Travel Boulder Magazine Winter 2021 - Spring 2022

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HOT & COLD WINTER WELLNESS Self-Care at Every Temperature

BOULDER CLIMATE SCIENTISTS

Keeping Colorado and Planet Earth Beautiful

AN ART LOVER’S GUIDE TO GALLERIES Essential Boulder Spaces for Inspiration

BEST BRUNCHES

Boulder Restaurants Serving Delicious Fare

THE

ISSUE

WINTER-SPRING

2021-22

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WINTER-SPRING 2021-2022

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WINTER-SPRING 2021-2022


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ide

e have u find your

essions, g strong. ul with a market.

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In the name of Corporate Responsibility + LOVE, we partnered with Community Food Share to hire a farmer, and are now cultivating this land to grow thousands of pounds of fresh produce. Every single ounce of food will be donated to hungry people across Boulder and Broomfield Counties. To learn more about this spectacular farm and our efforts to feed our community, scan the code. Join us,

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Our Relocation Experts Will Guide You Home Ranked in the top 0.5% of Colorado agents, we have the market savvy and knowhow to help you find your Front Range dream home quickly in today’s challenging market. Similarly to its stellar performance through other recessions, Boulder County real estate is continuing to perform exceptionally well. Call us now to learn how to be successful with a purchase or sale in the current Boulder market. 303.301.4718 // hello@burgessgrouprealty.com

Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.

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FROM THE EDITOR FROM THE PUBLISHER

Summer/Fall 2018

PUBLISHER / CO-OWNER JOHN R. BRICE

WINTER-SPRING 2021-22

Some of my most beautiful memories are set to this backdrop. Sometimes it’s simple: my bare toes deep in the cool grass of the Chautauqua lawn. Other times it’s adventurous: foraging through the forest, stopping along the way to marvel at the views. A few times, it’s been the screaming burn of my thighs as I ran up the steep Chautauqua trail. OK, those last memories are a little less than beautiful. (More like sweating and sobbing, “Why? Why?”) But each moment is special to me. Because each moment is a part of Boulder’s famous Colorado Chautauqua. Boulder is open for business. Locals and visitors have returned to experience all Chautauqua is Boulder. And Colorado is celebrating itsshould big that Boulder has to offer. Thisthe issue providesChautauqua ideas and experiences that you 1-2-0 this year. this winter and spring. consider NeedlessOver to say, we wanted giveI have it a felt good the past year andto a half, thegift. stress of the pandemic, our politically divided country and of everyday I found myself searching for something new Enter: Travel Boulder’s premierelife.print magazine, The Ultimate Guide that You wouldcan relieve also provide additional exercise. I have been into to Boulder. findstress theseand guides, written by locals so you cannever experience however, when I twice found athis activity, it clicked and it helps to relieve stress. Boulderrunning, like a local, published year. Now more than ever, it’s time to consider taking care of ourselves. We created this And what better way to kick off a new mag than with Boulder’s shining star? issue around wellness with everyone in mind. I hope that these ideas will inspire you An in-depth at Chautauqua is our lead story in this edition. In this package, to dolook something for yourself. you’ll learn which cottage to stay at for the best views (or the most privacy); which The issue starts off with a wellness bucket list. How many of these ideas are on trails to your hike bucket with your kids; some of Chautauqua’s andhot list? Or maybe you should add them.coolest Aimee events Heckel for also2018; explores also some history that we bet will surprise you. and cold winter wellness experiences that you might enjoy. WhetherWeyou don’t even sknow what a “chautauqua” (it’s progressive OK; I didn’t for visited Boulder’ Resource Central to learn aboutistheir recycling about a and decade) or you think you’ve explored every inch of these grounds, there’s educational programs that are pioneering and innovative. Boulder’s beauty encourages local climate keep it that way. Discover what is being done something here to help enrich scientists your nexttovisit. here in Boulder. In addition, the Summer 2018 Ultimate Guide to Boulder includes the We talked with founder Libby Alexander Common Threads, the boutique Ultimate Guide to Boulder’s Neighborhoods (the of likes of which has never been consignment shop in Boulder and Denver as they celebrate their 15th officially reported on before), as well as guides to family fun and music in anniversary. Boulder. Sarah Kuta spoke with Boulder’s restaurant entrepreneur Dave Query of Big Red F As a native to these parts, I’ve always loved Boulder for its ability to surprise. restaurants group. “It was crazy. It’s hard to ever plan for something like that,” he Just when you you’ve tried it all, there’s some crazy new vegan stuffed gourd said of think the pandemic. surrounded by flaming hay (that’s at Emmerson), or a wall-dancing class (that’s at Find out what you may not know about Longmont as they celebrate their 150th Iluminaranniversary. Aerial), or some dude on the Pearl Street Mall playing the piano while hanging by his a tree (um, Getfeet out,from discover new art yup). through our art lover’s guide to local galleries. We As explored John Brice, the publisher and co-founder of TravelBoulder.com, says,up the best brunches in Boulder, make your reservation today. Warm “You would be amazed at what is going on in Boulder that you don’t know about. with seasonal sips. The issue also includes additional wellness and things to do experiences for you. We found it was difficult to find out early enough what was happening in Boulder hope that enjoy issue of out.” Travel Boulder Magazine. For more until after it We happened. Weyou were tiredthis of missing Boulder-area experience and adventures, visit Well, you don’t have to miss out anymore. Wetravelboulder.com. got ya. Enjoy our first of many magazines; I hope to see it used and abused, crammed I wish you wonderful new in your backpack anda splattered withyear. cold brew and craft beer and adventure, because that’s what’s Boulder’s made of. Get even more info online at TravelBoulder.com.

— John R. Brice

Publisher and Co-Founder of Travel Boulder

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SUMMER/FALL 2018

Aimee Heckel Editor-in-chief

CO-OWNER

JILL NAGEL-BRICE PUBLISHER JOHN R. BRICE/FOUNDER EDITORIAL

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / WRITER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/FOUNDER AIMEE HECKEL

JILL NAGEL-BRICE

DESIGN DIRECTOR / MANAGING EDITOR

TYLER PERCY EDITORIAL

EDITOR-COPY MANAGER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT KAITLYNKUTA PAYNE SARAH

COPY EDITORWRITERS CONTRIBUTING CLAY EVANS

AIMEE HECKEL CREATIVE SERVICES / PRODUCTION SARAH KUTA JEFF BLUMENFELDMANAGER PRODUCTION SARAH MILLER BARRY BORTNICK BRITTANY ANAS

PUBLICATION DESIGNER

MONIKA EDGAR ART DIRECTOR/DESIGNER

MONIKA EDGARDESIGNER ADVERTISING DAWN SHUCK ADVERTISING SALES

TRAFFIC MANAGER JOHN R. BRICE SARAH EATHERLY JILL NAGEL-BRICE ADVERTISING SALES CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER JENNIFER STEEL RANDY GOLDNER

ACCOUNT DIGITAL TEAMEXECUTIVES MICHELLE ADAMS, RYAN GRAF DEVELOPER GEOFF HERDEN, DREW BARON AARON LOVATO CONTRIBUTORS

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER COVER PHOTO ISABELLE NAGEL BRICE ANN DUNCAN

PHOTOGRAPHERS

ZACH ANDREWS, JONATHAN AUERBACH, On the cover: Woman pouring tea. Photo by EMILY CARL, STEPHEN COLLECTOR, Tatjana Zlatkovic. ANN DUNCAN, PAULA GILLEN, JACOB HELLECKSON, BRIAN LOPEZ, JESSICA MORGAN, GRANT NYQUIST, WERNER SLOCUM, EMILY TAYLOR, Copyright 2022 by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. PRUNE VANDENOVER All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly proWRITERS hibited withoutANAS, publisher’JESSICA s permission,MORGAN, including original BRITTANY editorial, graphics, design,CALLIE photography, advertising and KAITLYN PAYNE, PEDERSON sponsored content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are published by Go Visit Media Co., 2535 Copyright 2018 by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. Meadow Ave, Boulder CO 80304 | Phone: 720-708-6803 All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly prohibited Sales: john@travelboulder.com, jill@travelboulder.com without publisher’ s permission, including original editorial, graphics, design, photography, advertising and sponsored Travelboulder.com content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are Facebook.com/travelboulder published by Go Visit Media Co., 2465 Central Ave. Suite 203 Instagram.com/travel_boulder Boulder, CO 80301 | Phone: 303-544-1198 | Fax: 303-449-6121 Advertising Sales 303-544-1198 Ext. 102 Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com


951 PEARL ST BOULDER 303 . 543 . 9191 JALBRECHTDESIGNS.COM

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Contents

14 14 WINTER & SPRING BUCKET LIST 22 HOT & COLD WELLNESS 34 RESOURCE CENTRAL 42 COMMON THREADS 45 GUIDE TO BOULDER GALLERIES 50 WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT LONGMONT 56 BOULDER CLIMATE CHANGE LEADERS 60 BIG RED F’S DAVE QUERY 64 BOULDER’S BEST BRUNCHES 68 SEASONAL SIPS 72 EXPERIENCE BOULDER 73 ADVERTISING INDEX

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68


LOCAL ART • FINE WINE • CRAFT BEER FOCUSED ON COLORADO ARTISTS • ROTATING FEATURED EXHIBITS ARTIST DEMONSTRATIONS • LIVE PERFORMANCES • EVENT SPACE RENTALS

R Gallery was founded in March 2019 to make fine art approachable and available for customers by giving local artists a prominent downtown location. We are curating a diverse and unique art experience for those visiting the Pearl Street Pedestrian Mall.

www.RGallery.art

Downtown Boulder • 2027 Broadway @ Pearl Street (303) 444-4146

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THINGS TO DO

THE WINTER & SPRING BUCKET LIST

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THE YEAR’S END BRINGS CHILLS TO THE AIR, CHANGES TO THE LANDSCAPE AND SNOW TO THE HIGH COUNTRY. A NEW YEAR HAS ARRIVED. IT’S A PERFECT MOMENT TO REFLECT ON THE TASKS COMPLETED AND THOSE STILL YET TO ACCOMPLISH. TWO YEARS OF COVID-19 HAS RUINED OLD ROUTINES. FACE-TOFACE FAMILIARITIES ARE DISTANT MEMORIES. SOCIAL DISTANCING, ISOLATION AND TOO MUCH ZOOM TIME HAVE ALTERED US ALL.

