Page 1

10 12 17

T RIBECATRIB

9/11 museum curators on making the hard choices Downtown’s hospital drills for a chemical explosion

Skydivers take amazing flight over Lower Manhattan ‰ ‰

THE

Choosing Tribeca’s Next Park

MATHEWS NIELSEN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

Vol. 20 No. 10

www.tribecatrib.com

JUNE 2014

The future of Bogardus Garden and Plaza is now. [PAGE 4]


2

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Full-Floor Penthouses Immediate Occupancy

The complete offering terms are in an Offering Plan available from Sponsor. File No CD11-0178. Property Address: 93 Worth Street NY, NY 10013 Sponsor Name: 93 WORTH LLC Sponsor Address: 420 Lexington Ave, 1610 NY NY 10170

93WORTH 212.219.9393 93Worth.com

Exclusive Sales & Marketing


TRIBECA TRIB

THE

VOLUME 20 ISSUE 10 JUNE 2014

Winner National Newspaper Association First & 2nd Place, Breaking News Story, 2013 Second & 3rd Place, Feature Story, 2013 Third Place, Web Site, 2013 First Place, Feature Photo, 2012 Second Place, Local News Coverage, 2011 New York Press Association First Place, Best Web Site, 2014 First Place, Best Feature Photo, 2014 Second Place, Best Video, 2014 Third Place, Best Feature, 2014 CUNY IPPIE AWARDS Second Place, Best Photograph, 2012

PUBLISHER A PRIL K ORAL APRIL @ TRIBECATRIB . COM EDITOR C ARL G LASSMAN CARLG @ TRIBECATRIB . COM ASSOCIATE EDITOR A MANDA W OODS AMANDA @ TRIBECATRIB . COM ASSISTANT EDITOR/LISTINGS E LIZABETH M ILLER ELIZABETH @ TRIBECATRIB . COM ADVERTISING DIRECTOR D ANA S EMAN DANA @ TRIBECATRIB . COM CONTRIBUTORS OLIVER E. ALLEN THEA GLASSMAN JULIET HINDELL BARRY OWENS NATHALIE RUBENS CONNIE SCHRAFT ALLAN TANNENBAUM COPY EDITOR J ESSICA R AIMI TO PLACE AN AD Print ads for The Tribeca Trib are due by the 18th of the month. Ads received later are accepted on a space-available basis. For prices, go to “Advertising” at tribecatrib.com or email Dana Seman at dana@tribecatrib.com. Information about online ads can also be found on our website. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Trib welcomes letters, but they are published at the discretion of the editor. When necessary, we edit letters for length and clarity. Send letters to editor@tribecatrib.com. TO SUBSCRIBE Subscriptions are $50 for 11 issues. Send payment to The Tribeca Trib, 401 Broadway, Rm. 500, New York, NY 10013. The Tribeca Trib is published monthly (except August) by The Tribeca Trib, Inc., 401 Broadway, Rm. 500, New York, N.Y. 10013 tribecatrib.com, 212-219-9709.

Collect Pond Park is beautiful but how will it be maintained?

VIEWS

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

Worrying about the future of Greenwich St.

To the Editor: I read with dismay your article about the Friends of Greenwich Street and their struggle to keep going. Nancy Owens and the late John Petrarca and I fought very hard to make that little bit of green possible and overcame many obstacles to make it an amenity for all Tribecans to enjoy. Steve Boyce and Ron and Joanne Capozzoli did a tremendous job in taking it to the next level. I sincerely hope that Steve is able to recruit a new crop of volunteers to continue the upkeep of this important piece of the neighborhood. It was created by members of the community for the community and I hope that spirit still exists in Tribeca. Doug Sterner

To the Editor: After a three-year delay, due to construction problems including many attempts to get the water feature right, Collect Pond Park at Leonard Street between Centre and Lafayette opened the morning of Thursday, May 22, with no prior announcement or ceremony. The park is exquisitely designed. The view from the surrounding sky-

3

a block away; contiguous rat-infested subway tunnels and ancient storage catacombs; organic trash that’s bound to be left at picnic tables; trees shedding leaves into the pond; high use by pedestrians and the very attractiveness of the space will all contribute to a likely mess in the near future unless there is proactive action now. The Parks Department has con-

Celebrating the ferry, the wave of the future

To the Editor: The start of new West Side commuter ferry service between West 44th Street and the World Financial Center on the Hudson River by New York Water Taxi is the wave of the future. Our waterways are an underutilized natural asset that can offer significant transportation alternatives for thousands of New Yorkers. Most of our existing public transportation and roadways are already operating at or above capacity, and new ferry services can be implemented far more quickly than construction of new subway, commuter rail or highways. Rail service between Liberty Street and Pavonia, New Jersey, and Barclay Street and Hoboken ended in 1967. Fast-forward to today, thousands of commuters use ferries from New Jersey to Downtown Manhattan. Riders also now use the new East River ferry connecting waterfront neighborhoods in Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan. Who would not want to enjoy the fresh air and breeze that only waterborne transportation can provide? Riding a ferry can be less stressful than being packed in a subway car like sardines in a can. Larry Penner

New Collect Pond Park, at Leonard, Centre and Lafayette streets.

scrapers will best capture the park’s esthetic pleasures as the architect saw it on the drawing board. The sleek, succinct design features are, like the recently opened James Madison Plaza Park nearby, luxurious and perfectly inserted into the landscape for a highly pleasing experience for the parkgoer. The amenities are all first-rate. The fabulous quintessential 21stcentury urban pond, with elegant kissing bridge and total perimeter access, however clever and appreciated by visitors, demands extra and specific maintenance to keep clean. The water feature especially will be a challenge for the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation to maintain properly. There are potentially large pitfalls for this park, seemingly designed with ignorance of the park before it closed for renovation: permanent communities of rats and homeless people, especially in warm weather. NYC Rescue Mission

structed a very high-maintenance, densely used park that looks great at the opening, but with no increase in Parks staff, will deteriorate rapidly. In order to have a clean park, there should be more maintenance staff. This is not just a seasonal need. These three parks served by the same Parks Department staff—Columbus, Foley Square and Collect Pond—are jewels in a necklace of parks in lower Manhattan that demand the same care as parks in other cities’ civic centers. Unless there are additional workers, all three parks will suffer. Let’s not quibble about a welldeserved celebration for this highly anticipated and greatly appreciated green recreational space downtown. We do demand anticipating and fulfilling maintenance needs that will assure a Collect Pond Park that we use and love into the future. Skip Blumberg Founder/President

TRIBECA HARDWARE

154 CHAMBERS ST 212.240.9792 Mon-Fri 7-7 Saturday 9-6 Sunday 10-6

& Tool Rental

PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES NUTS BOLTS SCREWS FASTENERS HOUSEWARES BULBS KEYS APPLIANCES LOCKS CLEANING & MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES REFINISHING SUPPLIES HAND & POWER TOOLS LADDERS & MORE

WE RENT... POWER TOOLS, FLOOR REFINISHING EQUIPMENT, CARPET/UPHOLSTERY CLEANERS


Pick One: Choosing a Bogardus Garden Design 4

BY CARL GLASSMAN Last month Tribeca residents got their first peek at what may well be the plan for a boldly beautified Bogardus Garden and Plaza. But which plan? That was the question posed to a small public gathering at the Downtown Community Center on May 27, where Signe Nielsen of Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects presented three possible schemes for merging the garden and plaza that form the triangle on Hudson Street between Chambers and Reade streets. The three plans, informed by comments and wish lists at a public “listening session” in February, each feature a different major design element: an elevated walkway through the garden; nooks and curves and an enlarged area for events; or a partially unfenced garden with emphasis on a variety of seating options. “Garden plus plaza equals a new kind of space,” Nielsen told the group, who had been given comment sheets on which to express their likes and dislikes about each option. All the plans for the 12,000-squarefoot space call for adding new trees (four

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

or five, depending on the plan) and about the same amount of green space (28 percent). They will also include additional plantings in the garden, cobblestonelike pavement, a required 16-foot-wide path through the plaza for emergency vehicles, a clock and movable furniture

CARL GLASSMAN

Looking north, Bogardus Garden and Plaza as it is today. Inset: One of the comment sheets filled out at a presentation on three possible future designs.

similar to what is there now. With the feedback in mind, the landscape architects will develop a final scheme, to be shown to the Community Board 1’s Tribeca and Landmarks committees, possibly as early as July. Before going forward, the design would still need the approval of the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission. Construction is expected to begin in the

summer of 2016 and be completed a year later. The $3 million project is being funded in part by a $2 million grant from the city’s Department of Transportation, and additional money from elected officials and private donations. What Do You Think? The city and Friends of Bogardus Garden want to know your opinion. Email your choice or suggestions to info@bogardusgarden.org.

CONCEPT A: “ELEVATED STAGE”

RENDERINGS BY MATHEWS NIELSEN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

At a public design workshop in February, some said they wanted more opportunity to enjoy the garden, which now is fenced. This concept provides a path that cuts through the garden. In order to do that without destroying the plantings, the walkway would be raised and entered by a ramp from the south. The path and park could also be entered from near the corner of Reade Street and West Broadway. “That would bring us up 18 inches or so and provide a continuous seating element along the [west] side,” Signe Nielsen said. The platform, she noted, could serve as a stage. This concept provides only “slightly less” green than the other two, according to Nielsen, because of the path through the garden. The two existing London Plane trees would remain in the garden, and four new flowering trees along with new plantings would be added.

CONCEPT B: “GARDEN CURVES”

Curves and nooks are created in this plan, which also provides a wider area on the plaza for events. Because this concept has the widest unplanted space of the three schemes, the area would be dotted with planters similar to those now in the plaza. There would be the same amount of green in this plan, Nielsen said, but it would be distributed differently. With the exception of the raised garden, the space would be flat. In this scheme, the entire garden is fenced and rails surround the low planted areas. A wooden bench is integrated into the perimeter edge of the garden. A curved backless bench, not shown in this rendering, would be located near the subway elevator at the south end of the plaza. As with Concept A, four new flowering trees as well as new plantings would be added.

CONCEPT C: “NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY”

As a homage to the neighborhood’s history as a butter-and-egg district, some of the seating in this plan would be provided by immovable “eggs,” up to four feet long and 14 to 16 inches high that are placed along a deck on the plaza side of the garden. “This scheme best accommodates something playful for children,” Nielsen said. “It also has the most diversity of seating from back benches that are tucked into the plantings and decks for people to sit on.” In this plan, the West Broadway and Reade Street sides of the garden are fenced, but on the plaza side the seating element of the deck provides an unfenced edge of the garden. Five new trees are added in this concept, and it includes a second type of paving over a large portion of the plaza.


THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

5


6

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB From far left: An 1860 four-story commercial building (shown here in 1914) was reduced in 1966 to a twostory structure. In the 1970s and 80s, the building was occupied by the food store BellBates. The restaurant MaryAnn’s took over the building and covered it in orange stucco.

Proposed New Look for Changing Corner PHOTOS: LAWRENCE G, JONES ARCHITECTS

Plan for Chelsea eatery outpost Cafeteria raises noise concerns in Tribeca

BY CARL GLASSMAN It’s sight lines and design decisions, not noise levels and neighborhood nuisance complaints, that are the usual concerns of local preservationists. But when the architect for Cafeteria Tribeca, the restaurant planned for West Broadway at Reade Street, came before Community Board 1’s Landmarks Committee last month, the members could already anticipate the rumble of complaints to come. The 185-seat, two-story restaurant, a spinoff of Chelsea’s popular Cafeteria restaurant, is going into the site formerly occupied by the restaurant MaryAnn’s, next to the Cosmopolitan Hotel. The proposed second level of the eatery is faced with light-colored glazed brick rather than the orange stucco of its predecessor. A cornice and canopy would also be added. While the building would maintain the same four-window scheme on the second floor, the ground-level facade, nearly 100 feet long, would be glass panels that can be raised like garage doors, creating an open-air restaurant. “I don’t know if you’re familiar,” Committee Co-chair Roger Byrom instructed architect Lawrence Jones, “but restaurants and bars that like to open their windows have had a lot of resistance because this is a residential, mixeduse area.” The committee noted that Sazon, the

RENDERINGS: LAWRENCE G, JONES ARCHITECTS

Top: Rendering of proposed design for Cafeteria Tribeca, to mostly front onto West Broadway. Above: Proposed West Broadway side of Cafeteria Tribeca, with glass panels raised.

restaurant a few doors down at 105 Reade St., has been a frequent target of noise complaints for years, and that Ward III, a bar next door to the site, has also been singled out as a problem. Indeed, in April of last year, neighbors showed up at CB1’s Tribeca Committee to voice their worries over a liquor license for the place, its exterior as yet

undesigned. CB1 gave its advisory approval, having heard promises from co-owner Mark Thomas Amadei that his establishment would be sensitive to noise concerns—even promising to pay for soundproof windows. (Amadei could not be reached for comment for this story.) The Trib’s online article about the restaurant’s design elicited letters to CB1

from neighbors, claiming that Amadei had gone back on his promises. “Cafeteria will not just exacerbate the problem [of noise from other establishments]; it will have an exponentiallydeleterious impact our collective right to the quiet enjoyment of our homes,” wrote Frank Massino of 100 Reade St. Even on aesthetic grounds, the committee decided, the long expanse of glass did not fit with the Tribeca South Historic District. “Do you know of anything [in the historic district] that’s a hundred feet long that’s the size of these windows that open up to the street?” committee member Marc Ameruso asked the architect. “These are twice the size of any place that I know of.” Plans for a residential building on that site, with an all-glass ground floor, had already been approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 2010. (The project was later abandoned by the Cosmopolitan Hotel, which owned the property.) Jones argued that his design introduces many elements found in Tribeca, including the glass storefronts seen on nearby buildings as well as one that stood on that corner in the 1800s. “We’re trying to harken back to what had been there before,” Jones said. But the full board voted to recommend denying the application, citing in its resolution “no context [that] exists in Tribeca for 99 feet of ground-floor glass” and, as a “side note” mentioning that the noise level would be “intolerable.” As of press time, no date had been set for a Landmarks Commission hearing.

