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EXPLORE MORE WINTER AND SPRING BUCKET LIST

GREEN BUILDING A BOULDER LIFESTYLE

UNLEASH YOUR CREATIVITY ARCHITECTS, ARTISTS & MAKERS

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FROM THE EDITOR

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Summer/Fall 2018

WINTER -SPRING 2020-21

Some of my most beautiful memories are set to this backdrop. Sometimes it’s simple: my bare toes deep in the cool grass of the Chautauqua lawn. Other times it’s adventurous: foraging through the forest, stopping along the way to marvel at the views. A few times, it’s been the screaming burn of my thighs as I ran up the steep Chautauqua trail. OK, those last memories are a little less than beautiful. (More like sweating and sobbing, “Why? Why?”) But each moment is special to me. Because each moment is a part of Boulder’s famous Welcome to the Winter-Spring 2020-21 issue of Travel Boulder magazine with Colorado Chautauqua. a focus on living in Boulder. Chautauqua is Boulder. And the Colorado Chautauqua is celebrating its big My wife, Jill, and I have lived in Boulder for more than 20 years and it is a place 1-2-0 this year.to call home. We moved here in 1998 with two young children and a third on we love Needless say, we it a good gift. the way.to Moving to wanted Boulder to wasgive a major lifestyle change for our family, coming from the East Coast. Looking back, it was one of the best decisions ever made. Enter: Travel Boulder’s premiere print magazine, TheweUltimate Guide During the months of isolation in these uncertain times, our homes have provided to Boulder. You can find these guides, written by locals so you can experience us like a haven of safety and stability. pandemic has created the perfect opportunity Boulder a local, published twice aThe year. for tackling home projects and updates. And what better way to kick off a new mag than with Boulder’s shining star? While staying close to home, enjoy our socially distanced bucket list of things to do An in-depth lookand at Chautauqua is our story inpopular this edition. In meals this package, this winter spring and order somelead of the most carryout at Boulder you’ll learn which cottage to stay at for the best views (or the most privacy); which(or County restaurants. Grab a winter-inspired cocktail at local bars and restaurants trails toorder hikethem withto-go yourand kids;sipsome coolest events for 2018; and themof at Chautauqua’s home!) or pick up a fresh, home-grown sandwich fromhistory Organic Sandwich also some that we bet Company. will surprise you. Learn Boulder architects and Whether youfrom don’tsome evenofknow whatCounty’s a “chautauqua” is (it’sgreen OK;builders, I didn’twhose for creative minds are shaping the future of home design and architecture in Boulder and about a decade) or you think you’ve explored every inch of these grounds, there’s the surrounding area. Draw inspiration from local woodworker artist Anne Shutan, something here to help enrich your next visit. who creates beautiful custom doors, sculptures and more, each one a true reflection Inofaddition, the Summer 2018 Ultimate Guide to Boulder includes the her creativity. Ultimate Guide to Boulder’s Neighborhoods (the likes whichand has learn neverhow beenthis Meet Nick and Helen Forster, the founders of ofeTown, officially reported on before), as well as guides to family fun and music in Boulder. innovative radio broadcast has become the center stage for music in Boulder while Asreaching a nativelisteners to thesearound parts,the I’veworld. always loved Boulder for its ability to surprise. If the pandemic has you itching to some try a crazy new hobby and spend time Just when you think you’ve tried it all, there’s new vegan stuffedmore gourd outdoors than ever before, read the history of Neptune Mountaineering, a worldwide surrounded by flaming hay (that’s at Emmerson), or a wall-dancing class (that’s at institution born in Boulder nearly 50 years ago. Get the scoop on what ski season will Iluminar Aerial), or some dude on the Pearl Street Mall playing the piano while look like this year, as well as some of the hottest new outdoor gear and equipment hanging by his at feet from a tree (um, yup). available local retailers. As John Brice, publisher co-founder of TravelBoulder.com, says, as I hope that the you stay healthyand safe and love this issue of Travel Boulder magazine “You would bewe amazed what isit.going on in Boulder you don’t know about. much as enjoyedatcreating For more Boulder areathat experiences, visit travelboulder. We found com.it was difficult to find out early enough what was happening in Boulder until after it happened. We were tired of missing out.” Well, you don’t have to miss out anymore. We got ya. Enjoy Publisher our first ofand many magazines; I hope to see it used and abused, crammed Co-Founder of Travel Boulder in your backpack and splattered with cold brew and craft beer and adventure, because that’s what’s Boulder’s made of. Get even more info online at TravelBoulder.com.

— John R. Brice

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Aimee Heckel Editor-in-chief WINTER-SPRING 2020-21

SUMMER/FALL 2018

PUBLISHER / CO-OWNER PUBLISHER JOHN R. JOHN R. BRICE BRICE CO-OWNER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER JILL NAGEL-BRICE JILL NAGEL-BRICE

EDITORIAL EDITOR-COPY MANAGER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / WRITER SARAH KUTA AIMEE HECKEL

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DESIGN DIRECTOR / MANAGING AIMEE HECKEL TYLER PERCY

EDITOR

SARAH KUTA EDITORIAL ASSISTANT CAMILLA MCLAUGHLIN KAITLYN PAYNE JEFF BLUMENFELD COPY BORTNICK EDITOR BARRY CLAY EVANS ALICIA M. COHN BRITTANY CREATIVE ANAS SERVICES / PRODUCTION

PRODUCTION MANAGER ART DIRECTOR/DESIGNER SARAH MILLER MONIKA EDGAR PUBLICATION DESIGNER

COVER PHOTO MONIKA EDGAR ANNE SHUTAN

ADVERTISING DESIGNER

ADVERTISING DAWN SHUCKSALES

JOHN R. BRICE TRAFFIC MANAGER JILL NAGEL-BRICE SARAH EATHERLY

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS ADVERTISING SALES

ANNE SHUTAN

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

RANDY GOLDNER DIGITAL DEVELOPER

DREW BARONEXECUTIVES ACCOUNT

MICHELLE ADAMS, RYAN GRAF DESIGNER GEOFF HERDEN, AARON LOVATO

TYLER PERCY

CONTRIBUTORS

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

COVER PHOTO ISABELLE NAGEL BRICE ANN DUNCAN

On the cover: PHOTOGRAPHERS

ANDREWS, JONATHAN AUERBACH, AZACH custom wood door made by Anne Shutan, EMILY CARL, STEPHEN COLLECTOR, aANN Boulder County PAULA artist and woodworker who DUNCAN, GILLEN, specializes in dramatic, BRIAN one-of-a-kind JACOB HELLECKSON, LOPEZ,carvings. JESSICA MORGAN, GRANT Photo courtesy of Anne ShutanNYQUIST, WERNER SLOCUM, EMILY TAYLOR, PRUNE VANDENOVER Copyright 2021 by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. WRITERS All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in BRITTANY JESSICA MORGAN, this magazine orANAS, Travel Boulder website is strictly proKAITLYN PAYNE, CALLIE PEDERSON hibited without publisher’s permission, including original editorial, graphics, design, photography, advertising and sponsored content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder Copyright 2018 by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. magazine are published by Go Visit Media Co., 2535 All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this Meadow Ave, Boulder CO 80304 | Phone: 720-708-6803 magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly prohibited without publisher’s permission, including original editorial, Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com graphics, design, photography, advertising and sponsored Sales: john@travelboulder.com, jill@travelboulder.com content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are published by Go Visit Media Co., 2465 Central Ave. Suite 203 Travelboulder.com Boulder, CO 80301 | Phone: 303-544-1198 | Fax: 303-449-6121 Facebook.com/travelboulder _boulder Advertising Sales 303-544-1198 Ext. 102 Instagram.com/travel Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com


951 PEARL ST BOULDER 303 . 543 . 9191 JALBRECHTDESIGNS.COM

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Contents

52 14 WINTER AND SPRING BUCKET LIST 18 MEET THE FOUNDERS OF ETOWN 23 NEPTUNE MOUNTAINEERING, A BOULDER INSTITUTION 30 WHAT SKI SEASON WILL LOOK LIKE 34 THE BEST GEAR FOR WINTER AND SPRING 38 GREEN BUILDING BOULDER

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48 MEET THE ARCHITECTS 52 ARTIST ANNE SHUTAN 58 THE POST BREWING CO. 64 ESSENTIAL TAKEOUT DISHES 68 ORGANIC SANDWICH COMPANY PROFILE 72 WINTER COCKTAILS 75 AD INDEX 76 EXPERIENCE BOULDER

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THINGS TO DO

THE WINTER & SPRING BUCKET LIST BY BA R RY B O RTNICK

THE DAYS ARE SHORTER AND THE TEMPERATURES ARE COLDER, BUT IT’S TIME TO ENJOY SOME WINTER AND SPRING FUN. NOW IS THE PERFECT TIME TO LEARN A NEW SKILL, LIKE HOW TO LAND THE PERFECT UPPERCUT, HOW TO PLAY FRISBEE GOLF OR HOW TO COOK DELIGHTFUL PERUVIAN DISHES AT HOME. OF COURSE, YOU’LL NEED TO FOLLOW ALL LOCAL HEALTH MANDATES AS THEY EVOLVE, SINCE THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC CONTINUES TO RAGE ON. TRUTH IS, COVID-19 OR NOT, BOULDER IS PACKED WITH WINTERTIME THRILLS. ALL IT TAKES IS A DESIRE TO GET OUT THERE AND DO IT. HOW MANY OF THESE WINTER AND SPRING BUCKET LIST ITEMS CAN YOU CHECK OFF YOUR LIST? (TOP LEFT AND TOP RIGHT) LEARN HOW TO SCUBA DIVE AT WEAVER’S DIVE & TRAVEL CENTER. PHOTOS COURTESY OF WEAVER’S DIVE & TRAVEL CENTER (BOTTOM RIGHT) WORK UP A SWEAT AT FRONT RANGE BOXING ACADEMY. PHOTO COURTESY OF FRONT RANGE BOXING ACADEMY

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1. Under The Sea Landlocked locals can discover life beneath the oceans with a scuba certification course from Weaver’s Dive & Travel Center, which is implementing COVID-19 safe practices. Most course material is taught online, and the hands-on practice with scuba gear takes place in local pools. Once certified, students can practice their skills during dive center trips to Belize, Honduras or Egypt (subject to COVID-19, of course). Until humans develop gills, being scuba certified is the only way to see a real-life Nemo. It’s easy to learn to float amid the coral, exotic fish and sea turtles and the occasional shark. Diving literally takes you to another world where you can experience weightlessness while swimming with manta rays. Three-quarters of the planet is covered with water. Why not experience it yourself? Visit their website at http://weaversdive.com or call 303499-8500 for more information.

2. Become The ‘Eye of the Tiger’ Ready to find your inner Rocky? Prepared to sweat like never before? Psyched to float like a butterfly and sting like a bee? The art of the jab is open for all at Front Range Boxing Academy. Housed inside a rusted and ancient Quonset hut off east Pearl Street, the facility follows all COVID-19 safety practices as students learn to land uppercuts, right crosses or body blows. The owner, Dave Gaudette — a former light heavyweight champ and practicing Buddhist — teaches the ways of the heavy bag, the speed bag and shadowboxing. The gym is right out of a 1950s boxing film and is open to men and women of all ages. The first class is free. Learn more online at https://frontrangeboxing.com or call 303-546-9747.


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THINGS TO DO

3. Cook and Learn South America has some of the best eats on the planet. Those in the know say Peruvians have the most sophisticated palates of all. Learn to make amazing South American, Italian and French dishes at home by attending a cooking class at Journey Culinary. Journey, which also offers language classes in Spanish, French and Italian, doubles the delight with monthly cooking classes at the school’s Longmont office. The classes give attendees more than basic cooking lessons. Each event includes a smattering of language lessons and cultural exposure. Journey Culinary specializes in the Mediterranean (Southern Spain & Italy), European (France & Portugal), Latin American (Perú) and vegetarian meals. The events are not just feasts, but salon-like cultural experiences that fill the belly, brain and spirit. Space is limited due to COVID-19 rules. All health protocols are followed. Learn more online at https:// www.journeyculinary.com or call 720-745-2290.

4. Time for Comfort Pho Few things are as wonderful as a steaming bowl of pho on a winter’s day. The noodle, meat and beef broth concoction is a staple offering across Vietnam. Today, the dish is found everywhere from college dorms to high-end restaurants. Pho delivers belly-warming joy no matter the weather. The sight and smell of Vietnamese goodness zaps the winter blues. Boulder is blessed with many pho options. Chez Thuy, a decades-old Boulder Vietnamese restaurant, offers some of the best in town, but it’s become a common offering at many other eateries such as Boulder Pho.