YB YBAR TNICKBOR

IT’S A MOMENT TO OPEN OUR BODIES AND MINDS TO NEW THOUGHTS, PHILOSOPHIES AND BEHAVIORS. IT’S TIME FOR SELFIMPROVEMENT, AND A CHANCE TO FOCUS ON WELLNESS FOR THE BODY AND SOUL. BOULDER COUNTY OFFERS A WIDE RANGE OF OPTIONS TO HEAL, ENHANCE AND REJUVENATE BODY AND SOUL. HERE ARE A FEW OF OUR FAVORITES TO EXPLORE THIS WINTER AND SPRING.

PHOTO BY ALEXIS AHRLING

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THINGS TO DO LET’S GET FIT. Nothing says “wellness” like a good sweat. While Boulder offers a vast array of gyms, yoga studios and outdoor fitness options, those seeking something more may want to consider CrossFit. Athletes in the know say CrossFit offers more than just a good burn. It presents the chance to join a fitness community. Plus, CrossFit routines rarely repeat. That makes it harder to hit a workout rut. “People can get bored going to a regular gym, because they often just stick to the same training pattern,” said CrossFit trainer Kaytee Sigler. “Your CrossFit community encourages you to do better. And the variety of workouts are always fun and challenging.” CrossFit involves new movements, varied cardio work and a range of weight-training that changes with each class. “I find that when I do CrossFit, I never plateau,” Sigler said. “The variety encourages you to do better. And the workouts are fun.” The communal vibe of CrossFit also gives individuals the drive to improve their overall lifestyles, she added. “When you make a conscious choice to work out and strengthen your body, it also helps get the rest of your life in place,” Sigler said. “You’ll sleep better and you’ll surround yourself with a supportive and likeminded community ... You will also make better food choices that nourish your body and fuel your workouts.” Fees run about $150 a month, depending on which gym you join to try CrossFit. See Instagram@kayteesiglerfitness for further details or contact Sigler at kaytee. sigler@yahoo.com HUG IT OUT. Few things are as vital to mental and physical health as touch. After nearly two years of

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physical distance, masks and the overall bummer of COVID, who doesn’t need a good cuddle? Yes, there are professional huggers, who are there to give stressed-out humans a shoulder to relax on. While the job might sound semi-salacious, there is nothing sexual about professional hugging. “I make sure this is about platonic touching. My sessions are intimate but not sexy,” said professional cuddler Kassandra Brown. “Few people have experienced anything like it.” Aside from no sexual touching, the hour-long sessions are wide open. Clients can be held or they can hold the hugger. Brown said newcomers are nervous about the process. But that weirdness fades and, before long, the client and cuddler are engaged in shoulder massages, eyebrow touching and spooning. Cuddling is more important than ever because platonic touching is rare in Western societies, Brown said. Touch deprivation is connected to anxiety, depression, aggression, stress, violence and poor job performance. A cuddle can help. “This work is more than just hanging out and cuddling,” Brown said. “It is a quiet revolution of taking a society that is lonely and scared and teaching it the skills of touching and connecting.” An hour-long cuddle session runs between $80 to $130. Brown offers a sliding scale and says she won’t turn anyone away. “Humans are wired for connection,” she said. “Physical touch is one powerful way we can feel connection with other human beings. It’s very easy for us to forget we are animals and that we need to be touched.” See Cuddlist.com, or use https://cuddlist. com/kassandra/ for more details.

MEDITATION TIME. Life today is very frantic as we dash from one task to the next and spend endless hours on social media while missing the quiet wonder of the world. Our monkey brains never get a break. That’s why meditation, especially the ancient art of transcendental meditation, is needed now more than ever. The Beatles tried it when they met Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in 1967. If the mental exercise was good enough for John, Paul, George and Ringo, it’s probably good enough for you. Transcendental meditation is more than closing your eyes and repeating a mantra. It’s a disciplined practice that takes time to understand and perform. Hundreds of clinical studies have proven the benefits of transcendental meditation. One study determined that it helped reduce the chance of heart attack and stroke by 48 percent. Best yet, the practice involves only two 20-minute sessions per day. Phil and his wife Gail Lynch have practiced and taught transcendental meditation since the 1970s. They offer regular classes on the matter at the Boulder Transcendental Meditation Program. “Human consciousness is an ocean,” Lynch said. “The surface of the ocean is the everyday world. The waves crash and swell. That’s our daily life. But at a deeper level, the ocean is very quiet and stable.” He said meditation allows the brain to access that quiet zone. “If we just live at the surface level, we will miss all that calm,” he said. “Every culture from all around the world speaks of inner peace, inner happiness. If you take the time to develop the inner part of your nature, it will grow in your life.”


TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION IS MORE THAN CLOSING YOUR EYES AND REPEATING A MANTRA. IT’S A DISCIPLINED PRACTICE THAT TAKES TIME TO UNDERSTAND AND PERFORM. HUNDREDS OF CLINICAL STUDIES HAVE PROVEN THE BENEFITS OF TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION. ONE STUDY DETERMINED THAT IT HELPED REDUCE THE CHANCE OF HEART ATTACK AND STROKE BY 48 PERCENT.

PHOTO BY KAYTEE SIGLER

PHOTO COURTESY OF MAHARISHI FOUNDATION USA

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THINGS TO DO He said the practice, which he shares during a four-day session, allows practitioners to experience the quiet part of nature that is in all of us. Hundreds of studies conducted over the past 50 years prove that meditation works to reduce stress, PTSD, anxiety, sleep issues and a range of everyday worries. “You don’t do it for a 20-minute escape,” Lynch said. “You do it for the change in brain functioning and physiology. You do it because it will enrich your life.” See TM.org for further details or email Lynch at plynch@TM.org. A LITTLE NEEDLE WILL DO YOU GOOD. Talk about old school! Acupuncture has been practiced for over 5,000 years. The preventative healing treatment often raises eyebrows among those who fear needles, but in truth, a little prick can really do the trick for anyone suffering from stress, insomnia, pain and a range of illnesses. “Acupuncture is all about preventative medicine,” said Rachel Muich, who works at Amaluna Wellness in Boulder. “It’s meant to keep you from being sick. It’s a way to keep your body balanced and to keep imbalance from coming up.” Long ago, practitioners used animal bones on pressure points in the body to realign a person’s internal energy. Today, hair-thin needles are employed to influence the “flow of energy in the body,” Muich said. Pain comes when the body’s energy flow is jammed. The jamming can come from injuries, trauma or the general stress of life. Acupuncturists use needles to adjust the parasympathetic system, which centers on our rest and digest mechanisms. The technique tells the body to relax. That internal relaxation leads to healing.

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Practitioners contend that acupuncture increases circulation, enhances healing and flushes toxins from the bloodstream. They say it also reduces muscle tension, produces endorphins and lowers stress and inflammation. It’s been used to treat PTSD, depression, digestive upset, sleep issues, headaches and menstrual irregularities. It’s for everyone, really, with any imbalance, no matter the size or weight of it, Muich said. Anyone seeking a new way to improve wellness and improve the body and soul should take a stab at acupuncture. See https://amalunawellness.com for more information. HYPNOSIS IS NO PARLOR TRICK. We’ve all seen TV hypnotists turn ordinary people into zombies, who perform parlor ticks on command. But that’s comedy, not the healing work of hypnosis therapy. Hypnosis is a technique used to access the human subconscious and to help relax and heal a worried mind. “Hypnosis gives us access to the subconscious mind,” said Boulder hypnotherapist Kelly Bearer. “We use that state of mind for healing.” In addition to her hypnotherapy practice, Bearer is a psychology professor at Naropa. She specializes in working with adults who suffer from addiction, past traumas, fear and relationship issues. Her hypnotherapy works to heal external issues, while also rewiring, updating and optimizing a person’s internal programming. The work leads to happier lives, and helps put an end to bad habits and unhealthy patterns, she said. “If you are stuck in a bad habit and want to break free, this is for you,” she said.

Hypnosis is not about mind control. Her clients are aware of all the conversations that occur during a session. “You control your own mind, and no one is going to make you cluck like a chicken,” she said. “That form of hypnosis is for entertainment, this is for healing.” The hypnosis journey is for those struggling with anything from smoking, eating disorders, PTSD or a search for purpose in life. “These things occur when there is a block in the subconscious,” Bearer said. “Hypnosis can help remove the block.” Bearer said hypnosis is no magic wand, but she points out that research indicates that hypnosis may help lead to faster results compared to standard face-to-face counseling sessions. An hour session costs $160. “This is all about freedom,” she said. “If you want to free yourself from what’s holding you back, this is a way to set your mind free.” Visit Kellybearer.com for more details. TANK TIME. Before we came into this world, all of us enjoyed a good deal of float time in the womb. The stresses of life might make some of us crave a return to a warm, safe, stress-free environment surrounded by liquid and peace. Modern floatation tanks might be the closest thing we can get to the womb. Practitioners say the flotation experience delivers a state of deep relaxation. The process lets us meditate and frees the mind from constant overstimulation. The process involves lying in a float tank filled with 1,000 pounds of body-temperature water and Epsom salt. The sensation is like floating on air inside a warm, music-filled or quiet and dark or lighted space. Tierra Coxsey, owner of Radi8 Float Studio in Boulder, said the float


process is often used for reducing inflammation, providing mental clarity and easing symptoms of anxiety and depression. The tank experience lets the body relax and put an end to all the outside stimuli that can make us crazy. The process is recommended for people who have chronic pain, anxiety and insomnia. It’s also a great way to recharge your internal battery and just relax. Rates are $65 for an 80-minute float session. Coxsey also has group rates, and better deals for those who sign up for multiple sessions or for monthly memberships. She also gives back to the community by gifting 10 percent of the proceeds into a special float account for local firefighters. “People need to invest time and energy into controlling their stress,” she said. “Floating achieves that quickly, and it gives you mental clarity in return for the deep relaxation you feel can be incredibly content within minutes of your private float.” Radi8 can schedule up to three private sessions at once. “It’s a relaxing and decompressing thing for people to do,” Coxsey said. “And it’s just a healthy way to get away.” See: Radi8float.com for more details. SOME SPECIAL K, PLEASE. If change is what you seek, it might be time to go psychedelic and explore the benefits of ketamine-assisted therapy. Treatments conducted under the assistance and supervision of trained psychotherapists and physicians can be life-changing. Those familiar with the very legal therapy say ketamine brings people into an altered state of consciousness that can provide life-enhancing and deeply spiritual experiences. “Most people who come in are at an impasse in their lives,’’ said Craig Salerno of Craig Salerno Counseling. “They feel stuck.” Salerno, a licensed professional counselor (LPC), uses ketamine to help those who seek a new path or anyone who suffers from anything from PTSD to anxiety. Ketamine is an alternative therapy frequently used in mental health care. “Anxiety, fear and panic block people from deep therapy,” he said. “Ketamine tends to reduce those blocks so people can explore at a deeper level.”