FATHER’S DAY AT THE ARMOURY Being a specialty men’s retailer means knowing a thing or two about what Dads like. As Father’s Day approaches, we invite you to come find the perfect gift for your loved one. Offering everything from tailored clothing to accessories and swimwear, we think you will find something that every dad will appreciate. Cotton Scarves: Drake’s London ($220), Ties: Drake’s London, Mattabisch, Tie Your Tie (from $140), Panama Hat: Lock & Co. ($350), Shoes: Carmina ($550), Umbrellas: Fox ($385)

168 Duane Street New York, NY 10013 +1 646 613 7613 nyc@thearmoury.com WWW.THEARMOURY.COM


7

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

NE W YORK CIT Y

„

HA MPTONS

„

CONNECTICUT

„

NEW JERSEY

„

HUDSON V VA ALLEY

EXQUISITE LUXURY HOME / G GREENWICH REENW NWICH STREET Excl. T This his mint and sophisticated 3,650SF corner condo loft ake yyour our breath aaway! Keyed-elevator lofftt is guaranteed to ttake way! K eyed-elevator opens to a grand-scaled Living/Dining room bathed in nat natural ural sunlight with 1 11’ 1’ ceilings, a WBFP P, enormous st state-of-the-art ate-of-the-art B Boffi offi kitc kitchen, Bedrooms Room, oom, hen, 4 B edrooms + Media R sweeping city river er vie views ws 4 gorgeous bathrooms + sw eeping cit y and riv 15 oversized windows. Every inch luxury from 1 5o versized windo ws. Ev er y inc h curated with luxur y comfort stunning. and comf ort in mind. Absolutely st unning. $10.75M. Web#9917397

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE VIEWS… VIEWS… / GREENWICH G VILLAGE Excl 4,150SF perched hed 1 17 7 stories Ex cl This This 4,1 50SF full floor residence is perc above eatures a dramatic entert aining abo ve L ower Manhat tttan and ffeatures Lower Manhattan entertaining e xpanse w/st ate-of-the-art cchef’s hef’s kitc hen, 3 bedrooms, librar expanse w/state-of-the-art kitchen, libraryy w/wbfp, an enormous wraparound ter race, plus astonishing terrace, north, south, east, and w est vie ws from endless floor r-to-towest views floor-tows. Enjo vice ceiling windo windows. Enjoyy absolute luxur luxuryy in this full-ser full-service 5.825M. W eb#10127801 doorman building with garage! $1 $15.825M. Web#10127801

PENTHOUSE-I PENTHOUSE-IN-THE-SKY THOUSE-IN-THE-SKY / FLATIRO FLATIRON N ws Ex Excl. cl. Enjo Enjoy y brilliant light and st staggering aggering river-to-river riverr-to-river vie views wling 3,60 0SF duple from 52 windo windows ws in this spra sprawling 3,600SF duplexx penthouse hed living/dining room with 2 wbfps, ffeaturing eaturing a sun-drenc sun-drenched y, of ffice, fice, plus breatht cchef’s hef’s kitc kitchen, hen, 5 bedrooms, librar library, office, breathtaking aking cit city y and riv river er panoramas from multiple landscaped ter terraces. races. P Prime rime 24-hour doorman condominium has gym and on-site parking. Extraordinar parking. Extraordinary! y! $7 7.75M. Web#9248195 Web#9248195

YORK WEST K / MIDTOWN MIDTOWN IDTO LANDMARK NEW YOR Excl. This This legendary legendar y 9-room residence at the historic Osborne is restored to perf perfection ection with all original det details ails int intact! act! 3,0 3,000SF 0 0SF duple duplex x home ffeatures eatures grand-scaled entert entertaining aining rooms with 14’ 14’ ceilings, 5 w wood ood burning fireplaces, 4 bedrooms, fformal hef’s kitchen, ormal dining room, cchef’s kitchen, exquisite details quality! plus e xquisite det ails throughout. Museum qualit y! $5.5M. Web#9918902 W eb#9918902

S CLASSIC PENTHOUSE THOUSE LOFT / SOHO Excl. Dramatic top-floor loft features an loft in historic SoHo features expansive 13-foot ceilings, expansive sky-lit sky-lit entertaining entertaining space with 13-foot kitchen, sun drenched drenched wide-plank flooring, flooring, open chef’s chef’s kitchen, 1,600SF master bedroom suite, 2 gorgeous bathrooms, plus 1,600SF available roof rights from the co-op to create your your own own of available y! $3.6M. W eb#10133540 landscaped roof garden-in-the-sk garden-in-the-sky! Web#10133540

GREENWICH VILLAGE PRIME VILLAGE LOFT / G Keyed elevator elevator opens to this Rarely Excl. R arely aavailable… vailable… Keyed oot loft lofft with high ceilings, exposed exposed 2,000 sunny sunn y 2,0 00 square ffoot hen, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, plus bright brick walls, kitchen, bric kw alls, open kitc wood-framed windows. views wall all of wood-framed windows. treetop vie ws from a w ocation location! $3.45M. W eb#9845319 Location Web#9845319 L

WEST W EST VILLAGE OASIS / WEST WEST VILLAGE This rare and wonderful wonderful 2 bedroom, 2 bath floor rExcl. This floorttiest tiest tree-lined bloc k in the prettiest block through is located on the pret W est V illage and ffeatures eatures a sun drenc hed living/dining room West Village drenched with w hen, and wood windowed kitchen, ood burning fireplace, windo wed eat-in kitc y windo ws. P ure views oversized bay windows. Pure tranquil treetop vie ws from o versized ba magic! $2.995M. Web#9928738

JAY S TREET LOFT / T RIBECA STREET TRIBECA Excl. Keyed-elevator opens to this classic 1,860SF full-floor loft featuring an expansive living/dining room with high ceilings, exposed brick walls, a wood burning fireplace, open chef’s kitchen, 2-3 bedrooms plus 2 renovated bathrooms. A charming oasis on TriBeCa’s TriBeCa’s most coveted cobblestone block! $2.85M. Web#9887871

DUANE PARK PENTHOUSE / TRIBECA Excl. Rarest of rare… A sun-blasted duplex penthouse loft perched high above Duane Park. 3 bedrooms plus den, chef’s kitchen, wood burning fireplace, and a spectacular private roof garden with breathtaking city views. Location location location! $18,500/month. $18,500/month. Web#10110574 Web#10110574

Halstead Property, LLC LLC We are pledged to the lettter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin. All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. No representation is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate and all information should be confirmed by customer. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reser ved to Broker.


8

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

ƞƭƦ˴ΎƪƝƞƪƝƫƠơƦƟ˴ΎƚƝƙƭƬơƞƭƤΎƬƪƝƙƬƫ ƞƧƪΎT The Th he e Summer Summer Months! M Mon onths!Ύ

‘  ‘’–œ’ŒŠ•ǰȱœŒ›ž–™’˜žœȱ‘Š—ȬŽŒ˜›ŠŽȱœ ŽŽœȱ™Ž›ŽŒȱ˜›ȱ ‘ŠȱŠŸ˜›’Žȱž¢ȱ˜—ȱȱFather’s Father’s Day!

Fabulous Summer Pies ꕕŽȱ ’‘ȱ›ž’œȱ˜ȱ‘ŽȱœŽŠœ˜—ǯǯǯ Š—ȱŒŽ•Ž‹›Š˜›¢ȱȱMessage Message in a Box BoxȱȱŽŽ’œȱ˜ž›œȱǷ

ƛȶȳȱȹΎȽɃɂΎȽɃɀΎɅȳȰɁȷɂȳΎȯȼȲΎȱȽȼȼȳȱɂΎɅȷɂȶΎɃɁΎȽȼ

ɅɅɅ˷ȲɃȯȼȳȾȯɀȹȾȯɂȷɁɁȳɀȷȳ˷ȱȽȻ ɅɅɅ˷ȲɃ Ʌ ɅɅ˷ȲɃɃȯȼȳȾȯɀȹȾȯɂȷɁɁȳɀȷȳ˷ȱ ȯȼȳȾȯɀȹȾȯɂȷɁɁȳɀȷȳ˷ȱȱȽȻ ȽȻ ƧɀȲȳɀΎƧȼȺȷȼȳ˻ ƧɀȲȳɀ Ƨ ɀȲȳɀΎƧ ƧȼȺȷȼȳ˻ ȼȺȷȼȳ˻ ̶̸̰ΎƜɃȯȼȳΎƫɂΎȊΎ̱̰̱˹̶̱̳˹̷̶̳̳ΎȊΎƥȽȼ˹ƫȯɂΎ̷ȯȻ˹̶ȾȻΎȊΎƫɃȼΎ̸ȯȻ˹̴ȾȻ ƠƙƛƛƨΎƛȽȻȾȺȷȯȼɂ

OUR RESTAURANTS


9

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

Register now for Fall 2014 comprehensive piano program 2 practice support music literacy & sight reading lessons mon–fri 10-7 sat 10-5 291 Broadway I Suite 700 Corner of Reade in Tribeca 212.227.7979 pianostudiotribeca.com

THE PIANO STUDIO Instruction for Children and Adults

Introducing Home Textiles by

184 Duane Street • 212.233.9610 • Mon–Sat 11–6

LANCE LAPPIN SALON TriBeCa

Learn to SAIL!

est. 1985

“By nature, men desire the beautiful.” St. Basil (329-379)

123 West Broadway lancelappinsalon.com 212.227.4150

MANHATTAN SAILING SCHOOL Adult courses begin at $390 Summer camps for juniors

Info at sailmanhattan.com 212.786.0400


10

Making the Hard Choices

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Meet the curators who helped decide what you see and hear at the newly opened 9/11 museum

for the sake of conservation anything that’s textile or light-sensitive needs to be rotated out. Every object goes into our “option bank” to be pulled sometimes into the Memorial Exhibition, sometimes into the Historical Exhibition.

Jan Ramirez is chief curator and Amy Weinstein is associate director of collections and senior oral historian at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. The Trib interviewed them about their work at the museum, which opened last month.

The dominant artifacts rising up into the museum atrium are the twin “tridents,” the 70-foot high remnants of the North Tower. What made you choose them? RAMIREZ: On our advisory committee, there were family members, survivors, responders, the Port Authority and Lower Manhattan residents. And the number of times they agreed outright on anything was very rare. But there was almost instant unanimity around the tridents. They were stripped of their skin but they were upright. They showed no evidence of having bowed. That was powerful for people. Like the slurry wall, they held.

A consensus on many of the curatorial decisions must not have been easy. RAMIREZ: This is an organization that has always had internal group meetings to decide everything—the public will never know how often we had to gather to reach our own consensus about design directions and exhibit content. We may have had 38 meetings about whether to include this teddy bear or that teddy bear. And should the teddy bear be upright or is the teddy bear lying down and does the teddy bear cross its legs?

How do you approach a project this big? RAMIREZ: We started by starting. Had we followed our normal practice, to write a proposal, do studies, have committees issuing white papers, we would have missed a couple of years’ worth of this material. The archeological relics in Hangar 17 at JFK Airport, brought from the rubble, was our foundational collection. So we had to start by saying, “All right, we’ve got 22 damaged rescue vehicles, which one do we choose? Do you choose the one that is a horribly damaged

Will you do more oral histories? WEINSTEIN: Yes. There are first responders who are retiring. Some have been waiting to talk about their complex emotions until they’re no longer in uniform. But also with family members, the kids have gotten a little bit older and are able to reflect, or people are in a new space in their grief process.

CARL GLASSMAN

Jan Ramirez, left, and Amy Weinstein. In the background is the crushed Ladder 3 fire truck.

vehicle but everybody lived from that truck? That’s a great outcome but is that the most telling story you actually want as a first encounter? How were the small, personal objects collected? WEINSTEIN: One way was through our interviews with people who were at the site, ambulance drivers and firefighters, for example. When they were telling us their story, they might say they picked up something at Ground Zero and we would say, “Would you like to donate that to the museum?” RAMIREZ: Some families found us. Despite the politics and delays, they really believed the museum was going to happen, and should happen, and they wanted to make sure their loved one’s item was preserved for posterity in a place with an educational mission. How many oral histories did you conduct with survivors, family members, first responders and others? And how did you emotionally deal with speaking to so many people who had been through this tragedy? WEINSTEIN: Jenny Pachucki and I conducted about 800 interviews. There were some days when you just couldn’t help but cry. But then there were other

times when you were just so impressed when somebody tells you about their loved one, how they grew up and what kind of father or mother or spouse they were. And you wish you had met them— and then you wish you’d never heard about them because you only heard about them because of 9/11. To keep it from being overwhelming, I think you shift gears. So instead of talking to survivors or to first responders, you talk to the memorial quilt makers or instead of talking to family members you talk to a survivor. Or you do some paper work. RAMIREZ: It was often like a confessional. People would say, I never told my wife this, I’ve never told my colleagues or my family, and they would tell in vivid detail something they saw, something that they were feeling. Or they hadn’t dared tell a mother that their daughter’s recovered pocketbook had been found and returned. So they would entrust that to us. It’s a huge moral responsibility. Will you change the exhibits?

RAMIREZ: We have so much materi-

al, whether it’s the shoes worn by survivors or the recovered personal property of victims, that it will be rotated. Also,

What is it like for you now to walk through the museum? RAMIREZ: It was hard for me to pull back and see what we have done. I was always seeing what we hadn’t done or the detail we needed to fix. Then, about three days before we dedicated the museum, I found myself tearing up, walking into the Flight 93 alcove and hearing that program. We only chose two calls that were made by a passenger and a crew member to their loved ones and there’s some archival audio from the cockpit and FAA that is also very powerful. And then I looked around and realized how we referenced the efforts of a flight attendant to heat up water to throw on the hijackers, and there was the mangled water heater from the galley kitchen, recovered from the crash site. I’ve come to know the husband of the senior flight attendant and there was her small, fragile personal log book that was found in the debris field. And the watch that had been worn by passenger Todd Beamer, who helped resist the highjackers on that flight—his father is on our board of directors. It really came together in a sensory way that I wasn’t quite prepared for. WEINSTEIN: It was really good to go through with the people who had donated something and watch them listen to their voices or see their words on the wall or see their object and what we had done with it. That was what made it all worthwhile.

Serving Tribeca for over 3 decades, has earned Ecco its reputation as one of the finest Italian eateries in the neighborhood.

The Italian Saloon Prix Fixe Menu available daily Please inquire about private events. 124 Chambers St. (bet. W. B’way & Church) eccorestaurantny.com 212.227.7074 f: 212.227.8651 Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:45am-4pm Dinner: Mon-Fri 4-11pm • Sat 5-11pm • Sun Closed


Sidewalk Shed on Landmark to Remain There for How Long?