MURAL BY GARY HIRSCH. PHOTO BY FLICKR USER JC SHAMROCK

5. Zen Time

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It’s time for a mental reset. Decompress from the stress and worry of 2020 at the Eldorado Mountain Yoga Ashram, a blissful place that offers in-person and virtual meditation classes. Whether in person or on Zoom, the value of meditation is well established. It’s a simple and safe way to experience stillness and introspection. Winter is for inside activities, so why not take a trip inside your own mind? Meditation is an easy escape. It will give your monkey brain a much-needed time-out. Take a deep breath and enjoy. You can learn more online at https://www.eldoradoyoga.org or call 303-249-1671.

6. Tee ‘Em Up Golf is ideal on a cool summer’s day, but the game does not go dormant in winter. Local courses like Flatirons Golf Course, which started in 1938, are open year-round based on weather conditions. As Coloradoans know, winter can mean three feet of snow or a sunny day in the 50s. Real golfers fight through the cold and enjoy whacking drives like Bryson DeChambeau on the frozen tundra of winter. More info here: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/ flatirons-golf-course. Those who like warmer temps can maintain their form at Fairways at the Stable, an indoor facility in Superior. The center is open seven days a week and gives hackers and scratch golfers the option of playing a simulated game at


their indoor practice center. The simulators offer 30 different course layouts, plus the simulators are steps away from the center’s lounge and bar. No chills, no heavy clothing, no sweating. Just you, your pals, smashing balls into some of the best virtual courses in the world. Learn more online at https://www.golfatfairways.com or by calling 720-749-6445.

7. Golf Without Clubs Not everyone has the time or ability to learn the art of golf. Fortunately, there’s frisbee golf and plenty of options for lovers of the flying disc to test their ability across open parks and landscapes scattered around Boulder. Plus, it’s free. Lovers of “frolf” can challenge their abilities by tossing the disc into a small basket, which serves as the target and hole. You can really play in any weather, so long as you can see the basket in front of you. Valmont Park Disc Golf Course, at the intersection of Valmont and Airport Road, is a popular spot to get started. https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/ valmont-park-disc-golf-course

8. Learn to Fly What’s more bucket list-ish than learning to fly? Not much. And, luckily, there are several flight schools in Boulder that are happy to help you soar. Journeys Aviation is just one local flight school that provides full instruction at the Boulder Municipal Airport. Whether you want to buzz the Flatirons or check out the view of your neighborhood from a few thousand feet in the air, Journeys Aviation has it covered. Instructors follow all the COVID-19 safety protocols. Students can study in classrooms, flight simulators and in the air. The school is good to go as long as the runway is free of snow. Time to fly like an eagle. Get started at https://www. journeysaviation.com or by calling 303- 449-4210.

9. Relax and Unwind Time for some pure joy. You’ve made it through one of the worst years in recent memory. Be happy and treat yourself to some serious self-indulgence. Start with a top-shelf room at the St Julien Hotel & Spa. Get a top-floor suite with a view of the Flatirons, then hit the spa and go nuts. Facials, manipedis, CBD deep tissue work or whatever you need to end the tension of 2020. Enjoy a spot of tea, then stroll out the doors and do Pearl Street like an old-school tourist. Grab familystyle Italian food at Pasta Jay’s, feast on sushi at Japango or stroll the mall to shop and people watch. Enjoy some of the best steaks in town at The Boulder Cork, then retreat to your luxury suite for a nightcap, dessert and stargazing. Enjoy the moment. Dance in your bathrobe and be thankful for all the good that’s coming. Book online at https://stjulien.com/ or by phone 720-406-9696. (TOP LEFT AND BOTTOM LEFT) LEARN HOW TO COOK AT JOURNEY CULINARY. PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOURNEY CULINARY (TOP RIGHT) GRAB A BOWL OF DELICIOUS PHO FROM CHEZ THUY. PHOTO COURTESY OF PEXELS (MIDDLE RIGHT AND BOTTOM RIGHT) TREAT YOURSELF WITH A VISIT TO THE SPA AT ST JULIEN. PHOTOS COURTESY OF ST JULIEN HOTEL & SPA

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MAKERS SERIES

etown IMAGES COURTESY OF ETOWN

By Aimee Heckel

IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN BOULDER, THE FORMER CHURCH CONVERTED INTO A RADIO STATION SITS MOSTLY DARK, BUT IT IS NOT EMPTY. 18

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N

ick and Helen Forster toil away on computers, running Zoom calls with famous musicians. A small, dedicated group crafts the upcoming episodes of Boulder’s internationally syndicated radio show, eTown. These walls used to be bustling with a live audience, and those virtual chats with band members used to be in person. COVID-19 has forced a lot of change. But for eTown, the evolution has been in logistics. Not heart. The Forsters, the local husband-wife team that literally runs the show, are gearing up to celebrate eTown’s 30th birthday in 2021. “It’s always been about connecting our listeners to the higher ideals of making connections, having respect for other cultures and different points of view and the planet,” Nick Forster says. And music has always been a key component of that: harnessing the energy of live music to help inspire positive change. On radio. The idea was so unusual that it took a while to convince others. “The thing that aggravated radio stations and programmers when we first started was they couldn’t tell what we were. They encouraged me, ‘Will you just make up your mind? Are you a music show or a talk show?’” Nick Forster recalls. “We’re a combination. And not just a talk show. We’re a talk show based on our mission and values.” The end goal: The audience is entertained. They hear some great music. And they’re also inspired and educated. “Those are the things that make eTown different from any other radio program,” he says.

He began thinking about ways to use that power he’d witnessed on stage to raise awareness about environmental stewardship. On the flight back home, he wrote an outline for a radio show that was a blend of dialogue and live music. It would feature musicians, as well as policy-makers, scientists and other inspirational characters. It was like nothing else out there.

THE MISSING STEP

In the true spirit of eTown, the notable names stretched beyond music, too. Other interviewees featured on the show would include Jane Goodall, Al Gore, Jimmy Carter, Michael Moore, poet Allen Ginsberg and Dave Barry.

The vision came when Nick Forester, a musician touring the world with the bluegrass band Hot Rize, wondered if there was a way to harness the incredible connection between the musicians and the audience at a successful performance. That energy is palpable, he says. He recalls one show in Bulgaria: a huge crowd of a diverse audience, all united by the power of the universal language of music. “It struck me that there was a missing step: Wouldn’t it be cool if we could then take a step together toward affecting positive change,” he says. Even back in the ’90s, Nick Forster was an environmentalist concerned about climate change.

Just unique enough to catch the eye — and get the go — from NPR. In 1991, eTown launched on Earth Day. Less than a month later, Nick and Helen Forster got married. It was a true mom-and-pop operation. The couple themselves hung up posters, picked up artists at the airport, did the prep work for the show, the postproduction and the editing. Nick Forster redefined the role of radio host. In addition to interviews, he would pivot and pick up the guitar or mandolin to jam a bit with the musical guests. Then he’d bring it back to conversation. Helen Forster knew how to make eTown a successful radio show and musical experience. She had experience working on NPR’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” and she also had been the co-owner and co-producer of the internationally acclaimed Telluride Bluegrass Festival. They immediately began packing the show with their musical connections, from James Taylor to Lyle Lovett. Over the years, the list of eTown performers would grow to include Ray LaMontagne, David Gray, Michael Franti, the Barenaked Ladies, Sarah McLachlan, Los Lobos, Jack Johnson, Ani DiFranco and hundreds more.

A MANIFESTATION OF OUR VALUES The show didn’t have an easy path. In fact, at one point, it ran out of money and had to raise funds to get back on the air. It came back stronger than before, and in 2008, the Forsters opened eTown Hall in a former church building in downtown Boulder. They completely gutted the building and redesigned it to meet their needs and priorities.

“It was a manifestation of our values,” Nick Forster says. “It’s energy-efficient, solarpowered, state-of-the-art.” In fact, eTown Hall consumes no fossil fuels on site and makes enough power that it doesn’t even have a natural gas line. It used recycled and repurposed materials in the renovation. The 1,700-square-foot production facility includes a studio where musicians can record. For example, Elephant Revival and Big Head Todd and the Monsters have made records made here. The building is also a world-class music venue and was a gathering place for the community. Of course, that was before the pandemic emptied the seats and cleared the stage, for now.

A NEW ERA FOR ETOWN Today, more than 300 radio stations carry eTown. Over the years, it grew to include more staff, and most recently it welcomed a few additional producers to help with the new demands.

“We’re making it up as we go. We’re improvising,” – Nick Forster. The show still includes music performances, as well as interviews with musicians and other inspirational people, but now, it has to be more curated and designed in-studio; the live shows are currently on pause. Some artists, such as Nathaniel Rateliff earlier this fall, have begun returning to the studio to record. But for those who can’t, there are Zoom calls, separate recordings of performances in the artists’ homes and sometimes sharing music that was previously recorded. “We’re making it up as we go. We’re improvising,” Nick Forster says. “That’s what musicians are good at: improvising.” There are some unexpected blessings with the forced change, too, he says. No longer does eTown have to work around such difficult tour schedules, and without requiring artists to make it to the Boulder studio in person, it opens up the potential to connect with people who might not have otherwise been options.

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MAKERS SERIES

HELPING THE HEALING The pandemic has devastated the music industry, Nick Foster says. But he hopes eTown can play a role in helping the healing. In a world with easy music streaming where people don’t pay for music anymore, the main form of revenue left for musicians was touring. Then COVID-19 hit. That income stream was largely wiped out. “We’re able to provide an outlet for artists to raise awareness for their art; artists will still make art, and songwriters will still make songs,” Nick Forster says. “We help get the word out, so they feel like they’re still connected to an industry that’s been paralyzed.” Even if eTown has to do it in a remote way, it can still make a positive impact, he says. In that, and amid today’s growing social, political, economic and environmental turmoil, eTown is more important now than ever — to shine a spotlight on our common humanity.

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eTown has always done that, Nick Forster says. Over the years, eTown has presented black musicians singing with white; musicians singing in Spanish, Cuban, Hawaiian, Celtic and African; and unlikely artists singing together, people who never would have paired up otherwise, like Willie Nelson and African pop singer Angélique Kidjo, who joined together on a reggae song. “The goal has always been to combine these things to show that we are part of a global community, and we can learn from each other,” Nick Forster says. “It’s a fundamental part of what eTown has been about since we started.” The nation is “unbelievably divisive” right now, he says. He says he hopes the show can not only model unity around music, but also inspire fundamental values like kindness, respect and sustainability. Nick Forster does believe a radio show can make a difference, and he has received a ton of mail from listeners around the world

backing that up. Things like: “Over the years, I’ve changed the way I think about transportation and the food I eat.” “The show provides a positive view of the U.S. that I might not have gotten otherwise.” “It helped me discover so many artists who are now among my favorites.” Nick Forster says he’s proud that eTown has survived three decades. To create something out of thin air and watch it grow and withstand the test of time is satisfying, he says. But above all, he says, “I’m proud of the fact that we’ve stayed true to our values. We haven’t compromised them, and in some ways, that’s made our path harder. We haven’t pandered to the marketplace or fads or trends.” eTown’s mission was true 30 years ago and it’s true today, even amid great change and chaos. In Nick Forster’s words, “We are a home for great music and good ideas.”


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Posters

Record Albums

Stickers

Photography

Apparel

PosterScene 1505 Pearl St #101 Boulder 303-443-3102

PosterScene.com

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Neptune Mountaineering

This

Outdoor Shop Was By Aimee Heckel PHOTOS COURTESY OF NEPTUNE MOUNTAINEERING

Built by a Boulder Legend and Became a Legend of Its Own

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LOREM PISUM

IT STARTED OUT AS A SMALL HANGOUT

for people who like to explore the outdoors. Nearly 50 years later, it has grown into a Boulder institution — an outdoor adventure mecca that’s known around the globe, complete with an on-site history museum, a cafe and bar and special events and clinics featuring world-renowned experts in the field. Neptune Mountaineering is so much more than an outdoor equipment shop. Of course, that’s what draws many people into the doors to begin with. Neptune, at 633 S. Broadway in Boulder, is known for carrying all the climbing, skiing, camping and hiking gear you could possibly want (as well as things you never knew you wanted but now that you know they exist, you must have them). Find books, maps, shoes, clothes and everything from crampons to climbing packs to crash pads. Rent rock climbing gear, get your boots fit and tune your skis. Neptune Mountaineering claims it has one of the largest (if not the largest) selections of climbing gear in the country. Plus, the shop is located directly off the trailhead in front of the Flatirons. After shopping, stay and play. Get recommendations on where to go and what to do to prepare from the highly knowledgeable staff, all avid skiers, climbers and mountaineers themselves. For example, one Google review of the shop in September came from a climber who got stuck on Longs Peak and was unsure where to go. When his phone caught cell service, he called Neptune Mountaineering for advice. The staff knew the mountain so well, they were able to help him find the way back down.