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WINTER BUCKET LIST

PHOTO COURTESY OF RADI8 FLOAT STUDIO

“This is all about freedom,” she said. “If you want to free yourself from what’s holding you back, this is a way to set your mind free.”

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Two-hour sessions, which involve an oral dose or intramuscular injection of ketamine, a comfortable couch and soothing music, range from $300 to $450. There is nothing illegal here. Though ketamine can deliver a very heavy LSD-style experience, the drug requires a physician’s prescription and the therapy is conducted under medical supervision. “The treatments can initiate new insights for people and lead them toward a spiritual experience. These experiences tend to help people find new and creative ways to change their lives,” Salerno said. It’s common to leave a session feeling a huge sense of oneness with the universe. The sessions also deliver a new perspective for patients.

“Too often, we get stuck in a tunnel vision view of life,” Salerno said. “Ketamine sessions give you more awareness.” Though the experience might conjure up images of The Summer of Love or a Grateful Dead show, Salerno said everything is done in a clinical manner. “We have a medical provider overseeing the process,” he said. “We do everything very professionally. This is not just some kind of wild ride of LSD.” For more details see: CraigSalernoCounseling.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF CRAIG SALERNO

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THINGS TO DO

winter wellness Hot & Cold

PHOTO COURTESY OF PIXABAY

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By Aimee Heckel

Maybe the chilly weather has you

ways to keep you entertained. And

excited. You want to do snow angels

either way, it’s also crucial to keep

in celebration of winter and spend

up your health during the cold-cold

as much time immersed in cold-

season. Whether you want to spend

weather activities as possible. Or

the winter warm or you want to really

maybe the season has you shivering.

feel the chill, here are some of our

Bundled up, clutching warm bevvies,

favorite healthy activities this winter

waiting out the winter in wool socks.

— both hot and cold.

Either way, Boulder’s got plenty of

PHOTO BY AIMEE HECKEL

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THINGS TO DO

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PEXELS

TRY HOT YOGA.

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WINTER-SPRING 2021-2022

Yoga in a heated room is a great way to warm up on a cold day — and boost your health. Boulder Bikram Yoga, 3035 Sterling Circle, offers a traditional 90-minute hot yoga class that guides you through 26 different postures and breathing exercises.

SIP HEALTHY TEA. It’s no doubt tea can be good for your health. Studies find tea can be filled with antioxidants, reduce your risk of stroke and heart attack, benefit your bones, soothe stomach aches and more. For a hot cup of health, the Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse (1770 13th St.) is one of the most popular attractions in Boulder. The brightly colored building was a gift to Boulder by its sister city, Dushanbe, in


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WELLNESS

INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LANDMARK DUSHANBE TEAHOUSE. PHOTO BY LITTLE NY PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS

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Tajikistan (in Central Asia). It was built by more than 40 artists, disassembled and then sent to Boulder, where it was put back together. The teahouse has a full, extensive tea list; the spicy chai is a show-stealer. Not far away you’ll find the Ku Cha House of Tea, 1211 Pearl St. a traditional Chinese tea house. It features a large selection of fine loose-leaf teas from China, Japan, India, South American and South Africa. Another quintessential Boulder bucket list activity is to tour the Celestial Seasonings Tea Factory and FLOAT ON.whiff of the mint room. It’ll warm you take a deep up, nosea sensory first. Temporarily closed check forthe While deprivation tank for isn’tcovid hot-hot-hot, reopening . water is warm and the tank can get a bit toasty, making it especially appealing on a chilly day. Book a 90-minute float in about 10 inches of water mixed with epsom salt, and float away your stress, anxiety, high blood pressure, tight muscles, insomnia, chronic pain, anxiety and more. Floating in pitch darkness is meditative, relaxing and (honestly) otherworldly. Check out the Isolate Flotation Center (643 S. Broadway) and Radi8 Float (5290 Arapahoe Ave.).

SWEAT IT OUT. A sauna studio is a surprisingly pleasant way to raise your body temp, detoxify your body and get your sweat on. The Cyl Sauna Studio/The Sweat House at the Twenty Ninth Street Mall offers private, infrared sauna sessions in luxury pods. These get really heated, ideal for a winter day in Boulder or self-care day.

RELAX IN A HOT TUB. Ease your muscles, aches and pains in a bubbly hot tub. The East Boulder Community Center has a great one. Hit the steam room first, then lean back in a hot tub and let the jets do their job.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PEXELS

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THINGS TO DO

GET A WARM OIL SCALP TREATMENT. Spavia, 1810 29th St., offers a way to warm up from the head down with the Fijian Warm-Oil Scalp Treatment. This relaxing treatment begins with a slow drizzling of warm nut oils on your head and neck from a traditional Fijian coconut bowl. The therapist then massages those areas. It feels great and is also good for your hair.

TRY A GEMSTONE CHAKRA BALANCING TREATMENT The St Julien Hotel and Spa, 900 Walnut St., also offers a hot oil scalp massage, but you can pair it with one of the newest (and unique) treatments. Lie on a heated infrared crystal rainbow chakra mat and get treated with warmed gemstones. The mat is said to use farinfrared, negative ion and PEMF therapy to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, among a long list of other potential benefits. Even if this seems a bit woo-woo for you, it includes a full-body massage, which we’re all familiar with.

SIT IN AN INFRARED SAUNA. Infrared Salt Therapy, located at 825 S. Broadway, has infrared saunas (as well as salt therapy). Advocates claim these saunas can help with relaxation, detoxification, sore muscles, joint pain and more. If you don’t mind the short drive to Denver, the Beer Spa, 3004 N. Downing St., Denver, combines a full-spectrum infrared sauna with a bubbling cedar tub that is filled with a blend of hops, barley and herbs; they call it beer bath hydrotherapy. It’s like you’re sitting in a big beer tea.

SIT IN A STEAM ROOM OR SAUNA. Craving warm air? Head to the steam room or sauna. A favorite is the Mokara Spa at the Omni Interlocken Hotel, 500 Interlocken Blvd. in Broomfield, which has also offered treatments that involved a hot blanket in the past. Or head to the Dragontree Spa in Boulder, where you can sip tea in the Sangha Room, get a foot bath and then sit in the steam room.

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PHOTOS (COUNTERCLOSKWISE) COURTESY OF: RADI8 FLOAT STUDIO PEXELS THE CYL SAUNA STUDIO/THE SWEAT HOUSE ST JULIEN HOTEL & SPA


GET A HOT STONE MASSAGE. Elements Massage, 2321 ​​ 30th St., offers massages with stones heated to about 125 to 135 degrees. This ancient Chinese technique is said to warm your body, loosen your muscles and can improve circulation.

WARM UP WITH CANNABIS. For a warm wellness treatment at home, take a hot bath with a Coda Signature’s Bath Bomb while sipping a hot cup of tea from Willie’s Remedy. The locally-made bath bombs feature various scents, each “bomb” containing 15 mg of CBD and 15 mg of THC. The tea is infused with 2 mg of CBD per 1g of tea leaves.

HEAT UP YOUR PEDICURE. There’s something so comforting about a paraffin wax treatment when you get a mani or pedi. Lotus Nails, 2422 Arapahoe in Boulder, offers the Lotus Organic Pedicure, which includes a herbal and collagen treatment to detoxify and soothe your skin; a paraffin wax treatment paired with a hot stone massage while your feet are resting; hot towels; and a traditional pedicure prime and polish.

ADD A HOT TOWEL TO YOUR BODYWORK. An easy way to warm up your life is to request a hot towel when you get a massage or other treatments. Boulder Cupping Therapy offers cupping with a hot towel, as well as essential oil therapy. A unique offering is facial cupping (including a warm towel to relax your facial muscles and open your pores), which is said to treat chronic sinus issues, temporal headaches and more.

LIGHT A CANDLE AND RELAX. Even if you don’t have the time or resources for a full spa day, light a candle, snuggle under a quilt and take time to relax. Pearl Street Lights makes soy candles, finished with a wooden wick. Try the Connection + Healing candle, designed to calm your senses with eucalyptus, mint and bergamot. Order them online at pearlstreetlights.com or check the website for shops nearby.

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THINGS TO DO

EXERCISE OUTSIDE.

Cold

Yes, even in winter. Just bundle up and go for a walk or hike. Just check the trail conditions before you head out (call or visit the rangers’ station), make sure you’re prepared for the weather and someone knows where you’ll be and be flexible. If you want to go hiking, many of Boulder’s hiking trails remain open year-round. We love Mesa Trail/Woods Quarry, starting at the Chautauqua Ranger Cottage and then heading up Bluebell Road. It tends to be less harsh even on the coldest days.

GO ICE SKATING. The YMCA of Northern Colorado, 2800 Dagny Way in Lafayette, has an ice-skating rink, complete with tons of programs, including rec skates, skate fitness, hockey and learn-to-skate classes. For more ice skating fun, there is also Ice Centre in Westminster (10710 Westminster Blvd.), the seasonally open Longmont Ice Pavilion (725 Eighth Ave.) and Louisville’s Winterskate, an old-fashioned ice skating rink and the largest rink in Boulder County. Winterskate is open in the winter at the Steinbaugh Pavilion, 824 Front St.

RECOVER WITH VASPER The Mapleton YMCA, 2850 Mapleton Ave. in Boulder, recently added the Vasper System. This uses compression, cooling and interval training to help with recovery and strength.