11

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

BY AMANDA WOODS ey said, “and if there needs to be new Sixty Hudson Street, the Art Deco work, we want to have it up.” landmark formerly known as the Western “So it is up indefinitely, then?” asked Union Building, has for years drawn Bruce Ehrmann, a committee member neighbors’ ire. As a telecommunications who lives across the street from the hub, its diesel generators and other building and has been a frequent critic of equipment have led to complaints of noise, pollution and the alleged dangers of belowground fuel storage. Now comes another one: the unsightly sidewalk bridge. Last month, Shaun Mooney, director of infrastructure at Colliers International, the real estate company managing the building, ap- A sidewalk shed rings the former Western Union Building. peared before Community Board 1’s Tribeca Committee in its operation. response to residents’ latest concerns, “I do not have a set date to take it including the sidewalk bridge that has down,” Mooney replied. ringed it for more than two years. The “So that just doesn’t seem fair,” said shed was installed in spring 2012, when Committee Chair Peter Braus, “that it windows were replaced on six floors of would stay up forever, pretty much.” the building. After this story’s online posting, Mooney told the committee that the Mooney sent the following statement to building is 70 percent occupied and the the Trib: “We have decisions to make for scaffolding will stay up in anticipation of additional window replacements as well new renters who often change their win- as possibly a façade inspection. We will dows in order to install new equipment. take the necessary steps to expedite any “It’s expensive to re-erect it,” Moon- work so the bridge can be removed.”

Tribeca is the best community. I know this, because it’s my community too. Tribeca and Lower Manhattan are about remarkable people, great resources and terrific homes. I know because I own here and have sold and rented here, and for more than three decades I have been part of the challenges and rebirth of Tribeca and the Financial District. If you are thinking of buying, selling or renting, allow me to put my experience to your advantage. Selling Tribeca is the easiest part of my job. It would be my pleasure to meet with you and discuss your real estate needs.

Emily Stein Emily A R Stein E B

S ICENSED L

SSOCIATE

EAL

STATE

ROKER

emily.stein@corcoran.com 212-941-2570 office emily.stein@corcoran.com | 212-941-2570 S EN I O R V I C E P R ES I D EN T / A S S O C I AT E B RO K ER

The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker. Owned and operated by NRT LLC. All material herein is intended for information purposes only and has been compiled from sources deemed reliable. Though information is believed to be correct, it is presented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice.

Equal Housing Opportunity. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity 660 Madison Ave, NY, NY 10065 I 212.355.3550

THE SUITES AT LIBERTY VIEW

212 842 7300 www.liberty-view.com 30 Day Minimum • Brokers Welcome

RENOVATING? OLD APARTMENT SOLD? NEW APARTMENT NOT READY? RELATIVES VISITING?


12

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Clockwise: A paramedic dons protective garb, including long rubber gloves, before the first “victims” arrive at the hospital’s Gold Street emergency entrance. EMS workers lift a dummy patient out of an ambulance before it is taken into the decontamination tent. Paramedics wheel a “victim” into the tent at right, where it will be washed before entering the hospital’s emergency room.

drilling t s n i disaster aga In a real-time exercise, NewYork–Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital treats the “victims” of a chemical explosion.

Inside the decontamination tent and beneath a gentle shower of water, a paramedic practices removing contaminants from a “victim” that will next be wheeled to the emergency room.

BY AMANDA WOODS Paramedics covered head to foot in biohazard suits. Ambulances in a steady stream pulling up to the hospital. A woman frantically telling paramedics

Lower Manhattan Hospital one afternoon last month had all the frightening appearances of a Downtown disaster. But it was a drill, preparing staff for the potential of real victims of a chemical explosion. Seven dummy victims arrived by ambulance, and several human volunteers arrived on foot for a chilly washdown in the inflatable decontamination tent set up on Gold Street. “New York Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital is the only acute care hospital below 14th Street, and with over 750,000 New Yorkers in our surrounding community, when an emergency strikes, Seven Tribeca CERT members diverted pedestrians away we need to be prepared,” said from the hospital’s drill site on Gold Street. Jeffrey Bokser, vice presithat her skin is burning. dent for safety, security and emergency The scene outside the emergency services at the hospital. entrance of NewYork Presbyterian– Before the “victims” arrived, seven

paramedics donned oxygen masks, tanks and special protective suits in the back of an ambulance. “Monitor your own air,” a commander told the paramedics as they pulled on their masks. “I’m going to watch, but it’s all up to you guys.” When the dummy victims arrived, two paramedics wheeled them on stretchers into the blue and white decontamination tent and washed them with soap beneath a gentle spray of water. Two more paramedics met them on the other side of the tent and wheeled them into the emergency room. “You never completely simulate an actual event, but we try to come as close to it as we can,” said Steven Friend, a paramedic who supervised the drill. “It protects the hospital, the nurses are prepared, doctors get to know what to do as the patients come in, and for our teams, the more prepared you are, the more you practice, the better.”

A paramedic cools off after removing his protective gear at the end of the drill.

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN


13

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

TRADITION. EXPRESSION. REFLECTION.

THIS IS

Jewish Culture Downtown DISCUSSION Genesis: Truman, American Jews, and the Origins of the Arab/Israeli Conflict Author John B. Judis in conversation with MJH Director David G. Marwell, Ph.D.

SUN | JUN 1 | 4 P.M.

NOW ON STAGE

$20, $15 members

FAMILY PROGRAM Almost Summer Celebration Concert * Storytelling * Art Activities Lawn Games * Picnicking

SUN | JUN 8 | 11 A.M. - 2 P.M. Free

FATHER’S DAY PROGRAM

Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food Author Laura Silver in conversation with food writer Gabriella Gershenson

SUN | JUN 15 | 2:30 P.M.

We rent & repair violins Student renters can choose a beginner or advanced violin, then apply payments toward the purchase of an instrument.

$15, $12 members

FREE SUMMER FILM SERIES

Close Encounters of the Spielberg Kind Eight iconic films by Steven Spielberg EVERY WEDNESDAY JUN 25–AUG 13 6:30 P.M.

LOWER MANHATTAN | 646.437.4202 MORE PROGRAM & EXHIBITION INFO @ WWW.MJHNYC.ORG

Already own a violin? Our luthiers can repair, restore, or appraise your fine instrument. 36 Walker Street btwn Church & B’way Open Mon–Sat, 212.274.1322 DavidGage.com

Public programs are made possible through a generous gift from Mrs. Lily Safra.

QUARTERS DON’T MAKE YOUR WASHING MACHINE WORK. ELECTRICITY DOES. ,W·VHDV\WRIRUJHWKRZLPSRUWDQW HOHFWULFLW\LVWRRXUGDLO\OLYHV%XW UHVWDVVXUHG&RQ(GLVRQQHYHU GRHV2IFRXUVHDOOWKDWUHOLDELOLW\ GRHVQ·WFRPHFKHDS6RZHRIIHU PRUHWKDQPRQH\VDYLQJ WLSVRQRXUZHEVLWH/LNHZDVKLQJ \RXUFORWKHVZLWKFROGZDWHUDQG QRWRYHUGU\LQJWKHP:HHYHQ KDYHHQHUJ\FDOFXODWRUVVR\RX FDQHVWLPDWHKRZPXFKWKRVH FKDQJHVFDQVDYH\RX$IWHUDOO GRLQJWKHODXQGU\VKRXOGQ·WFOHDQ RXW\RXUZDOOHW)RUPRUHWLSV YLVLWFRQ(GFRPDQGIROORZXVRQ )DFHERRNRU7ZLWWHU


14

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

WALKER’S

Jazz on Sundays 8-11 pm

Gabriel’s Brunch Sat & Sun 11am - 4pm 16 N. Moore St. (at Varick) • 212-941-0142

Tokyo Bay Open 7 days 11am - 4am

Elegant Sushi & Japanese Dishes in an Intimate Setting

Our fish comes from South America, California, New Zealand, Canada and Norway—and some special fish from Japan. “Tokyo Bay looks like most other sushi dens in the city, but the fish is better. The sushi and sashimi options are extensive...and the rolls are creative.” — Metro NY

Party Trays of sushi, sashimi & special rolls available for large or small events.

183 Duane Street 212.431.8666 LUNCH Mon–Fri: 11:30am–3pm DINNER Mon–Thu 5–10:45pm; Fri 5–11:15pm; Sat 5–11pm; Sun 5–10:15pm

Free Delivery

Open daily for Lunch & Dinner Brunch on Saturday & Sunday Free Local Delivery Happy Hour 4-8 pm Mon-Fri $2 off all Drinks

273 Church St.

bet Franklin & White

212.219.0640 • southnyc.com


THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

15

POLICE BEAT

AS REPORTED BY THE 1ST PRECINCT

BATTERY PARK May 25, 9 p.m. A thief pushed a 31-year-old Australian tourist off a bench in the park and ran off with her Nikon camera and lens, worth a total of $4,500. SW CORNER, WEST AND CANAL STREETS May 25, 1 p.m. Someone stole a Droid phone, bank cards, a driver’s license, $20 and an unlimited Metrocard from a 30-year-old man’s bag as he played basketball at the Canal Street courts. 39 WHITEHALL STREET May 22, 10:30 a.m. A 36-year-old man told police he placed his wallet in his locker before he began working out at the New York Health and Racquet Club. When he returned to the locker an hour and 10 minutes later, the wallet, which contained a driver’s license, car keys and credit and debit cards, was gone. He later discovered fraudulent usage on two of the credit cards totaling $339. 120 CHURCH STREET May 18, 2:30 p.m. Someone made off with a woman’s bag, which she had placed on the chair next to her at Starbucks while she sat and listened to music. The bag contained a wallet, keys, credit and debit cards and $260. 34 DESBROSSES STREET May 17, 2:50 a.m. A thief, joined by an accomplice, snatched an iPhone from a 29-year-old woman who was walking down the street listening to music. The thief and the accomplice fled on Desbrosses toward West Street. A black four-door sedan met up with them, and the thief jumped into the front seat. The accomplice then turned around and displayed what appeared to be a gun before getting into the car. 311 BROADWAY May 19, 10 a.m. A 7-Eleven employee placed her pocketbook on the coat rack in an “employees only” room. When she returned several hours later, the bag, which contained $310, a credit and debit card and an identification card, was gone. WASHINGTON MARKET PARK May 13, 12:30 p.m. A thief stole a woman’s Prada pocketbook from her baby’s stroller as she sat in the park. The pocketbook contained a designer wallet, $160, a $38 Metrocard, a gift card and credit cards, among other items. 90 JOHN STREET May 9, 8:15 p.m. A man left his bag hanging on a hook

under the bar at Stout, a pub, when he went out for a smoke. When he returned, the bag, which contained a laptop and an iPhone 5, was gone. Surveillance video showed a man with close-cut hair, glasses, a dress jacket and dress shoes entering the bar, removing the bag and fleeing.

168 DUANE STREET May 7, 2:30 p.m. Two men snatched a designer tote bag, two pairs of green Armani jeans, a designer umbrella and a copy of The Rake magazine, worth a total of $1,545, from a display at The Armoury, a men’s clothing boutique. 95 PEARL STREET May 1, 8:30 p.m. A 27-year-old woman was eating dinner at Ulysses Folk House when someone stole her purse, which contained debit and credit cards, a driver’s license, her house and car keys and designer sunglasses.

Arrest Made in Armed ATM Robbery

The alleged accomplice in an unusual armed robbery scheme at a Broad Street ATM was arrested on May 17. A thief allegedly posed as a police officer and snatched the debit card being used by the victim, a 38year-old man, at the Wells Fargo Bank ATM at 75 Broad St. When the victim refused to follow the man into his car waiting outside, the thief punched him in the face, police said. The thief then reportedly called another man, Amro Abdelhalim, 26, telling him the victim was not cooperating. Abdelhalim entered the bank, took the debit card from the thief and demanded the victim’s PIN and money, police said. When the victim refused, Abdelhalim allegedly pulled out a box cutter and demanded, “Give me your money or I’ll kill your wife and children in Egypt.” Abdelhalim began to cut his own arm with the box cutter and called police, threatening to tell the officers the victim had hurt him. When police arrived, the first robber fled, and Abdelhalim allegedly blamed the victim for cutting him. Surveillance video confirmed that he was lying, police said. Abdelhalim was charged with first degree robbery, coercion and unlawful imprisonment, according to the Manhattan district attorney’s office.

We carry PHYTO, AVEDA, FRAMESI, AQUAGE, MASTEY & KERATIN COMPLEX

See our selection of Kobo Candles 100% soy wax • 80-hour burn 28 Ericsson Place (bet. Hudson & Varick) Tue-Sat 10-6:30 212.941.9505


16

TRIB bits

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

To me, it’s about people and building trust and relationships.

“I

ARTHUR STEUER

Licensed R.E. Salesperson KIAN Realty NYC, LLC 450 7th Ave Suite 1501 New York, N.Y. 10123

Off: 212-757-8268 x 104 Cell: 646-271-5742 ASteuer@KianRealtyNYC.com

had plenty of brokers after me trying to convince me that I should use them, even two who lived in my building. But I chose Arthur Steuer. He seemed to care more. He was very good at listening to me, trying to understand what I wanted. Without my asking, he not only went the extra mile, but extra miles. While I was away, he had the apartment renovated and painted and even watered my plants on the terrace. Selling an apartment can be incredibly stressful, and Arthur was always there for me.”

Mark McBain Seller/Client

THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD s ONLY @ THE FLEA! s #GOSPEL48

Waterers Needed

The trees and plantings along Greenwich Street from North Moore to Duane Streets will not survive the summer unless they are watered. Anyone interested in helping can attend a “Summer Watering Corps” meeting at Josephine Café, 350 Greenwich St., on Wednesday, June 18, at 6:30 p.m. Volunteers will learn to use a hydrant wrench and drive a hose cart. Meet there or email volunteer@friendsofgreenwichstreet.org.

Poetry on the Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is the backdrop for poetry on Monday, June 9, during Poets House’s annual benefit, Poetry Walk Across the Brooklyn Bridge. The event features readings about New York City by poets Mark Doty, Thomas Lux and 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner Vijay Seshadri, followed by dinner at a renovated historic foundry in Dumbo. Walkers meet at 6:30 p.m. at the south side of the Municipal Building at One Centre Street. Tickets are $250. For reservations, go to poetshouse.org.

Boat Rides and Circus

This year’s annual North River Historic Ship Festival at Pier 25 (the end of North Moore Street) is June 19 to June 22, with free dockside tours of the steampowered lighthouse tender Lilac, the 99year-old wooden barge Lehigh Valley No. 79 and tug Pegasus, as well as free river trips on other historic vessels. On Sunday, at 1 and 4 p.m., the Showboat Circus will present Will Shaw in a oneman circus and comedy show for children. Tickets are $15; $12 kids at waterfrontmuseum.org. A complete schedule of weekend events is at nrhss.org.

BPC Goes Swedish

All things Swedish—from folk dancing to wreathmaking to Swedish children’s games—are coming to Battery Park City’s Wagner Park near Battery Place, on Friday, June 20, from 5 to 8 p.m. The event is free. Swedish food will also be available. Information at bpcparks.org.