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Reviewer Alex Mandrila wrote: “Thanks to Jon Klothe whose beta got me down to Mills in one piece, and though I didn’t need to call back was willing to follow up until I found everything. This is just one reason I’ll always be a customer here, because experiences like this one show Neptune staff cares.” Yeah. This place is the real deal. After befriending the staff here, shoppers can also meet other like-minded people over a cup of locally roasted coffee or a locally brewed beer. (During social distancing times, the outdoor cafe remains open.) Neptune not only encourages its shoppers to stay awhile, but that’s the foundation the entire business was built upon, says Neptune spokeswoman Amy Wansing.

‘Where Anyone in the Outdoors Wants to Be’

In 1973, Gary Neptune, an avid skier and climber who went on expeditions all over the world, founded Neptune Mountaineering to connect with other adventurers in the area. Back then, it was more of a specialty store that emphasized equipment for serious athletes. The store grew over the decades to widen its selection for all experience levels, even visitors and newbies. “This year especially, we have noticed more people wanting to get outside,” Wansing says. “We’re seeing a lot of new faces in the store looking for advice on how to camp with their family and getting started in new hobbies and activities.”


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SHOPPING

Whereas Neptune Mountaineering may have felt a little intimidating to the regular camper in the past, that has changed, she says. “In the past, it was for serious gear junkies, but it has evolved to definitely be a place where anyone of all levels in the outdoors wants to be,” Wansing says. In 2013, Gary Neptune retired. The store was run by another retailer for a few years, before it was bought by local climbers Shelley and Andrew Dunbar in 201.7 They did a mega remodel, added a cafe and turned the artifacts that Gary Neptune had collected over the years into a curated museum. It’s now one of the largest collections of mountaineering artifacts in the world. Wansing says it’s on a global list alongside museums in Italy and France with relics of early climbing and skiing gear. In Neptune’s collection, you can see expedition suits from early trips up Mount Eiger and Mount Everest. Look at some of the first ski boots ever made, dating back to the early 1900s. Appreciate the science of modern skis next to antique skis (which were really just basic wooden planks). And imagine using the simple climbing hardware mountaineers used to use, back when they ascended the rock without pulling on anything except the natural features, Wansing says. “Things are so incredibly safe now in comparison,” she says. “To see the evolution of what was used as a rappel device or belay device — it really has come a long way. You get a lot of appreciation for the people who did the early climbs with not much more than courage.” Many of the artifacts came from Gary Neptune’s personal collection.

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He was fascinated by the history and wanted to understand how early mountaineers made their expeditions, Wansing says. “Sometimes, he liked to use it himself or use replicas to get a true understanding of that experience from their perspective,” she says. He began bringing the artifacts from his home into the shop and, over time, people began sending him more gear from all over the world. Today, the artifacts are in beautiful display cases throughout the store, organized by theme. Staff is currently working on creating a self-guided tour (perhaps with a smartphone feature) where visitors can listen to Gary Neptune explain the history of the various displays. “We want to preserve this tradition of Boulder being at the center of climbing and mountaineering,” Wansing says.

A Place Where You Can Learn

Another way the store solidifies its reputation is through its special events. In fact, in pre-coronavirus times, that’s what Neptune Mountaineering was best known for. This fall, events have slowly begun picking back up, part in-person and part virtual. The store has hosted avalanche awareness clinics, backcountry meet-ups, happy hours and presenters sharing stories about recent trips or about specific topics (such as climbing volcanoes). Some of the most popular events in the past featured Conrad Anker, a renowned American rock climber, mountaineer and author, and Lynn Hill, the first person to free climb The Nose on El Capitan in Yosemite Valley.


THREE LEAF CONCEPTS

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LOREM IPSUM

Neptune has also highlighted local skiers and guides offering tips and inspiration about their conquests. All of this cred, and Neptune Mountaineering remains a locally owned, small business. This matters to Boulder, Wansing says. She says she hopes people who visit Neptune Mountaineering leave inspired. “Neptune plays a mentorship role for many people,” she says. “It’s one thing to have the gear, but it’s another to have the people who can tell you how to get into a sport and how to advance in your sport — not just a place to gather, but a place where you can actually really learn, as well.”

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The Neptune Café and Bar One of the most unique features of Neptune Mountaineering is its on-site cafe and bar. With social distancing requirements, some of the offerings are limited, but during normal business, you can gather inside on the long, community table or outside on the patio. The cafe serves burritos, paninis, soup, waffles, salads, sandwiches, cupcakes, bread and baked goods from local businesses Spruce Confections and Kim & Jake’s Cakes. In the morning, you can sip locally roasted Ampersand Coffee and various teas, and as the day goes on, switch to sipping local beer and kombucha from four rotating taps. You can also find wine, cider and other non-alcoholic beverages.


SEASONAL AMERICAN CUISINE AWARD-WINNING WINE CELLAR ON-SITE HERB & PRODUCE GARDEN WEDDINGS & EVENTS |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||

Dinner WED-SUN 5pm-9pm Offering our Bistro and Classic Dinner Menus Happy Hour WED-SUN 5pm-6pm Brunch SUN 10am-1pm To-Go Orders Available

ENJOY AN UNFORGETTABLE MEAL IN OUR ELEGANT DINING ROOMS, COZY BAR OR BEAUTIFUL PATIOS

8735 North Foothills Highway, Boulder

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L I L LA P

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1122 Pearl Street | Boulder, CO 80302 303-444-0282 | www.islandfarm.com

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THINGS TO DO

CURB

By Jeff Blumenfeld

YOUR EXPECTATIONS Skiing will look different this season... here’s what to expect. There will be a 2020-21 ski season. Temperatures will drop. Snow will fall and enthusiasts will return to the slopes. Of that you can be sure. But will skiing and riding at a Colorado ski resort feel the same this year? Don’t count on it. Advance reservation requirements, limited seating in base lodges, reduced lift capacity and masks have created a mountain of pre-season anxiety. Patricia Campbell, president of Vail Resorts Mountain Division, told snowsports industry leaders last spring, “We want people to get out and do what they love, but people need to be flexible as the situation will be constantly changing.” Rick Kahl, editor of the trade publication “Ski Area Management,” added that before

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heading out, “It’s important to know what the preconditions are such as the need for parking reservations and temperature checks once you arrive.” The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment will require nowcommon safety measures for skiers and riders to follow, including physical distancing, wearing masks except when actually skiing or snowboarding, and gathering in small groups. Avoid places where people congregate, such as lift lines, lodges, restaurants, and restrooms and you’ll mitigate risk substantially. Welcome to the new normal.

What’s Different This Season? Pretty much everything. The stay-at-home orders created a huge pent-up demand for outdoor recreation this past summer for golf, cycling, camping and hiking. Now it’s skiing’s turn.

Don’t plan to just roll up and buy day-of lift tickets to ski or ride anytime you want, especially on weekends and holidays. While the pandemic will reduce the number of international visitors and corporate meetings, visitors to Colorado will still be competing against Front Range skiers on Saturday and Sunday. On holidays, resorts will likely be maxed out. Regardless of the day of the week, most resorts will require advance reservations online, giving priority to season pass holders. No pass? You’ll be able to purchase tickets online but only if the resort isn’t sold out for the day. “For the vast majority of days  during the season, we believe everyone who wants to get on our mountains will be able to,” said Vail Resorts CEO Rob Katz in a letter to guests. “However, we are not planning for the majority of days, we are planning for every day of the season.” (TOP LEFT) A FRESH POWDER DAY AT COPPER MOUNTAIN. COURTESY PHOTO BY CURTIS DEVORE (RIGHT) DROPPING INTO COPPER BOWL. COURTESY PHOTO BY CURTIS DEVORE


YOUR COV I D- 19 GUI DE TO COLORADO SKIING

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CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING AT ELDORA. PHOTO COURTESY OF ELDORA

Some resorts, such as Eldora and Copper Mountain, will require online parking reservations to reduce capacity, although if you ride public transportation or get dropped off, you won’t need to make a reservation. Be prepared to boot up in your car as base lodge entry will be limited. There will be longer waits for parking lot shuttle buses as capacity is limited, you’ll be asked whether you’re experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms, and dine-in service will be drastically cut in favor of grab-and-go box lunches. Say goodbye to salad bars and buffets. How this affects lift lines remains to be seen. Skiers will not be required to ride a lift with people outside of their own party. Single skiers may have to wait longer than usual for a nearly-empty uphill ride, whether on a chairlift or gondola whose windows will be kept open regardless of the weather. When loading lifts, skiers already line up six feet apart — about the length of a ski — but be prepared to slide along larger, reconfigured lift mazes with ghost lanes in between to encourage distancing in all directions — front, back and side-to-side. Not a fan of lift lines? Consider skiing

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Bluebird Backcountry, a new backcountryonly ski area without lifts located on the Continental Divide about 30 minutes from Steamboat Springs. The ski area will welcome a maximum of 200 guests a day on the mountain, spread across 1,200 acres of in-bounds terrain, which is nearly the acreage of Arapahoe Basin. Ski school lessons will be limited to a maximum of 10 students, and some areas will offer terrain based learning using instruction “stations” on the hill, again to enhance social distancing. Rental services will require advance reservations and likely move outdoors, including boot fitting so curb your expectations about that experience. Bindings will be pre-set to smooth the process and avoid bottlenecks; you may be assigned a specific pick-up time. To avoid rental lines entirely, consider rental delivery service Ski Butlers which will deliver to your room and can go touchless guiding you through the fitting process. Apres ski and tightly-packed nightlife? Don’t plan on it. “That’s not what skiing looks like in a pandemic,” Colorado Gov. Jared Polis said at an October 20 press briefing.

You’ll See More of These Expect to see more outdoor portable toilets to reduce crowding in base lodge restrooms. Some indoor stalls and urinals will be blocked off to limit capacity. Look for lots of sanitation stations and touch-free faucets, paper towel dispensers and doors. Resorts are investing in outside propane heaters to increase socially distant dining. They’re so popular during the COVID-19 era that a national shortage exists. Here’s a clever work-around: Telluride is gaining praise for its plan to recondition old gondolas and turn them into heated dining cabins outside restaurants. You’ll also see more ATM-style kiosks to pick-up tickets purchased in advance, and those big white instant structures — essentially wedding-style heated tents on steroids — to increase social distancing in base areas. Signs, signs and more signs. There will be signs reminding you to stand apart, wear masks, stop skiing if feverish and wash your hands. Get used to it.


Bring It On This isn’t the first-time skiers have faced a winter crisis. Skiers figured out a way to pursue their runs during the 1973 gas crisis when rationing caused long lines at the pump. Let’s not forget those historically low snow years, for example, 1980-81 and 2017-18 in the West, and 2015-16 in the East, not to mention the disastrous 197677 season when snowmaking wasn’t as advanced as it is today. The good news now, versus midMarch when skiing switched off like a light, is the knowledge that comes with several months of life during a pandemic. What’s more, skiing and riding, enjoyed in hundreds of acres of fresh air and natural environment, is a sport made for a pandemic. For one thing, skiers have been wearing head, face and eye coverings for a century. “The fact that we ski outside in ultraviolet sun and in the wind, it’s common for us to wear goggles, gloves and face coverings. All of those things bode very well for us as a sport,” says Dave Byrd, director of risk and regulatory affairs at the Colorado-based National Ski Areas Association (NSAA).

Is Your Ski Day COVID-19 Ready?

More good news: The NSAA recently launched its SkiWell BeWell guidelines, emphasizing that wintersports promote health and well-being, which can reduce the risk of infection. So there’s that. Aspen Snowmass CEO Mike Kaplan says, “No doubt, next ski season will be more of an old school experience, but that could also translate to less noise, fewer distractions and, hopefully, more meaning.” Snowsports enthusiasts will demonstrate great resourcefulness and resilience again this coming winter. Whether sliding on snow one day or 20, we’ll all be happy to get back out again. As the debate over masks and lockdowns continue in some quarters, you want to talk freedom? Go skiing or riding. For specifics on COVID-19 protocols at your favorite Colorado ski resort, be sure to check their website prior to departure. See the State of Colorado’s ski resort-specific COVID-19-19 guidelines here: https://covid19.colorado.gov/ ski-areas-and-resorts

Before you head to the slopes this winter, here are some handy items to bring along to make COVID-19 regulations a bit more palatable.

