep teachers noted that the program than traditional methdoes not allow for a comods, such as simulamonplace classroom scetions, role play or vinario—when all the studeo?” said Kelley Lassdents are talking at once. man, an assistant proBut a uniquely rewardfessor at the School of ing aspect of the program Education. “Our hope is is that it gives teachers a The “class.” An overhead camera lets the actor in Florida watch the teachers. that it is.” rare opportunity to watch With further development of the pro- said Jermain Smith, the School of their colleagues in action. gram, the university could apply this Education’s director of technology. “We “It’s good to see how other people technology in the nursing school or law are always looking at what’s next.” handle their situations—get out of the While working with avatars comes hole and get back on track,” said Pace school, or for in-service teachers who close to mimicking a real classroom, student Abbie Signore. “That, I think, is want to try out a new curriculum. there are shortfalls. “The system is constantly evolving,” the scariest part for a real teacher.”

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

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16 BEAVER Feb. 7...noon A woman left her wallet unattended in Burger King and it was stolen.

BROADWAY & PARK PLACE Feb. 8...4:30 p.m. A French tourist was entering the subway station carrying his child when someone snatched his shoulder bag. The thief made off with an iPad, $350, a $600 camera and a cell phone. 100 WALL

Feb. 10...6:50 p.m. A thief stole two iPhones from a Verizon store by using wire cutters to remove them from the display.

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Feb 17...11 a.m. Someone entered a store while the clerk was in the restroom and left with more than a dozen pairs of shoes and several bottles of shoe polish.

195 BROADWAY Feb. 17...5 p.m. A Starbucks customer placed her purse, which contained $100, on the back of a chair and it was taken. VARICK & CANAL Feb. 18...4 p.m. Three males menaced a man exiting the subway station. After the man gave them $5, they knocked him to the sidewalk and kicked him.

157 CHAMBERS Feb. 19...3:55 a.m. Thieves removed a glass pane from a store door, and after entering the shop and trying unsuccessfully to pry open the cash register, made off with a score of smart phones valued at nearly $25,000. 44 PARK PLACE Feb. 21...9:44 a.m. A thief walked into an office claiming to be “a messenger” and stole a woman’s purse.

BROADWAY & JOHN Feb. 23...3:17 a.m. Police arrested four teenagers and one 20-year-old after the group allegedly assaulted a 27-year-old man on the southbound #4 platform, choking him until he lost consciousness and then stealing a $150 pair of earphones, an iPhone and an iPad.

WATER & WALL Feb. 24...2:10 p.m. A Subway customer left her wallet unattended on a table and it was stolen.

CORTLANDT & CHURCH Feb. 24...7:30 p.m. Three men stole a woman’s wallet as she entered the R subway station.

PARK PLACE & CHURCH Feb. 25...4 a.m. A robber approached a man as he was parking his car, displayed a handgun, and demanded his wallet, cell phone and car keys. The robber then reached into the car and yanked a gold chain off the victim’s neck before fleeing on foot. HUDSON & NORTH MOORE Feb. 25...10 a.m. Thieves walked off with more than $2,000 in video equipment and cash left unattended on a film shoot.

285 WEST BROADWAY Feb. 26...12:05 a.m. A man left his bag, containing a computer, library book, passport and headphones unattended in a bar. It was stolen. CANAL & VARICK Feb. 26...6:30 p.m. Two drivers got into a disagreement, and one driver pulled out a can of pepper spray and assaulted the other driver. 71 MURRAY

Feb. 27...1:30 a.m. Thieves broke into Seasonal Whispers, a jewelry store, and stole $200 from the cash register.


17

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

Celebrating a Long-Awaited Traffic Light

Coby Cohen, 4, watches light being assembled before it’s installed. Right: Richard Carty, with son Ozzie and wife Sonia, holds up Ozzie’s gift to Borough President Scott Stringer.

Even as a worker knelt on the sidewalk last month, connecting a spaghettilike tangle of wires behind the red, yellow and green lenses of a new traffic signal, passersby were already paying gleeful attention. This was not to be just any new light, but the long-awaited one for the intersection of Duane and Greenwich streets. “I thought I’d never live to see the day,” said one woman. “I’ve seen too many close ones here.” “It’s much needed,” said Katie Acosta, who stood with Deborah Cohen as their 4-year-old sons watched the light

being assembled. The boys attend JCP preschool on Duane Street and are often crossed at the intersection to go to Washington Market Park. “There’s so much traffic here that you kind of have to run,” Acosta added. That’s been the argument for the past 20 years. The day after the light went on, elected officials and local residents gathered at the intersection to mark the event. Councilwoman Margaret Chin recalled how the need for the light had been on the minds of many. “Every time I come to Tribeca and

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was nearly struck by a cab as he crossed the intersection with his mother, Sonia. The incident brought renewed attention to the corner and another call for a light from elected officials. “When a community can come together and build that coalition, it gives elected officials the ammunition they need to make the case,” Borough President Scott Stringer. told the gathering. “And this community did a great job.” At that, the group applauded themselves and a nearby traffic light, new to the job, glowed brightly. PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

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visit the senior center, they ask me, ‘Margaret, when are we getting the light?’ I run into Washington Market Park and the park board members say, ‘Margaret, we’ve gotta work to get that light.’ I visit P.S. 234 and the parents say the same thing.” Community board resolutions and a vigorous campaign by Friends of Washington Market Park had led to multiple traffic studies but always the same conclusion: The intersection did not meet federal guidelines for a traffic light. That changed with a close call in September, when 3-year-old Ozzie Carty

179 Duane St • 212-274-844 Mon–Sat 8–6:30 • Sun 9–5

See our selection of Kobo Candles 100% soy wax • 80-hour burn 28 Ericsson Place (bet Hudson & Varick) Tue-Sat 10-6:30 212.941.9505


18

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Costly Fix for Seaport Museum’s Lettie G.

BY JESSICA TERRELL The South Street Seaport Museum, charged with the long and costly process of restoring its decaying fleet of ships, is asking for help in getting one of those boats—a 119-year-old historic fishing vessel—sailing once again. The Lettie G. Howard, now docked at a Mystic, Conn., shipyard, was supposed to start sailing again this summer out of Pier 16. But to the dismay of museum officials, the boat is in worse shape and will be far more costly to repair than expected. “We’ve discovered that the rot we knew existed is a good deal more extensive than we thought,” said the museum’s waterfront director, Jonathan Boulware. The repair cost is bad news for the already financially struggling museum. Now under the direction of the Museum of the City of New York, the Seaport Museum is challenged with both repairing its fleet of boats and breathing life into the museum proper, which reopened in January. (See page 39.) Repairs on the ship are currently estimated at around $250,000—far more than the $56,000 the museum had budgeted, said Susan Henshaw Jones, who heads the museum. Even after several generous donations, Jones estimates that the museum needs another $150,000. “She’s a very beloved ship,” said Jones. “It does seem unlikely, but if there

COURTESY OF THE SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM

Above: The Lettie G. Howard in dry dock at Mystic Seaport, Conn. It was returned to the water due to the expense of repairs. Left: The Lettie G. Howard and Ambrose at the South Street Seaport last summer.

was somebody who would come in and say yes to the [funds] we need, I think they could do the work and have her sailing this summer.” Built in 1893 in the famed shipyard at Essex, Mass., the Lettie G. was acquired by the museum in 1968. The schooner was used for school trips and educational excursions until a few years ago, when the former museum administration canceled its sailing schedule. The ship has a rotted keelson, the part of the schooner that runs from stem to stern and strengthens the hull. Boulware said he was not yet certain if the entire

keelson would need to be replaced, or just sections of it. The Lettie G. is one of eight ships that the museum must keep afloat, the expense of which dominates the Seaport Museum’s current budget, Jones said. The museum recently spent about $170,000 repairing the hull of the lightship Ambrose, but $300,000 in deck repairs is still needed. (The boat is expected to be open to visitors later this spring.) Jones said the museum is asking the city to help pay for the Ambrose’s repairs, as well as restoration on the steelhulled Wavertree. The museum is also in CARL GLASSMAN

discussions with officials in Hamburg, Germany, about returning the tall ship Peking, the costliest ship to repair, to its city of origin. The fate of other ships in the museum’s fleet, like the poorly maintained 1932 wooden Marion M. is uncertain. In the meantime, the museum is requesting donations from the public in the name of Lettie G. Howard. “We are very, very hopeful,” Boulware said. “Many people know Lettie, many people love her. We are very eager to get her back in the water and sailing again.”