Polynesian Festival

For a taste of Polynesian and Hawaiian culture, come to Pier 26, at the end of Hubert Street, on Saturday, June 21. From 9:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., there will be music and dancing from the Pacific Islands, storytelling and hula lessons. The free events are part of an annual Hudson River race of outrigger canoes from around the world. Go to libertychallenge.org for information.

Calligraphy Workshop

Call 212-352-3101 or visit us at www.theflea.org for tickets and more info. Tickets: $15/$35/$55/$75/VIP$125 Lowest priced tickets available on a first-come, first-served basis. Telephone and internet orders are subject to service fees.

@ THE FLEA 41 WHITE STREET between BROADWAY and CHURCH STREET Raising “a joyful hell in a small space” since 1996, the award-winning Flea Theater is your Tribeca neighbor!

Artist and calligrapher Eleanor Winters will lead a beginner’s workshop on calligraphy and Gothic lettering on Saturday June 7, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Anne Frank Center, 44 Park Pl. The course coincides with the exhibit “A la Mémoire des Enfants Déportés,” show-

ing through Friday, June 20. Reservations are required. Call 212-431-7993 or email info@annefrank.com. The fee is $8; $5 for seniors and students.

Draw in the Park

The season’s free drawing lessons, sponsored by Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, have begun. On Wednesdays, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., students can learn figure drawing outdoors with a clothed model. Meet at South Cove near 2nd Pl. Sketch and paint the river and parks on Saturdays, from 10 a.m. to noon (also at South Cove). On Wednesdays, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., meet at Wagner Park near Battery Pl. to draw the gardens. Each class is led by a professional artist, and all materials are provided. Registration is not necessary. Information at bpcparks.org.

Record and CD Sale

The ARChive of Contemporary Music, a music archive, library and research center, is holding its annual summer sale from Saturday, June 7, to Sunday, June 15 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. There will be more than 20,000 records and CDs for sale, in a variety of genres, from pop to rock to jazz and more. In addition, there are vintage 1960s psychedelic posters from the Grande Ballroom in Detroit, rare Fillmore East programs, turntables, audio equipment and vintage music magazines. ARC is located at 54 White St. Examples of some of the items can be found at arcmusic.org.

Finn Square Activities

A free one-day event with activities for kids, dance performances, bike repair and discussions about open space will take place on Varick Street between Franklin and Leonard on June 14, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tribeca Trust, the event’s organizers, submitted an application, which is still pending, to the Department of Transportation to create a pedestrian plaza around Finn Square, south of the Franklin Station subway stop. The organizers hope the event will build local support for more plazas and bike lanes in Tribeca. Individuals or groups interested in participating can contact Alessandra Galleti at alessandra@tribecatrust.org.

Big City Fishing

The Hudson River Park Trust’s annual free catch-and-release fishing program begins this month for adults and children five and older. An instructor will be available to give lessons to beginners, and park rangers will tell visitors about the many fish species that live in the river, fish biology, water quality and the Hudson’s ecosystem. Rods, reels and bait are provided. The program runs from June 1 to Sept. 28 on Sundays, from 1 to 5 p.m., and on Mondays (from July 7 to August 25), from 5 to 7 p.m., at Pier 25 at the end of North Moore Street. Information at hudsonriverpark.org.


17

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

TAKING FLIGHT

ANDY FARRINGTON

Skydivers’ record-making plunge over Lower Manhattan This is how Lower Manhattan would look to Superman. On Sunday morning, May 18, five skydivers from the Red Bull Air Force Wingsuit Flyers—Jon Devore, Jeff Provenzano, Amy Chmelecki, Sean MacCormac and Andy Farrington—jumped from a plane over the northern end of Governors Island. Falling from 7,500 feet and soaring up to 120 miles an hour above Downtown, they opened their chutes at 2,500 feet and landed safely on their target, a 40-foot-wide barge opposite Rockefeller Park in Battery Park City. The skydivers, members of an 11-person aerial sports team, traveled two miles in two minutes. Jon Devore, the group’s lead skydiver, called the experience “exhilarating.” “To be the first people ever to do the flight line—the skyline— down Manhattan,” he said. “I can’t explain it. I was sure I was going to wake up from a dream.”

RED BULL MEDIA HOUSE (4)

WATCH THE VIDEO AT TRIBECATRIB.COM CARL GLASSMAN


18

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

T

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

he September 11 Memorial Museum opened last month to great fanfare, and to a public that is expected to number some 2.5 million each year. It is difficult to imagine how the institution—however delayed and costly—could meet its mandate, both to tell the 9/11 story in its many complex facets, and appropriately honor the memory of the nearly 3,000 innocents lost. Indeed, the architects, designers and curators have met that test. The challenge now belongs to each visitor and the emotional stamina that he or she brings to the experience. This is not just one more stop on the out-of-towner’s city tour, nor another casual afternoon of culture for New Yorkers. The visit requires unhurried time and reflection, which the crowds, moving silently and respectfully through the museum corridors, thankfully seem to understand. Memorial President Joe Daniels calls the experience transformative. “I really believe in my heart that when people leave this museum, they’re going to look at their son or daughter differently, or their neighbor differently, or someone who is experiencing a difficult time differently,” he says. “We have a real chance to harness the emotions and the truth of this museum to make the world better.” The museum attempts this in ways large and small. There are the mangled steel remainders of the Twin Towers, the ruins of emergency vehicles and the vastness of Foundation Hall where the retaining or slurry wall rises from bedrock as both archeological artifact and symbol of resilience. Then there are the photos and remembrances of the victims, the story of 9/11 told through videos and photos, audio recordings and the simplest of artifacts. It is, in fact, the personal, mundane possessions—a photo ID, a pair of glasses, a watch—that can weigh most heavily on the heart. The museum, says its director, Alice Greenwald, “is like walking into a space of memory, walking into an archeological site, walking into a cathedral. And at the same time, you are remembering people who were just like us.”

Tragedy of immeasurable proportions begot The September 11 Memorial Museum, an institution that meets the herculean challenge of education and remembrance.

FACING 9/11

“We have a real chance to harness the e museum to make the world better.” — JOE

Left: Quote from Virgil’s “Aeneid,” forged by a blacksmith out of World Trade Center steel. Above: “In Memoriam” hon in the Sept. 11 attacks and the six victims of the 1993 bombing of the Trade Center.


THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

In the introductory exhibition, visitors view images of witnesses to the burning towers and hear the voices of people around the world recalling where they were and how they felt when they heard and saw the news.

emotions and the truth of this

E

DANIELS, PRESIDENT OF THE SEPT. 11 MEMORIAL & MUSEUM

ors the memory of those killed

In Foundation Hall, visitors can write messages on interactive screens, to be projected onto a wall in front of the table.

19

Above: “The Last Column,” weighing 58 tons and standing 36 feet high, was ceremonially removed from the World Trade Center pit on May 30, 2002, and now stands as a centerpiece of Foundation Hall. The artifact in the background is a river water valve that had been located beneath the site. Left: “Impact steel,” bent by the impact of hijacked Flight 11, was part of the facade of the north tower, between the 93rd and 99th floor. Another piece of the facade, from the 93rd through 96th floors, hangs in a different part of the museum.


KIDS

20

REMATCH In their red-hot season, I.S. 276 Chargers topple I.S. 89 Cougars

music&art

summer

Starting June 23rd

Programs for students of ALL AGES! Music & Art Camps Q Private & Group Instrumental Q Birthday Parties & Space Rentals SPRING BREAK CAMPS - APRIL 14th - 18th Q

212-571-7290 74 Warren Street www.churchstreetschool.org

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Above: In a steal attempt at second, Cougars runner Olivia Contiero beats the throw to Chargers shortstop Brooke Kirwin but is tagged out when she overruns the bag. Below: Pitcher Jaime Morrison, a sixth grader, throws four strong innings against the Cougars.

It was a whole new ball game. Last month, Battery Park City sister schools I.S. 89 and I.S. 276 faced off in what has come to be called a “sibling rivalry” between the school’s girls’ softball teams, organized by Manhattan Youth’s after-school program. With four innings of powerful pitching by Jaime Morrison, the I.S. 276 Chargers—with sixth graders filling more than half its roster—held the Cougars to two runs for an 11-2 victory. That was in sharp contrast to last year’s matchup, when the Cougars came out on top, 19-9. And no wonder. This year’s team, headed by Ryan Hennessy and assistant coach Cynthia Deleon, was undefeated at the end of the month and seeded first in the city. “They’re competitive softball players who have come of age now,” said Hennessy. “They’ve been stepping up.”

Left: Cougars third baseman Lily Delfino snags a foul. Above: Midway through their game, Chargers get pumped with assistant coach Cynthia Deleon (green headband).

THI THIS S SU SUMMER MMER

July July 7th - A August ugust 22nd

Register TToday! oday! Register Tel: 212.334.3764 212.334.3764 Tel:

S Stretch tretch ttheir heir Bodies*Ex Bodies*Exercise ercise ttheir heir Minds Immersive Immersive Chinese Language + Gymnastics + Imaginative Imaginative Arts Arts

New N ew Y York Yor ork Chinese Cultur Cultural al Cent Center er Summer Cam Camp p www w chinesedance org www.chinesedance.org


21

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

Sign up for the 2014 Fall Season! September 3 – November 23

Registration runs May 1 – June 30 www.downtownsoccer.org

One Great Preschool in two DOWNTOWN locations!

or pick up a registation form at PS150, PS234 or PS/IS89

Applications will be accepted on a space available basis with preference given to returning DSL families, players who reside in or attend school in lower Manhattan (south of Canal St/Rutgers St) and those who are prepared to make an extraordinary volunteer effort.

6 Barclay St. 275 Greenwich St. 212.571.2715 212.571.6191 www.theparkpreschool.org www.thebarclaystreetschool.org

We have AFTERNOON openings for the 2014-15 school year…all ages. Call to set up an tour.


22

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

Medical • Surgical • Cosmetic • Laser

Lois A. Jackson, D.D.S. Stanley B. Oldak, D.D.S. Lois A. Jackson, D.D.S. Ruby& A. Gelman, D.M.D. Associates Diane Wong, D.D.S.

Hirshel Kahn, MD Helen Radoszycki, MD Terri Raymond, PA-C

Pediatric Dentistry 505 LaGuardia Place  Manhattan  212-995-8888 62 2nd Place  Brooklyn  718-855-8833

Chambers StreetOrthodontics Kenneth B. Cooperman D.M.D. Maggie R. Mintzberg D.D.S.

for Children and Adults 88 Chambers St. Suite 101 212.233.8320 TribecaTeeth.com

soho psychotherapy Individuals and Couples

Psychotherapy and EMDR Trauma Therapy Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for Couples 110 Greene Street SOHO 917.612.0595 ryscw@aol.com www.Soho-Psychotherapy.com

KINGS PHARMACY

5 Hudson St. 212.791.3100 (at Reade) • kingspharmacy.org • Open Mon–Fri 8–8 Sat 9–7 Sun 10–6 Free pickup and delivery of prescriptions • Computerized scanning for drug interactions • Custom flavoring for all liquid medication

EVERY DAY IS A SALE DAY! MONDAY Vitamin Day

TUESDAY Senior Citizen Day

WEDNESDAY Student Day

Buy 1 Vitamin Get 2nd at 1/2 price

Get 10% OFF Any Purchase

Get 10% OFF Any Purchase

THURSDAY Household Appliance Day

FRIDAY Cosmetics Day

SATURDAY Double Coupon Day

Get 10% OFF Any Appliance Purchase

Get 10% OFF Any Cosmetic Purchase

Maximum Discount of $1.

Selected vitamins only equal or lesser value

Some Restrictions Apply

Some Restrictions Apply

Medela Breastfeeding Center and Rental Station

We carry a full line of Medela breastpumps, parts, supplies and accessories. Rent by the day, week or month.

Visit our beautiful sister store at 345 Hudson St. (corner of King St.) 212-989-1400


Rejection Goes Along with Middle School ‘Choice’ KIDS

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

Last month I wrote about the position of parent coordinator and its many responsibilities. There was one I forgot to mention. Therapist. After a decade of calming parents when their child is not accepted to their zoned kindergarten, I have learned how to counsel them to handle disappointment, be optiCONNIE mistic and SCHRAFT build resilience in both their children and themselves. More painful than the luck of the draw involved in kindergarten lotteries, though, is the middle school SCHOOL process. TALK If you toured a few middle schools with your fifth grader in the fall, filled out the application and received your preferred result, you are lucky. Not everyone is. Honestly, I am often surprised when certain children are not accepted to one of their top choice schools. It’s usually not the lackadaisical students or the wiseguys who slip through the cracks in this process. It tends to be solid, smart, hard-working,

all-around good kids. This disappointment is tough on families, because it feels personal. When I call to break the news to parents—before the envelopes go home, so that they are prepared to help their children—some parents cry, some are angry. All are in disbelief. When one mother was so calm and seemingly cheerful over the phone, I repeated myself, thinking she hadn’t heard me correctly. Really, I thought she had gone into shock and was on automatic pilot. It’s not hard to support the parents

23

often dismissed by Downtown parents), the disbelief and disappointment last much longer. I spend time with those parents, trying to make them understand how it happened (which is just guesswork on my part) and that it’s not their fault. I also think back on my conversations in the fall, when they were submitting their children’s applications. I always make it clear that in the middle school “choice” process, there are no guarantees, and that if their children are going to “try for” Lab or Salk, they need to have an appropriate second choice.

When parents hear that their children do not get into their schools of choice some cry, some are angry. All are in disbelief. whose children have been accepted to their second or third choice. While they are disappointed initially, their children have ended up in a fine school, and both parents and kids quickly adjust. They learn that other children didn’t receive their first choice, that some of their friends will be attending the same school, and all is well. But for the parents of children who were passed over by their chosen schools and end up “placed” in the zoned middle school (which, though a fine school, is

This year, even the appropriate second choices didn’t pan out in many cases. With a growing pool of candidates, the schools can fill a class with students who put them first on their list, and why wouldn’t they pick the children who want them the most? I sleep badly for several nights after the middle school letters arrive, wondering if I should have suggested that someone swap their third choice for the second. During the day, I try to convince the

disappointed parents that it’s just a numbers game—too many applicants for the most popular schools. Or reminding those who are second-guessing their choices that their strategy made sense back in December. Those families hope that with the appeals process, they can find a better placement for their child. Parents not satisfied with their child’s assigned school are able to ask for the student to be considered again at three schools. Which to pick and in what order to place them? We puzzle over this up to the last minute. I don’t tell them what they already know—that their children will be competing against each other to gain the one or two available seats at each school. The results of the appeals will arrive in the next week or two, and unfortunately, there will be more disappointment. This disappointment will be different from the earlier one—less shocking, more bitter. Those parents will be disillusioned about middle school “choice,” as it is so inappropriately called. After facing families who were denied their appeal and telling them that there’s nothing more that they can do, I will be the one in need of a therapist. Connie Schraft is P.S. 89’s parent coordinator. For questions and comments, write to her at connie@tribecatrib.com.

summer! register now!