Collapsible Water Bottle — Stay

hydrated with your own water. The more you drink, the smaller it gets. Besides, it eliminates the need for cups and extra trips indoors.

Extra Face Masks — Pack several face

masks because you’re going to need them everywhere. Sorry, but Buffs or fleece mufflers aren’t considered COVID-19 resistant masks. When you mask up, your runny nose and eyes will make your mask wet and uncomfortable. Bring some fresh ones. (No one said this was going to be easy.)

Heat Packs — These convenient flameless

hand warmers are great any time of the year. They easily fit inside mittens and thinner toe warmers can go into your boots. Buy them at a big box store to save money.

Food — Purchase a sandwich at a supermarket or prepare one in your condo. Small plastic storage containers are perfect for keeping your PB&J from squashing. Bring instant oatmeal for a hearty instant breakfast or lunch. Even if the resort charges you 50 cents for a cup of hot water, you’re still ahead of the game. Also carry plenty of snacks for quick nourishment while on the lift.

Backpack

— Rather than stuff your pockets, consider a backpack to carry your gear. Some resorts will require you to take off the pack before lift loading, but that’s a minor inconvenience. Include a small first aid kit and a whistle for safety’s sake.

Portable Car Mat — You’re going to

be asked to boot up in your car since base lodge capacity will be tightly controlled. Put a portable mat down to protect your socks from parking lot mud and grit.

Hand Sanitizer — No surprise here. Look

for 2 oz. travel-size bottles of Purell or Germ-X which, thankfully, is now easier to find than at the start of the pandemic. So are antiseptic wipes to use if you do manage to score a table to sit down. As the Scouts say, “Be prepared.” SKIER IN KEYSTONE. PHOTO BY REID NEUREITER, FLICKRUSER

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Gear Guide: Top Picks for Outdoor Adventures

This winter

By Alicia Cohn

Boulder gear stores are country skiing, but also hiking, snowshoeing, running, camping and predicting that even the most outdoorsy among us will be getting ice climbing. outdoors more. Staff at stores like Boulder’s Sea to Summit recommend crossfunctional gear and gifts that can encourage trying new hobbies, “Especially with the pandemic that we’re living in, now more than because we’re all likely to be looking for multiple ways to stay outside. ever, getting outside is taking a whole new spin, and especially for Boulderites who have always been active outside, as we’re getting “The pandemic has encouraged people to pick up new outdoor into fall and winter, it’s going to be on a whole other level,” said sports and hobbies, as spending time together outdoors is one of the Kate King, manager of Boulder’s Go Far shop. “Everything’s going to best ways to gather responsibly with friends,” said Josh Simpson, the be centered on getting outside and doing things of that nature. [It’ll] general manager of Sea to Summit North America. “When investing probably be more important to our sanity than ever.” in new gear, it’s important for it to be versatile: to be able to use the So when it comes to giving gifts to your favorite gearhead, same equipment from season to season and across sport categories.” think outdoor activities — not just skiing, snowboarding and crossHere are some recommendations from Boulder gear stores to help you pick the best gifts this season.

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1

3 2 4 5

6

Skiing, snowboarding, cross-country skiing 1 From Boulder’s Go Far Shop, pick up the top-rated Smartwool Merino 250 Base Layer 1/4 zip top ($115). “They’re 100 percent wool and they’re great for any cold-weather activity,” said King, who also pointed out that Smartwool is a Colorado company. 2 From REI, check out the Co-op Powderbound Jackets and Pants collection, which includes insulated jackets and snow pants for men and women under the $200 range. This gear includes pit zips—a must—and extended-sizing options for maximum comfort when playing in the snow. 3 The team at Neptune Mountaineering recommends the Outdoor Research Trailbreaker Pant, a breathable, stretch-woven softshell with waterproof lower legs to help you stay dry. No Colorado skier likes a soggy ankle, after all. Hiking/snowshoeing 4 The team at Neptune Mountaineering recommends the Oboz Sapphire 8” Insulated Boot ($175) for its long-lasting leather, waterproof insulation and good traction —exactly what’s needed for these winter activities. 5 Go Far recommends the Hoka Kaha Hiking Shoe ($220). There are three shoes in the series, but King recommends this one because it’s ultralight and waterproof for winter activities. “I call it the moon shoe … it definitely feels like you’re walking on clouds,” she said. Running 6 Go Far recommends the On Cloudventure Trail Shoe ($150) for winter trail running. “It’s unique in the fact that it has this kind of cool pod system on the bottom of the shoes [for] shock absorption and great grip on rocky terrains,” according to King. “They are pods that basically compress when you’re running really hard.”

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SHOPPING

9 8

7

12 10

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7 Neptune Mountaineering recommends the Vuori Women’s Daydream Crew ($58) or Vuori Men’s Long Sleeve Tradewind Performance Crew ($58). These are made with recycled materials with built-in sun protection and quick-drying fabric. Layers that will wick sweat away while keeping you warm are key for winter workouts. Camping 8 For winter camping adventures, Neptune recommends the Primus Firestick ($89.95), a sweet little lightweight and packable stove with a built-in lighter and potholder. Gear experts say it can boil a liter of water in four and a half minutes, or can be lowered to simmer a delicate (or hearty—whatever you’re feeling) sauce. Climbing 9 Neptune Mountaineering says the Patagonia R1 Techface Hoody ($179) is a staff favorite as the ultimate layering piece. It has a helmet-compatible hood, which is basically non-negotiable during the winter. 10 And for the ice climber in your life, check out the Blue Ice Choucas Pro Harness ($99.95) at Neptune Mountaineering. This is an ultralight, three-buckle climbing harness “for alpine-style missions into high mountains or multi-pitch alpine climbs.” The experts at Neptune also noted the leg loops are open so you don’t have to take off your crampons to put on the harness. Staying cozy 11 Being outside shouldn’t mean cold toes, right? Right. Pay a visit to Neptune Mountaineering to check out the Western Mountaineering Standard Down Booties ($100) for those winter days when you’re hanging out under a patio heater or around a backyard fire. 12 For your upper body, check out this cute Moore Collection sweatshirt ($48) from Go Far. This fleece-lined sweatshirt from a local Denver company is screen-printed with “take me to the trees.” This is the kind of motto most Boulderites can get behind.

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13

13 Sea to Summit recommends this year’s ultimate accessory, their Barrier Face Mask ($9.95). It has three layers of fabric and it’s comfortably seamless and machine washable. It comes in a variety of sizes—so long as you get the right size it will definitely stay on your nose—and looks pretty hardcore when wearing.

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GREENER

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building

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LIVING

GREEN Home

BY CAMILLA MCLAUGHLIN PHOTOS COURTESY OF RODWIN ARCHITECTURE AND SKYCASTLE CONSTRUCTION

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G

reen was a lifestyle here in Boulder County, long before it was trendy and valued everywhere else. Nate Kipnis came to Boulder to attend the University of Colorado, but he learned almost as much about sustainability from living in Boulder as he did in school. His firm, Kipnis Architecture + Planning, has locations in Evanston, Illinois, and Boulder. He is considered to be at the forefront of sustainable residential design and architecture. “It was just wild to see a city that had solar panels in 1982, and that people had all these passive home designs. It was mind-boggling,” said Kipnis, who designed his first solar home in Boulder when he was 22 years old. Other Boulder County architects share that sentiment. “We’re in the NFL here,” said David Sloan, citing the high level of knowledge of green design and sustainable practices. “We are surrounded by abundance, and the expectations and talent are high.”

Sloan, who owns Sloan Construction, is also president of the Colorado Green Building Guild (CGBG). Founded in 2004, the guild’s mission is to connect and educate industry professionals and to “ensure the widespread adoption of sustainable practices to increase the efficient use of resources, create healthier buildings and support vibrant, sustainable communities.” Along with a series of educational events, the guild also sponsors an annual Green Homes Tour, which showcases a range of examples including modern and traditional custom homes, remodels and multifamily projects. (This year’s Boulder Green Homes Tour is a virtual event due to COVID-19.) Architects here are focused on energy efficiency and sustainable practices, with some such as Bryan Bowen, founder of the firm Caddis, pushing the applications in the community overall. Bowen won the Colorado Green Building Guild’s leadership award in 2019 for the award-winning Project Renovate, which involved energy, aesthetic and functional upgrades to 300 affordable housing units for families and seniors. Unlike many other regions, builders and contractors in Boulder and surrounding towns are equally dedicated to green building. There is also a long track record of Boulder homes earning regional and national green recognition.

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cott Rodwin, president of Skycastle Construction and principal of Rodwin Architecture, has been on the leading edge of innovation for the last 25 years. His designs have achieved the highest level third-party certifications including EnergyStar and LEED Platinum. More than architectural vision and building science contribute to Boulder’s status as a national leader in energy efficiency and sustainability. Local government and the community are equally dedicated. “The green building movement has been very strong in Boulder for at least 20 years, and green building requirements have been among the strictest in the nation,” said Rodwin. Newcomers often remark about the composting and recycling bins throughout the city, just one indication of how much stewardship of the land and environment is valued. It’s a commitment that also appeals to many who opt to relocate here. “For the most part, the people who are moving to Boulder move here with a pretty

WINTER-SPRING 2020-21

strong environmental ethos and a high level of knowledge,” Rodwin said. Similar to the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED program are Boulder’s Greenpoints program and the county’s Greensmart programs, which date to 2007 and 2008. In 2016, Boulder adopted a climate change commitment to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent (below 2005 levels) by 2050 and achieving 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030. In 2017, Green Points was replaced with a comprehensive energy code; those requirements were further strengthened in January 2020. New 3,000-square-foot and larger residences are required to be netzero. Remodels, if the constructed value exceeds 50 percent of the home’s former value, must meet new home construction standards. Additionally, 75 percent of the waste from remodels must be recycled or repurposed instead of sent to a landfill. New homes are required to be solar-ready, and also must include dedicated circuits for electric vehicle recharging. Rodwin uses a car analogy to illustrate this transition. “We used to be a Subaru town,” he says. “Then it went from Subaru to a Prius. In the last few years, it’s gone from a Prius to a Tesla. At this point, the city of Boulder requires that you essentially design and build at the very least a Prius, and because of land prices, for most people that ends up becoming a Tesla.”


LOOKING BEYOND NET-ZERO In most of the country, net-zero remains an elusive goal; in Boulder, it is on the way to being the norm. Still getting to net-zero or even close requires a combination of strategies including passive solar elements such as a super-insulated building envelope, airtight construction, high-performance windows and overhangs to temper overheating from direct sun later in the day on Western exposures. Active solar heating is also almost a given to reach net-zero status. “Solar panels are so cheap now that it’s insane not to include,” said Kipnis, noting that on a high-end house, a solar system would be in the $20,000 range. For net-zero, battery storage for times when the sun doesn’t shine for a couple of days in the winter is part of the strategy. Protocols and best practices for batteries are still being sorted out. Prices are down but not where they will be someday, Kipnis said, “Batteries are on a little different trajectory than solar,” he said. “We encourage people to pre-wire for that if they have the money, but absolutely, make a really big mechanical room and get it set up for batteries. And then obviously, put electric charging in the garage.” Boulder’s long-term goal is to move away from reliance on fossil fuels and natural gas. Increasingly stringent energy and sustainability requirements for buildings are part of the process moving toward a greater reliance on electrical power and alternative fuel sources. As a founding member of AIA’s 2030 Commitment, whose goal is to design full net-zero buildings by 2030, Kipnis is a leader in the move away from fossil fuels. Not to be confused with current electric heat and powered appliances, this new vision uses solar energy as well as geothermal and other sources. A heating system, for example, would typically employ an air source heat pump or geothermal. Both heat pump dryers and heat pump water heaters would replace current electric or gas models, and, according to Kipnis, they are “wildly more efficient.”

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LIVING

WHAT’S NEXT? EMBODIED CARBON The new lesson for green? “Everything old is new,” said architect and sustainable design specialist Lauren Folkerts with HMH Architecture + Interiors. Some passive strategies rely on time-tested methods such as deep overhangs. Looking ahead, Folkerts said she expects to see “more use of straw bale construction and American clay plaster because of the growing emphasis on embodied carbon.” Net-zero is a good metric for energy efficiency, and it’s easy to track. But it’s much more complicated to measure the carbon usage of products and materials that go into buildings. Regulations that apply to energy expended in a structure don’t necessarily calculate embodied energy. Now, Folkerts said, we are starting to get a deep enough understanding of carbon use to look at the lifestyle of products.