TRADITION. EXPRES EXPRESSION. SION. REFLECTION.

THIS IS

Jewish Je wish Cultur Culture e Downtown Downt Do wntown

NOW NOW ON S STAGE TAGE

ON VIEW

Jewish T Jewish Tales ales from Wales: Wales: A Film Series SUN | MAR 11 & WED | MAR 14 Join us for for a collection collection of films about the Welsh Welsh Jewish Je wish experience, experience, including screenings screenings of Gaenor, Furiously,, and V Very Solomon and Gaenor G aenor,, Sleep Furiously aenor ery post-screening Annie Mary, Mary, and pos t-screening discussions discussions with directors. directors. Actors Actors starring starring in these films include Pryce, Rachel Griffiths, Jonathan Pry ce, and Ioan Gruffudd.

L earn about the poet who ga ve Learn gave v oice to to the Statue of Liberty. Liberty. voice mjhn yc.org/ g/emma emma mjhnyc.org/emma

To T o purchase tick tickets ets and for for more info, inf info o, mjhnyc.org visit mjhny mjhn yc.org

“Until We We Are All Free”: Emma Lazarus’ L egacy egac y Legacy SUN | MAR 18 | 2:30 P P.M. .M.

Experienc e an inspiring soundExperience scape and inc omparable view view incomparable of the Statue of Liberty Liberty.. mjhnyc.org/khc/voices mjhn yc.org/khc/ g/khc/v voices

Prof. Prof. Joyce Joyce Antler, Antler, Brandeis Brandeis University; University; Ruth Messinger, Rosenbaum, Jewish Messinger, AJWS; AJWS; and Judith R osenbaum, Je wish Women's Women's Archive, Archive, explore explore the legacy of Lazarus' activism and advocacy advocacy for for human rights.

$10,, $7 $10 $7 sstudents/seniors, tudents/seniors, tudents/ seniors, $5 members

Behind the L Lens: ens: Cura Cur Curator ator T Talk alk with Chris tian Delage Christian WED | MAR 21 | 7 P P.M. .M. offers a cinematic introduction introduction to to the Delage offers newest exhibition exhibition Filming the Camps, Museum's newest March 22. opening March

T he sstory tory of Je ws who The Jews emigr ated from from the former former emigrated So viet Union. Soviet

$10,, $ $10 $7 7 sstudents/seniors, tudents/seniors, tudents/ seniors, $5 members OPENS MARCH 22

Freedom Sounds: A Pre-Pas Pre-Passover Pre-P asso as sover C onc oncert ert with Gerard Gerard Edery Edery Concert WED | MAR 28 | 7 P P.M. .M. Sephardic Sephardic music-master music-master Gerard Gerard Edery Edery and friends return return for for a soul-stirring soul-stirring program program of Passover Passover songs, stories, stories, and poetry from from Iberia, North Africa, Africa, the Middle East, East, and beyond. beyond.

$12, $10 students/ sstudents/seniors, tudents/seniors, tudents/ seniors, $7 $7 members

Documenting ho w Holly wood how Hollywood directors John F ord, Samuel directors Ford, Fuller,, and Geor Fuller ge Stevens Stevens George filmed the camps.

Public programs programs are supported, supported, in part, through the Edmond Edmond J. J. Safra Safra Hall Fund.

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19

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012 Thinking of entertaining or just dining out? Come join us at Ecco Restaurant! Serving Tribeca for almost three decades has earned us our reputation for being consistently one of the finest eateries in the neighborhood.

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Bespoke Cocktails™ shaken vigorously and expertly served.

Spring! Finally. In honor the Vernal Equinox, your neighborhood cocktail lounge, whisk(e)y bar, craft-beer hall, and general meeting-up joint is pleased to announce our Spring Cocktail menu, and a selection of refreshing cocktails crafted to match the season. New beers, wine and menu items too, y’all. Spring cleaning all around. Comestibles and libations to 4 am nightly. See you on Reade Street!

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212-240-9194 ward3tribeca.com HAPPY HOUR MONDAY THRU FRIDAY (5-7 pm) Come check The Rum House, when you’re in Times Square.


20

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

What’s In a Name? Here’s what they’re calling Downtown dogs these days, and it’s not Muffin, Fluffy or Spike. BY APRIL KORAL WITH DANA SEMAN

nyone following the Westminster Dog Show last month couldn’t help but notice some pretty oddball show names: Kiss My Cash, Sugar Daddy, Captain Crunch, Send Money Honey, to name a few. How different from the lovingly bestowed monikers of our Downtown dogs. Indeed, in a highly unscientific survey, the Trib found that Lower Manhattanites favor people’s names for their pets, and often for very human reasons. Take Thurman, for instance. Major League ballplayer does not immediately come to mind when one meets this tiny white Maltese. But his last name happens to be Munson, namesake for the Yankee catcher who died tragically in an airplane accident and was a boyhood hero to this Thurman’s keeper, Andrew Frank. “I was 14 when Thurman Munson died,” Frank said. “This was my way to honor him.” Then there’s Stanley George, a teacup Yorkie, who carries a more formidable name than his 3.5 pounds might suggest. Stanley and George were the middle names of Benjamin Dell’s father and grandfather, respectively. “It’s supposed to be the names of my sons, if I had sons,” Dell said. “But my wife didn’t like either of the names, so the dog got them.” Naomi Buchman cheerfully concedes that Atticus, whom she named after the courageous lawyer in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” is not living up to his namesake. “It’s a strong, dignified name,” Buchman said, her lively chihuahua tugging at his leash. “But he’s not a dignified dog. It just hasn’t worked out that way.” When it comes to human names, Gizmo doesn’t qualify. Besides, this border terrier looked nothing like a Gizmo, the name he’d been given when Denise Lonigro got him as a puppy. “My friends had this uncle and his name was Murray. I don’t want to get into this—but when we got Murray he looked like him,” Lonigro said. “He was a wonderful man, but very scruffy, just like our Murray.” Had Elvis lived long enough, he might have ended up looking like the pet that resides with Trisha Farkus. (See his portrait on page 1.) In any case, the furry Elvis clearly identifies with his namesake. According to Farkus, who likes to listen to an Elvis radio station, “Hound Dog” is the mutt’s favorite. In addition, she noted, “He totally thinks that he’s the king of our floor.” We had no luck getting in touch with a greater Swiss mountain dog named Moses who lives in Tribeca. But we did find his biblical predecessor, Abraham. Owners Lindsay and Matt Bernson, however, insisted the name has neither religious nor presidential references. “I figured he’d have to be smart if he had a name like that,” Matt said. “And I just wanted a smart dog.” Is he smart? “Yeah, so far, except if there’s thunder. Then he loses his mind.” Elizabeth Biondi’s wirehaired dachshund, Boris (Becker), came from a kennel that named each puppy in his litter after a Wimbledon competitor. She insists the name fits because both have “big personalities.” However, she allowed, Boris could easily be a Yeltsin, a Godunov or a Karloff. “Any of those,” she laughed. The Trib wants to know the story behind your dog’s name. Send a photo with a sentence or two and we’ll add it to an upcoming online slide show. Submit it to tribeditor@tribecatrib.com.

A

PHOTOS BY CARL G

THURMAN

OLIVE

ATTICUS

MURRAY

ELLIOTT

HAZEL

MOLLY

JOHANN


21

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

MORTIMER

“He was so tiny when I got him. He could fit in the palm of my hand. He resembled a mouse. I didn’t want to name him Mickey so I named him after the original Disney mouse, Mortimer Mouse.” –Yana Agoureev

GLASSMAN

HANNAH

JUDE

BORIS

LITA

STANLEY GEORGE

ABRAHAM

PENNY

WINNIE


OLD TRIBECA

22

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

FROM THE PICTURE COLLECTION OF THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

The northern section of Tribeca appears in the left portion of this westward-looking photo from 1923. Canal Street is the route that runs diagonally.