6 one-week sessions from june 30-aug 8 full-day session for K-6th grade + half-day sessions for preschoolers (3 yrs +)

291 broadway in tribeca

212.962.1800

tada! musical theater costume-making tap

breakdancehip hop jazz arts & crafts

choreography lyrical creative movement as featured in time out new york kids

downtowndancefactory.com


24

OPERA Serving the Tribeca Community since 1992

Premium Brands of Dog & Cat Food Stella & Chewy, Evermore, California Natural, Solid Gold, Innova, Evo, Blue Buffalo, Orijen, Fromm, Dr. Harvey’s, Natural Balance, Wellness, Honest Kitchen, Halo, Merrick, Natural Choice, Weruva, BFF, Zoe’s and Holistic

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

GOES TO

SCHOOL

Pet Care Products • Gourmet Treats Top Quality Toys & Accessories

327 Greenwich St. • 212.966.5167 • M-F 11-7 Sat 10-6 Free Local Delivery Live Music Thursday Nights

READE STREET PUB & KITCHEN

Great Lunches, Dinners and Daily Specials!

135 Reade St. 212-227-2295 Mon-Sat 11am-4am • Sun noon-4am

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

Above: Tory Weil (Hansel) and Susan Holsonbake (Gretel) on the P.S. 234 stage. Left: Hansel and the witch, sung by Lara Ryan.

This spring, Downtown public school students have been treated to something they’re not likely to see on their own: opera. Four opera singers and a string quartet from the Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra, led by Gary Fagin, have been touring the schools with a 35-minute version of Englebert Humperdinck’s “Hansel and Gretel,” shown here in a performance last month at P.S. 234. It’s part of the orchestra’s Youth Outreach Program funded by Goldman Sachs. “The best way for kids to see opera is to bring it to them,” Fagin said, “rather than make them go to a big opera house.”


Manhattan Youth Salutes Those Making a Difference

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

KIDS

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

Former I.S. 89 principal Ellen Foote, left, and principals Ronnie Najjar, P.S. 89, and Zeynep Ozkan, I.S. 89, give laudatory remarks about the P.S./I.S. 89 custodial staff. From left: Jose Velez, Derick Henry, James Willie, Frank Diorio, David DiGiacomo and Mike Clark.

They are the few who have made a difference in the lives of the many. That is the spirit behind the annual Downtown Community Awards, given each year by Manhattan Youth. Last month at the Downtown Community Center, it was the custodial crew of P.S./I.S. 89 in Battery Park City and the multivolunteering Wendy Chapman, a P.S. 150 parent in Tribeca, who took home the plaques. And so, before a room filled with celebrants, there were laudatory speeches about broken toilet fixes and Hurricane Sandy heroism for the six custodians, and Taste of Tribeca chairing and new school lobbying for Chapman. “They love the building as much as I do. They love the kids in that building as much as I do,” P.S. 89 Principal Ronnie Najjar said of her facilities team. “And they make sure that that space is a safe and clean environment for all of us. I can’t thank them enough.” Najjar, who was joined by former I.S. 89 principal Ellen Foote and the school’s current leader, Zeynep Ozkan, especially lauded the custodians for their efforts to keep the school dry during Sandy. “They sacrificed [being with] their families and their homes and stayed and lived at P.S./I.S. 89 for the entire weekend to make sure.” “We walked into a space that was pristine,” added Ozkan. Manhattan Youth Director Bob Townley called Chapman “a fixture in our community and a fixture in our community center.” Chapman, a Manhattan Youth board member, is co-president of the P.S. 150 PTA, a former longtime co-chair of the Taste of Tribeca (and still an active volunteer) and an activist co-founder of

TRIBECA: A PICTORIAL HISTORY BY OLIVER E. ALLEN

On sale at Amazon.com and Stella, 184 Duane Street

Manhattan Youth Director Bob Townley introduces Wendy Chapman, who received a Downtown Community Award.

Build Schools Now, an organization lobbying to help relieve school crowding in Lower Manhattan. Chapman helped lead a successful campaign by P.S. 150 parents last year to reverse the Department of Education’s plan to close the school and send its students to a new school in Chelsea. But in her self-effacing speech, Chapman gave much of the credit to others. More important, she said, the experience led her, along with fellow P.S. 150 parents Buxton and Lisa Midyette, to start Build Schools Now. “We made a promise that if we won we would give back,” she said, “and keep helping.”

25


OMING U C P

26

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

FOR KIDS

South America. There will be traditional demonstrations and performances. Sat, 6/21, 1–4 pm. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu.

ARTS, CRAFTS & PLAY g

Preschool Play & Art Toddlers play, sing songs and hear stories. Toys, books and other play equipment are provided. For toddlers with an accompanying adult. Ages 2–4. Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 10 am. Free. Wagner Park near Battery Pl., bpcparks.org.

g Family Yoga Class Kids learn the foundations of yoga, breath and age-appropriate yoga poses, plus games, art projects, songs and more. Healthy snacks will be served. Yoga mats available. Fri, 6/27, 6 pm. Free. Charlotte’s Place, 109 Greenwich St., trinitywallstreet.org.

g Art and Games Kids play Tug of War, Red Light/Green Light, Wiffle ball and other lawn games, and do art projects using clay, wood and other materials. Ages 5 and up. Wednesdays & Thursdays, 3:30 pm. Free. Rockefeller Park near Chambers St., bpcparks.org.

SPORTS g Basketball Learn to play basketball with adjustable-height hoops and fun drills to improve skills. Mondays, 3:30 pm: 5–6-yearolds; 4:30 pm: 7 and up. Free. Rockefeller Park near Chambers St., bpcparks.org

g Chess Experts offer strategies and tips. All ability levels are welcome. Ages 5–15. Wednesdays, 3:30 pm. Free. Rockefeller Park near Chambers St., bpcparks.org.

g

Soccer Children learn to pass, shoot and dribble through games and skill-building drills. Tuesdays, 2:30 pm: 3–4-year-olds; 3:30 pm: 5– 7-year-olds; 4:40 pm: 8–11-year-olds. Free. Rockefeller Park near Chambers St., bpcparks.org.

T

g

Sidewalk Art Kids will learn about skyscrapers, then use chalk to draw their own skyscraper design on the sidewalk. Ages 4 and up. Sat, 6/14, 10:30 am. $5. Skyscraper Museum, 39 Battery Pl., skyscraper.org.

g Father’s Day Party Children can bring their dad, uncle or other grown-up to the library for coffee and juice, where they will hear a story and make a Father’s Day gift. Sat, 6/14, 11 am. Free. Battery Park City Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org.

his year’s “Almost Summer Celebration” includes performances by the children’s rock band Brady Rymer and the Little Band that Could (above) and a Native American hoop dancer. There will also be storytelling, lawn games, arts and crafts and nature activities for families. Sunday, June 8, 11 am–2 pm. Free. In Wagner Park, next to the Museum of Jewish Heritage, mjhnyc.org. In case of rain, the event will be held in the museum. Due to limited capacity, tickets will be released on a first-come, first-served basis starting at 10 a.m.

DANCE g Downtown Dance Factory The school’s students, ages 3 to 15, will perform hip hop, tap, ballet and other dance styles to music ranging from Mozart to Michael Jackson. Go to downtowndancefactory.com for schedule. Sat, 6/7 & Sun, 6/8, 9:30 am, 1 pm & 4:30 pm. $22. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., tribecapac.org. g Tap City Youth Concert An end-of-year recital

by young tap dancers ages 9 to 19 from the American Tap Dance Foundation’s education program. Sun, 6/22, 6:30 pm. $20; $10 students, seniors. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., tribecapac.org.

FILM g

Native American Kids’ Films Five short animated and live-action films that look at the lives, traditions and struggles of Native American peoples from Canada, the United States and Bolivia. Sun, 6/1, 10:30 & 11:45 am. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu.

MUSIC g

Sunset Singing Circle Sing rounds and folk songs accompanied by acoustic guitarist and folksinger Terre Roche. All ages welcome. Fridays (except 6/20), 7 pm. Free. Wagner Park near Battery Pl., bpcparks.org. g

Astrograss A lively acoustic bluegrass band for families. Thu, 6/5, 5:30 pm. Free. Washington Market Park, Greenwich St. at Duane St., washingtonmarketpark.org.

g

Dirty Sock Funtime Band High energy, wild original children’s music that encourages kids to get up and dance. Thu, 6/12, 5:30 pm. Free. Washington Market Park, Greenwich St. at Duane St., washingtonmarketpark.org.

g

Teen Drumming Circle Participate in a drumming circle led by master Senegalese drummer Maguette Camara. Drums are provided. Tuesdays starting 6/17, 4 pm. Free. Rockefeller Park near Chambers St., bpc-

parks.org. g

DJ Kai Song Eight-year-old DJ from Brooklyn spins fun dance and electronic tunes. Wed, 6/18, 5 pm. Free. Washington Market Park, Greenwich St. at Duane St., washingtonmarketpark.org.

FISHING g

Big City Fishing Learn how to fish and find out more about the aquatic animals that live in the Hudson River. Also find out about the river’s ecology, including fish biology, water quality and more, with an instructor. Rods, reels and bait provided. Ages 5 and up. Sundays, 1 pm. Free. Pier 25 near N. Moore St., hudsonriverpark.org.

GARDENING g

Young Sprouts Gardening Simple, ageappropriate gardening projects including planting seeds, watering the garden and picking and eating fresh greens and vegetables in an organic garden. Kids will also hear stories and do crafts. Ages 3–5 with an accompanying adult. Tuesdays, 3:15 pm. Free. Rockefeller Park near Chambers St., bpcparks.org.

g

Gardening Club Kids develop gardening skills, prepare soil and garden beds, plant seedlings and bulbs, water, weed, harvest, compost and more. Registration required. Tuesdays, 4 pm. $130/two months (July/August, September/October); $350/season. Rockefeller Park near Chambers St., bpcparks.org.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS g

Summer Reading Party Crafts, games and

prizes, reading-log preparation and demonstrations by the New Canaan Nature Center with real hawks, owls, falcons and other birds of prey. Thu, 6/5, 4 pm. Free. Battery Park City Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org. g

Dragon Boat Family Festival Learn about Chinese dragon boats, try zongzi, a Chinese snack, create paper dragon boats, crowns, potpourri satchels and braided bracelets and hear stories about the Dragon Boat Festival in China. Sat, 6/7, 12–4 pm. $10; free under 2. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre St., mocanyc.org. g Suma Qamana Festival Hosted by the Bolivian Embassy, this festival celebrates suma qamana, or living well, with the traditional dance and music of Bolivia’s indigenous cultures, art demonstrations and artisan vendors. Sat, 6/14, 12–4 pm. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. g

Swedish Midsummer Festival Celebrate the summer solstice, the longest day of the year, with folk dances from Barnklubben Elsa Rix and the Swedish Folkdancers of New York, midsummer wreath-making, Swedish children’s games and Swedish delicacies. Traditional music will be played by Paul Dahlin and fiddlers from the American Swedish Institute of Minneapolis, and dances will be led by Scandinavian singer and folklorist Ross Sutter. Fri, 6/20, 5–8 pm. Free. Wagner Park near Battery Pl., bpcparks.org.

g Inti Raymi Welcome the summer solstice with Inti Raymi, the Festival of the Sun, one of the most important ancestral celebrations of the native peoples of the Andean region of

g Parent & Baby Yoga Yoga for new parents and their babies. Mondays, 6/2–6/30, 1 pm. $112/5 sessions. Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, 6 River Terrace, bpcparks.org.

STORIES & POETRY g

Storytime Colorful picture books, finger-puppet plays and action songs. Free. Up to 18months: Mondays, 9:30 am; Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:30 am. 1–3-year-olds: Mondays & Wednesdays, 4 pm. Battery Park City Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org.

g Children’s Storytime Children with a parent or caregiver can hear readings of new and classic children’s books. Saturdays, 11 am. Free. Barnes & Noble, 97 Warren St., bn.com. g

Library Slumber Party Kids are encouraged to wear pajamas and bring a toy to share during bedtime stories and a show and tell. Thu, 6/12, 6 pm. Free. Battery Park City Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org.

g

Bilingual Stories Stories in English and French. Thu, 6/19, 4 pm. Free. Battery Park City Library, 175 N. End Ave., nypl.org.

THEATER g

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day A musical adaptation of the classic children’s book by Judith Viorst. Alex wakes up with gum in his hair, then trips on a skateboard and accidentally drops his sweater in the sink—all before breakfast. But Alex—and the audience—find humor in his misadventures as he learns to take things in stride. Ages 4 and up. Sun, 6/1, 1:30 pm. $25. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., tribecapac.org. g Story Pirates This always-popular group sing and dance their way through original adventures based on prompts from the audience. Mon, 6/9, 6:30 pm. Free. Pier 25 near N. Moore St., hudsonriverpark.org. g Showboat Circus DeadPan Alley and Will Shaw present a one-man performance of physical comedy, verbal wit and circus skill, with astounding and amusing displays of juggling, balance, cowboy roping, boomeranging, spinning top manipulations, hat tricks and more. Shaw will also play the piano and harmonica, and incorporate volunteers from the audience into his show. Sun, 6/22, 1 & 4 pm. $15; $12 kids. Pier 25 near N. Moore St., waterfrontmuseum.org.


27

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

“HANDS DOWN,

THE BEST GYM IN NYC.” — Franz H.

Savoring the 20th ‘Taste’

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

At Taste of Tribeca last month, Yalda and Harris Bock help their son Riley, 21 months, join the feeding frenzy. Riley is getting a taste of crabcake from Sarabeth’s.

With perfect weather following a threat of evening of rain, and a multitude of noshers for the 75 participating restaurants, Taste of Tribeca’s 20th anniversary food fest last month was, indeed, a fittingly festive occasion. “This is a gift,” Taste co-chair Tanya Burton said, recalling the nerve-racking wet weather of the night before. Burton said the event has reached its allowable maximum of restaurants for the last couple of years and some local eateries have had to be turned away. “This is an event that everyone wants to be a part of,” she said. “It was not a hard sell.” Meanwhile, Rocco and Electra Damato, owners of the former Bazzini restaurant and specialty food store (location of the current Sarabeth’s) watched it all with special interest. It was 20 years

ago that they helped start Taste of Tribeca with two Early Childhood Center (now P.S. 150) parents, Colette Wong and Deborah Pearson. Rocco recalled watching the school rummage sales from his store across the street and thinking there were more effective ways to make money. With arts funding being cut at the time, Taste was created to supplement that money. P.S. 234 parents joined the effort that to this day supports the schools’ arts programs. “The first year we made $28,000—a lot better than rummage sales,” he laughed. “I hoped it would be something that would last but this is really beyond our imagination,” Damato added. “It’s a tribute to everyone who followed and I’m proud of them.”