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Noting we have approximately 20 to 30 years left of carbon resources, she said having insulation that uses 30 years’ worth of carbon is something we can’t afford to do. Traditional insulators such as cellulose and wool are generating interest, as are new products such as hempcrete and rigid insulation boards made out of renewables. Folkerts said she expects to see more of these products coming to market. “Embodied energy is going to be a huge shift in the way people see buildings,” she said More shifts ahead? Wellness, particularly indoor air quality, which has been in the background, is fast becoming a focus for consumers. Also on the horizon are regenerative buildings that create more energy than they use. But most say we’re not quite there yet.


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M E E T T HE ARCHITECTS D R I V I N G B O U L D E R’ S LTHE O MEN O K AND A RWOMEN OUND YO U.

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

TAKE NOTE OF THE HOMES, BUILDINGS AND PROPERTIES THAT DOT THE STREETS OF BOULDER. ONE THING THEY ALL HAVE IN COMMON? STUNNING ARCHITECTURE.

Jennifer Lombard bldg.collective 2872 Bluff St., Boulder Why did you pursue a career in architecture and interior design? I’ve always loved design and creating spaces — I actually went into interior design first, thinking I didn’t have the math chops to be an architect. In the course of working as an interior designer for an architecture firm, I realized that a) there wasn’t that much complex math involved and b) I wanted to do both design and architecture, so I went back to school and got a master’s of architecture. How do you describe your style and vibe? Contemporary yet timeless — pretty, comfortable and warm. I love to mix different time periods and styles so that the result feels curated and collected, rather than like it was all purchased at once. Nothing too fussy or precious — spaces are meant to be used! What architectural/interior design trends are you seeing a lot of right now? On the architectural side, we’re seeing a lot of people asking for more dedicated home office spaces or more separation in their living spaces — with everyone at home all the time this year, there’s a definite push for more discrete spaces rather than full open concept plans. On the interiors front, richer colors and jewel tones are one trend I’m loving — we’re also using a lot of handmade materials right now. Things with a tactile quality and variation to the finish, that feel more warm and crafted and less machine-precise. What do you wish more people knew or understood about your industry? That designers do way more than pick pillows and paint colors! Joking aside, the value in hiring an architect or designer. It’s an investment, but having an expert to guide the process will almost always save you so much time and money. We help manage the thousands of decisions that come with a project, and can look holistically at the choices being made so that you end up with a gorgeous and functional final product.

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BY SARAH KUTA

Scott Rodwin Rodwin Architecture 1245 Pearl St. Suite 202., Boulder Why did you pursue a career in architecture? I always loved art and physics. Architecture is the intersection of those two. How do you describe your architectural style and vibe? We are known for a warm Colorado modern style, but we work in every style. The style of each project primarily expresses the clients’ personality and taste, rather than ours. Our firm’s focus is on providing extraordinary customer service, cutting-edge sustainable design and an integrated design/build delivery model. What architectural trends are you seeing a lot of right now? Boulder’s architecture is becoming more luxurious, modern and sophisticated. And we are constantly pushing the boundaries of sustainability (including net-zero energy and LEED platinum certification). What inspires your work? One of our clients summed it up best yesterday when he said to me, “I am so grateful to be living in this house during COVID.” We aspire to create homes that enhance the quality of life of our clients. Our designs are informed by the pragmatic (budget, energy-efficiency, function and flow) and the sublime (how it relates to the site, the views, the light and the social patterns of how our clients inhabit the home) and we seek the optimal balance of those two influences. What do you wish more people knew or understood about your industry? Like medicine, creating a custom home is an organic exploration. No two are ever the same and no outcome is guaranteed. This is art, not manufacturing. What are the benefits/powers of architecture? As Winston Churchill famously said, “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.” Most people contort their lives around the home that they have. But it is possible to craft a home that supports and enhances the life you aspire to live. That’s what we strive to create for each of our clients every day.


BOULDER IS ON THE CUTTING-EDGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO SUSTAINABLE, ECO-FRIENDLY PRACTICES. WE SAT DOWN WITH A FEW OF BOULDER COUNTY’S TOP ARCHITECTS TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS IMPORTANT PROFESSION AND WHAT INSPIRES THEIR WORK EACH AND EVERY DAY.

Elizabeth Smith Fänas Architecture 2930 Broadway, Suite 106, Boulder

Dale Smith Fänas Architecture 2930 Broadway, Suite 106, Boulder

Why did you pursue a career in architecture? Simply put, I just couldn’t stay away. My roommate in college was in the design school and I found myself doing her homework every night because it was such fun! How do you describe your architectural style and vibe? My architectural style and vibe is a direct reflection of each individual client. I don’t strive to design my dream house for anyone. The goal is to design the perfect home for each client and I thoroughly enjoy all styles: contemporary, Tuscan, mountain modern, traditional, craftsman, mid-century modern What architectural trends are you seeing a lot of right now? There is still a steady stream of clients looking for a contemporary home, but we are also seeing a small shift towards craftsman as well. What inspires your work? Seeing amazing design materials used in unexpected ways, innovative spaces and the potential for truly transforming a building into a place people are drawn to. Also, it goes without saying, the clients I work with. What do you wish more people knew or understood about your industry? Design is the driving force behind every project, but there is so much more that goes into every project. Working with local jurisdictions, consultants, contractors and vendors, managing expectations related to schedule and helping clients stay focused on design decisions are just a few. What are the benefits/powers of architecture? Architecture creates and defines environments. The opportunities are endless and the potential to influence so many people is undeniable.

Why did you pursue a career in architecture? I always had a strong art background throughout my public school years, but realized there were too many starving artists in the world (who were much better than me). I discovered architecture (a tangible art) a couple of years after high school, and have enjoyed it ever since. How do you describe your architectural style and vibe? I don’t have a style per se. I love the diversity. With study and research, we can recreate any genre, and by applying our sense of “appropriateness,” make it ours. What architectural trends are you seeing a lot of right now? It has been so great to see a turn towards the new modern and contemporary work being done, especially in the Boulder area. Elizabeth & I spent the 1990s in Vail, doing a lot of the Colorado craftsman style, which is a great mountain look, but it’s wonderful to look behind other doors. What inspires your work? Everything. And clients who allow you to do what they hired you to do. What do you wish more people knew or understood about your industry? A couple of things. That not only are we designers, but also project managers, from top to bottom of each project. And that it’s not all science (the objective), that much of it is art (the subjective). It should be fun, romantic. What are the benefits/powers of architecture? When well designed, spaces accomplish what they were intended for. Regardless of what you’re doing in there, it’s a joy.

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LIVING

Lauren Folkerts HMH Architecture and Interiors 1701 15th Street, Suite B, Boulder Why did you pursue a career in architecture? Early on, I realized the power that buildings have not only to provide shelter, but to uplift us. While the potential is always there, many buildings miss the mark. The challenge of making buildings that are comforting, not confining, that inspires curiosity, that foster connection, and are not only good for us, but good for our world, drew me to becoming an architect. How do you describe your architectural style and vibe? I love regional modernism. Natural local materials and vernacular styles combined with modern features and detailing have always resonated strongly with me, but that doesn’t mean it’s the right choice for every project. In practice, our team works together with our clients, drawing inspiration from the site, the surroundings and the unique demands of the project to create something timeless regardless of style. What architectural trends are you seeing a lot of right now? You can’t get away from modern right now. Even more traditional houses are getting edgier modern touches. But what I’m excited about are curves. I’ve been seeing arched doorways, curved sofas and circular windows bringing some sensuality back to architecture. What inspires your work? My inspiration always starts with the place, the people and the goal. Why here? Why now? What opportunities and challenges do the overlapping circumstances create? I find even the most basic things like the color of the dirt and the quality of afternoon light awe-inspiring. What do you wish more people knew or understood about your industry? HGTV and Pinterest are pushing architecture more and more into the realm of instant gratification and, to get there, people are sacrificing quality, sustainability and good design. That’s not to say there shouldn’t be an Instagrammable moment in your building, but a great building should do so much more than that. What are the benefits/powers of architecture? Buildings influence every aspect of our lives, from the quality of the air we breathe to our mood, our productivity and the habitability of the planet. Fortunately, there don’t have to be trade-offs. Turns out, doing the right thing is usually better for us, the world and the bottom line.

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Nathan Kipnis Kipnis Architecture Planning 1200 Pearl Street, Boulder Why did you pursue a career in architecture? I grew up on the North Shore of Chicago near some spectacular homes designed by some amazing architects including Frank Lloyd Wright. Later, the 1973 oil embargo crisis opened my eyes to our reliance on oil, and I thought that I wanted to somehow, someday, do something to change that. How do you describe your architectural style and vibe? Our general vibe is really clean design that is a direct response to the site’s context, the client’s wishes and the local climate. We don’t ever design two homes exactly the same — we believe in personalizing each and every design. Our firm’s overall philosophy can be summed up as high design/low carbon — to design beautiful architectural buildings and spaces that have a positive impact on society and the planet. What architectural trends are you seeing a lot of right now? It’s fascinating and heartening to see that the concepts of low-carbon design that we espoused decades ago are being implemented across so many projects now. In addition to building for sustainability and resilience in the face of climate change, this past year has also brought healthy home features to the forefront. What inspires your work? The state of the planet drives me every day. We are in a critical time — with the earth’s climate being attacked relentlessly. There is a lot of work to do and not much time to do it. While it’s easy to focus negatively on the task at hand, I try to think positively about the solutions that are available. Every day, it’s clearer to see what needs to be done for a more sustainable and resilient future.


MY LIFE

IS IN YOUR HANDS TheWildAnimalSanctuary.org

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ARTS & CULTURE

SHUTAN CHOOSES THE MYSTERY BY AIMEE HECKEL

“STAND UP BASS.” PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNE SHUTAN

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"CENTERFOLD." PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNE SHUTAN

ANNE “Each piece has its own secret.”

SHUTAN

–ANNE SHUTAN

“One of the things that Jan said to me if ever you have a chance to choose between the mystery and the obvious, go with the mystery.“ He lay unconscious in the hospital bed, and the young woman held his hand. She made him a promise that would carve out the rest of her life — and punctuate the finality of his. “I’ve got this. You can go.” Jan DeSwart, the elderly woodmaker of Holland, was far past speech, but she felt his feeble hand squeeze hers in acknowledgment that he’d heard her. And in farewell. It was what he needed to hear to let go. He died the next day. Young Anne Shutan was devastated at the loss. And terrified — of the magnitude of the vow she had made to a dying man; DeSwart was a woodworking genius. “I told him ‘I got this.’ But did I?” Shutan recalls. She’d met him through a common connection in 1985 in Los Angeles. He had been so impressed with the Boulder County artist’s work that he decided to make her his protegee, the apprentice he’d been searching for his entire life to share his artistic secrets. “I will teach you how to use the bandsaw like a pencil,” he had promised with his thick accent.

And he did. Shutan kept her promise, too. Thirty-three years later, the Boulder County woman is renowned for her wood carvings, in particular elaborate, one-of-a-kind doors. Some stand as dramatic entries to judicial centers or libraries. Others redefine curb appeal for private residences. The doors range from $8,500 up to $25,000, depending on the details and size. They can take two to four months to hand-make. She makes most of her doors with the most stable wood: mahogany. Sometimes, she uses other hardwoods, such as cherry, walnut and teak. She also makes wooden beams, sculptures, artistic musical instruments and furniture, but none like you’ve seen before. She uses a large bandsaw from the ’50s to literally turn the wood inside out, exposing the deepest core of the tree. She makes wood look like water, giving it movement and flow. “I do feel like I was able to carry on what he passed down,” Shutan says. Shutan says she has an intimate relationship with wood. She says she sits with a piece of wood — even just a square beam of wood — sometimes for days before she begins working on it. She spends time with it until suddenly, something speaks to her and she knows what to do with it. “Whether it’s the wood or God or I don’t know, but whatever it is, something speaks to me,” she says. “I’ve done it enough to know it’s for real. … Something’s in the wood.”

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ARTS & CULTURE

(TOP LEFT) “JUDICIAL DOORS” (TOP RIGHT) “SHUTAN’S DOOR” (BOTTOM LEFT) “WALNUT BENCH WITH DAVID NORRIE BASE” (BOTTOM RIGHT) “BARN DOOR” (RIGHT SIDE) “FRIENDS” ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANNE SHUTAN

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Maybe it’s the echo of DeSwart. After all, she says, he is still her main inspiration. She says she still talks to him frequently. “Each piece has its own secret,” she says. And in that, each piece represents a sliver of her mentor’s mysterious mind. We wanted to learn more about Shutan’s unique art, so we spent time talking to her. Here’s what else we learned.