Snap from Above A photo captures the northern Tribeca of nearly 90 years ago BY OLIVER E. ALLEN ne day in 1923, a photographer took a flight over what is today’s Tribeca and made this lovely westward-looking aerial view of the northern end of the neighborhood along with the Hudson River piers that lined West Street. His instructions were simply to record the area around the proposed entrance to the Holland Tunnel, whose construction had recently begun, but he ended up revealing many things that over the years since then would change or disappear. In his photo, the diagonal street is Canal. The street along the bottom of the photograph is Varick; then comes Hudson, then Greenwich with its elevated railroad line, then (hardly visible) Washington, and finally West Street. The southernmost street—on the left—is Laight, while the northernmost is Spring. The piers, ranged along the top of the picture, virtually reveal their functions. Those at the left, opposite Laight Street, were leased by the Pennsylvania Railroad, which used them for bringing box-

O

cars of food to Manhattan from the railheads on the Jersey shore. Note the boxcars on their flatboats tied up alongside or between the piers; one flatboat is being nudged into a pier by a tugboat. The next two or three piers are dominated by two large white craft with pointed ends that may be Hudson River Day Liners, which operated as excursion boats sailing up the Hudson to Bear Mountain or beyond. At one of these piers the famed fast Day Liner Mary Powell used to dock. The larger of the two pointed-end craft, on the other hand, might have been in the service of the Eastern Steamship Company, which for years carried passengers overnight between New York and Boston. Between these two large craft is a building containing two slips for what appear to be ferryboats. In the era before bridges and tunnels many ferry lines carried passengers and cars back and forth across the Hudson. One remaining feature on this stretch of the waterfront would have particularly interested the photographer. At the end of the pier that is opposite both Canal and

Spring streets—served by a double ramp leading from both streets—is a barge anchored next to the pier and carrying construction cranes. It is surely engaged in the building of one of the big ventilation towers for the forthcoming tunnel, which still stands today. Now note the small triangular block that abuts Canal Street where that thoroughfare meets West Street. A small park was originally built there by the city, but commercial pressures forced the city around 1920 to allow buildings to occupy the space. Neighbors in recent years discovered the mistake and notified the authorities, and the space today is once again a park. It is in the blocks stretching across the bottom of the photograph—between Varick and Hudson streets—that the biggest changes have occurred. At the very lower left corner of the picture the shed-like structure is the infamous New York Central Railroad freight depot that Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt put up in 1868 and that blighted the neighborhood for decades; it lasted until the 1930s, and the site is now taken up by exit roads from the Holland

Tunnel. A block to the right is a triangular block on the far side of Canal that was demolished soon after our photograph was taken, as its near side was needed to make way for the Holland Tunnel exit road that today delivers traffic to the exit circles where Vanderbilt’s terminal once stood. Then across Canal is another triangular block that in 1923 was filled with small buildings. In 1929–30 they were all taken down and replaced by a huge office building that is still the biggest structure in this part of the city. It is known as 75 Varick Street. Among its many significant tenants today are Adelphi University, Metropolitan College of New York, the Jackie Robinson Foundation and New York Magazine. Finally, the block to the north of 75 Varick, between Watts and Broome streets, represents the most significant change from 1923. It is gone completely. When you take part in the great trafficyielding joust that finally allows you to enter the Holland Tunnel, that’s where you are.


23

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

Live Music Thursday & Saturday Nights

READE STREET PUB & KITCHEN Please join us on the night of St. Patrick’s Day for

Free CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE AND POTATOES! 135 Reade St. 212-227-2295 Call 212-227-0404 for delivery! (3 block radius)

spring is here! the little fountain is back now through Easter at the old fashioned ice cream parlor kiddie cone with rainbow sprinkles & marshmallow Peeps

95 WEST BROADWAY

Breakfast - Brunch - Creperie - Lunch & Dinner Private room available for Easter dinner

Cosmopolitan Cafe 125 CHAMBERS STREET 212.766.3787

Mon-Sat 11am-4am • Sun noon-4am

In Tribeca forever Come Celebrate Irish Heritage All month we will be serving our famous Homemade Irish Specialties. Live Music on St. Patricks Day

Leatherneck Pipes & Drums appearing after Parade

C ity H all W ines & S pirits 108 Chambers Street 212-227-3385 bet. West Broadway & Church

Try us for Brunch Free Mimosa or Bloody Mary Sat & Sun 11 to 4 pm. Happy Hour every day featuring our 5 @ 5 pm

$5 Appetizers • $5 Pints Guinness, Harp, Smithwicks & Kilkenny Kitchen open 10 am to midnight every day 41 Murray St. • 212-962-7300


24

Tokyo Bay

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

girello

Elegant Sushi & Japanese Dishes in an Intimate Setting

tastes good

girello is open for lunch and dinner Our fish comes from South America, California, New Zealand, Canada and Norway—and some special fish from Japan. “Tokyo Bay looks like most other sushi dens in the city, but the fish is better. The sushi and sashimi options are extensive...and the rolls are creative.” — Metro NY

Now delivering in Tribeca next to Walker’s

9.5(wide) x 6.625

Party Trays of sushi, sashimi & special rolls available for large or small events.

183 Duane Street 212.431.8666 LUNCH Mon–Fri: 11:30am–3pm DINNER Mon–Thu 5–10:45pm; Fri 5–11:15pm; Sat 5–11pm; Sun 5–10:15pm

Free Delivery

M

11 varick street 212.941.0109 • 212.941.0110

h t 9 1 ay

20 1 2 Over 70 restaurants 92Y Tribeca, Acappella, Baluchi’s, Barzinho, Billy’s Bakery, Birdbath Bakery, Blaue Gans, Bouley, Bouley Upstairs, Bread Tribeca, Brick NYC, Bubby’s Pie Co. Inc., Capsouto Freres Bistro, Carl’s Steaks, Centrico, Cercle Rouge, City Hall Restaurant, Cornerstone Grill, Cosmopolitan Café, Da Mikele, Duane Park, Duane Park Patisserie, Ecco Restaurant, Edward’s Restaurant, Estancia 460, FDNY — Ladder 8, Flor de Sol, Gigino Trattoria, Grandaisy Bakery, Greenwich Grill, Industria Argentina, Jerry’s Café, Kori, Kutsher’s, Landmarc, Le Pain Quotidien, Lilly O’Briens, Locande Verde, M1-5, Macao Trading Co., Marc Forgione, Mary Ann’s, Max, Mehtaphor, Mrs. Cupcake, Nobu, Peace and Love Café, Pepolino Restaurant, Petite Abeille, Plein Sud, Ponte’s Restaurant, Roc, Salaam Bombay, Sarabeth’s, Sazon, Scalini Fedeli, Stuzzicheria, Takahachi, Terroir Wine Bar, Thalassa Restaurant, The Harrison, The Hideaway, The Odeon, The Palm Tribeca, Toyko Bay, Trattoria Cinque, Tribeca Grand Hotel, Tribeca Grill, Tribeca Treats, Walker’s Restaurant & Bar, Ward III, Warren 77, Weather Up, Zucker’s Bagels & Smoked Fish

Discounted advance tickets now $40 at www.tasteoftribeca.com Kid Zone * Wine Tour * Live Music 501(c)3 benefit for local schools PS 234 and PS 150


25

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

We deliver!

Jazz on Sundays 8-11 pm

Gabriel’s Brunch Sat & Sun 11am - 4pm 16 N. Moore St. (at Varick) • 212-941-0142 Open 7 days 11am - 4am

$30 BRUNCH MENU SPECIAL Unlimited...Bellini, Mimosa, Bloody Mary and a Main Course from the Brunch Menu.