GO SNOWSHOEING. Boulder and the surrounding areas are ripe with snowshoeing options. For starters, check out trails at Rabbit Mountain Open Space, Heil Valley Ranch and Bear Peak Trail. If you need to rent gear or want to join a guided tour, Colorado Wilderness Rides and Guides (coloradowildernessridesandguides.com) offers snowshoeing adventures in the area.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PEXELS

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SPRUCEBOULDERADO.COM

2115 13th St. Boulder, CO Located Inside Hotel Boulderado 303-442-4880

CORNERBARBOULDERADO.COM

2115 13th St. Boulder, CO Located Inside Hotel Boulderado 303-442-4880

LICENSE1BOULDERADO.COM

2115 13th St. Boulder, CO Located Inside Hotel Boulderado 303-442-4560

FRANKSCHOPHOUSEBOULDER.COM

921 Walnut St. Boulder, CO 303-444-1295

FRISCO MARINA AND LIGHTHOUSE. PHOTO COURTESY OF TOWN OF FRISCO

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THINGS TO DO GO SKIING.

FREEZE, ON PURPOSE.

Colorado Wilderness Rides and Guides can also take you backcountry skiing and ski mountaineering, but Boulder’s favorite place for downhill skiing is Eldora. This ski hill is just 21 miles west of Boulder, and only three miles from the Boulder County mountain town of Nederland.

Cryotherapy is said to help your health, speed up recovery and relieve pain. It’s popular among athletes, and you can try it too at Restore Hyper Wellness, 2835 Pearl St. In cryotherapy, your body is exposed to sub-zero temps for short bursts of time. The chill is supposed to be anti-inflammatory, boost cellular survival, release endorphins and reduce pain. Restore Hyper Wellness also offers CryoToning. This uses cold to create vasodilation; the claim is this can increase the production of collagen to break down cellulite.

CLIMB ON ICE. If you’re experienced and have the right gear, get active outside with ice climbing. You can sometimes find tempting ice formations in Boulder Canyon. Make sure you stay safe and know what you’re doing.

SLED THE DAY AWAY. It’s fun, it’s free and it’s fun. Slide down The Hill, Tantra Park and Scott Carpenter Park on a sled. Or for a faster run (and a faster heart rate), try tubing. An inner tube is tougher to steer and stop, which can be either a blast or terrifying, depending on the level of adrenaline you prefer. PHOTO COURTESY OF SHREDDER URBAN SKI AND SNOWBOARD PARK

GO SKIING INDOORS. Shredder Urban Ski and Snowboard Park, 3640 Walnut St. in Boulder, is an indoor ski training facility for kids. It uses synthetic snow, man-made hills and various obstacles to train kids how to ski and snowboard indoors, before heading to the real slopes. Not exactly chilly, but an inside precursor to a cold nose.

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ENJOY A HEALTHY SMOOTHIE. Wonderpress, 946 Pearl St., can blend you up a healthy smoothie, like the Turmeric Twist, made with OJ, coconut, carrot, avocado, mango, turmeric and ginger juice, beet, amla and black pepper. Rush Bowls, 1207 13th St. on University Hill, is another way to enjoy cold health food. These bowls are packed with fruit and topped with granola and honey. Try the Bravocado (and not just because it’s fun to say). This bowl contains avocado, banana, mango and pineapple juice; boost it with an antioxidant and immune support boost.

GET A TABLE SHOWER. Craving both hot and cold in the same experience? Try a 10-minute table shower (also called a Vichy shower) at the On Broadway Salon and Spa, 380 Arapahoe Ave. A Vichy shower usually alternates between super cold water and warm water to stimulate circulation and boost health. Look for “contrast hydrotherapy” or other kinds of hot and cold hydrotherapy options at other spas in town, too.

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Posters

Record Albums

Stickers

Photography

Apparel

PosterScene 1505 Pearl St #101 Boulder 303-443-3102

PosterScene.com

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LIVING

RESOURCE CENTRAL: 45 years of leading conservation in Boulder BY SARAH KUTA ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF RESOURCE CENTRAL

VISITING RESOURCE CENTRAL IS A BIT LIKE GOING ON A TREASURE HUNT — AS A SHOPPER, YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO FIND AMONG THE SHELVES OF RECYCLED CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS, HOME FIXTURES, GARDEN TOOLS, FURNITURE AND OTHER ODDS AND ENDS.

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What People Are Saying About Resource Central “RESOURCE CENTRAL IS CENTRAL TO IMPLEMENTING COST-EFFECTIVE MEASURES THAT HELP BUSINESSES AND RESIDENTS REDUCE THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT WHILE SAVING MONEY. THAT’S THE SUSTAINABLE WAY TO DRIVE SOLUTIONS THAT HELP MAINTAIN ECONOMIC VITALITY AND OUR QUALITY OF LIFE IN A RESOURCE-STRAINED ENVIRONMENT.” — JOHN TAYER, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE BOULDER CHAMBER “RESOURCE CENTRAL IS SUCH AN INCREDIBLE RESOURCE FOR OUR COMMUNITY, PROVIDING A WIDE RANGE OF REUSABLE BUILDING, HOME AND OFFICE MATERIALS AND HELPING OUR COMMUNITY TO

SIGNIFICANTLY

REDUCE

OUR

GREENHOUSE

FOOTPRINT BY REMOVING LITERALLY TONS OF MATERIALS THAT WOULD OTHERWISE GO TO THE LANDFILL. I PERSONALLY HAVE BOUGHT DOORS, A

ROOF,

MIRRORS,

WINDOWS

AND

BUILDING

MATERIALS OVER THE DECADES AND SAVED A TON OF MONEY FOR GREAT STUFF WHILE HELPING TO SAVE THE EARTH, ONE ACTION AT A TIME.” — LISA MORZEL, FORMER BOULDER CITY COUNCIL MEMBER “RESOURCE CENTRAL IS AN INCREDIBLY INNOVATIVE BOULDER ORGANIZATION THAT IS PIONEERING OUR LOCAL PATH TO A RESILIENT CIRCULAR ECONOMY. THEIR

FOCUS

ON

PROMOTING

RE-USE

AWARENESS

OF

THE

PREVENTING AND

CREATING

IMPACTS

OF

WASTE, BROAD MATERIAL

CONSUMPTION HAS MADE THEM A LEADER IN SUSTAINABILITY BOTH LOCALLY AND NATIONALLY.”

TO DONATE OR LEARN MORE ABOUT RESOURCE CENTRAL, 6400 ARAPAHOE ROAD, BOULDER, VISIT RESOURCECENTRAL.ORG OR CALL 303-999-3820.

— SAM WEAVER, BOULDER MAYOR

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LIVING

W

hen you stumble upon something unique, vintage or just the right size and shape for whatever project you’re tackling, you feel a little thrill of joy that’s hard to beat. Plus, the feeling gets even better when you consider the affordable price and the fact that you’re helping to keep that particular item out of the landfill. Now, the longtime Boulder organization is making it even easier to shop for reclaimed materials with the completion of a major $2.9 million renovation and expansion project at its materials reuse facility at 6400 Arapahoe Road. The upgraded facility features an insulated and temperature-controlled indoor warehouse (complete with bathrooms!), plus a new 20,000-square-

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foot covered structure over the outdoor yard. There are also improvements to the donation intake area. Overall, the project aims to make shopping, donating, volunteering and working at Resource Central a more comfortable experience, said Brandon Hill, Resource Central’s materials reuse program director. The upgrades also better protect donated items from the elements, which helps them last longer and find a second life elsewhere. “Weather impacts are absolutely huge since our facility is primarily outdoors — you can just imagine we’re trying to store cabinets, windows and doors and then we get a storm or a big snow,” he said. “That hurts our customers and it also hurts our mission. We take materials in,


but then they get ruined, so what have we really accomplished there? Whether it’s 100 degrees and you’re cooking or it’s raining or snowing, it’s tough to shop and we end up having a lot of spoilage, and that’s not good for anybody.” Founded in 1976, the nonprofit organization spearheads hands-on conservation programs that help people reduce waste, save water and conserve energy — almost effortlessly. The materials reuse program is a big part of that mission, taking in donations of reusable construction materials like cabinets, plumbing fixtures, furnishings, lumber, windows, doors and more, then reselling them at an affordable price. (In addition to taking dropped-off donations, Resource Central also offers a free pickup service.)

The items come from home renovation projects both big and small. When homeowners decide to renovate their kitchens, for example, they’re often removing perfectly good cabinets that could be used again. Resource Central keeps those cabinets out of the landfill and makes them available to someone else. “Construction and demolition waste is a big problem in this area,” Hill said. “We’re one of the facilities that helps to chip away at that problem.” The organization sells its reclaimed materials at a 75 percent discount compared to the price of new materials, which can help make renovation projects more accessible to residents and businesses no matter their budget.

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LIVING

“We’re really proud that a significant percentage of our participants are low- and middle-income families and people who might not be in a position to make thousands of dollars of upgrades or fixes to their houses,” said Neal Lurie, Resource Central’s president. “Working with Resource Central, they’re able to make improvements oftentimes for just a fraction of that amount — for hundreds of dollars rather than thousands of dollars — which makes it within reach for the masses.” Right now, Resource Central takes in and resells about

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4 million pounds of building materials per year. With the upgraded facility, they’re hoping to double that number. The organization also hopes to inspire similar initiatives in cities across the country. “This is a very innovative place, we’re ahead of the curve on this, but we’re showing a model here that works,” Hill said. “It’s financially sustainable, it makes sense for donors, it makes sense for shoppers, it makes sense for a city that is trying to prevent this stuff from ending up in the landfill. Imagine what a bigger city


could do if they got on board with this, or if 10 other cities got on board with this. The impact would be huge across the country.” Resource Central has a number of other programs and initiatives that aim to help reduce waste, save water and conserve energy. The popular Garden in a Box program provides homeowners with low-water gardening kits that serve as easy (and beautiful!) lawn alternatives. The organization also offers lawn removal services, waterwise yard seminars and xeriscape design ideas and inspiration.