WHAT ARE YOU EXCITED ABOUT NOW? I am now part of a gallery in Big Sur, the Hawthorne Gallery, one of the finest galleries in the whole country. It is an honor to be part of this gallery, mainly because it is mostly artists from the Hawthorne lineage who show there.

HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED WITH THAT GALLERY? I went there, showed up and the manager called the owner, who came right down. Hawthorne said, “I don’t know why I came down here. I get 100 people a month wanting to meet me, but I had a feeling.”

WHERE DOES YOUR ARTISTIC DIRECTION COME FROM? Each design is unique. There’s no way for any door to be the same, because they’re all from a different tree. Even if I tried to do the exact same one, I couldn’t because of the grain and knots and whirls and fissures. But to this day, most of my inspiration comes from Jan, my mentor.

HOW HAS YOUR ART CHANGED AND REMAINED THE SAME OVER THE PAST 35 YEARS? Parts have changed; I do it in different ways. But I still love making such a hard medium look liquid, look like water. It’s a solid, but it has the semblance of movement and water. Water is such a live medium, as is wood, but people don’t think of wood as a live medium. There’s no such thing as a dead tree. The cells are always moving and breathing. I do lots of wave sculptures now more than ever, not only for me — it’s exciting to make — but also to give to a client. It brings water into their world in a very unexpected way.

WHAT ARE SOME CHALLENGES OF YOUR WORK? My doors are all completely solid wood, which is harder to do. There are more avenues for something to go wrong — which is not something I shy away from. Because mistakes are the road to magic. In the beginning, mistakes used to be really scary. Now, when I make a mistake, it’s like, “Hmm, I wonder what it’ll be now.” Hopefully, I can apply that to my day-to-day, too. My art informs me on how I should be living, even though I forget it from time to time. We forget we can fall in love with different things in the same way. I fall in love with each piece I make. It’s like I have a relationship with the wood, and in having a relationship, I need to work with it. Just like you do with people.

OTHER THAN DOORS, YOU ALSO MAKE FURNITURE, SCULPTURES AND MUSICAL

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“I’m open to not knowing. Sometimes, I have to be in the dark for the light to show.” –ANNE SHUTAN

Top left) "Mother and Child" (Bottom left) "Outdoor Family" (Bottom right) "Reflections"

Photos courtesy of Anne Shutan

(TOP LEFT) “MOTHER AND CHILD” | (BOTTOM LEFT) “OUTDOOR FAMILY” | (BOTTOM RIGHT) “REFLECTIONS”. PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANNE SHUTAN

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INSTRUMENTS. WHAT’S THE APPEAL FOR THE LATTER? I think the violin, viola, stand-up bass and guitar all have a womanly figure that is an incredible form. Jan taught me to cut things apart and put them back together, so I like taking a beautiful form and then making it a different form. I do this with beams, too: I cut them apart and reconstruct them. They start out as a square beam of wood that I cut on the bandsaw twice and literally turn it inside out.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE? It’s really hard to plan right now. I’m open to not knowing. I don’t know. The best thing I can do is not know and be OK with that. Only then can something enter me.. Sometimes, I have to be in the dark for the light to show.

SEE SHUTAN’S WORK AT: Mary Williams Fine Art, 5311 Western Ave. Unit 112 Boulder, Colorado Hawthorne Gallery, 48485 Highway 1 Big Sur, California Boulder Furniture Arts 2055 26th St, Boulder, CO 80302 (303) 443-2030 Shutan also is regularly involved with Boulder County’s Open Studios and Sculpture in the Park in Loveland, and she opens up her private studio to visitors (depending on COVID-19 restrictions): 6671 Lake View Point Drive, Longmont, Colorado

Learn more about Anne Shutan at www.customdoormaven.com

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REFUEL

BY A I M E E HE C K E L

Post Brewing Co.: Fried chicken, beer and community This isn’t your ordinary bar food. Not that there’s anything wrong with jalapeno poppers and nachos to the side of a cold beer. But at Post Brewing Co., the beer shares the spotlight with your dinner plate. Post opened its first location in Lafayette in January of 2014, after two years of brainstorming. The inspiration behind it all: Simple. Good fried chicken and good beer. “The idea of having the perfect combo of chicken and beer was the grounding of everything,” says Brett Smith, who began as the executive chef and partner. Today, he’s the operating partner, along with Dave Query and Bryan Selders. That simple dream in east Boulder County has since grown to four local branches; starred on the Food Network with Guy Fieri; and earned impressive accolades at the Great American Beer Festival. The fried chicken has garnered its own share of applause, too. “The fried chicken is the focal point of our menu,” Smith says. “We spent a lot of time and effort into developing that recipe.” As the executive chef, he says he experimented with at least 50 different combinations of seasonings and flours before ultimately settling on the recipe that has earned nationwide notoriety. It just so happens to be gluten-free, too — a huge bonus in health-friendly (and gluten-unfriendly) Boulder County. Smith says they never set out to pursue fried chicken to adhere to

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any specific dietary needs. This version was just the best tasting of them all. The winning batter came from a blend of rice flour, potato and tapioca starch. Compare this to most fried chicken recipes, which rely heavily on wheat flour. “We just loved how the crust cooked up and absorbed less oil,” Smith says. “It was less greasy and stayed crispy for longer.” The bone-in chicken is prepared in a pressure fryer that is preprogrammed with the precise time and temperature; this yields a highly consistent result every time that Smith says locks the flavor in. Making the chicken in a pressure fryer instead of a traditional fryer is another distinguishing feature of the Post’s famous fried dish. The kitchen does use a traditional fryer to prepare other dishes, but the fried chicken stays out of it. The fried chicken is actually a two-and-a-half-day process. “All our food is really simple, but we’ve approached it with the mindset of how a classically trained chef would prepare that food,” says Smith, who has been a chef for 25 years. “All of the dishes, from the collard greens to the mac and cheese, we handle them properly, we use great products and we approach them with a chef’s mentality.” In that, he says, Post’s food is considered elevated comfort food. It starts with approachable dishes everyone’s familiar with, but then takes them to another level.


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE POST BREWING CO.

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REFUEL

THE POST BREWING CO. MAKES DELICIOUS FRIED CHICKEN AND CRAFT BEER. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE POST BREWING CO.

Indeed, while the gluten-free fried chicken gets a lot of attention, Post Brewing Co.’s beer is far from second fiddle. He says Post brings the same mindset to its beer. “Having the two paired together is a winning combo,” he says. There are several ways to enjoy your fried chicken at Post. The fried half-bird is served with pickles and chorizo country gravy (make it “Nashville hot” if you like a kick). The chicken tender basket comes with fries or slaw. Then there’s the to-drool-for chicken and waffles, topped with pumpkin seed butter, chorizo country gravy, chile-cherry chutney and maple syrup. (Post is also beloved for its brunch every Saturday and Sunday.) The original Post Brewing Company opened in the old VFW hall right in downtown Lafayette. It was such a success that a second branch

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launched in Longmont two years later. A Denver branch (in the Rosedale area) popped up the following January, and Boulder’s branch at 2027 13th St. in downtown opened on Halloween night in 2017. The Lafayette branch features the largest on-site brewery, and Boulder’s restaurant added another brewery into the mix, as it took over a previous brewery space. The Longmont and Denver destinations don’t have a brewery attached, but they do serve beer at all locations. Just no fun brewery tours. Indeed, while the gluten-free fried chicken gets a lot of attention, Post Brewing Company’s beer is far from second fiddle. The brewery just won its third Great American Beer Festival medal (a bronze) in a row for its dry stout. Even as a relative newcomer in a brewery-heavy state, Post has earned GABF medals four out of the last five years. In the spirit of the original mission, the beer menu began simply, with several balanced, well-crafted beers. The goal was to make highly drinkable beers that went well with fried chicken. This meant no huge variety of beer types or crazy, strong IPAs; they didn’t want to overpower the food, Smith says.


PHOTO BY EMMA GODDARD

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REFUEL

WE ASKED OPERATING PARTNER BRETT SMITH WHAT HE LIKES TO EAT AT POST BREWING COMPANY. HERE’S WHAT HE ORDERS: Fried chicken ordered half Nashville hot, half not. Start with the hot meat and work back to moderately spiced. Several sides to share, Thanksgiving style. Favorites include: • Green chile mac and cheese • Collard greens • Mashed potatoes and gluten-free brown country gravy • Cheddar rosemary buttermilk biscuits

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What Do you Order?


“That was an awesome way to start, but as time has gone on, the two brewers we have now like to tinker around with all kinds of different styles,” he says. Today, the Post still offers the drinkable beers it was originally known for, but it also has created the likes of a filtered, hazy IPA; a kolsch with tart cherry and makrut lime; a smoked stout; a tart wheat ale with blood orange; a schwarzbier with black tea; and a black IPA, among others. The Post’s beer menu isn’t its only claim to fame. In 2018, the Longmont location was featured on the Food Network’s show, “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.”

Smith says he knows every time the Food Network replays the episode highlighting the Post Brewing Company, because the Longmont restaurant will, without fail, see a surge in visitors that week. Of course, famed foodie Fieri filled up on the fried chicken, but he also tried the chicken chicharrones. This appetizer is a tasty take on fried chicken skins, served with pinto bean hummus, roasted poblano, garlic mojo, veggies and Texas toast. The skins are baked in the oven first, then crisped in a fryer and dusted with a special house seasoning. Smith calls the hummus a “Colorado twist on traditional hummus.” The TV spot was not the end of the “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” story, however. Turns out, that show has a cult following, inspiring people to travel around the country to try the restaurants featured on the show. “A couple weeks ago, we met a guy from Virginia who was in Colorado to his 12 of the restaurants from ‘Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.’ He had a book that features different recipes and had people sign it,” Smith says. “It’s cool to be part of that family.” Smith says he knows every time the Food Network replays the episode highlighting the Post Brewing Company, because the Longmont restaurant will, without fail, see a surge in visitors that week. Still, amid the Fieri fame and beer awards, Smith says his proudest achievement is not as flashy: “Just being able to take care of our team and guests, having hundreds of people who have worked for us and thousands of guests who have joined us,” he says. For him, success is having a warm and hospitable place where people can come enjoy fried chicken and beer. Simple. Just like the original dream that started it all.

GREENBRIAR INN. PHOTOS BY EMMA GODDARD

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE POST BREWING CO.

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REFUEL

Boulder’s 13 Essential Takeout Dishes By Brittany Anas

C

ERTAIN DISHES AND CUISINE WERE ONCE

SYNONYMOUS WITH TAKE-OUT. PIZZA, CHINESE FOOD, BURRITOS — THEY ALL MEET THE ESSENTIAL TAKEOUT CRITERIA OF BEING COMFORT FOODS THAT TRAVEL WELL AND CAN BE REHEATED WHILE YOU PAUSE YOUR NETFLIX SHOW. BUT,THEN,WHEN THE PANDEMIC HIT, PROMPTING US TO SPEND MORE TIME HUNKERED DOWN AT HOME, RESTAURATEURS ACROSS BOULDER GOT CREATIVE. THEY BEGAN THINKING OUTSIDE OF THE (TAKEOUT) BOX TO FIND WAYS TO HELP YOU

Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant: Family Fajita Pack 1101 Walnut St.

(303) 444-3690

riograndemexican.com/locations/boulder

The sizzle of fajitas is part of the soundscape at the Rio. Now, you can get a family pack of fajitas (as well as other dishes) for an at-home meal. In addition to its traditional menu that can be ordered for takeout, The Rio has an order-in-bulk option with a Family Fajita Pack that comes with the option to mix and match proteins, plus all the fixings like fajita veggies, sour cream, guac, tortillas, rice, beans and pico de gallo. Oh, and yes, you can get those famous Rio margs to go, too. Or, you can get a margarita kit to make your own. Spoiler alert: They’re still not spilling the frijoles on their trademark recipe, though!

Frasca Food & Wine: Frico Caldo 1738 Pearl St.

(303) 442-6966

frascafoodandwine.com

RECREATE A RESTAURANT EXPERIENCE — BUT DO SO AT HOME. RESTAURANTS IN THE BIG RED F GROUP, FOR INSTANCE, BEGAN OFFERING TAKE-HOME MEALS THAT YOU CAN EASILY FINISH IN YOUR OWN KITCHEN, AND THAT WILL FEED YOUR WHOLE FAMILY. YOU CAN ALSO ORDER COCKTAILS TO-GO FROM MANY OF YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL RESTAURANTS AND SOME SPOTS OFFER CURBSIDE PICK-UP TO MAKE THE WHOLE PROCESS SEAMLESS. HERE, 13 TASTY TAKEOUT DISHES TO TRY FROM BOULDER RESTAURANTS.