WEEKEND MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE NEW YORK’S MOST INSPIRING GYM Clockwise from above: Ray Colovic of Ecco dishes out a pasta specialty; Tokyo Bay’s salmon skin roll; zucchini and chicken sandwich from My Belly’s Playlist; and Sazon’s offering, shrimp ceviche.

Pier 60 | 212.336.6000 | chelseapiers.com/inspire Offer valid through 6/30/14. Restrictions apply. Photography: Scott McDermott


KIDS

28

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

MUSIC & DANCE A P.S. 89

CELEBRATION

Above: Third grader Lucia Kehoe takes a leap as part “Wings,â€? a dance inspired by a residency from Limon4kids and a dance by JosĂŠ Limon. Right: Julietta Orciuli, clarinet, and Yoon Chung are part of the wind ensemble that played such pieces as “Frère Jacquesâ€? and the “Ode to Joyâ€?; Lucas Fernandez and fellow recorder players; dancers perform “Wings.â€?

Music teacher Mary Cherney directs her performers from the side of the stage.

At least once a year at P.S. 89, each student in first through fourth grade takes the school’s stage in a performance of dance or music. Last month, several classes taught by Mary Cherney (music) and Catherine Gallant (dance) provided a mix of entertainment, from recorder concerts to fairly free-form movement, inspired by the poetry of Langston Hughes, the music of Miles Davis and the choreography styles of JosĂŠ Limon and Isadora Duncan. It all began with a wind ensemble of 4th- and 5th-grade musicians who study with Cherney before and after school. As for the dance, Gallant said her goal is for children to develop their own movement “vocabularyâ€? and a sense of limitless possibilities. “There’s never one way of looking at something,â€? she said she tells them. “And never one way of creating something.â€?

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

=<O9J<K 13 6 W . B R O A D W A Y A F  L J A : = ; 9  > G J  )*  Q = 9 J K  :J=9C>9KLDMF;@<AFF=J:JMF;@ >J==<=DAN=JQ www.edwardsnyc.com

H UDSON W INE & S PIRITS

We offer everything from chilled wines to champagne and a variety of liquors from around the world. Prompt, free delivery f Discount on cases Major credit cards accepted Corporate accounts welcome 165 Hudson St. (corner of Laight) 212-431-1010 fax: 212-431-0757 Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thur 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm f Friâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm


29

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

TriBeCa Kid Coach

for children in 3rd to 8th grade

8LI.I[MWL.SYVRI]4VSNIGX ..4 

revolutionary after-school Jewish learning experience.

is a new,

â&#x20AC;˘ individualized family and parenting coaching â&#x20AC;˘ short term, intensive and effective education â&#x20AC;˘ manage family conflict and kid behavior â&#x20AC;˘ two to teens

..4SJJIVWQYPXMTPITEXL[E]WSJ.I[MWL PIEVRMRKJSVOMHWXSI\TPSVI The

FIKMRW[MXL]SY

free consultation 646.722.6283 email: drpeter@tribecakidcoach.com

JEWISH JOURNEY PROJECT

welcomes

this fall

FALL 2014 REGISTRATION BEGINS JUNE 9. Our classes explore Jewish content through art, drama, cooking, sports, ½PQXI\XWXYH],IFVI[TLSXSKVETL]ZMHISKEQIWERHQSVI *SVQSVIMRJSVQEXMSRGSRXEGX8EQMH8LI(S[RXS[R7]REKSKYIEX

SUMMER SAILING CAMPS For juniors &â&#x20AC;&#x2C6;teens Starting at $390 per week

All info at nyharborsailing.com 212.786.0400

SVXLI..4SJ½GIEX

JJP IS AN INITIATIVE OF

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

%RWGLI'LIWIH&´REM.IWLYVYR'SRKVIKEXMSR,EFSRMQ8LI7SGMIX]SJXLI%HZERGIQIRXSJ.YHEMWQ 7%.  8EQMH8LI(S[RXS[R7]REKSKYIERH;IWX)RH7]REKSKYI JJP is made possible with the support of Bezalel Foundation, Gottesman Fund, Jim Joseph Foundation, Neshamot Fund, The Steinhardt Foundation for Jewish Life, UJA-Federation of NY, and generous individual donors.


30

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB Right: Amanda Canavan, Mika Imatome and Francesca Mirenda were among the volunteers who planted hostas and petunias in Tribeca Park last month at Beach Street and West Broadway. They supplemented the work of Don Thomas and Julie Matsumoto, the park’s main stewards. Far right: Dan Ackerman plants geraniums with student volunteers in Trinity Place Park.

Swingin’ into

SPRING

Left: As the TriBattery Pops played on at the Spring Festival in Bogardus Garden, conductor Tom Goodkind twirled with Gwen Moss, whose husband, Edward, was playing clarinet. Below: Azalea Danes (in white shirt) was one of four middle schoolers who helped out with It’s My Park Day in Washington Market Park, where children planted purple petunias and pink begonias.

May is the month when Downtown parks come alive with volunteers of all ages, eager to join a spring planting ritual. “They’ve never done this before and they really want to,” Sarah Aronson, the Washington Market Park gardener, said before showing a gaggle of kids how to plant the petunias and begonias awaiting them on It’s My Park Day. “Some of them have seen me do it in the park and they’re absolutely bewitched.” The fun was not only of the plantgrowing kind. In Duane Park, there were farm animals to pet and live music to listen to alongside the flowers ready to pot. In Bogardus Garden, kids’ events and concerts were preceded the day before by planting in the normally gated garden. Down on lower Greenwich Street, the Downtown Alliance was giving newly renamed Elizabeth Berger Plaza and the nearby Trinity Place Park lots of attention—and color—with 1,200 geraniums and 20 student volunteers. Luckily, the ideal weather made all the park days perfect. “I love gardening rain or shine,” said the Alliance’s Dan Ackerman, who was digging in the soil with vigor. “But shine is always better.”

INAUGURAL GOVERNORS ISLAND ADULT COED SUMMER SOFTBALL LEAGUE sponsored by Yorkville Sports Association info@ysaleagues.com 914-962-8390 ext 10 ysaleagues.com/GI

GAMES THURSDAYS STARTING JUNE 19, 2014 11:00 AM & 12:30 PM

PHOTOS BY CARL GLASSMAN

TRIBECA COBBLER SHOP Shoe Repair & Sales 390 GREENWICH ST. (lobby of Citibank building) 212.349.0003 • tribeca.cobbler@gmail.com z

21 years in the neighborhood, serving with utmost proficiency Shoe repair and shine “while u wait” We sell an array of shoe products • Orthopedic work done on premises

We also sell men’s shoes.

Bostonian, Johnston & Murphy, Allen Edmonds and Alden


Flood Can’t Unravel This Close-Knit Community

31

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

BY NATHALIE RUBENS Val Chan has always been an avid crafter, but her true gift, it turns out, is for weaving people together. When Chan opened Stitched Tribeca last October at 72 Warren St., her dream was to have a space where people could come together around the art of different crafts—sewing, needlepoint, knitting, and crocheting, among others—and create friendships at the same time. “I was really hoping to build a community,” she recalled. “A place to meet other people who wanted to make things. I’m really just trying to foster some faceto-face connections.” When a fire followed by a flood from upstairs closed down Stitched Tribeca in March—also displacing a family and damaging the Church Street School for Music and Art—it brought to a sudden halt the zipper workshops, the “chat and crafts” and kids sewing and crocheting classes that had just begun to blossom. But with the help of Chan, one loyal group of regulars to the store’s classes are stubbornly determined to keep crafting together. Less than a month after Stitched closed, Jane and Doug Smith, owners of The World Trade Art Gallery on Trinity Place and friends of Chan, opened their store for the first “knit-along.” A former Stitched teacher held an impromptu knitting class, and children sat on the floor making “friendship bracelets” while their

CARL GLASSMAN

At Whole Foods, Chan, left, with fellow crafters Kris Dikeman, foreground, and Kally Aronis.

mothers perused the “fire sale”— baskets of colorful skeins of Baby Alpaca, ecoWool, needles and accessories that Chan had salvaged from the store. “This story is about friendship,” explained Lucia Volkova, who said her daughter Katya used to “run” to her weekly class at Stitched because she loved it so much. “This is our community,” she added. “We want to help.” At the center of this community is Chan, a former statistics teacher and Battery Park City resident, whose true love had always been crafting. After she had children, she decided to open a store,

subletting from the Church Street School. “I figured, what better way to teach my kids to embrace life than to model it myself,” she said. Chan said she was touched when she discovered that “whatever people were going through, they came to take a class and it helped them in some way.” “I’m not looking to work in the aggregate,” she added. “But if I can make a difference to just one or two people, to me that’s worth something.” Last month, the group met again, this time on the second floor of Whole Foods

DOWNTOWN DAY CAMPS:

on Greenwich Street. Chan arrived with an armful of crafting supplies that she placed on two tables that had been pushed together, A half-dozen women gathered around her, sifting through the felt squares, colored thread and knitting yarn. As hands worked steadily on different projects, conversation meandered from tips about sewing patterns and other hobbies to family life and myriad everyday topics. Kally Aronis, who was working on intricately patterned knit lace shawl that she had designed, used to go to Stitched for its noontime “Chat & Craft” with coworkers who she had taught to knit. “It’s just fun,” she said. “We were always laughing or sharing ideas. If you don’t know someone, you just bond with them through love of craft.” Before she went to Stitched, added Kris Dikeman, who was sitting nearby, she had always done crafts on her own. “I had never really thought of it as an experience that you do in community with other people.” Now, she hopes that the groups Chan started will continue to expand. “I truly see it as something that is going to keep growing like a ripple in a pond,” she said. Nonetheless, she is looking forward to the store reopening. “I hope the studio opens back up again. I hope that Val gets to keep living her dream.”

GRADES K-8

Memories That Last a Lifetime

JUNIOR DIVISON: AGES 4-8

SENIOR DIVISON: AGES 9-13

Fh_lWj[Feebš<_[bZIfehjišF_[h(+šAWhWj[šJ[dd_iš7hji9hW\jišCki_Y:hkcc_d] Cel[c[djšIjehoF_hWj[išIed]I^emišM[[abo<_[bZJh_fiš9^e_Y[J_c[<ehI[d_eh:_l_i_ed9Wcf[hi

X BUSING AVAILABLE mmm$ZemdjemdZWoYWcfi$Yecr('($-,,$''&*n(+&rJh_X[YWr8Wjj[hoFWha9_jorBem[hCWd^WjjWd


OMING U C P

32

A SELECTION OF DOWNTOWN EVENTS

READINGS

g

St. Peter’s B-List Eleven poets read their works that appear in a new anthology of poems inspired by the saints. Wed, 6/11, 6 pm. Free. Poets House, 10 River Terrace, poetshouse.org.

g Laura Silver Co-author of “Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food,” Silver will talk about her round-the-world quest for the origins of the knish and share anecdotes about the food that she says “were her family’s religion.” Sun, 6/15, 2:30 pm. $15; ticket includes a reception with light refreshments. Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org. g Neal Corman The food writer will talk about his book, “Virgil’s Barbecue Road Trip Cookbook: The Best Barbecue from Around the Country Without Ever Leaving Your Backyard,” which contains 98 barbecue and grilling recipes. Wed, 6/25, 6 pm. Free. Barnes & Noble, 97 Warren St., bn.com. g

DANCE g

28th Annual Performance Mix Festival Works by 32 artists that challenge the traditional definition of dance. In addition to the dance performances, there will be related events, including a workshop on filming dance, a panel discussion about dance residencies and a closing party. Tue, 6/10–Sun, 6/15, see website for full schedule. $15–$30. New Dance Alliance at HERE, 145 6th Ave., newdancealliance.org.

g What Was Wasn’t Here Dance inspired by the process of developing Governors Island. Vanessa Anspaugh’s work explores the illusion of separation, relationships, space, and asks how bodies share and lose one another. Fri, 6/20, 3 pm & Sat, 6/21, 1 & 3 pm. Free. LMCC Arts Center, Governors Island, lmcc.net. g

Two Women Japanese dancers Eiko and Tomoe Aihara, dancers with similar style but of very different ages and at different points in their careers, present an experimental dance performance that focuses on their age difference and explores how two bodies sometimes mirror each other. Fri, 6/20 & Sun, 6/22, 2 pm. Free. LMCC Arts Center, Governors Island, lmcc.net. g

Where We Are Right Now In Enrico Wey’s dance performance, “Where We Are Right Now,” Wey explores life, love and death. Sun, 6/22, 7 & 8 pm; Tue, 6/24, 7:30 pm. Free. Pier 15, lmcc.net.

g

Untitled Tere O’Connor has created a duet for Michael Ingle and Silas Riener that explores the relationship between the human figure and monolith forms in public spaces. Mon, 6/23– Wed, 6/25, 1 pm. Free. Elevated Acre, 55 Water St., lmcc.net.

g

Of History (Virgule de L’histoire) An exploration of the process of transformation that comes from accepting circumstances that are often beyond our control. Tue, 6/24, 3 pm & Wed,

T

he Global Beat Festival offers four nights, from June 13 to 17, of free music from France, Armenia, Turkey, Pakistan, Ukraine and Iran. Performers range from Pakistan’s underground indieart rock group, “Poor Rich Boy,” to Kayhan Kalhor (left) who plays the Persian spiked fiddle, to Jivan Gasparyan, an accomplished player of the duduk, a woodwind that is a symbol of Armenian national identity. At the Winter Garden, Brookfield Place, artsbrookfield.com/new-york.

g Singapore Noir Readings by authors who contributed to this book of short mysteries, all of which take place in Singapore. Tue, 6/3, 6:30 pm. Free. Mysterious Bookshop, 58 Warren St., mysteriousbookshop.com.

Donald L. Miller The historian will discuss his book, “Supreme City: New York in the 1920s and 1930s,” which charts the era’s ambitious personalities who shaped modern Manhattan. The book also explores such engineering triumphs as Grand Central Terminal and the Holland Tunnel, which shifted New York’s commercial hub from Downtown to Midtown. Reservations required. Thu, 6/26, 6:30 pm. Free. Skyscraper Museum, 39 Battery Pl., skyscraper.org.