“Our goal is to help make beautiful waterwise yards the new norm in Colorado and beyond,” Lurie said. “Increasingly, people are asking the question, ‘Why am I spending all this time mowing my lawn, spending all this money watering my yard when my kids are grown and not even using it?’” To help residents save water, Resource Central offers outdoor sprinkler consultations and indoor water inspections to increase efficiency both inside and out. The organization can also help homeowners upgrade to smart

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LIVING

“Climate change can feel so overwhelming, it’s such a big and daunting challenge and it can feel paralyzing,”

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sprinkler controllers, which adjust their watering schedule based on local weather data. Resource Central’s Renew our Schools program encourages kids to conserve energy through energy efficiency competitions. Participating schools save thousands of dollars in energy costs while students get a hands-on learning experience that helps set them on an environmentally conscious path for life. So far, Resource Central has worked with more than 200,000 students. “We bring in energy mentors and outfit the schools with gauges that actually measure their real-time energy usage, then empower students to sleuth around their schools and help come up with a list of all the different ways their schools can save energy,” Lurie said. Through these and other programs and initiatives, Resource Central has helped more than 700,000 people save water, conserve energy and reduce waste over its 45-year history. All told, the organization has helped divert more than 50 million pounds of building materials from landfills and save more than 1.3 billion gallons of water. “We can comfortably say that the community has embraced conservation as an ethic,” said Lurie. “This organization has thrived because of the model we’ve developed, which is simple: conservation programs that are good for the earth and help people save money. If you can combine the two things together, it becomes a no-brainer for people to participate.” And, in the face of accelerating climate change, the organization hopes to reach even more people in the years to come. “Climate change can feel so overwhelming, it’s such a big and daunting challenge and it can feel paralyzing,” Lurie said. “It’s really important for people to look at incremental steps they can incorporate into their lives that can help reduce carbon emissions. Organizations like Resource Central are really great places to start.”


REMEMBER G.N.O.?

Remember girls’ night out, gossiping about silly things, and finding your new favorite dish? It’s all still here. Safer and with more to offer than ever. So come rediscover everything that made you fall in love with Downtown Boulder in the first place. With your support, we can help keep it a place worth discovering and rediscovering for years to come!

OPEN FOR REDISCOVERY Plan your visit at LoveTheLocal.com

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MAKERS SERIES

THIS IS MORE THAN A STORE. IT’S A SOCIAL GATHERING PLACE, AN EDUCATION CENTER, AN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY MARKETPLACE TO SCORE INCREDIBLE DEALS ON DESIGNER GOODS AND THE HEART OF ONE OF BOULDER’S FAVORITE ANNUAL CREATIVE EVENTS

By Aimee Heckel

ANYTHING BUT COMMON

Common Threads celebrates 15 years as unique Boulder consignment/sewing center PHOTOS BY JENNIFER STEEL

Common Threads is truly not common. A glimpse at Common Threads’ Instagram makes that immediately apparent. Diamond jewelry, Tom Ford sunnies, Gucci accessories and Alexander McQueen heels appear at surprisingly discounted prices. The reason: Everything is gently used — it’s a consignment store. But it’s also a careful curation of some of Boulder’s finest fares. Common Threads, 2707 Spruce St. in downtown Boulder, is getting ready to celebrate its 15th year as a Boulder staple. Its younger Denver branch just celebrated its big 1-0. And Libby Alexander, founder, says business is still going strong, despite the bumps in the road related to COVID-19. In fact, she says, perhaps the store is playing a more important role than ever before. “After this last year, people need to feel good about themselves. A lot of us gained weight or feel depressed or are struggling in other ways,” she says. “When someone is smiling when they walk out of the store, it really does matter.”

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Last year’s big-sellers (sweatpants and comfortable clothes) have been replaced by sexy shoes and date-night dresses. Plus, Alexander says, many people are finding it cathartic to sell the clothes they lived in in 2020. Letting go of those clothes can be a healing way to transition out of lockdown into trying to reclaim life again. Not to mention the discounted prices, which help many people buy quality items they otherwise might not be able to afford. “People are shopping again,” Alexander says. “It’s been gangbusters since the vaccinations. It feels good to be a part of the community again.” The cornerstone of Common Threads, according to Alexander, is having a positive impact on the community. And this unique store strives to do this in a variety of different ways. She founded Common Threads in 2007 with the intention of blending the consignment store concept with sewing. Initially, the vision was to teach people how to select secondhand items in the store and then repurpose them.


But to do that for each transaction was incredibly timeconsuming. “You’d need a whole staff of people sewing and repurposing to do it right,” Alexander says. So the business evolved into two different but complementary branches.

The Consignment Store

On one hand, there’s the consignment model. You can bring in your gently used clothes to sell. Consignors get 50 percent of the sale price, and it stays on the racks for 45 days. If you choose to use the credit in store, you get 10 percent off. This leads to a bit of a circular system, where many people bring in what they’re no longer wearing and leave with new (used) items that they’re excited about. After a few successful years in Boulder, Common Threads opened a Denver branch, on Old South Pearl Street, headed up by Alexander’s sister, Jennifer. Between the two shops, you can find everything from Prada to Anthropologie, with a careful eye on higher-end, current styles. Unique, eclectic, quality pieces are the priority; Common Threads shies away from clothes you can find in big-box retailers. “We don’t take in everything to fill space. We try to curate the items we take in,” Alexander says.

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MAKERS SERIES Since Common Threads opened, Boulder has evolved into a more fashion-forward community. Shoppers come to the store from beyond Boulder’s borders, and frequent consignors — drawn largely by word of mouth — live in Aspen, Breckenridge, Steamboat and other Colorado ski towns.

The Creative Lab

Then there’s Common Threads’ sewing program, The Creative Lab. This is what makes Common Threads different from any other store in Boulder. While it’s not as intimately woven into the shopping experience as the original vision, Common Threads still offers sewing classes and camps for people of all ages and experience levels. Ninety percent of the sewing participants are kids, but adults can also sign up, and The Creative Lab can offer private classes for people with specific goals. Classes begin with the basics (tote bags and pillows) and can get as advanced as the students want (jumpers, shorts, tops). Common Threads has also offered knitting classes. Sewing classes were cut back in 2020 during the pandemic restrictions (although there were some virtual offerings for more experienced sewers), but after vaccinations became more available, The Creative Lab has opened back up and is thriving. Four days a week after school, the lab is packed with students eager to learn and design. Some of those students are taking it to the next level. They’re getting ready for Common Threads’ annual fashion show, Trash the Runway (formerly known as Recycled Runway). This fashion show competition was the brainchild of a sewing teacher who wanted to challenge her students to design clothes out of unexpected, repurposed materials. Not just trash bags and old fabric, but the likes of bike tires, holiday lights, trampolines, balloons, you name it. Participants can make any garment of their choice, from dresses to suits to ski jackets.

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“I was blown away. They were some of the most amazing garments I’ve ever seen, straight off the bat,” Alexander says. The event grew every year, until it landed a spot at the Boulder Theater — which it sold out every year in about 10 minutes. This year, the popular event went virtual; Alexander says she’s still waiting to see if the 2022 show will be at the even bigger Macky Auditorium, as planned. “Every year, I wonder how it can be as good as the previous year, but the kids are so creative,” Alexander says. “Every year there are new ideas and designs coming out that are phenomenal.” Participants have used their creations to help them get into design college, and the winners’ designs are displayed throughout Boulder, in University of Colorado museums and storefronts on the Pearl Street Mall. Trash the Runway is a natural extension of Common Threads’ original mission, Alexander says. It’s not just selling things. It is teaching and growing and connecting. In that, she says, it’s rewarding. Design students return to the shop years later to share their successes, wins that started in this small Boulder store.

IF YOU GO Visiting Common Threads for the first time? As with any consignment store, it can require a bit of digging to find the right items. A key to a successful shopping experience is to enlist the knowledgeable sales staff. Tell them what you like and what you’re looking for. The staff loves to help and are excited when they can help people find the perfect treasure, says Alexander. Also make sure you follow Common Threads on Instagram (@commonthreadsboulder). This is where staff posts their best finds. If you see something you like, just ask them to hold it for you so you can run over and try it on. Other services Common Threads can offer: Wardrobe styling. Staff can help you revamp your wardrobe or pick out clothes for a specific purpose. Private parties. Common Threads can host private events, such as a wedding shower or party where you shop, drink, snack and sew. These events are currently on pause, due to pandemic restrictions, but may be offered again soon.


ART & CULTURE

An Art Lover’s Guide to Local Galleries From a gallery that has an adjoining art bar to host artist talks and other events to a hidden gem in a warehouse on the edge of town, Boulder is brimming

By Brittany Anas

with wonderful and unique art galleries that are worth discovering. Here are six of the premier art galleries around town that are bidding for your attention whether you’re a first-time art buyer looking for a special piece or a serious art collector looking to grow your at-home gallery.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SMITHKLEIN GALLERY

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PHOTO COURTESY OF R GALLERY & ART BAR

R GALLERY & ART BAR 2027 BROADWAY (303) 444-4146 RGALLERY.ART

With a mantra of “fine art for everyone,” R Gallery & Art Bar showcases a variety of artists spanning different mediums and styles. The gallery — which is a block off Pearl Street and is open every day — is a space where both emerging and established local artists can showcase and sell their paintings, drawings, sculptures, jewelry and more. R Gallery is a great place to find a piece of local art that captures Boulder and greater Colorado’s natural beauty. Among R Gallery’s artists is Colorado painter Topher Straus, whose large-scale impressionistic pieces feature national park landscapes like that of Mesa Verde and other iconic and recognizable nature sites close to home, including Boulder’s own Flatirons, as well as Hanging Lake and the crimson Garden of the Gods. Photographer Carol Walker captures striking images of stallions in beautiful landscapes and Boulder artist Anne Gifford (a poster artist for the Bolder Boulder) creates vibrant, layered watercolors that showcase Boulder’s beauty. The addition of the Art Bar has created a lovely community gathering space where art lovers can enjoy artist talks, poetry nights, dance events, live perfor-

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mances, demos and more. The bar serves Colorado craft beers and kombucha, fine wines from Italy, France and California, plus sodas and teas. The art bar recently started serving charcuterie and desserts, as well. R Gallery has new exhibits every four to six weeks, so there’s always new work to see, says owner and photographer Rob Lantz.