Unlimited...CHAMPAGNE VEUVE CLIQUOT at the bar area 363 Greenwich Street 212.965.0555 trattoriacinquenyc.com


KIDS CALENDAR

26 ARTS, CRAFTS & PLAY ART OF THE PLAINS Overview of Native American ledger art, followed by a ledger artmaking activity. Free. Mondays–Saturdays, 10 am. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. MAKE A CORNHUSK DOLL Learn about cornhusk dolls and then make one. Free. Thursdays, 2 pm. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. NATIVE AMERICAN GAMES Kids play Native American games and make a ring and pin game. Free. Fridays, 2 pm. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. SEAPORT HISTORY Visit the museum’s exhibits, then do a related craft project. Ages 6–9. Registration required. $15. 3/13,3/17, 3/31, 10:30 am. South Street Seaport Museum, 12 Fulton St., seany.org. ARCHIKIDS Build a model skyscraper with an architect. Ages 9–13. Registration required. $5. Sat, 3/3, 10:30 am. Skyscraper Museum, 39 Battery Pl., skyscraper.org. GREENING THE CITY Learn about eco-friendly “green� buildings and build a model. Registration required. $5. Sat, 3/17, 10:30 am. Skyscraper Museum, 39 Battery Pl., skyscraper.org. COLUMNS AND STORIES Make a newspaper and learn about news-

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

“IT’S A BIG WORLD, LITTLE PIG!� Kristi Yamaguchi will read from her newest book at the Battery Park City Library on Tue., March 6, at 4 p.m. The library is located at 175 N. End Ave. Admission is free. For more information, go to nypl.org.

Place, 109 Greenwich St., trinitywallstreet.org.

paper buildings past and present. Registration required. $5. Sat, 3/31, 10:30 am. Skyscraper Museum, 39 Battery Pl., skyscraper.org. FILM NATIVE AMERICAN FILMS Shorts and animated films about Indian life. Free. Daily, 10:30 am, 1 & 3 pm. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. SPY KIDS 2 Screening of the children’s film, plus pizza. Free. Fri, 3/16, 6 pm. Charlotte’s

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MUSIC BARI KORAL FAMILY ROCK BAND Pop-rock for kids. $15; free under 2. Sun, 3/4, 11 am. 92Y Tribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. SUZI SHELTON BAND Songs about real-life kid issues. $15; free under 2. Sun, 3/11, 11 am. 92Y Tribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. THE JIMMIES Record release party for the band that plays bubblegum indie songs. $15; free under 2. Sun, 3/18, 11 am. 92Y Tribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. PRINCESS KATIE AND RACER STEVE Monster-themed interactive rock concert. $15; free under 2. Sun, 3/25, 11 am. 92Y Tribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY HACKASAURUS Learn how to build a website. Ages 13– 18. Free. Tue, 3/6, 4 pm. BPC Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org.

MAD SCIENCE Science experiments and demonstrations about the earth’s atmosphere and outer space. Ages 5–12. Registration required. Free. Tue, 3/13, 20 & 27, 4 pm. BPC Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org. SPECIAL PROGRAMS STUDIO TOURS Visit a studio that produces kids’ films and TV fare. Reservations are required. $10. Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11 am & 4 pm. Little Airplane Studio, 207 Front St., 212-965-8999, littleairplane.com. MINI MATES Crafts, music and movement, storytelling and play with nautical themes. Ages 18 months–3 years. Registration required. $15/$40 for four consecutive sessions. Thursdays, 10 am. South Street Seaport Museum, 12 Fulton St., seany.org. WILD AT THE LIBRARY Meet a real python, alligator, owl and more at a traveling zoo. Free. Thu, 3/8, 4 pm. BPC Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org. IRISH FESTIVAL Short Irish children’s films, Irish step dancing, goodie bags and more. See website for details. Sat, 3/10. Tribeca Cinemas, 54 Varick St., thecraicfest.com. STORIES & POETRY BABY STORYTIME Stories, songs and rhymes. For ages 0–18 months. Registration required. Free. Mondays, 9:30 am; Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:30 am. BPC Library, 175 N. End Ave.; Thu, 3/1 & 3/8, 10:30 am. New Am-

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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

Purim Festivities

sterdam Library, 9 Murray St., nypl.org. READING ALOUD Stories for 3–5-year-olds. Free. Mondays, 4 pm. BPC Library, 175 N. End Ave.; Mondays, 4 pm. New Amsterdam Library, 9 Murray St., nypl.org. TODDLER STORYTIME Interactive stories, songs, finger puppet plays and more. 18–36 months. Registration required. Free. Wednesdays, 10:30 am, BPC Library, 175 N. End Ave.; Thu, 3/15 & 3/22, 10:30 am., New Amsterdam Library, 9 Murray St., nypl.org. NATIVE AMERICAN STORIES Free. Wednesdays, 2 pm. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. TINY POETS TIME Poetry reading for toddlers. Free. Thursdays, 10 am. Poets House, 10 River Terrace, poetshouse.org. CORDUROY THE BEAR The storybook character reads a story and visits with kids. Free. Sat, 3/3, 11 am. Barnes & Noble, 97 Warren St., bn.com. J. PATRICK LEWIS U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate reads his work. Free. Sat, 3/24, 11 am. Poets House, 10 River Terr., poetshouse.org. JANE O’CONNOR Author reads “Fancy Nancy and the Mermaid Ballet.” Free. Sat, 3/24, 11 am. Barnes & Noble, 97 Warren St., bn.com.

Jewish Community Project is holding a Purim Carnival at 388 Greenwich St. Games, crafts, costume parade, Megillah reading and a “Glee musical shpiel.” Sun., March 4, 11 am–2 pm. $18; $65 for a family of four or more. jcpdowntown.org. Chabad of Tribeca hosts a Purim party with a NYC theme. Chow mein will be served and there will be Coney Island sand games. Entertainment by the Story Pirates, Megillah reading, face painting and crafts. Thu., March 8, 3:30–5:30 pm. at City Hall restaurant, 131 Duane St. $36 per family. chabadoftribeca.com. Synagogue for the Arts, 49 White St., has a free Purim celebration for kids on Wed., March 7 at 5:30 pm. Megillah reading, crafts and a costume parade. Dinner and family entertainment with music and a talent show follows. $30, $15 child. info@synagogueforthearts.org. Chabad of Battery Park City offers an Israeli-themed Purim festival on Thu., March 8, 3:30–5:30 p.m. at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl. Israeli-style dinner, music, dancing and games. $36 per family. chabadbpc.com.

THEATER KNUFFLE BUNNY Adaptation of Mo Willems’s book about a stuffed bunny that gets left at the laundromat. $20. Saturdays & Sundays to 3/25, 12 & 2 pm. Manhattan Children’s Theatre, 380 Broadway, mctny.org. THE MAGIC SCHOOL BUS Original musical about a class whose teacher, Ms. Frizzle, takes them on a field trip to learn about global warming. Ages 5–8. $25. Sat, 3/10, 1:30 pm. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., tribecapac.org.

NATE THE GREAT Based on books by Marjorie Weinman Sharmet, a budding detective is asked by a neighbor to help find a missing painting. Ages 5–9. $25. Sun, 3/18, 3 pm. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., tribecapac.org. THE LONELY PHONEBOOTH A phone booth on West End Avenue that used to help everyone in the neighborhood must adjust to the advent of the cell phone. $20. Saturdays & Sundays, 3/31– 4/29, 12 & 2 pm. Manhattan Children’s Theatre, 380 Broadway, mctny.org.

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

29

Tricky Business The Manhattan Youth Players of I.S. 89 performed trickster tales from around the globe.

“Trouble Makes the World Go Round,” directed by Lance Windish and Constance Tarbox, offered a compendium of trickster deeds last month. Above left: Jesus Vasquez, The Toothless Beauty in Tyl Eulenspeigel, is a vain noblewoman tricked into announcing a blank wall is her great portrait. Above: The Boy Who Cried Wolf (Faith Green-White) tries to convince his flock (Cora Dardis, Nyela Graham, Isabel Burton, and Asher Yanovsky) to help him cause trouble. Right: Teacher Turned Trickster (Raina Schoen-Thomas) sings her own “Thriller” adaptation. Left: Spider-god Ananse gives his mother Nsia (Cora Dardis) to Nyame the Sky-god (Gabriela Breton) in exchange for her stories.