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

TODD ROSENBERG

6/25, 1 & 5 pm. Free. John Street United Methodist Church Courtyard, lmcc.net. g ...Moses(es) Inspired by a re-reading of Zora Neale Hurston’s Moses, Man of the Mountain (the Moses story told as a Southern folk tale in African-American vernacular), this dance examines the migration of peoples and culture from Africa. Wed, 6/25, 2:45 pm & Thu, 6/26, 1:45 & 3:45 pm. Free. St. Cornelius Chapel, Governors Island, lmcc.net. g

I’m Going to Toss My Arms–If You Catch Them They’re Yours Experimental dance piece choreographed by Trisha Brown that features industrial fans. Wed, 6/25 & Thu, 6/26, 7 pm. Free. Pier 15, lmcc.net.

g I Nyoman Catra A series of Balinese dances featuring eight international artists. Thu, 6/26, 5 pm; Fri, 6/27 & Sat, 6/28, 1 pm. Free. 120 Wall St., lmcc.net.

FILM g

New Frontiers and Unreserved: The Work of Louie Gong Two short documentaries follow members of the Seminole tribe who are working to achieve their dreams of success in mainstream American pop culture, including in filmmaking and designing skateboard shoes for Vans. Each film highlights how these young people balance their lives in two very different worlds. Daily, 1 & 3 pm. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu.

and Karen Allen, this 1981 film features an archaeologist and adventurer Indiana Jones who is hired by the U.S. government to find the Ark of the Covenant before the Nazis do. Wed, 6/25, 6:30 pm. Free with suggested donation. Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org. g On Video: New York Close-Up A screening of short videos that explore the filmmakers’ first ten years of their respective careers living and working in New York City. Sun, 6/29, 4:30 pm. Free. LMCC Art Center, Governors Island, lmcc.net.

GALLERIES g

Eleanor Winters Calligraphic paintings created in memory of the children of Paris who were deported to Auschwitz between 1942 and 1944. To Fri, 6/20. Tuesdays–Saturdays, 10 am–5 pm. Anne Frank Center, 44 Park Pl., annefrank.com.

g

Hidden Passengers A group show, organized by Avi Lubin, features works by seven artists that explore the role of art in science today. To Thu, 7/26. Tue–Sat, 11 am–6 pm. apexart, 291 Church St., apexart.org.

g

George Schneeman “A Painter and His Poets” is the first major retrospective of George Schneeman’s collaborative paintings, collages, prints and books, including portraits of his poet friends. Schneeman’s playful, energetic, modern, clear and likable art opens new possibilities in writing and art. To Sat, 9/20. Tue–Fri, 11 am–7 pm. Poets House, 10 River Terrace, poetshouse.org.

Early 1800s These early maps give detailed depictions of an emerging nation. They include a map by John Silsbury, who created the first jigsaw puzzle as a way to teach children geography, and a pre-Revolution plan of New York City, with a bird’s-eye view of lower Manhattan Island, eastern New Jersey, and western Brooklyn. To Sat, 6/28. Daily, 12–5 pm. $7; $4 students, seniors, children; free under 5 and active military. Fraunces Tavern Museum, 54 Pearl St., frauncestavernmuseum.org. g Robert Davidson: Abstract Impulse In collaboration with the Seattle Art Museum, this is the first major exhibition of works by Haida artist Robert Davidson. A pivotal figure in the Northwest Coast Native art renaissance since 1969 when he erected the first totem pole in Massett village, Davidson creates his own interpretations of traditional Haida art forms, including minimalist paintings, graphic works and brightly colored sculptures. To Sun, 9/14. Fri–Wed, 10 am–5 pm; Thu, 10 am–8 pm. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 1 Bowling Green, nmai.si.edu. g Oil & Water: Reinterpreting Ink Contemporary Chinese ink paintings by three artists, Qiu Deshu, Wei Jia and Zhang Hontu. Historically, ink has been the primary medium of Chinese visual arts, and are an integral part of calligraphy, poetry and painting. These artists continue the medium’s relevance in modern-day art. To Sun, 9/14. Tue–Wed & Fri–Sun, 11 am–6 pm; Thu, 11 am–9 pm. $10; $5 students, seniors; free under 12. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre St., mocanyc.org.

The Muppets Take Manhattan A musical comedy for the whole family, Kermit and his friends go to New York to get their musical on Broadway. Wed, 6/11, 8 pm. Free. Pier 17, southstreetseaport.com.

g Marilyn Fish-Glynn The photographer captured images of wet, discarded objects on one block in the West Village after a rainy Gay Pride parade in 2013. Wed, 6/4–Sat, 6/28. Opening reception: Tue, 6/3, 6 pm. Wed–Sun, 1–6 pm. Soho Photo, 15 White St., sohophoto.com.

g

g

g The Fed at 100 An exploration of the complex inner workings of the nation’s central bank and the pivotal role the Federal Reserve has played throughout the history of American finance. To October. Tue–Sat, 10 am–4 pm. $8; $5 students, seniors; free under 6. Museum of American Finance, 48 Wall St., moaf.org.

MUSEUMS

g A Town Known as Auschwitz: The Life and Death of a Jewish Community Photographs trace the life of the town of Oswiecim, Poland, called Auschwitz by the Germans, which was home to many Jews starting from the 16th century. Ongoing. Sun–Tue & Thu, 10 am–5:45 pm;

g

Approved for Adoption A documentary by filmmaker Jung Henin about his experience as one of thousands of Korean children adopted by Westerners after the Korean War. The film, which features Henin’s hand-drawn animations, examines how adoptees often feel stranded between two cultures. Tue, 6/17, 7 pm. Free. Tribeca Cinemas, 54 Varick St., tribecacinemas.com.

g

Raiders of the Lost Ark Starring Harrison Ford

Kazumi Yoshida The show, “Plein Soleil,” consists of colorful collage-like paintings of wild animals in their natural habitat. Thu, 6/12–Sat, 7/12. Mon–Fri, 11 am–6 pm and by appointment. Cheryl Hazan Gallery, 35 N. Moore St., cherylhazan.com.

g

Defining Lines: Maps From the 1700s &

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 32)


33

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

DINE

|

SHOP

|

EXPLORE

Head to Lower Manhattan for discounts

BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

every Tuesday from over 60 participating partners including restaurants, retailers, museums and more. Redemption codes available on our website and with your confirmed reservation to the 9/11 Memorial Museum on every Tuesday between May 27- September 30.

IN ASSOCIATION WITH:

PL AN YOUR VISIT AT LOWERMANHATTANTUESDAYS.COM


OMING U C P

34

JUNE 2014 THE TRIBECA TRIB

A SELECTION OF DOWNTOWN EVENTS

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30)

Wed, 10 am–8 pm; Fri, 10 am–5 pm. $12; $10 seniors; $7 students; free under 12. Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl., mjhnyc.org.

ers of history to reveal the PatriotLoyalist conflict within New York. Visit the site where the Declaration of Independence was first read to New Yorkers, the graves of Alexander Hamilton and Revolutionary War General Richard Montgomery, the site of President George Washington’s inaugural address, Fraunces Tavern and the target of the Stamp Act mob in Bowling Green. Meet at City Hall Park, Broadway and Murray St. Sat, 6/14, 11 am. $20; $15 students, seniors. Big Onion Walking Tours, bigonion.com.

g Anne Frank: A Family Photo Album As an amateur photographer, Otto Frank focused his lens on his two daughters. Through photographs salvaged along with Anne’s diary following the family’s arrest, Frank’s album gives a glimpse into the life of a GermanJewish family. Tue, 6/24–Fri, 8/29. Opening reception: Tue, 6/24, 4 pm. Tue–Sat, 10 am–5 pm. $8; $5 students, seniors; free under 8. Anne Frank Center, 44 Park Pl., annefrank.com.

g

MUSIC g

Joel Diamond The composer and pianist will play some of his pieces, followed by a service with Rabbi Dani Passow of the Harvard Hillel and dinner. Tue, 6/3, 6 pm. $30; $18 under 13 years old. Tribeca Synagogue, 49 White St., synagogueforthearts.org.

g

Terry Riley & Friends Iconic composer and musician Terry Riley, known as the father of Minimalism, will perform some of his pieces. Fri, 6/20, 7 pm. Free. Federal Hall, Wall St. and Broad St., lmcc.net.

g

Dar Williams The singer/songwriter, whose 1998 song “What Do You Hear in These Sounds” became a pop hit, will perform original pieces from her latest album, “My Better Self.” Fri, 6/20, 8 pm. $35–$55. Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., tribecapac.org.

T

he widely-exhibited work of Andrew Salgado, who lives and works in London, will be on display at One Art Space, 23 Warren St., until Wednesday, July 6. Salgado is known for his bold, large-scale figurative paintings of people against abstract backgrounds. “Variations of a Theme.” The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., oneartspace.com.

g

Claire Chase & Svet Stoyanov Flutist Claire Chase and Bulgarian percussionist Svet Stoyanov collaborate in a new duet by composer Marcos Balter based on a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. Using acoustic and electronic manipulations of their instruments and voices, Chase and Stoyanov explore facets of loneliness. Sat, 6/21, 7 pm. Free. Federal Hall, Wall St. and Broad St., lmcc.net.

g

Kimmo Phojonen & Jeffrey Zeigler Finnish accordionist Kimmo Pohjonen and former Kronos Quartet cellist Jeffrey Zeigler play an ode to the Aokigahara forest, which has long been associated with demons and spirits in Japanese mythology and, in recent decades, has become a popular place for suicides. Mon, 6/23, 7 pm. Free. Pier 15, lmcc.net g

Carbon Leaf with Gaelic Storm Carbon Leaf, a group that includes a mandolin, bouzouki, fiddle, accordion and penny whistle and Gaelic Storm, an entirely acoustic group, perform indie-folk music with Celtic influences. Thu, 6/26, 5 pm. $25. Pier 15, 78 South St., watermarkny.com.

g

Fronteras From an accordion fronted Tex-Mex punk-band to socially conscious Haitian songs and from ambient folk and electronica to the king of Colombian vallenato and cumbia, this Caribbean and Latin America festival features performances by Bélo, Curupira and Nickodemus. Fri, 6/27, 4 pm; Sat, 6/28, 5:30 pm; Sun, 6/29, 1:30 pm. Free. The uplands, South Street Seaport, lmcc.net.

g

The Commons Choir The chorus performs a

mix of speech, movement, reparative tones and tunes that seek to tackle economic disparity and suggest a sustainable future. Sat, 6/28, 6 pm. Free. Poets House, 10 River Terrace, lmcc.net.

between Brown’s dance ideas and visual art of her time, focusing on major works of the 1970s and 1980s. Sun, 6/22, 4:30 pm. Free. LMCC Arts Center, Governors Island, lmcc.net.

TALKS

THEATER

g

Introduction to Calligraphy Artist and calligrapher Eleanor Winters leads a workshop on calligraphy and Gothic lettering. Reservations required: 212-431-7993 or info@annefrank.com. Sat, 6/7, 2 pm. $8; $5 students, seniors. Anne Frank Center, 44 Park Pl., annefrank.com.

g

Finding Family: Using FamilySearch Learn how to search the FamilySearch database that includes more than three billion names and offers a way to find family members who are generations removed. Registration required: newyork.archives@nara.gov. Tue, 6/10, 12 pm. Free. The National Archives at New York City, 1 Bowling Green, archives.gov/nyc. g West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776 Claudio Saunt will talk about the many other events that occurred in 1776, when the east was rapidly developing and the west was being explored. They include the Spanish landing in San Francisco and the Sioux discovering the Black Hills. Thu, 6/12, 6:30 pm. $10. Fraunces Tavern Museum, 54 Pearl St., frauncestavernmuseum.org. g

In Conversation: Susan Rosenberg on Trisha Brown Brown’s principles of choreography and movement are discussed by art historian Susan Rosenberg in a talk that illuminates parallels

g The Mysteries Forty-eight playwrights and 54 actors tell the story of the Bible in a single six-hour night. To Mon, 7/14. Thursdays–Saturdays & Mondays, 6:30 pm; Sundays, 4:30 pm. $15–$75. The Flea, 41 White St., theflea.org. g

Ludic Proxy Inspired by the devastation of Japan following the 2011 earthquake, this play by Aya Ogawa explores the tenuous line between memory, reality and fantasy. Mon, 6/23, 5 pm; Wed, 6/25, 2 pm & Fri, 6/27, 4 pm. Free. 1 Liberty Plaza, lmcc.net.

g Bronx Gothic: The Oval A one-woman comingof-age show about two 11-year-old schoolgirls that focuses on issues of self-esteem, body image and sex. Sat, 6/28 & Sun, 6/29, 3 pm. Free. LMCC Arts Center, Governors Island, lmcc.net.

WALKS g

Chinatown: A Walk Through History The tour examines how the neighborhood has changed over several centuries, and accommodated the large number of immigrants who have lived there, both past and present. Meet at the museum. Sat, 6/7, 14 & 21, 1 pm. $15; $12 students, seniors; free under 5. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre St., mocanyc.org.

g

Revolutionary New York This tour uncovers lay-

Downtown Manhattan’s Lost Neighborhood From the mid19th through mid-20th centuries, the area around Washington Street from Liberty to the Battery was a thriving community of immigrants from Ireland, Germany, Central and Eastern Europe and the Middle East. The building of the World Trade Center displaced most of these residents and the establishments that catered to them. Visit the former St. George Syrian Melkite Church, the Downtown Community House and some remaining tenements. Sun, 6/15, 10:30 am. $20. Municipal Art Society, mas.org.

g Garden Tour: Wagner Park Tour the gardens with a Battery Park City Parks Conservancy horticulturist and learn about innovative organic gardening on a large scale. Meet at the brick building in the park. Wed, 6/18, 1 pm. Free. Wagner Park near Battery Pl., bpcparks.org.

g Digital Sanctuaries Participants explore various sites in Lower Manhattan accompanied by a musical score that is meant to enhance their experience in each place. Download the app in advance at digitalsanctuaries.com. Sat, 6/21, 1 pm (at India House), 3 pm (at Peter Minuit Plaza) & 5 pm (at Teardrop Park). Free. lmcc.net. g Scandals and Scoundrels A 90-minute tour of the Financial District with a focus on its numerous contemporary and historical financial scandals. Meet at the museum. Sat, 6/21, 1 pm. $15. Museum of American Finance, 48 Wall St., Tickets at moaf.org.