PHOTO COURTESY OF SMITHKLEIN GALLERY

SMITHKLEIN GALLERY

ART + SOUL GALLERY

1116 PEARL ST.

1505 PEARL ST.

(303) 444-7200

(303) 544-5803

SMITHKLEIN.COM

ARTANDSOULBOULDER.COM

The SmithKlein Gallery is a Boulder institution that, for more than 35 years, has been exhibiting the work of distinguished artists from around the country. With a prime location on Pearl Street, the 2,800-square-foot space excels when it comes to ambiance: It’s outfitted with high ceilings, wood floors and ample natural light from tall windows, all amazing elements for showing off the artwork. Owned and managed by Nathan Klein and his wife Ann Klein, who is the marketing and graphic designer for the gallery, the gallery is in its second generation of ownership. Nathan’s mother Deborah SmithKlein opened the gallery as an expression of her passion for fine art. The gallery’s currently exhibiting professional artist Lyudmila Agrich, who has a unique “expressionistic impressionism” style. She trades a palette knife for a painting brush to create bold and bright images of nature, flowers and people. She focuses on intimate moments in ordinary life to evoke feelings, with pieces that capture a cozy European bistro, autumn in Soho and the glow of Times Square.

For art you can wear, head to Art + Soul Gallery, where, in addition to fine art, you’ll discover an impressive global collection of designer jewelry. Here, you’ll find gems like gold pendants and earrings from Celine D’Aoust, a designer who juxtaposes rough and precious elements and draws inspiration from nature and the symbolic values of the stones she uses. Her handmade pieces include tourmalines and sun eyes. Or, shop from John Varvatos’ rock n’ roll jewelry, whether it’s brass guitar pick pendant or distressed silver cufflinks. Or, Sweetbird Studio’s playful jewelry is made from stones and baubles, as well as recycled tins and found objects. Art + Soul also has its signature Soulmate Collection, which is a curated selection of alternative wedding and commitment jewelry that includes a variety of ethically mined and lab-grown stones. The intimate gallery, which is a half-block off the Pearl Street Mall, has fine art exhibitions featuring contemporary artists from emerging artists in the area, with solo shows changing bi-monthly. Art + Soul Gallery also sells luxe hand-painted and dyed yarns created by talented artisans.

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ART & CULTURE

PHOTO COURTESY OF ART + SOUL GALLERY

MARY WILLIAMS FINE ART 5311 WESTERN AVE., SUITE 112 (303) 938-1588 MARYWILLIAMSFINEARTS.COM

Nicknamed “The Secret Garden,” this warehouse gallery is a special space on the outskirts of east Boulder that’s filled with amazing art and that connects collectors with fine artists from around the country. The gallery started out in 1996 as a spot to find antique prints and maps, as well as custom framing. Over the years, the gallery has grown and today represents around 100 fine artists. The gallery houses paintings, prints and sculptures from artists across the country and also boasts a rare collection of antique prints and maps, some dating back to the 1700s. The gallery also offers art and framing design for projects of any size. Mary Williams Fine Art does special commissions, facilitating meetings between customers and represented artists so you can purchase a personalized piece unique to your home or office. The gallery also offers in-home consultation and installations to help your art make a statement. REMBRANDT YARD ART GALLERY & EVENT CENTER 1301 SPRUCE ST. (303) 301-2972 REMBRANDTYARD.COM

Rembrandt Yard is an art gallery that doubles as a beautiful events space. The 6,500-square-foot gallery

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showcases the work of Colorado and international artists in one stunning exhibit. One especially powerful exhibit is the Aboriginal series from Australia that showcases stories told by the Aboriginal people through art. All the pieces in the gallery are available for purchase, which very well means you may come for a wedding or a meeting and find the next “it” piece for your living room. You can view the current exhibit free of charge Mondays through Saturdays between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m., but it’s a good idea to call in advance in case the gallery is closed for a private event. 15TH STREET GALLERY 1708 15TH ST. (303) 447-2841 15THSTREETGALLERYBOULDER.COM

A contemporary art gallery located in Boulder’s “15th Street Design District,” the 15th Street Gallery represents many museum-track contemporary artists. You’ll also find artwork from some exceptional emerging local artists at this gallery (make an appointment before visiting). While the exhibitions rotate throughout the year, the gallery consistently has a wide range of media, including oil paintings, woodcuts, hybrid collages, wood sculptures and lithographs. 15th Street gallery is also a premier spot for custom framing, trusted by artists, museums, and collectors for more than three decades.


B O U L D E R ’ S O N LY M U LT I - D I S C I P L I N A R Y ARTS CENTER IS OPEN! JOIN US FOR LIVE MUSIC, C I N E M A , C O M E DY, M A G I C , D A N C E , T H E AT E R , V I S U A L A R T S I N O U R AWA R D - W I N N I N G GALLERIES & MORE!

FREE ADMISSION TO THE GALLERIES!

BOULDER COMES TOGETHER TO HONOR AMERICA’S BLACK HISTORY

Take a walk with us and experience America’s Black History through the lens of famed civil rights photojournalist, Dr. Ernest Withers. A 6-week exhibition comprising of over 100 iconic photographs that document civil rights activism, sports, music, politics and everyday life.

JAN 16 - FEB 26, 2022 ON VIEW AT THE DAIRY ARTS CENTER

3 0 3 . 4 4 4 .73 2 8 | WWW.T H E DA I RY.O R G | 2 6 T H & WA L N U T ST - B O U L D E R

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EXPERIENCE

9 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT LONGMONT

PHOTO BY SHERRI O’HARA

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BOULDER’S NEIGHBOR TO THE NORTHEAST, LONGMONT, HAS AN ECLECTIC, COOL VIBE THAT’S DEFINITELY WORTH THE DRIVE UP HIGHWAY 119. THANKS TO ABUNDANT TRAILS AND OPEN SPACE, A TOP-NOTCH FOOD AND

BY SARAH KUTA

BEVERAGE SCENE, A WALKABLE DOWNTOWN, GREAT LOCAL SHOPS AND A THRIVING ARTS COMMUNITY, LONGMONT OFFERS A LITTLE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE. NOT FAMILIAR WITH THIS BOULDER COUNTY CITY? HERE ARE NINE THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT LONGMONT.

PHOTO BY SHERRI O’HARA

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1. 9 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT LONGMONT

COURTESY OF YA YA FARM & ORCHARD 52 PHOTO WINTER-SPRING 2021-2022

THE CITY HAS A LONG AND STORIED HISTORY. In 2021, Longmont celebrated its 150th anniversary. That’s a long — and impressive — time for a western city to thrive when you stop and think about it. Longmont was established in 1871 by a group of people from Chicago, who decided to head west and build a town from scratch. Originally called the “Chicago-Colorado Colony,” Longmont’s founders sold memberships to help pay for the 60,000 acres of land in northern Colorado where the city sits today.

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THE NAME COMES FROM A PROMINENT NEARBY MOUNTAIN. Longmont’s earliest settlers could see the towering, 14,000-foot mountain called Longs Peak — named for explorer Stephen H. Long — off in the distance from their burgeoning town. They were so intrigued by this awe-inspiring peak that they decided to name their city “Longmont” in its honor.


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LONGMONT HAS BEEN THE HOME OF SOME PROMINENT PEOPLE. Over the years, a handful of impressive celebrities, changemakers, athletes and other influential people have called Longmont home. Vance Brand, who had a prosperous career as a NASA astronaut, was born here in 1931 (and is now honored in the name of Longmont’s Vance Brand Municipal Airport!). Comedian and actress Kristen Schaal grew up here, and former NFL football player and coach Greg Biekert attended middle and high school in Longmont. More recently, Longmont Silver Creek High grad Valarie Allman won a gold medal in the discus at the 2020 summer Olympics.

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IT WAS THE SITE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC LIBRARY IN COLORADO. Reading has long been a part of Longmont’s history. Members of the original Chicago-Colorado Colony founded the Centennial State’s first public library in 1871. It was called Library Hall and had around 300 books.Today, Longmont has a thriving public library system, plus several beloved local bookstores, including Barbed Wire Books and Used Book Emporium.

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IT HELPED GIVE RISE TO JCPENNEY. JCPenney, one of the more well-known department stores around, has roots in Longmont. James Cash Penney (J.C.) left his hometown in Missouri and moved to Denver in 1897 upon the advice of his doctor, who suggested he take advantage of Colorado’s dry air. From there, he made his way north to Longmont, which better suited his propensity for small-town living. In Longmont, he used his $300 life’s savings to buy partial ownership in a butcher shop on Main Street. A few years later, he bought out his partner and changed the name to James C. Penney Meat Market. The store closed and, in December 1898, Penney got a job at the dry goods store The Golden Rule, where owner Tom Callahan took note of his strong work ethic. Callahan offered Penney a one-third ownership share for a new store in Evanston, Wyoming. Penney moved to Wyoming, eventually taking over ownership of the new chain, which he renamed JCPenney. And the rest, as they say, is history. PHOTOS (TOP TO BOTTOM) BY: COLIN ARGYS ALAN DAMKOEHLER LISA PATCHEM

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PHOTOS BY LINDSAY BRADY & SHERRI O’HARA

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6.

LONGMONT HAS SOME OF THE FASTEST INTERNET IN THE COUNTRY. In 2014, the city embarked on an ambitious plan to bring lightning-fast, fiber-optic internet to its residents and businesses. Today, Longmont’s NextLight gigabit broadband system continues to earn awards and accolades for its speed and reliability. It’s also helped make Longmont a hub for tech companies and remote workers.

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THE BREWERIES HERE ARE WORTH A ROAD TRIP. Some of the biggest names in craft brewing are in Longmont, including Oscar Blues and Left Hand. Other must-visit breweries include 300 Suns, Wibby, Grossen Bart, Bootstrap, Collision, Outworld, Primitive, Pumphouse, and Shoes & Brews. Though it’s not currently open for public rides because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Longmont’s BrewHop Trolley is a great way to hop from one brewery to the next (plus a few cideries and distilleries) with your private party.

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THE CITY IS HOME TO SOME SERIOUSLY DELICIOUS CHEESE. Yes, you read that right, cheese. Longmont’s Cheese Importers store and bistro regularly draws visitors from miles around, thanks to its mega, walk-in cheese refrigerator, adorable home goods and European-inspired fare. Plus, Longmont is also the headquarters of Haystack Mountain Cheese, which is well-known for its creamy, tangy goat cheese.

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LONGMONT IS CLOSE TO THE ACTION WHEN IT COMES TO AGRICULTURE. Within minutes of downtown, you’ll find family-owned farms and ranches like Buckner Family Farm, Aspen Moon Farm, Ollin Farms, Ya Ya Farm & Orchard, Sunflower Farm and many others. Plus, the Longmont farmers market, part of Boulder County Farmers Market, is a weekly community gathering held every Saturday during the summer at the Boulder County Fairgrounds.