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

CONNECT

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Grades K-8, Wednesdays, 4-6 pm at 92YTribeca

Connect Jewish After-School captures kids’ imaginations and interests, and brings Judaism to life with exceptional educators, artists and musicians. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Contact Rabbi David Kalb at DKalb@92Y.org, call 212.415.5767 or visit 92Y.org/Connect 92Y Connect After-School programming receives major funding from The Samuel Bronfman Foundation; generous scholarship support is provided by the Stacey and Matthew Bronfman Scholarship Fund. An agency of

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MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

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THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

A Mighty High Note

33

A Tribeca music teacher and performer comes home with a Grammy BY CARL GLASSMAN The Washington Market School, Tribeca’s venerable preschool, has had its share of high-profile show-biz parents. But none, probably, have gotten star treatment like music teacher Oran Etkin when he returned to work from Los Angeles last month—a Grammy Award winner. “Oh, my God!” shrieked Jessica Kim, the school’s receptionist as she quickly slid beside Etkin to have her picture taken by teacher Isil Unaydin. “Can you sign by the cool Grammy?” gushed fellow teacher Larry Budasoff, pushing a pen and red carpet photo of Etkin into the musician’s hands. “Write ‘To Larry, Love, Oran, Hugs and Kisses,’” he prompted with a laugh. Unaydin grabbed the award winner’s scarf and jumped up and down with her mock souvenir. “I got it, I got it!” she shouted. It was indeed a giddy reception for Etkin, 32, who has taught at the school for seven years and played his clarinet at community events in Washington Market Park and Bogardus Plaza. But while maintaining his local roots, Etkin has built a solid performance and recording career as well as minting a special tech-

CARL GLASSMAN

COURTESY OF ORAN ETKIN

nique, called Timbalooloo, for teaching music to children. Among his recordings are two tracks on “All About Bullies…Big and Small,” winner of the Grammy for best children’s album. “I thought we had a good chance but I wasn’t totally prepared for what happened,” Etkin said. While the reception at the awards for him and fellow artists on the album hardly matched that of, say, Adele, it did let him take in the post-win whirl of reporters’ questions and the feel

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Top: Oran Etkin teaches rhythm. Left: On his return, Isil Unaydin photographs Etkin with Jessica Kim. Above: At Grammys with jazz bassist Esperanza Spalding, last year’s Best New Artist winner.

of red carpet beneath his feet. None of which seems to have gone to his head. When it was suggested that his students were lucky to have a Grammy winner teach them, he said he was the lucky one. “I learn a lot from the kids, from their energy, freshness and looking at everything through their eyes.” “He’s just got a beautiful style,” said Joan McIntee, director of the school’s toddler branch on Duane Street. “He teaches us about the capacity of children to hear music.”

Hirshel Kahn, MD Helen Radoszycki, MD Terry Raymond, PA-C

Ronnie Moskowitz, the head of school, said she has wondered if the school might lose its acclaimed teacher. “This is Washington Market,” she said, “but he is bigger than Washington Market and he has to spread his wings.” Etkin seems quite happy where he is. In the midst of the school’s recent celebration, someone asked about his next project. “I think my next project is about to start,” he said with a smile, grabbing his backpack and heading upstairs to meet the next class of 3-year-olds.


ARTS, ETC.

34

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Photos of dancers in a Mission church courtyard in Isleta, NM, taken in 1867 by Dr. WIlliam A. Bell

T

Life Observed Through rare, historical photos, a Pueblo village seen close up

BY APRIL KORAL he Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railway began pushing its way westward from Topeka in 1868 and didn’t arrive in Isleta, N.M., until 1881. The last rail had hardly been laid in this Pueblo Indian town when photographers began descending on the community. In the ensuing years, no fewer than 22 photographers, as well as writers, painters and anthropologists, came to record, observe and interview the inhabitants of Isleta. Thousands of their photos were sold as postcards, stereo views, playing cards, calendar pictures and art prints to Easterners who were fascinated by Indians and the wild West. “Time Exposures: Picturing a History of Isleta Pueblo in the 19th Century” is a fascinating exhibit of 300 rare photographs of this thriving community that had settled along the Rio Grande nearly 700 years ago. On view at the Museum of the American Indian until June 10, the show captures a way of life before—and after—their culture was disrupted by the incursion of the white man. Traditionally an agricultural community, the Isletas celebrated the cycles of the seasons with rituals and celebration. There are images of the annual opening of the irrigation canals and the races to welcome the coming of spring. The photographers also documented daily life: husked corn drying outside a house,

horses threshing wheat in a corral, and even the making of wine, a method the Indians learned from Spanish priests during the European colonization. We also see the disturbing images of Indian children who have been taken from their parents to attend distant schools where they were forbidden to speak their native language. A 1918 photo shows the Isleta Pueblo on their return from Washington, D.C., where they had fought for the return of their lands. Anger and determination are stamped on their faces. The show, overseen by leaders of today’s Isleta community, concludes with a critical look at the biases of the images themselves. The organizers note that the photographers took few pictures of men working or of children playing. The photos, the organizers say, “act less as a record of our people than a statement by others about our people.” Overwhelmed by the military and economic power of outsiders, the Isletas were forced to adopt alien ways—something that the photos fail to convey, the curators note. “This struggle between our Indian world and the white man’s world created a conflict within our community and within each of us that survives today.” Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. Free. To Sun, June 10. Fri.–Wed. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Thu. 10 a.m.–8 p.m.

Top: Women grinding in milling bins, 1908 by Milton E. Porter. Above left: Selling goods along tracks, late 1880s to early 1900s by George Wharton James. Above right: Vicente Jiron, 1886, by John K. Hillers


35

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

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LISTINGS

36 DANCE g

Dance Conversations Performance by four

dancers/choreographers followed by a moderated discussion with the audience. Wed, 3/14– Sun, 3/25. See website for dates and times. Free. The Flea Theater, 41 White St., theflea.org.

EXHIBITIONS g

Lee Mingwei: The Travelers and the Quartet Project 100 shared diaries in which travelers wrote their thoughts on what it means to leave home. To Mon, 3/26. $7; $4 students, seniors, free children under 12 and on Thursdays. Mon & Fri 11 am–5 pm, Thu, 11 am– 9 pm, Sat & Sun 10 am–5 pm. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre St., mocanyc.org. g

Varick St., thecraicfest.com. g

Crossing Canal Documentary about the role

of the Overseas Chinese Mission in the expansion of Manhattan’s Chinatown over the past 60 years. Thu, 3/8, 6:30 pm. Free. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre St., mocanyc.org. g

Solomon and Gaenor Depiction of an ill-

fated romance between a Jewish peddler and a Welsh miner’s daughter. Sleep Furiously Documentary about a Welsh farming community where Jews took refuge during World War II. Sun, 3/11, 11 am. $15; $12 students, seniors. Very Annie Mary A woman yearns to break free from her strict family. Post-screening discussion with director Nathan Abrams. Wed, 3/14, 7 pm. $10; $7 students, seniors. Museum

Urban Site Group show of paintings, photography and sculpture. To Sat, 3/3. Yi Zhou Underworlds Rising. Sculptures and film inspired by Greek mythology. John O’Reilly I Stand and Look at Them Long and Long. Sculptures of animals in ambiguous states between sleep and death. Tue, 3/6–Fri, 4/27. Opening reception: Tue, 3/6, 6 pm. Tue–Sat 11 am–7 pm; Sun by appointment. RH Gallery, 137 Duane St., rhgallery.com. g The Ones Group show featuring works by more than 40 graduates of the classes for 1991, 2001 and 2011. To Sun, 3/4. New York Academy of Art, 111 Franklin St., nyaa.edu. g

Post Contemporary Art Works by nine artists that explore the fleeting nature and illu-

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB Walker St., artingeneral.org. g

Cecilia Visser Ultima Thule (The Far North). Abstractions of the landscape of the northwest point of Scotland. To Sat, 3/31. Masters & Pelavin, 13 Jay St., masterspelavin.com.

g Pouran Jinchi Dawn, Noon and Night. Detailed mixed media designs on a variety of paper. Thu, 3/1–Sat, 4/14. Tue–Fri 11 am–5 pm. Art Projects International, 434 Greenwich St., artprojects.com. g

Adrian Villar Rojas La Infancia de Cristo. Site-specific sculpture. Thu, 3/1–Sat, 3/31. World Financial Center Plaza, worldfinancialcenter.com.

g

Mark My Words Group show featuring pop art text-based and graffitiinspired paintings. To Sat, 3/31. Mon–Fri 11 am–6 pm; Sat 12–6 pm; Sun 12– 5 pm. Cheryl Hazan Mosaic Studio, 35 N. Moore St., cherylhazan.com.