ET CETERA g

Drawing in the Park Sketch and paint the Hudson River and gardens with an artist. All materials are provided. Wednesdays, 11 am. Wagner Park near Battery Pl. Saturdays, 10 am. South Cove near 2nd Pl. Free. bpcparks.org.

g

Figure al Fresco Learn figure drawing outdoors with a clothed model and an artist/educator. All materials are provided. Wednesdays, 2:30 pm. Free. South Cove near 2nd Pl., bpcparks.org. g

Volleyball After Work Casual games with other adults. Scorekeeper and balls are provided. No experience necessary. Wednesdays, 6 pm. Free. Esplanade Plaza near 2nd Pl, bpcparks.org.

g Tai Chi Learn the Chinese martial art with Instructor Alex Hing. No experience necessary. Fridays, 8:30 am. Free. Esplanade Plaza near Liberty St., bpcparks.org.


35

THE TRIBECA TRIB JUNE 2014

Introducing our optical boutique! Martin and Martin, Michael Henau, OGI, Pro design, Seraphin & Urband • Wide variety of kids’ frames • Latest in Lens technology, Transitions, Crizal, Varilux Progressive Lenses

30% Discount on Frames & Lenses for our Grand Opening!

TRIBECA EYE PHYSICIANS Julius Shulman, MD Dalia Nagel, MD Adult Adolescent and Pediatric Eye Care

HEALTHY FEET ARE SEXY FEET! For over 30 years, utilizing the latest technology, we have skillfully treated patients in all areas of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

Revolutionary FDA approved laser treatment for toenails! Also specializing in diabetic footcare, sports injuries and surgical correction of all deformities of the foot and ankle. Meticulous attention is given to achieve aesthetically pleasing results.

To schedule an appointment or a FREE surgical consultation call today.

FREE LASIK CONSULTATIONS • Board Certified Ophthalmologists • Laser Vision Correction • Cataract Surgery with Premium Lenses • Affordable Contact Lenses • Comprehensive Eye Exams

n Book an appointment online n Most insurance plans accepted

Evening and early morning appointments!

19 MURRAY STREET 212.693.7200 TribecaEyeCare.com

An Affordable Downtown Hotel with Style 10% off with this ad... (must be booked in advance and based on availability)

DR. STEVE MENNA & DR. GEORGE PACE 52 Duane St. TRIBECA 212.349.7676 347 Fifth Ave. Suite 1110 MIDTOWN Across from the Empire State Building 212.629.5090 133 Smith St., BROOKLYN 718.330.1117 (bet. Dean & Bergen) manfootcare@aol.com www.manhattanfootcare.com

SATURDAY APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

“WOW ! No more contacts”

COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL - TRIBECA

Have LASIK at NY Vision Group: the only LASIK center in downtown Manhattan and leave your contact lenses or glasses behind. NY Vision Group is the only LASIK Center in Manhattan to utilize the newest, safest and most accurate LASIK laser available in the US: the Wavefront EX 500 Laser. Combined with the 20+ years of experience of Dr. Harry Koster, a Harvard-trained corneal specialist, who has performed thousands of LASIK procedures, we can clear up your vision.

95 WEST BROADWAY at Chambers Street in Tribeca

Toll-free reservations 888-895-9400 212-566-1900 • www.cosmohotel.com

BE WOWED. Call 212-243-2300 for a free LASIK consultation. NY Vision Group • 37 Murray St. • Lower Level • Tribeca nyvisiongroup.com


6R+R1R+R GRAND ON GREENE3O(O  3& "2 BATHCONDOLOFTWITH vHIGHCEILING XLIVING DININGAREA XWNDWS #ORINTHIAN CAST IRONCOLUMNS CENTRAL!# KEYED ELEVATOR-7%" 3IIM(ANJA   2UDI(ANJA   NOHO MINI LOFT.O(O 3PACIOUSMINI LOFTWITH FOOTCEILINGS  HUGEARCHEDWINDOWS PRIVATEBALCONY  EXPOSEDBRICKANDLARGEMEZZANINE BED"EAUTIFULCASTIRONDOORMAN BUILDING+7%" 2UDI(ANJA  

CREATE DREAM HOME 4RI"E#A/RIGINALARTISTLOFT  FOOTTIN CEILINGS HUGE.3WINDOWS EAT IN KITCHEN "2 7$ ORIGINALHDWDFLOORS ,OWMAINT-7%" "RAHNA9ASSKY  

9LOODJH

BRILLIANTLY RENOV 1-FAMILY 7EST6ILLAGEWIDE'REEK2EVIVAL TWNHOVERLOOKING"LEECKER'ARDENS &EATURESINCLUDE PASSENGERELEV TOTAL SMARTHOMETECHNOLOGYANDTERRACED 3OUTHGARDEN-7%" $AVID+ORNMEIER   PENTHOUSE W/2 TERRACES 'REENWICH6ILLAGE%XQUISITELYRENOVATED "2CONDOIN$-BUILDINGHIGH CEILINGS OPENVIEWS  3&TERRACE WITHHOTTUB GASlREPLACE OUTDOOR SHOWER-7%" ONE-OF-A-KIND LOFT4RI"E#A $AVID+ORNMEIER   3TUNNINGLOFTWITHmOOR TO CEILINGDOORS  TERRACED LOFT7EST6ILLAGE EXPOSEDWOODFRAMESANDGIGANTIC 2AMBLING"2 BATHLOFTWITH LIVINGANDLOUNGEAREAS!LSOFEATURES EXPANSIVEPRIVATETERRACEIN&3CONDO BEAUTIFULLYPLANTEDANDFURNISHED  HOURDOORMAN GARAGE GYM/PEN PATIO-7%" .VIEWS MINTCONDITION GREAT76SPOT &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM   ANDCLOSETOALL-7%" WALKER ST 2,563SF CONDO *OHN%DWARDS   4RI"E#AvCEILING INSPIRED RENOVATION SUPERBORIGINALDETAILS  WV LOFT WITH PARKING7EST CASTIRONmUTEDCOLUMNS HUGECHEFS TH3T2ARELUXURYLOFTIN76 PARKING INCLUDED"2 BATHWOFFICEANDMEDIA KITCHEN HEATEDBATHmOORS KEYED RM#HEFSKITCHEN vBARRELVAULTED ELEVATORENTRY STONEFA•ADE LARGE STORAGERUN-7%" CEILING WBFP 7$INUNIT 37EXPOS  HOUR$--7%" 3IIM(ANJA   *ULIANA&REI   2UDI(ANJA   2ICHARD&&ERRARI   TROPHY TRIBECA TRIPLEX 4RI"E#A$RAMATIC 3&TRIPLEX SPRINGTIME OASIS%AST CONDOWCEILINGS DOUBLEHEIGHT 6ILLAGE,OVELY"2CONDOWITH WNDWSSPANNINGOVERLOOKING3& PLANTEDPRIVATETERRACES7ONDERFUL PRIVATEOUTDOOR ALLINATERRIlC4RI"E#A LIGHTALLDAYLONG WBFP ANDGREATEAT IN KITCHENWITHHIGH ENDAPPLIANCES-INT LOCATION-7%" CONDITION-7%" !NDREW*+RAMER   ,IZ$WORKIN   WEST VILLAGE CONDO LOFT 7EST6ILLAGE2AREANDRENOVATED   CEILINGS WBFP %MPIRE3TATEVIEWS  CENTRAL!# 3ONOS CUSTOMlNISHES ROOF DECK LAUNDRYROOM BIKEROOM FULL TIMESUPER-7%" %RIN"OISSON!RIES   .IC"OTTERO  

7UL%H&D

TRIBECA LOFT TREASURE ,EONARD3TREET2ARELIGHT lLLEDARTISTS LOFTINPRIME4RI"E#AWITHPROTECTED 37VIEWS HIGHCEILINGS FACTORYDETAILS  KEYEDELEVATORANDPOSSIBILITYFOR"2   BATH-7%" +ARESSE'RENIER   +ELSEY(ALL  AND .ADINE!DAMSON   BRIGHT ARTIST AERIE4RI"E#A %XTRAORDINARYQUIETLOFT GREATLIGHT  EXPOSURES .3%OPENVIEWS SKYLIGHT  ORIGINALWOODCEILINGSANDBEAMS  PINEmOORS EXPOSEDBRICK TOPmOOR WALK UP-7%" "RAHNA9ASSKY  

LOFT WITH PARK VIEWS ,OWER%AST3IDE/PEN BRIGHT "2  BATHCONDO FULLYRENOV TEAKBUILT INS  ARCHITECTURALGLASS -IELEAPPLNCS WALNUT FLOORS7$CEILS VIEWSOF-ANHATTAN "RIDGE PETSOK-7%" *OAN4EAFORD  

VILLAGE STUDIO&IFTH!VENUE (IGHFLOOR 6ILLAGESTUDIOIN,ANDMARKED BUILDING WITH HOURDOORMAN lTNESS CENTER ANDLIVE INSUPER0IEDS A TERRE ANDPURCHASEFORCHILDRENPERMITTED SPRINGTIME PLEASURE 4RI"E#A,IGHTlLLED "20(WITH +7%" ENORMOUSPLANTEDTERRACES BOUTIQUE *ULIA(OAGLAND   CONDODOORMANBLDG GARAGESPACES  WBFP PERFECT4RI"E#ALOCATIONAND VIBE+MONTHLY7%" ,IZ$WORKIN    129 LAFAYETTE STREET VOLUMINOUS BRIGHT STUDIO $OWNTOWN/PENVIEWSOF3O(O $OWNTOWNvCEILINGSANDBRILLIANT FROMBEAUTIFULLYDETAILED"2 BATH LIGHT THISSPACIOUSRECENTLYBUILT  !PPROX 3&!VAIL/FFEREDFULLY SOUTHFACINGALCOVESTUDIOIN&I$I FURNISHED&3BLDGWITHRESIDENTSROOF HASAMENITIESGALOREINAPETFRIENDLY DECK+MONTHLY7%" BUILDING+7%" ,%LESE2EID   $AVID0ERRY   FISCHER MILLS LOFT4RI"E#A 3TUNNINGMULTI EXPOSURELOFTWITHBRICK ARCHWAYS MASSIVECOLUMNSANDROUGH SAWNTIMBERBEAMS&EATURES0OGGENPOHL KITCHENAND,UTRONSMARTHOMESYSTEM  +MONTHLY7%" 2BR, 2.5 BATH W/WATER VIEWS &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM   #HELSEA,ARGENEWLYDESIGNEDFULL )ESTYN,*ONES   SERVICECONDOINTHE*EAN.OUVEL DUPLEX IN HEART OF TRIBECA WITHEXPOSURES'REATLIGHT WATER 4RI"E#A"2DUPLEXLOFTFEATURING ANDOPENCITYVIEWSWITHOPENmOOR EXPOSEDBRICKWALLS BEAMEDCEILINGSAND PLANREALLYMAKETHISAMUSTSEE SPACIOUSLIVINGANDDININGAREAS!LSO -7%" OFFERSPRIVATEROOFDECK WITHDEGREE "ILL2OCHE   VIEWS+MONTHLY7%" PERFECT 2BR, 2 BATH CONDO &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM   $OWNTOWN-INTSPLITBEDROOMS  )ESTYN,*ONES   OPENKITCHEN HARDWOODmOORS 7$ LIVE/WORK WITH FRONTAGE ANDEASTERNCITYVIEWSFROMTH 4RI"E#A'ROUNDmOORUNITWITHOF mOOR%NJOYHEALTHCLUB POOL PLAY FRONTAGEONCOBBLESTONEDSTREET&EATURES AREA ANDCLOSETOTRANSPORTATIONAND INCLUDEEXPOSEDBRICK MODERNKITCHEN  SHOPPING-7%" NATURALSTONEANDHIGHCEILINGS #AROL!2ASKIN   +MONTHLY7%" -ARK02ASKIN   &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM   EXCELLENT VALUE AT TEMPO )ESTYN,*ONES   'RAMERCY"RANDNEW"2 BATH HIGH HIGH-TECH LOFT4RI"E#A CEILS OPENCHEFSKITCHEN 7$ EXCELLENT 3PECTACULAR"2LOFTFEATURINGASUN CLOSETS TERRACEOFFMASTERBEDROOM  DRENCHEDLIVINGROOM BLACKOAKmOORS  HEATEDBATHROOMmOOR'REATCONDITION STATE OF THE ARTHOMECONTROLSYSTEM  WITHGYM LOUNGE ROOFDECK LOW MARBLElNISHES ANDOVERSIZEDWNDWS MONTHLIES-7%" +MONTHLY7%" .ADA2IZK   )ESTYN,*ONES   PERFECT CHELSEA 1BR &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM   #HELSEA"2CONDOINTHE'RAND SUN-SPLASHED TRIBECA LOFT #HELSEA CLOSETOSHOPPING DINING  4RI"E#A"2 BATHLOFTWITH ANDSUBWAYS&EATURESSPACIOUSROOMS  SCENICPARKVIEWSINHISTORIC$-BLDG OPENVIEWS BREAKFASTBAR ANDOVERSIZED &EATURESINCLUDEEXPOSEDBRICK HDWD CLOSETS+7%" mOORS TERRACE ANDAMPLECLOSETSPACE &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM   +MONTHLY7%" BRAND NEW TO MARKET )ESTYN,*ONES   #HELSEA3PACIOUSLOFT LIKEGEMIN &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM   HEARTOF#HELSEA(IGHCEILINGS LOTS SPACIOUS AND SERENE LOFT OFLIGHT ANDEXPOSURES"RINGYOUR 4RI"E#A-INTCOND CEILS OVERSIZED IMAGINATIONANDMAKETHISYOUR ARCHEDWNDWS HUGEWALK INCLOSET ORIG DREAMHOME+7%" COLUMNS CHEFSKITCHEN 7$ AMENITIES (ARVEY-ESSING   GALORE+MONTHLY7%" %LISE2OBERTS-ESSING   ,ESLIE-INTZER   GRAMERCY PARK$OWNTOWN SOUTH ST SEAPORT LOFT 4HEPERFECTAPT ALLROOMSONONELEVEL 3EAPORT,IGHT FILLED "2WDIRECT"KLYN INTHEICONIC3AGE(OUSEBUILTIN "RIDGEVIEWS&EATURESHIGH ENDRENOV  FOOTCEILINGS HARDWOODFLOORS WALLOF ANDHISTORICDETAILSSUCHAS YEAROLD CLOSETS 37EXPOSURES&3PETANDSUBLET WDFLRS+MONTHLY7%" FRIENDLY#O OP+7%" )ESTYN,*ONES   2AJAN+HANNA   &ILIPACCHI&OUSSARD4EAM  

5HQWDOV

Andrew VanDusen

)L'L

*UDPHUF\&KHOVHD

Deborah Gimelson

Heather Cook

Jen Wening

Joan Goldberg

Kelsey Hall

Kristin Hurd

Lara Leonard

Liz Dworkin

Nic Bottero

All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker. Equal Housing Opportunity Broker.

June 2014 reduced