How to Spend The Perfect Day in Longmont BREAKFAST: Grab a cup of coffee or a latte from Cafe Luna, located inside a charming little yellow house downtown. Walk across Coffman Street and stroll around Roosevelt Park, stopping for a look at the rose garden in summer or the holiday lights and ice skating rink in winter. MID-MORNING: Shop downtown, perusing stores like A Florae, Barbed Wire Books, Adorn, Absolute Vinyl and Simply Bulk. LUNCH: Grab a few tacos (and maybe a marg if you’re feeling sassy!) from Jefes Taco and Tequila. AFTERNOON: If you’re feeling artsy, spend a few hours painting a ceramic masterpiece of your own at Crackpots downtown. If you’d rather get a breath of fresh air, ride your bike along the St. Vrain Greenway or head to McIntosh Lake for walking, jogging, standup paddleboarding or just some rest and relaxing. Grab a beer afterward at one of Longmont’s many standout craft breweries, distilleries and cideries. DINNER: There are so many good dinner options in Longmont, it can be hard to pick just one. If a cocktail sounds tasty, head to Martinis for upscale drinks and entrees. If you’re in the mood to dine al fresco, hit the rooftop at The Roost. Want to watch the game? Grab a burger and a beer at Red Zone. Craving authentic Caribbean-style seafood? Make a reservation at Tortugas. EVENING: Pop in for a nightcap at Dry Land Distillers, which recently opened a gorgeous new tasting room on Main Street. And no matter where you’re at, always look up — Longmont gets some seriously amazing sunsets.

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CLIMATE CHANGE

Boulder

The Silicon Valley of Environmental Sciences BY JEFF BLUMENFELD

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF UCAR/NCAR WINTER-SPRING 2021-2022


B

oulder is host to a veritable alphabet soup of environmental centers and institutes focused on studying how the climate is changing. Consider NCAR, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, both studying climate and weather. Their climatologists collect extensive weather data to help understand how the climate is changing and how its effects might be mitigated. There’s NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, home of the world’s most accurate atomic clock. Boulder is also home to NSIDC, the National Snow and Ice Data Center, which studies the cryosphere, the frozen places of our planet that influence the entire world’s climate. If mankind is ever going to slow climate change, the first stop could very well be Boulder.

“Boulder is blessed as an amazingly beautiful place to live,” she says. “It fosters a sense of stewardship with CU and a dozen federal laboratories that are conducting cutting-edge climate and environmental research. We are also known for our very informed and engaged public

BOULDER’S CLIMATE PROWESS “Boulder represents the convergence of government and academic investment, intellect and environmental consciousness all in one city. We collaborate with a number of other organizations, including the approximately 1,000 researchers at NOAA, all working to advance the environmental sciences,” says Waleed Abdalati, professor of geography and executive director of yet another acronym: CIRES, the Cooperative Institute for Research In Environmental Sciences, a partnership based at the University of Colorado Boulder. He considers Boulder the Silicon Valley of Environmental Sciences, adding that CU is the No. 2 geoscience university in the world, according to U.S. News & World Report 2021 Best Global Universities standings. “We’re successful in securing government and other funding to help us understand the environment. The opportunities to collaborate here are tremendous and we can really tackle environmental science, climate science and climate change in a coordinated and robust way in all its dimensions – physical, human, chemical, policy. “I don’t think there’s any place quite like it in the country that has such a powerful capability,” Abdalati says.

BEAUTIFUL PLACE One big reason Boulder is such a hub for climate science and activism? It’s beautiful here, says former Boulder mayor Suzanne Jones, now executive director of the nonprofit EcoCycle which is dedicated to building a zero-waste community.

and a plethora of nonprofits in conservation and sustainability all doing their part to protect the planet.” EcoCycle is one of the oldest and largest nonprofit recyclers in the country. The organization started in 1976 when it sent a repurposed school bus around neighborhoods to collect newspapers for recycling, one of the first curbside collection programs in the U.S. “The group has played a pivotal role in innovating and demonstrating how we can live more sustainably on the planet,” Jones says. Today, EcoCycle is collecting and processing over 60,000 tons of recyclables every year, the greenhouse gas equivalent of annually taking 53,000 cars off the road.

HOME TO EXTREME ELEMENTS Ulyana Horodyskyj, Ph.D., a geologist/glaciologist/ climate change expert, has dedicated her career to educating the public about science, in particular, issues concerning the climate. She is an associate scientist for the North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center that supports tribal, federal, state and local natural resource management and decision-making. “Because Boulder is in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, it’s a unique area of the country that experiences so many weather phenomena,” she says. “This makes it such a unique natural laboratory for

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ULYANA HORODYSKYJ

study. You have wildfires, devastating floods, tornadoes in the nearby plains, damaging hail, blizzards and severe drought. “All we’re missing are damaging earthquakes and hurricanes,” she jokes. “But the benefits are, we can experience an up-close and personal look at how these extreme elements are affecting us all.”

SEE FOR YOURSELF To understand Boulder’s climate prowess firsthand, your first stop should be the Museum of Boulder for a fascinating look at the city’s role in climate research. With roots dating back to 1944, the museum has accumulated a significant collection of artifacts, documents and photographs that chronicle the history of the area. Inside, you’ll see how Boulder has been a hub for cutting-edge scientific research — from government laboratories to university partnerships to private technology companies. The abundance of scientists and engineers in and around Boulder helps create a unique and vibrant culture of intellectual curiosity and achievement, according to one museum display. Don’t miss the “Science on a Sphere Explorer,” an interactive display that shows real-time climate data from NOAA.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF UCAR/NCAR

The museum, located in a former Masonic Lodge building, also offers a spectacular rooftop view of the Flatirons, the striking, slanted, reddish-brown sandstone formations that make up a portion of Boulder’s foothills on the west side of town, making it a favorite location for private functions. The museum has been open during the pandemic, but it’s best to check before arrival. (museumofboulder.org) South of the city, on a hilltop surrounded by hiking trails, is the NCAR Mesa Laboratory devoted to further research and education in atmospheric sciences. Drawing inspiration from Anasazi cliff dwellings and echoing the pinkish hue of the nearby Flatirons, the iconic I.M. Pei complex is an international landmark. Movie buffs will also recognize the Mesa Lab as a filming location for the classic 1973 Woody Allen sci-fi spoof “Sleeper.” At the Mesa Lab Visitor Center you can explore hands-on exhibits about weather, climate, the sun, the atmosphere and the relationship between art and science. Learn about cloud formation, lightning and tornadoes. While the Visitor Center has been closed during the pandemic, it’s expected to re-open in 2022. Until then, you can enjoy a 360-degree virtual tour at https://tinyurl. com/ncarTB. For additional information: https://scied. ucar.edu Just outside the Visitor Center is an approximately half-mile self-guided weather trail that uses inter-


pretative signs to explain how weather and climate features affect Colorado’s Front Range — the corridor between Pueblo and Fort Collins, including Denver and Boulder. It remains open during the current health crisis. A spur leading from the trail connects to Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks with one of the city’s best views of the Flatirons. Bring a picnic and enjoy the beauty of this stunning landscape that local scientists are working to preserve for us all.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ULYANA HORODYSKYJ

K I M C LA RY

L I L LA P

K I M C LA RY CPSHADES

L I L LA P INJIRI

CPSHADES INJIRI OUTDOOR M AT TA VOICES OUTDOOR M AT TA OLIA VMOAIGC N ES JOHNNY WAS PEARL MAGNOLIA JOHNNY WAS PEARL 1122 Pearl Street | Boulder, CO 80302 3 0 3 - 4 4 4 - 0 2 8 2 | www.islandfarm.com 1122 Pearl Street | Boulder, CO 80302 3 0 3 - 4 4 4 - 0 2 8 2 | www.islandfarm.com

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MAKERS SERIES

What’s new

BY SARAH KUTA

with Big Red F founder Dave Query PHOTOS COURTESY OF BIG RED F RESTAURANT GROUP

DAVE QUERY IS A BUSY MAN. WITH FOUR DIFFERENT RESTAURANT CONCEPTS — JAX FISH HOUSE & OYSTER BAR, WEST END TAVERN, CENTRO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND THE POST CHICKEN AND BEER — AND MORE THAN A DOZEN LOCATIONS IN COLORADO (AND ONE IN KANSAS CITY), QUERY DOESN’T GET MUCH TIME TO RELAX. AND HE’S PERFECTLY OK WITH THAT.

Query, a self-described workaholic at age 58, founded his Big Red F restaurant group 27 years ago and isn’t showing any signs of slowing down yet. We sat down with Query to learn more about his approach to hospitality and the restaurant business. What was the COVID-19 pandemic like for your restaurants? What pivots did you make and why? It was crazy. It’s hard to ever plan for something like that. One of our big focuses was tackling pay inequity during that time and making a switch to something we had talked about for a long time, but the pandemic gave us the opportunity to finally tackle that pay inequity between the front and back of the house. So when we reopened, we moved into a tip-sharing model and created top-of-market wages for every position. Colorado’s minimum wage is now $12.32 an hour and with our tip-sharing model, the lowest-paid employee we have now makes $22 an hour. We’ve got dishwashers making $22 to $24 an hour, and cooks making upwards of $28 to $30 an hour. And it’s been great. It’s really helped to close the gap between the front and back of house, which was already a huge inequity and for some employees, who are

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working two and three jobs, this was a great opportunity for us to really figure that out and stop that. You almost had to have a reboot. It’s hard to make a change just out of the blue, so coming out of COVID-19, everything was up for grabs at that point and so it wasn’t as hard to make a change because we had just lived through the craziest thing of our lives, why not do something else crazy? What’s your overarching vision for Big Red F restaurants in terms of expansion and future plans? We’re trying to take advantage of some opportunities coming out of the pandemic and we have plans to grow the Post Chicken and Beer joints, so we opened one in Estes Park and we’re opening one in Fort Collins. We also launched Big Red F Catering and Provisions, and we bought a food truck — we named her Queenie. She’s running around now as people are changing their catering and their partying habits. We’re trying to alter our ability to offer food in a way that lends itself to more of the outdoor and alternative event and party spaces, and certainly having a truck helps us to be a little more nimble in that pursuit.