Carl Beam Paintings, ceramics, construc-

tions and video by the late Native American artist. To Sun, 4/15. Time Exposures: Pic-

turing a History of Isleta Pueblo in the 19th Century See review on page 34. To Sun, 6/10. Small Spirits Dolls from more than 100 Native cultures. To Thu, 7/19. Admission is free. Fri–Wed 10 am–5 pm; Thu 10 am–8 pm. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu.

g

Phillip Theis and Uccello Karnal. Unconventional depictions of the human face and body. Thu, 3/1–Sun, 4/1. Opening reception: Thu, 3/1, 6 pm. Daily 10 am–6 pm. Tachi Gallery, 414 Washington St., tachigallery.com.

g

Let My People Go! The Soviet Jewry Movement, 1967-1989 Exhibition from the

Museum of the Jewish People in Tel Aviv about the Soviet Jews who wanted to emigrate but were denied the right to leave. To Sun, 4/29. Emma Lazarus: Poet of Exiles Rare artifacts about the poet/writer/immigrant advocate. To Dec. $10; $7 seniors; $5 students; free under 12. Free Wed, 4–8 pm. Sun–Tue, Thu 10 am–5:45 pm; Wed 10 am–8 pm; Fri 10 am–5 pm. Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org.

MUSIC g

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Checks and Balances: Presidents and American Finance Money problems faced by

nied by fortepiano. 3/22.

Trinity Baroque Orchestra with Avi Stein

African Burial Ground The story of the free

and enslaved men, women and children who lived and were buried downtown. Ongoing. Free. Tue–Sat 9 am–4 pm. African Burial Ground Center and National Monument, 290 Broadway, africanburialground.gov. g

A Church for the New World Chronicle of the Episcopal parish from the 17th century to today. Ongoing. Mon–Fri, 9 am–5:30 pm; Sat– Sun, 9 am–3:45 pm. The Trinity Museum, Broadway at Wall St., trinitywallstreet.org.

FILM g

Selection of upcoming films: Steel Magnolias The struggles of a group of Southern belles. Sat, 3/3, 10 pm. $13. As Batidas do Samba Documentary about the development of Rio samba over the 20th century. Thu, 3/8, 7 pm. $12. Legend A monster kidnaps a woman who must be saved by a hero. Followed by a post-screening discussion with a film critic. Sat, 3/10, 8 pm. $12. A Quiet Inquisition Screening of a documentary-in-progress about the decisions made by doctors who work in countries where all abortions are strictly outlawed. Thu, 3/15, 7 pm. $12. Gaea Girls Look at the physically and mentally grueling regimen of Japanese women wrestlers. Fri, 3/23, 7:30 pm. $12. Old Dog In response to a wave of dog thefts, a Tibetan man sells his family’s longtime pet and his father tries to get it back. Wed, 3/28, 7:30 pm. $12. See website for more films. 92YTribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. g The CRAIC Festival Irish film and music festival. See website for details, schedule and prices. Thu, 3/8–Sat, 3/10. Tribeca Cinemas, 54

Lipkina

berts and Christoph Hammer Violin accompa-

presidents on the job and in their personal lives. To November. Tue–Sat 10 am–4 pm. Museum of American Finance, 48 Wall St., moaf.org. g

Natasha

Violinist. 3/8. Sebastian Chamber Players Quartet. 3/15. Cynthia Ro-

MUSIC: Award-winning singer/songwriter KJ Denhert, whose works span genres from jazz to R&B and blues to folk, will be performing with special guests at Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., on Friday, March 16 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. For more information, go to tribecapac.org. of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org. g

Aakideh: The Art and Legacy of Carl Beam Documentary about the Native American artist. Fri, 3/16, 2 pm. Flowers of the Desert, The Drum Celebration and In Defense of Wirikuta and the Sierra de Catorce Three films about the Wixaritai who live in the American Southwest and Mexico. Thu, 3/29, 6 pm & Sun, 3/31, 2 pm. All films are free. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. g

Outside the Law Three Algerian brothers lose their home and go on to lead radically different lives. Wed, 3/28, 7 pm. $10. Alwan for the Arts, 16 Beaver St., alwanforthearts.org.

GALLERIES g

Matt Cetta, Lisa Schuchmann, Catherine Day and other winners of the 19th Annual Krappy Kamera Exhibition. Holga Inspire Works by 10 Holga masters. Wed, 3/7–Sat, 3/31. Opening reception: Thu, 3/8, 6 pm. Wed– Sun 1–6 pm and by appointment. Soho Photo, 15 White St., sohophoto.com. g Jessica Stoller Painted porcelain sculptures. Fri, 3/9–Sat, 4/7. Hionas Gallery, 89 Franklin St., hionasgallery.com. g

Daniel Escobar Fictitious Topographies. Manipulated maps, documents and images creating imaginary landscapes. Unspecified

sion of time. Sat, 3/17–Wed, 5/2. Viewing by appointment. Salomon Arts Gallery, 83 Leonard St, salomonarts.com.g Battery Park City

Parks Conservancy’s Annual Art Exhibition Art created by people of all ages in the Conservancy’s programs. To Fri, 3/9. Mon– Fri 2–4 pm. Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, 75 Battery Pl., bpcparks.org. g A Postcard from Afar: North Korea from a Distance Group show that uses reliable,

unbiased information in an attempt to develop a picture of what the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea might be. To Sat, 3/10. Consent Exploration of the public and private relationships Americans have with pornography, through video-recorded interviews with people who consume the product. Wed, 3/21–Sat, 5/12. Opening reception: Wed, 3/21, 6 pm. apexart, 291 Church St., apexart.org. g

Aris Moore, Lucas Grogan and Shaun Odell Drawings on paper. To Sat, 3/10. Jack

Hanley Gallery, 136 Watts St., jackhanley.com. g

Mounira Al Solh Installation that explores Lebanese immigration in a fictional and fantastic way. Katrin Sigurdardottir Sculptures and installations on landscape, architecture, space and memory. Theresa Himmer All State. Sitespecific audio installation that toys with the elements of elevators, including entrapment and movement. To Sat, 3/17. Art in General, 79

Orchestra performs with a harpsichordist. 3/29. All concerts are at Thursdays, 1 pm and are free. Trinity Church, Broadway at Wall St., trinitywallstreet.org.

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Carolina Chocolate Drops Music rooted in the southern African American string genre. Fri, 3/2, 7:30 pm. $25–$50. Laurie Anderson’s Delusion Violin, electronic puppetry, music and visuals. Fri, 3/9 & Sat, 3/10, 7:30 pm. $30–$65. Patricia Racette Cabaret. Sun, 3/11, 7:30 pm. $30–$55. Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce St., pace.edu/schimmel. g

Selected musical performances: Bocafloja Album release party for the poet, hip-hop and spoken word artist. Fri, 3/2, 9 pm. $12. Martha Redbone Appalachian folk. Fri, 3/9, 9 pm. $10. Revolutionary Snake Ensemble and Gato Loco Funk/street beat improvisational jazz band and Latin/rock/jazz fusion. Sat, 3/17, 9 pm. $10. A Lorca Soundscape Commissioned pieces that incorporate Federico Garcia Lorca’s poetry as lyrics into jazz music. Wed, 3/28, 8 pm. $15. Swear and Shake, Tall Tall Trees and Plume Giant Indie music. Sat, 3/31, 9 pm. $10. See website for more concerts. 92YTribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. g

Ahmad Gamal Musician performs the works of Egyptian pop music icon Sayyed Darwish. Sat, 3/3, 9 pm. $20; $15 students, seniors. SSAHHA Maqam jazz by the North African ensemble. Sat, 3/17, 9 pm. $20; $15 students seniors. Sonia M’Barek Tunisian vocalist sings Andalusian muwashahat. Fri, 3/23, 7 pm. $45; $25 students, seniors. Alwan for the Arts, 16 Beaver St.