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Frico Caldo is a Frasca favorite. Since day one, this dish has been a signature menu item at Frasca, a James Beard Award-winning restaurant inspired by the Northern region of Italy. The comfort dish from the Friuli region is a perfect bite, with potatoes, cheese and onions griddle until crisp and made with an herb vinaigrette. Other popular to-go dishes are gnocchi and the Torta Tenerina, which is a flourless chocolate cake served with raspberry jam and chocolate pearls.


Boychik: Shawarma Hummus Bowl 1401 Pearl St.

(720) 343-7757 boychikkitchen.com

Seafood may not be top of mind when it comes to takeout, but Jax Fish House tweaked its menu to create a tasty to-go experience. Jax is offering fresh sustainable seafood dishes in three formats: in the dining room, for takeout, or as finish-at-home kits to prepare when you like and that includes mussels with your choice of broth (Thai curry, tomato chorizo, chardonnay garlic) and Maine lobster cavatappi for two. All of the take-home kits are easy to complete in your own kitchen and come with instructions. One of the top sellers is an Alaskan halibut kit for two, which comes wrapped in parchment paper with seasonal vegetables and a side of sherry mustard potatoes. Just pop it in the oven and enjoy.

Jill’s Restaurant and Bistro: Boulder Burger (720) 406-7399

Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar: Alaskan Halibut Kit 928 Pearl St.

(303) 444-1811

jaxfishhouse.com/boulder

926 Pearl St.

(303) 444-3535

thewestendtavern.com

Great for game days, West End Tavern has created to-go barbecue family meal platters that can serve two, four or six. (Order extra so you can make barbecue sammies throughout the week. West End Tavern also sells buns to go). Platters include fresh-fromthe-smoker sliced brisket, St. Louis style ribs, pulled pork, bone-in chicken and hot links, plus house barbecue sauce, Carolina gold barbecue sauce, beans, coleslaw and cornbread. Macaroni and cheese topped with bread crumbs is a great add-on. Round out your order with Pearl Street Punch, a gin cocktail mixed with hibiscus syrup, fresh citrus and soda.

900 Walnut St.

Launched by a pair of childhood best friends, Boychik is among the vendors inside Boulder’s new food hall, Avanti Food & Beverage. The Middle Eastern-inspired menu includes salads, pita wraps and plenty of dips and spreads (introduce your veggies and pita chips to the whipped feta, ASAP). Boychik’s selection of hummus bowls put a modern twist on the menu and make for a great lunch-time alternative to salads and sandwiches. Make a lunch out of the Shawarma Hummus Bowl topped with onions, sumac, pickles and a house sauce.

West End Tavern: Family Barbecue Platters

stjulien.com/eat-drink/ jill’s-restaurant-and-bistro-new

Pig and Tiger: Beef Noodle Soup 1401 Pearl St. Pass on the frozen burger patties. Instead, head to Jill’s Restaurant and Bistro inside the St. Julien Hotel, where you’ll find a veggieforward menu starring the Boulder Burger, crafted with a house-made black bean patty that’s covered with melted white cheddar and smothered with guacamole and adobo mayo and topped with a tomato. To really get this right, order at the restaurant so you’ll have time to enjoy a cocktail while your burger is being made. We suggest The Beetnik, a vodka, ginger and citrus cocktail made with beets from a Boulder County farm, Toohey.

(720) 343-7757 pigandtiger.co

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REFUEL We couldn’t blame you if you start picking up to-go from Pig and Tiger a couple of times a week. Sourced from Colorado farms, Pig and Tiger’s modern Taiwanese menu has 3 for $10 Gua Baos pork belly buns made with pork belly, seasonal veggies, or Sichuan hot chicken. For the winter, turn your attention to the Beef Noodle Soup, which is made with hand-cut noodles, braised beef shank, seasonal greens and pickled mustard greens.

Rye Society: Reuben (Available as a vegan sandwich, too) 1401 Pearl St.

(720) 343-7757 ryesociety.com

A reuben, but make it vegan? Rye Society mastered this challenge. Rye Society has gourmet, scratch-made Jewish cuisine, giving a contemporary update to old family recipes. Custom sandwiches, matzah ball soup by the quart and pastries are all available to-go. The classic reuben comes with steamed corned beef or whole roasted portabella mushroom, Swiss cheese, kraut, dressing and sandwiched on toasted rye bread. The vegan reuben is made with house marinated tempeh and vegan cheese, kraut and a vegan dressing, also served on rye.

Centro Mexican Kitchen: Baja Board

A common problem with takeout tacos: They become soggy by the time you get them home. Centro Mexican Kitchen came up with a savvy work around: The Baja Board, that allows you to assemble your tacos at home, with the warm tortillas packaged on the side. This taco feast includes beer-battered Pacific cod, chipotle crema, green rice, salsa plus Mexican street corn. You can choose between corn or flour tortillas, or opt for lettuce wraps.

Pizzeria Locale: Il Marco

(303) 953-8364 foodlabboulder.com

localeboulder.com

Your Italian vacation may be postponed, but Pizzeria Locale’s Napoli-style pizzas will hold you over and satiate cravings in the meantime. Pizzeria Locale was the first restaurant in Colorado to employ a Stefano Ferrarra woodfired oven. (The artisan ovens perfect authentic Neapolitan pizzas). The East Pearl Street pizzeria has classics like margarita pizzas join more gourmet creations that are topped with n’douja sausage or oyster mushrooms. One of the newcomers on the menu is the Il Marco pizza, made with a spicy pine nut pesto, provolone piccante, mortadella, grana padano (and Italian cheese) and lemon juice. If you want to try your hand at pizza-making, Pizzeria Locale also sells dough balls for $2.50 a piece.

The Kitchen: Bone Marrow

(303) 442-7771

(303) 544-5973

WINTER-SPRING 2020-21

1825 Pearl St. A

(303) 442-3003

1039 Pearl St.

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Food Lab: Paella Experience

1730 Pearl St.

950 Pearl St. centromexican.com

Take your takeout to another level and start your meal off with a gourmet appetizer. Available for takeout from The Kitchen is popular dish Bone Marrow, which is filled with bison tartare, aioli and served with The Kitchen’s grilled bread that’s perfect for soaking up the bone marrow flavors.

thekitchenbistros.com

Offering culinary classes in Boulder, Food Lab has a calendar of events that includes virtual and in-person cooking classes. Food Lab is now offering “Anytime Cooking Kits” that come with everything you need to make a perfect dinner at home and at your own pace. The kits come with a video to help you perfect your dish. The paella cooking kits come with all the ingredients you’ll need, plus pairing suggestions for wine and music as well as recipes and a shopping list so you can recreate the meal in the future. For a special night at home, or if you’re looking for a unique gift, you can add the upgrade that comes with a traditional steel paella pan and other goodies, like all-natural, dry-cured chorizo and a Spanish sherry vinegar.

Efrain’s of Boulder Mexican Restaurant and Cantina 1630 63rd St. #10

(303) 440-4045

efrainsrestaurant.com If you love Mexican food, you could point your finger to any item on Efrain’s menu and be happy with your choice. Efrain’s is a Boulder institution serving Northern Mexican dishes and the menu has a spice-level scale to help you choose the right dish for your tastebuds, ranging from the mild cheese enchiladas to the hot chile verde burrito. Trust your chef; the $13 Efrain Burrito is a large flour tortilla stuffed and smothered with the chef’s choice. “Have fun, take a chance and trust Efrain” says the menu description.


N E W D AT E S + V E N U E S !

JUNE

24-27 2021

F I L M S / F O O D / M U SI C / PARTIES / MORE DOWNTOWN BOULDER A ND CHAUTAUQUA B I FF 1.c o m

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REFUEL

Farm-To-Table Sandwiches MADE WITH CARE AT ORGANIC SANDWICH COMPANY

ORGANIC SANDWICH COMPANY MAKES FRESH, ORGANIC SANDWICHES IN BOULDER AND LOUISVILLE. PHOTO COURTESY OF ORGANIC SANDWICH COMPANY

By Sarah Kuta As kids growing up in Michigan, sisters Marcy Miller and Bonnie Paisley ate home-cooked meals around the dinner table every night and helped their mom tend to the vegetable garden during the summer months. Those early experiences with fresh, simple foods made with love stuck with Miller and Paisley, the team behind the Organic Sandwich Company. Now a Pearl Street staple, Organic Sandwich Company was once just a kernel of an idea the two sisters brainstormed while thinking about ways they could make their mark on the world. Some 16 years ago while living in Chicago, the two sisters dreamed of opening a sandwich shop where families could enjoy a meal together, one that was made from natural ingredients sourced from local farms and purveyors. Today, that vision is a reality. They recently celebrated the fifth anniversary of Organic Sandwich Company, which has locations in Boulder and Louisville. “I wanted to have my shop be a place where you can get the same quality food you can get at a farm-to-table restaurant, but it’s in the form of a sandwich,” said Miller. “You can bring your kids and feel good about the food you’re feeding them, and you’re enjoying it, too.”

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Miller has always wanted to start her own company, an entrepreneurial bent she shares with Paisley. The two women used to get together over a glass of wine and brainstorm ways they could go into business together — no idea was too lofty or out-there. During these conversations in the early 2000s, they first began chatting about the idea of opening an organic sandwich shop. But at the time, organic food wasn’t nearly as popular or affordable as it is now, so they shelved the idea and moved on with their lives. After earning her MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, Miller worked in private wealth management in Chicago for several years. When her husband’s job brought their young family to Boulder, Miller left the corporate world to become a stay-at-home mom to their two boys. Eventually, she dusted off the notes for the sandwich shop idea and began to think more seriously about it. When she was able to sneak away from the boys for a few hours, Miller hunkered down in Boulder coffee shops and worked on the business plan. She met with anyone and everyone who was willing to offer advice. More often than not, however, they suggested she run — fast — in the other direction. But Miller wasn’t deterred.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF ORGANIC SANDWICH COMPANY

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“Oftentimes, people would try to talk me out of it,” she said. “They were like, ‘Don’t you know how much work this is? It’s not easy.’ And on and on. And finally, I would show up at meetings and say, ‘Look. I’m not afraid of hard work. I love to work hard. And working for myself, working hard would be even that more fun.’” And so, Organic Sandwich Company was born in 2014 at the Boulder Farmers Market. Miller sold three lunch sandwiches, two breakfast sandwiches and a kids’ sandwich at the farmers market, which she used as a real-life test kitchen for gathering feedback and making changes from week to week. “It was so fun, it was so hard, it was so humbling,” she said. “People would come and buy your sandwiches and give you great feedback. Obviously, everyone had their opinion and we tried to get the good and the bad. We wanted to improve every time.” After a year at the farmers market, Miller continued to incorporate real-time feedback when she opened the first brick-and-mortar sandwich shop at 16th and Pearl. Organic Sandwich Company’s menu is diverse, offering a little something for everyone. There are sandwiches made with meat, sandwiches made without meat, sandwiches made without animal products, spicy sandwiches, savory sandwiches and even sandwiches with a touch of sweetness. The shop also makes soup, salads and breakfast items. The company sources its ingredients from local farmers and ranchers like Aspen Moon Farm, Kilt Organic Farm, Altan Alma Organic Farm, Ela Family Farms and Buckner Family Farm, just to name a few. “I love when our local farmers come out with their summer list of produce and we get to switch things up like making watermelon gazpacho, squash and eggplant sandwiches, zucchini bread, etc.,” said Perri Longley, general manager of the Boulder location. “There’s always something new going on that we can get involved with. The job allows for a ton of creative freedom and flexibility.” Not only is Organic Sandwich Company committed to using the freshest, all-natural ingredients possible, but the company is also heavily focused on sustainability. Case in point: More than 95 percent of items served to customers are reusable, recyclable or compostable. Though she’s not involved in the day-to-day aspects of running the shop, Paisley remains a trusted advisor to Organic Sandwich Company. And whenever she’s in town visiting from Michigan, she’s been known to roll up her sleeves and start slinging sandwiches right alongside Miller. “We were just taught that food, in essence, is life, it’s medicine,” said Paisley. “Whenever we got sick, there wasn’t a rush to get to the doctor, it was like, ‘Let’s make a good meal and help your body heal.’ That’s what my sister Marcy has created in Boulder. She’s providing a good, clean, fresh meal to the community.” PHOTOS COURTESY OF ORGANIC SANDWICH COMPANY

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Lobster Rolls

Fish

- 9pm

Oysters Grilled Fish

Lobster Rolls

Cla

Clams

Oysters

Clams

Open Daily 11am - 9pm

Open Daily 11am - 9pm

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Dine-In, Patio Seating & Take-Out with Curbside Delivery -In, Patio Seating & Take-Out with Curbsid720-630-8053 e Delivery Dine-In,720-630-8053 Patio Seating & ORDER Take-Out ONLINE with CurbsiAT: de Delivery COUNTY 2020

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We’re all neighbors. Located at the SW corner of Arapahoe and 95th St. in Lafayette Open Dailythe 11amFight - 9pm Against Homelessness. Join Your support helps Boulder County residents get back on their feet. Together, we can prioritize stable housing for all.

bouldershelter.org

Dine-In, Patio Seating & Take-Out with Curbside Delivery 720-630-8053

ORDER ONLINE AT: www.eatreelfish.com Located at the SW corner of Arapahoe and 95th St. in Lafayette GIVE TODAY!