LISTINGS

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012 4th fl., alwanforthearts.org. g

Barbara Carroll, Jay Leonhart, Paula West and Aaron Weinsten Cabaret jazz. Thu, 3/8, 8 pm. $40; $37.50 students. KJ Denhart Urban folk and jazz singer/songwriter. Fri, 3/16, 8 pm. $15. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., tribecapac.org. g Stuyvesant High School Jazz Band and A Capella Choir Fri, 3/16, 4 pm. Free. Barnes &

Noble, 97 Warren St., bn.com.

Systems and the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. Free. Pace University, One Pace Plaza, Multipurpose Room. Wed., 3/7, 8:30 am. to 10 am. g

Jewish Dystopias Writers Ben Marcus and Joshua Cohen explore how the Holocaust informs their recent works. Sun, 3/4, 2:30 pm.

“Until We Are All Free”: Emma Lazarus’ Legacy Activists and scholars explore Lazarus’ advocacy for human rights. Sun, 3/18, 2:30 pm.

Behind the Lens: Curator talk with

1960s. Wed, 3/21, 12 pm. $18. Titanic

Tragedy: A New Look at the Lost Liner Maritime historian discusses the stories associated with the disaster. Wed, 3/28, 12 pm. $18. See website for more talks. 92Y Tribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. g On Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth Talk on the context of each poet’s development. Thu, 3/15, 7 pm. On Anne Bradstreet, Phillis Wheatly and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Look at the life and

g Gerard Edery Sephardic music incorporating songs, stories and poetry from Iberia, North Africa, the Balkans and the Middle East. Wed, 3/28, 7 pm. $12; $10 students, seniors. Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org.

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These Seven Sicknesses Five-hour marathon of all of Sophocles’ plays, creating a portrait of the human condition. Dinner included. To Sun, 3/4. Fri–Sat, 6:30 pm; Sun, 4:30 pm. $40. The Flea Theater, 41 White St., theflea.org.

WALKING TOURS

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Alison Gaylin “And She Was” and Hal Ackerman “Stein Slug.” Tue, 3/13. Lyndsay Faye “The

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Tribute WTC 9/11 Tours of Ground Zero. Daily 11 am, 1, and 3 pm, Sat hourly 11 am–3 pm. $10; free under 12. Visitors Center, 120 Liberty St., tributewtc.org.

Gods of Gotham.” Thu, 3/15.

Thomas Perry “Poison Flower.” Fri, 3/16. Elizabeth Hand

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Wall Street Walking Tour 90-minutes. Meet at U.S. Custom House, 1 Bowling Green. Thursdays and Saturdays, 12 pm. Free. Downtown Alliance, downtownny.com.

“Available Dark.” Fri, 3/23. All readings are at 6:30 pm and are free. Mysterious Bookshop, 58 Warren St., mysteriousbookshop.com.

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Gangs of New York The Five Points. Meet at SE corner of Broadway and Chambers St. Wed, 3/7, Thu, 3/15 & Mon, 3/26, 1 pm. The Financial District Meet at Broadway and Wall, Trinity Church. Wed, 3/14, 1 pm. Historic Lower Manhattan Meet at the U.S. Custom House, 1 Bowling Green. Sat, 3/24, 2 pm & Fri, 3/30, 1 pm. All tours: $15; $12 students, seniors. New York City Walking Tours, bigonion.com.

g Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler “From Street Fair to

Medical Home: The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center.” Thu, 3/1, 6:30 pm. Free. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre St., mocanyc.org. g

Bei Dao, Forrest Gander and C. D. Wright Poets read their

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works in English and Chinese (translated). Fri, 3/2, 1:30 pm. Free. Leaves of Grass Readings of Walt Whitman poems. Sat, 3/24, 2 pm. $10; $7 students, seniors. 19th Century French Poetry Reading of works by GALLERIES: An exhibition of works by Melissa Brown, entitled “Palisades,” explores the legacy of the Hudson Stephane Mallarme, Charles Palisades. It will be on display at KANSAS Gallery, 59 Franklin St., until Sat., March 31. The abstract images combine traditional printmaking techniques with contemporary painting styles. The gallery is open Tuesday Baudelaire and more. Thu, 3/29, 7 through Saturday, 12 to 6 p.m. and by appointment. kansasgallery.com. pm. $10; $7 students, seniors. See Christian Delage Talk and film clips about website for more events. Poets House, 10 River works of female poets of the New World. Sat, directors John Ford, George Stevens and Samuel Terr., poetshouse.org. 3/17, 2 pm. All talks: $10; $7 students, seniors. From East and Fuller. Wed, 3/21, 7 pm. See website for more talks. Poets House, 10 g Mayim Bialik “Beyond the Sling: A Real-Life West: Dueling Perspectives on Filming River Terr., poetshouse.org. Guide to Raising Confident, Loving Children the the Camps Comparison on how Eastern and g Dialogues in the Visual Arts: TransAttachment Parenting Way.” Tue, 3/6. Chris Western Allies documented images of death Pavone “The Expats.” Thu, 3/8. Luc Carl “The nationalism and Women Artists in the and concentration camps. Sun, 3/25, 2:30 pm. Drunk Diet: How I Lost 40 Pounds... Wasted.” Diaspora Panel discussion about female immiAll talks: $10; $7 students, seniors. Museum of Wed, 3/14. All readings: 6 pm, free. Barnes & grant artists in New York City. Wed, 3/21, 7 pm. Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org. Noble, 97 Warren St., bn.com. $5. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 g Work of Carlo Maria Marlani Discussion Chambers St., tribecapac.org. g Angus Kress Gillespie “Crossing Under the of the artists’ pieces. Thu, 3/22, 6:30 pm. All g The Pharmacology of Aging: Why Age Hudson: The Story of the Holland and Lincoln talks: free. New York Academy of Art, 111 Tunnels.” Wed, 3/7, 6:30 pm. Free. Skyscraper Matters Talk on testing new drugs for older Franklin St., nyaa.edu. Museum, 39 Battery Pl., skyscraper.org. people on younger bodies. Tue, 3/27, 1 pm. $30; g Slideshows: The Dutch Influence in $15 students, seniors. See website to register g Eleanor Henderson, Myfanwe Collins and America 3/6. Beyond Stonehenge: Rock and for more talks. New York Academy of Suzzy Roche Writers read their poetry and Sculptures of the Neolithic Era 3/13. The Sciences, 250 Greenwich St., nyas.org. prose. Tue, 3/13, 7 pm. Free. Libertine Library at Islands of Greece 3/20. Mt. Everest 3/27. g Finance and the Good Society Professor of Gild Hall, 15 Gold St., penparentis.org. All talks: Tuesdays, 6 pm, $2. Tuesday Evening Economics discusses public attitudes, opinion g Elaine Crane “Witches, Wife Beaters and Hour, 49 Fulton St., tuesdayeveninghour.com. and moral judgements regarding the markets. Whores: Common Law and Common Folk in g Selection of upcoming talks: Andy Warhol’s Tue, 3/27, 5:30 pm. $15. Museum of American Early America.” Thu, 3/29, 6:30 pm. $10. New York The artist’s friend and first studio asFinance, 48 Wall St., moaf.org. Fraunces Tavern Museum, 54 Pearl St., frauncessistant, Vito Giallo, discusses his factories, resitavernmuseum.org. dencies and clubs. Fri, 3/9, 12 pm. $18.

g Tech Talk “Power of Social Media in Politics.” A panel discussion on several current and past social media-related events impacting politics. Sponsored by the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information

entirely from stories written by children under 12. Thu, 3/1, 7 pm. $15. Don’t Cry for Me, Ahasuerus A Jewish girl becomes a queen and goes up against a Jew-hating royal adviser. Wed, 3/7, 7:30 pm. $25. Kevin Geeks Out About... Wrasslin! Comedy/variety show featuring videos, guest experts, games and more about professional wrestling. Fri, 3/30, 8 pm. $10. 92Y Tribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org.

g Playing Moliere Unique production of Moliere’s shorter comedies by the New York Classical Theatre. Tuesdays–Sundays to 3/11, 7 pm. World Financial Center Winter Garden, worldfinancialcenter.com.

READINGS

TALKS

37

Unlikely Collaboration: Gertrude Stein and Vichy France Discussion of the writer’s translations of speeches by Marshal Philippe Petain. Lunch included. Fri, 3/16, 12 pm. $40.

Illegal Living: 80 Wooster Street and the Evolution of SoHo Artists recount how they took on the real estate power structure of the

THEATER g

Formosa Poetic narrative that explores how women of color are pressured to conform to Western standards of beauty. Thu, 3/1, 6:30 pm. Free. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre St., mocanyc.org.

g

Story Pirates After Dark Play adapted

History of Wall Street Wed, 3/14, 11 am. Presidents and American Finance Sat, 3/24, 1 pm. All tours: 90-minutes, $15, meet at the museum. $15. Museum of American Finance, 48 Wall St., moaf.org.

ET CETERA g Beading Demonstration Artisan shows how to make a beaded octopus bag and moccasins. Tuesdays, 2 pm & Thursdays, 5 pm. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. g Capoeira Mucurumim Afro-Brazilian martial art. Tuesdays & Thursdays, 6:30 pm. $10. Park51, 51 Park Pl., park51.org. g Arab Music Instruction: Magam Theory and Practice Saturdays, 3/3–5/19, 3 pm. Arabic Percussion Saturdays, 3/3–5/19, 4:30 pm. Women’s Choir Sundays, 3/4–5/20, 11 am. Iraqi Magam Sundays, 3/4–5/20, 1:30 pm.

See website for prices and details. Alwan for the Arts, 16 Beaver St., alwanforthearts.org. g Introduction to Ikebana Learn to create a Japanese-style flower arrangement. Tue, 3/6, 10:30 am. $65. 92Y Tribeca, 200 Hudson St., 92ytribeca.org. g

Trinity Knitters Knit or crochet items for shut-ins, veterans, and others. All material is provided. Tue, 3/6, & Thu, 3/15, 5 pm. Free. Charlotte’s Place, 109 Greenwich St., trinitywallstreet.org.

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Prayer, Despair and Ecstasy Six-part workshop that explores secular and sacred poetry informed by altered states of consciousness. Thursdays, 3/8–4/12, 6 pm. $295. Poets House, 10 River Terr., poetshouse.org.

g Mah Jongg Marathon Games, raffles and more. Sun, 3/11, 12 pm. $54. Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org.


38

MARCH 2012 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Huddled Celebrities Movie stars Joaquin Phoenix and Marion Cotillard were among the actors-turned-Ellis Island-arrivals in a scene filmed on Tribeca’s boat, the Lilac.

PHOTOS BY MARY HABSTRITT

Above: Actress Marion Cotillard aboard the Lilac. Above right: Extras dressed as 1920s immigrants disembark. Right: The Lilac at Pier 40. The green screen allows an Ellis Island background to be added later.

Actors Joaquin Phoenix and Marion Cotillard took a cinematic journey to Ellis Island last month aboard Pier 25’s historic Lilac steamship. The circa 1933 Coast Guard tender was towed from the Tribeca pier to Pier 40 for the day, where crews transformed it into an Ellis Island ferry for an as yet untitled drama. The Lilac’s gangway was replaced with a wooden one, and costumed extras loaded onto the ship, said Mary Habstritt, museum director and president of the Lilac Preservation Project. “It was gratifying that they thought we were appropriate,” said Habstritt, who added that although it took only a few set modifications to make the Lilac look authentic, there was one historical detail she particularly enjoyed. “They hung a 48-star flag from our flagpole,” she said. “It was kind of fun to see that because that would have been the flag the Lilac flew first.”

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YESTERDAY & TODAY

39

THE TRIBECA TRIB MARCH 2012

From Henry Hudson to Occupy Wall Street, the many faces of the South Street Seaport Museum oth historical and contemporary in its prodigious offerings, the new incarnation of the South Street Seaport Museum defies description. Here’s a taste of what is waiting on the museum’s three floors. (That’s two more floors and quadruple the space available to the public than before its doors closed in February 2011.) The future of the financially strapped museum, which reopened in January, remains uncertain. But there’s no doubt that the creative spirit is willing among the people at the Museum of the City of New York who are charged with breathing new life into these galleries and saving the 45-year-old museum. For both institutions the vision is the same, says Susan Henshaw Jones, the director of the two museums. “We always try to connect the past to the present,” she says. “And, of course, that leads one to consider the future.” South Street Seaport Museum, 12 Fulton St., Wed.–Sun. 10–6. $5; children under 9 free. info@seany.org.

B

1 PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN (EXCEPT WHERE NOTED)

1. A mannequin in the remnants of an old Seaport hotel displays a frock by fashion designer to the stars Jordan Betten. 2. From Eric Sanderson’s Mannahatta Project, the Manhattan that Henry Hudson found when he arrived in 1609. 3. Candlesticks, designed by Ted Muehling, are among the many objects in “Made in New York” showing that artisanal manufacturing in the city is alive and well.

2

4. An Occupy Wall Street moment captured by Kevin Hagen, one of some 125 OWS photos in the show. 5. Tattoo selection in exhibit featuring historic Seaport commerce. Also included are the fish market and tea and coffee trade. 6. Tool collection as art installation. All the objects have a connection to ships—building, maintaining, planning and more. 7. “Widely Different” features the contrasting panoramic photo styles of Sylvia Plachy, shown here, and Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao. 8. A Fulton Fish Market scale and a muralsize photo of it in use.

8 3

9. Installation of 4,000 fishing weights suspended from the ceiling. 10. One of an armada of 30 ship models. Also on display are some 40 ships in bottles from the museum’s extensive collection.

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KEVIN HAGEN

5

SYLVIA PLACHY


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Jill Mangone

5HQWDOV SUPERB LOFT4RI"E#A(UGE  3& "2CONV BATH LOFT4HEX,2HASBRIGHT3 EXPOSUREWOPENVIEWS HR$-  BUILDINGHASPRIVATEINDOORGARAGE  MONTH7%" #RAIG&ILIPACCHI   *ACQUES&OUSSARD   TERRACES, LIGHT, PARKING 4RI"E#A,OFT AMAZINGLIGHT"2  BATH TERRACES7BFP *ACUZZI  HIGH ENDKITCHEN 6IKINGSTOVE -IELE $7 3UB :EROPARKINGSPACES  MONTH7%" ,IZ$WORKIN   LIVE/WORK RETAIL4RI"E#A  3&TRPLXWRETAILFRONTAGEVIAHUGE &RENCHDOORSTHATOPENDIRECTLYONTO STR&LEXLAYOUTW "2 BATHSNEW KIT MONTH7%" #RAIG&ILIPACCHI   *ACQUES&OUSSARD   TRIBECA LOFT4RI"E#A 3& LOFT"2 BATHWCHEFSKIT HIGHCEILS  CASTIRONCOLUMNS CUSTOMDESIGNED MSTRWALK IN ORIGDETAILSTHROUGHOUT  MONTH7%" #RAIG&ILIPACCHI   *ACQUES&OUSSARD   HISTORIC LOFT4RI"E#A"2  BATHLOFTWEXPOSEDBRICKIN$- BUILDING7$INAPT EXTRASTORAGEIN BASEMENT.EAR(UDSON2IVER0ARK  ! # %* . 1 2 :ANDTRAINS  MONTH7%" #RAIG&ILIPACCHI   *ACQUES&OUSSARD   PERFECT LOFT4RI"E#A"IGBRIGHT "2LOFT ORIGWOODBEAMCEILS COLUMNS EXPOSEDBRICK .3EXPOS OPENKITCHEN  GRANITECOUNTER CONCIERGE GREATROOF DECK MONTH7%" "RAHNA9ASSKY   SEAPORT LOFT3OUTH3TREET "RANDNEWGUTRENOVWITHGREAT SUNLIGHT%WATERVIEWS.EARGREAT 3EAPORTRESTAURANTSMANYSUBWAY LINES MONTH7%" #RAIG&ILIPACCHI  

 7 + (  + $ 0 3 7 2 1 6   3$ / 0  % ( $ & +

Andrew Charas

Joan Goldberg

Erin Boisson Aries

Thomas Hemann

Craig Filipacchi

Jacques Foussard

Brahna Yassky

Denise Guido

All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker. Equal Housing Opportunity Broker.


Tribeca Trib, March 2012  

A Downtown church caught in the city's church-school battle, plans in the making for a new community theater group, avatar students at Pace...

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