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Cocktails

REFUEL

to Order in Boulder this Winter By Sarah Kuta

WHEN THE TEMPERATURES START DROPPING, THERE’S WE’VE ROUNDED UP SOME OF THE BEST WINTER COCKTAILS IN NOTHING MORE COZY OR ROMANTIC THAN ENJOYING A UNIQUE

BOULDER TO HELP YOU GET THROUGH THESE COLDER MONTHS

WINTER COCKTAIL AT A BOULDER COUNTY BAR OR RESTAURANT.

IN ONE PIECE (AND IF ALCOHOL ISN’T YOUR THING RIGHT NOW,

WHETHER YOU’RE MORE OF A CLASSIC COCKTAIL PERSON (OLD

MANY OF THESE LOCAL ESTABLISHMENTS ARE OFFERING NON-

FASHIONED, ANYONE?) OR YOU LIKE TO SPICE THINGS UP WITH

ALCOHOLIC COCKTAILS — SO GO AHEAD AND ASK!). MOST, IF

A NEW DRINK EVERY TIME, YOU’RE SURE TO FIND WHAT YOU’RE

NOT ALL, OF THESE COCKTAILS CAN ALSO BE ORDERED TO-GO,

LOOKING FOR THIS WINTER. HOT OR COLD? CLASSIC OR EDGY?

SO YOU CAN ENJOY THEM FROM THE COMFORT OF YOUR LIVING

SHAKEN OR STIRRED? IT’S ALL UP TO YOU.

ROOM, TOO.

The Smoking Barrel Manhattan Steakhouse No. 316 1922 13th St, Boulder (720) 729-1922 steakhouse316.com/boulder Whiskey is a quintessential cold-weather spirit. But if you’re not a fan of drinking the stuff straight, consider the Smoking Barrel Manhattan at Steakhouse No. 316. It’s a simple but robust Manhattan made with Laws Colorado Rye Whiskey, house-blended sweet vermouth and barrel-aged bitters. It’s stirred with ice and strained into a Laws whiskey bottle. Next, the bartender pipes bourbon barrel smoke into the bottle with a special smoking gun. The capped bottle filled with the smoky cocktail is served table-side with a large ice cube and a house-cured cherry. “The moment the barrel smoke starts to waft through the dining room, guests look around and wonder where it is coming from,” says Ishael Ananda, general manager. “They can’t help but long for that comforting experience of sipping whiskey by the fireplace.”

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Moves Like Jäger

Pear Ginger Old Fashioned

Jungle

Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar

2018 10th St., Boulder (530) 414-1193 jungletiki.com

928 Pearl St., Boulder (303) 444-1811 www.jaxfishhouse.com/boulder

Somewhere along the way, Jägermeister earned a reputation for being one of the go-to drinks for apres ski. At Jungle, they’ve decided to put a fun tiki-style spin on this liquor by creating the Moves Like Jäger cocktail. It’s made with cachaça, strawberry, Jägermeister and lime. “We were going for an herbal, edgy take on a strawberry daiquiri,” says Jake Novotny, Jungle’s beverage director.

The pear ginger old fashioned at Jax brings together traditional fall and winter flavors in perfect harmony. It’s made with whiskey, a special pear- and ginger-infused honey syrup and orange bitters, then garnished with a maraschino cherry and candied ginger for added flare. “It’s a strong, warming cocktail that is still quaffable and pairs well — pun intended — with many cold-weather dishes,” says Jax’s Eric Linder.

Spicy Claus

Blood Orange Margarita

Flagstaff House Restaurant

Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant

1138 Flagstaff Road, Boulder (303) 442-4640 flagstaffhouse.com This isn’t your grandmother’s Christmas cocktail, and it’s not for the faint of heart. The kick of jalapeno and spicy vegetal notes in the Spicy Claus cocktail will help keep you warm on a cold winter’s day, while the fruity notes and creamy egg-white finish will have you asking for another round. It’s made with tequila, Chareau liqueur, bitters, lime juice, egg whites and a house-made tincture of jalapeno, cilantro, matcha, agave and honey.

1101 Walnut St., Boulder (303) 444-3690 riograndemexican.com/locations/boulder

Though you may only think of margaritas during the summertime, winter is actually when the magic really begins. You see, January is when blood orange season starts, which means the Rio can create some truly delicious cocktails. Their blood orange

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REFUEL

margarita is made with Maestro Dobel Diamante Tequila, which has

a softer, subtler presence, which really allows for the delicate blood orange flavors to shine through. And when you order a blood orange margarita from the Rio, you’ll be in good company — it’s developed a bit of a cult following over the years and it’s one of the restaurant chain’s most popular margaritas. “Blood oranges and their seasonality provide us an opportunity to have some fun in the cold winter months,” says Erich Whisenhunt, the Rio’s food and beverage director. “The Rio — as it has evolved its marg and cocktails — was looking for a new flavor that would be fun and interesting and fit with our culinary aspirations. This year will be our sixth year offering it on a winter seasonal menu.”

Don’t feel like heading out in the snow? Make Your Own Cocktail at Home Head up to Flagstaff House for the Good Cider Effects cocktail. The drink’s name is play-on-words from the phrase “good side effects,” and it’s a nod to apple cider season. It’s inspired by a classic Manhattan, with some apple, vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg flare.

Good Cider Effects INGREDIENTS 1.5oz. Buffalo Trace Bourbon ¾ oz. Sweet Vermouth ½ oz. Vanilla Simple Syrup ½ oz. Calvados 2 dashes of Angostura Bitters Splash of Apple Cider Shaved Nutmeg on top Shake over ice and strain into a martini glass. Garnish with a cinnamon stick, bordeaux cherry, cinnamon, sugar and salt rim. Recipe courtesy of Flagstaff House

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OUR USERS, YOUR CUSTOMERS! 5 5 0 + U S E R S A DAY*

Contact john@travelboulder.com | 720-708-6803

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ADVERTISER INDEX Art + Soul Gallery

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A Lodge

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Hotel Boulderado

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EXPERIENCE BOULDER

make the most of winter & spring in boulder

New Boulder Cookbook | By Sarah Kuta If you’ve always wondered how Santo makes its mouthwatering red chili pozole, you’re in luck — now you can try making it at home. The same goes for OAK at Fourtheenth’s popular kale salad and Zolo Grill’s cactus and corn fritters. You’ll find these and many other recipes inside “A Bite of Boulder,” a new Boulder-centric cookbook that arose when organizers had to cancel First Bite, aka Boulder County Restaurant week, because of the coronavirus pandemic. “‘A Bite of Boulder’ honors local chefs and restaurants, and celebrates some of their most popular and beloved dishes to date, allowing home cooks to make these dishes for their loved ones,”

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said Jessica Benjamin, First Bite’s producer. “Food truly is love, so dig in at home, share favorites with friends, and celebrate Boulder in a delicious new way.” The $29.99 book was released Nov. 12 and is available for purchase online. You’ll also find it at local stores and participating restaurants. At least 50 percent of the proceeds from cookbook sales will benefit the participating restaurants. Want to learn more? Head to https://www.travelboulder.com/ new-a-bite-of-boulder-cookbook-celebrates-boulder-countychefs/ to read the full story.


Make The Rio’s Famous Guac At Home

RIO GRANDE MEXICAN RESTAURANT’S GUACAMOLE RECIPE SERVES 10-12 AS AN APPETIZER

CHANCES ARE,

6 Haas avocados 0.25 fl oz lime juice 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons minced garlic Optional: cotija cheese and pico de gallo for topping

YOU’VE HAD A

FEW MARGARITAS (YUM!) AND MANY DIFFERENT ENTREES AT RIO GRANDE MEXICAN RESTAURANT, A BOULDER STAPLE SINCE 1989. BUT THEIR GUACAMOLE REALLY TAKES THE CAKE. IN FACT, THIS APPETIZER IS SO POPULAR THAT THE RIO GOES THROUGH NEARLY 5,000 AVOCADOS EACH WEEK AT THE FIVE RESTAURANTS ALONG

1. Carefully pit and spoon avocados into a bowl 2. Squeeze in lime and add garlic and salt. 3. Mash them together with a potato masher. A few lumps are OK as long as they are not hard unripe avocados. If you don’t have a masher, use a fork. 4. It is sprinkled with cotija cheese and plated with pico de gallo – a mixture of diced onions, jalapenos, tomatoes and cilantro.

THE FRONT RANGE AND IN THE MOUNTAINS. IF YOU HAVEN’T BEEN TO THE RIO LATELY, IT’S TIME TO PAY A VISIT. THE RESTAURANT RECENTLY UNDERWENT A $500,000 RENOVATION AT ITS 1101 WALNUT STREET LOCATION IN BOULDER. THE RESTAURANT IS OPEN FOR DINE-IN SERVICE AS

PRO TIP FOR LEFTOVERS: Prevent browning by pressing plastic wrap against the top of the leftover guacamole before storing.

WELL AS TAKEOUT, DELIVERY AND CATERING. IN THE MEANTIME, YOU CAN TRY YOUR HAND

WANT TO LEARN MORE? Read the full story at https://www.travelboulder.com/ how-to-make-the-rio-grandes-famous-guacamole-at-home/

AT MAKING THE RIO’S DELICIOUS GUACAMOLE AT HOME. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO MAKE IT HAPPEN.

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EXPERIENCE BOULDER

STEP INSIDE BOULDER’S UNIQUE CHANDELIER SHOP

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHANTIQUE

ANTHONY FUNDERBURGH

sits outside at a well-worn farm table and slides new wires coated with beeswax through the small holes in the arms of a French chandelier. The crystals sparkle with history. Every piece the Boulder man rewires shines a story. He recovers many antique chandeliers from demolitions of palaces and mansions in the French and Italian countryside, and some of their stories are preserved along with them. He learns about the symbolism of the various shapes (for fertility or farming) and the tales of craftsmanship long abandoned for cheaper, faster production. The Italians hand-carved wax molds to cast the bronze, like a statue.

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“They put their hearts into it,” he says. “It’s a lost art, and too expensive to even make them today.” CHANTIQUE, 2020 11TH ST., Funderburgh’s unique downtown Boulder shop specializes in this kind of lighting: antique French and Italian chandeliers, as well as the original Mid-Century Modern lights from Italy. He carries about 150 different, unique light fixtures, dating from the 1880s to 1960s. In that, Funderburgh is preserving culture and history, too. Read the full story online at https://www.travelboulder.com/ step-inside-boulders-unique-chandelier-shop/


CLIMB SKI

NEPTUNE IS Boulder’s locally owned outdoor store

CAMP HIKE

Neptune has been gearing people up for their outdoor adventures since 1973 with an outstanding selection of the best outdoor gear and friendly, knowledgeable advice. Just visiting Boulder? We also rent the gear you need to explore our amazing area. Come visit our huge store in south Boulder and plan to spend a little time touring Gary Neptune’s renown climbing and ski museum.

A LEGEND AMONG MOUNTAIN SHOPS NeptuneMountaineering.com | 303-499-8866

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Let’s Find Your Boulder! MEGHAN BACH Realtor || Bolder BoulderHome HomeTeam Team 619.955.2788 MeghanBach.com Meghan Bach is a Broker Associate affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate Broker in Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity Laws.

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Profile for Travel Boulder

TRAVEL BOULDER MAGAZINE Winter-Spring 2020  

TRAVEL BOULDER MAGAZINE Winter-Spring 2020  

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