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We’ve got one restaurant that’s out of state in Kansas City and that’s hard to do really well, so we’ll pick and choose when we do that again. But we just love Colorado and the Front Range. We looked at places in the mountains and on the Western Slope, but nothing has ever really stuck. We’re just going to keep trying to do things that are relevant and enjoyed by as many people as possible. What motivates you to come to work everyday? What excites you about your job? It’s just fun. I’ve had a lot of people who have been with the company for a long time, so I have a commitment to them to make things work and create opportunities for them, whatever that looks like. It’s fun. The restaurant business is very challenging and very rewarding and very exciting and kick-you-in-the-butt and knock-the-windoutta-your sails and all that. You can’t drop your guard,

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especially in pandemic times. It’s been quite exciting — both exhilarating and terrifying — during these last 20 months figuring out how to go about doing things and what the right moves are. As you approach 60, do you have any retirement plans in the works? When you read my obituary it will say, ‘Dave has given his notice and is retiring soon, if not already.’ But no, I have no desire not to work. I like to work. I get a lot of reward out of work. I am not the kind of person that’s like, ‘Man, I can’t wait to retire.’ I certainly like to take time off and travel and enjoy vacations with kids and my wife and family. I love recreating, but I love working.


What is your approach or philosophy to collaborating with/mentoring other chefs and restaurateurs? Why? I always help people write business plans and help them raise money and help them find locations, negotiate leases. It’s what I would expect people to do for my kids if they reached out and had a business challenge. That’s what makes community is you support people and more businesses. The more thriving businesses, the more thriving business is. So always trying to help people. I had a lot of good help when I was coming up and I’m a big believer in that pay-it-forward philosophy. When somebody calls and says, ‘Hey, I need some advice,’ I’m like, ‘Hell yeah, I’m honored that you would think that anything I have to say is worth listening to.’ We’ve had restaurant owners come hang out with us in our offices and spend a day learning all that we do. We put a lot of people through mini-bootcamps, sometimes a day, sometimes two or three days. We’re not saving lives, this isn’t something patented scientific process we’re doing. It’s pretty cut and dry, but sometimes it’s helpful for people to hear the repetitive response to their questions. Maybe it’s different coming from somebody sitting in the trenches with them, doing it. What are the biggest restaurant trends or challenges you foresee in the near- and long term? Certainly COVID-19 forced people inside, which required them to dine in their homes, so carryout and

takeaway food has become a big part of everybody’s lives — just trying to figure that out. We’re trying to work with the current supply chain issues and I think they’re going to get worse. We’re all just poised for another closure, another dining room modification, another mask mandate. The last 20 months have been a whole new level of what makes a trend and where it’s going. It’s all too up in the air. We’re just going to take it one day at a time, one shift at a time, one guest at a time. What do you wish people knew about dining out right now? I just wish people would lean into kindness. It’s really challenging being in any service business right now. Everyone is tired, including the guest. It’s just frustrating right now. It is what it is, here we all are and here we all go. Everybody you meet is going through something you have no idea about. We’re all dealing with it. I wish that people would make sure to put themselves in the shoes of other people. What’s your favorite dish to order at any Big Red F restaurant? That would be like saying who’s my favorite child. I like all of our restaurants. I try to eat off the menus as much as possible to give good and creative feedback. If I was just stuck with one item that I could eat, I sure do love breakfast at Centro — it’s really delicious. I love sitting and eating a big plate of oysters at Jax, there’s never a bad time happening there. I like them all. I dig everything we’re making right now.

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BREAKFAST IS THE MOST IMPORTANT MEAL,

By Aimee Heckel

YET EXPERTS AGREE IT’S ALSO VITAL TO GET ENOUGH SLEEP. THE PERFECT COMBO: SLEEP IN AND GO TO BRUNCH.

Boulder’s Best Brunches

Your stomach says you've got plans for the weekend

BOULDER KNOWS HOW TO BRUNCH — AND IN UNIQUE WAYS, TOO. HERE, YOU’LL FIND EVERYTHING FROM BOTTOMLESS BRUNCHES TO ELEGANT OYSTER MEANS TO FUN BLOODY MARY BARS. HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME OF OUR FAVORITE WAYS TO BRUNCH BIG IN BOULDER. Greenbriar Inn, 8735 N. Foothills HWY 303-440-7979 | greenbriarinn.com Greenbriar’s elegant Sunday brunch is nothing short of epic. It’s ideal for a special occasion that necessitates oysters, prime rib and multiple glasses of champagne. Brunch here used to be served buffet-style, but because of COVID-19, it is now a la carte. Enjoy eggs benedict, bagels and lox, Caesar salad, salmon and shrimp — with unlimited champagne. Bonus: Greenbriar Inn is a destination in and of itself, located at the base of the foothills with stunning views.

PHOTO BY AIMEE HECKEL

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PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR USER CARL MUELLER

Centro Mexican Kitchen, 950 Pearl St. 303-442-7771 | centromexican.com This innovative Latin restaurant on the west end of Pearl Street expanded its brunch menu in 2021 with creative options, like build-your-own taco boards and a bacon Bloody Maria with housemade chili-infused tequila. A fun one to try this fall or winter is the new Birra Burrito, made with slow-braised beef and stuffed with eggs, potatoes, Chihuahua cheese and onions, finished with a pour of consommé from beef bone stock. Vegans can enjoy the Crispy Cauliflower Taco Board and Grilled Squash and Tofu Bowl.

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PHOTO BY AIMEE HECKEL

Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse, 1770 13th St. 303-442-4993 | boulderteahouse.com The Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse is a bucket-list destination in Boulder. Enjoy a lengthy weekend brunch (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday) in one of Boulder’s most colorful buildings. The teahouse itself has a rich history; it was crafted by Boulder’s sister city, Tajikistan. Sip some house chai with whole wheat chai pancakes. Try a new kind of omelet, the Kookoo Sabzi, a Persian herb omelette with baba ganoush, crispy rice, walnuts and naan. Or if you’d rather stick to familiar comfort breakfast, you can also find eggs, potatoes, buttermilk pancakes and granola.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF SPRUCE FARM AND FISH

Lucile’s Creole Cafe, 2124 14th St. 303-442-4743 | luciles.com Lucile’s, a long-time Boulder staple, has long been known for its Creole and Cajun brunch. This year, it’s just as tasty but looks a little different than in the past. Lucile’s offers brunch kits that you can take home for the ultimate brunch with no cooking. There are a variety of different kits to choose from, such as a biscuits and gravy kit that serves four to six (mmm, buttermilk biscuits and tasty hot sauce) and the Cajun Lunch Kit, complete with gumbo, rice, red beans, French bread and (of course) that hot sauce. The Pain Perdu Kit is our personal fave, with French toast, Louisiana sausage, scrambled eggs, fruit and buttery Pain Perdu syrup. Get your brunch to go with a mimosa kit or (and?) a bloody Mary kit, with some pickled okra to pop in your bevvy. There’s also a Lucile’s in Longmont at 518 Kimbark St. The Buff, 2600 Canyon Blvd. 303.442.9150 | buffrestaurant.com The Buff is a Boulder celebrity; it starred on “Man Vs. Food.” Its claim to Travel Channel fame? Saddlebag Pancakes, massive pancakes stuffed with diced bacon or sausage and topped with eggs (yes, you can still order them to try them out yourself). While that’s what got the Buff in the spotlight, that’s far from the end of its creative dishes. Start with French toast “stix” drizzled in vanilla sauce. Then try the white buffalo cakes — pancakes filled with white chocolate chips, topped with strawberries. Or better yet, you’ve heard of chicken and waffles, but how about chicken and French toast, all gluten-free? Spruce Farm and Fish, 2115 13th St. 303-442-4880 spruceboulderado.com Spruce, located in the Hotel Boulderado, also has a delicious brunch menu. In addition to the obligatory mimosa, check out two new items

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on the brunch menu for fall/winter. First, strawberry and sweet cream cheese pancakes are a vegetarian option: buttermilk pancakes topped with a sweet cream cheese spread, strawberries, whipped cream and a dash of fresh mint. For a more savory option, the seasonal must-try is the salmon lox and cream cheese bagel plate. Pick a plain or everything bagel. Top with plain or chive cream cheese. And embellish with cured and smoked sliced salmon, capers, shaved red onion, lettuce and tomato. Snooze A.M. Eatery, 1617 Pearl St. 303-225-7344 | snoozeeatery.com Snooze is a chain, but it’s mostly based in Colorado, and it’s easily a Boulder favorite that can’t be overlooked. This retro-style diner puts a fun and innovative twist on comfort food, like its famous pineapple upside-down pancakes. If you can’t decide or want to go on a flavor journey, order a flight of pancakes (pineapple upside-down, blueberry danish and sweet potato). Of course, Snooze does brunch cocktails like a boss, but if you’re alcohol-free, its cold-pressed juices won’t leave you thirsty. Tip: The wait can be brutal here, so prepare yourself for a leisurely experience. Walnut Cafe, 3037 Walnut St. 303-447-2315 | walnutcafe.com This classic breakfast joint doesn’t call it brunch per se, but it serves breakfast and lunch with an incredible espresso bar, so it wins a spot on the best brunches of Boulder list. This is where Boulderites go for comfort fare, like omelets, big buttermilk biscuits and banana walnut pancakes. But you can also be surprised by some unexpected plates, like tofu rancheros for vegans and blueberry cornbread made fresh every morning. Walnut Cafe has been a local favorite for more than three decades. It also has a location at 673 Broadway St.


Beyond Boulder

The Kitchen, 1039 Pearl St. 303-544-5973 thekitchenbistros.com The Kitchen, ideally located on the Pearl Street Mall, does a hip, locally inspired brunch. Start with shrimp, salmon or fried green tomatoes with a crawfish remoulade. Let those flavors take you to the main course, whether that’s a classic farmer’s breakfast with sourdough toast, or the avocado and crab cake benedict with lime hollandaise.The Kitchen has a separate full brunch beverage menu, too. You’ve heard of a Bloody Mary, but have you ever had a Lucid Mary? That’s like a bloody (tomato, Tabasco, celery, horseradish bitters) with cachaca, paranubes rum, black pepper syrup and lime.

Tamayo, 1400 Larimer St., Denver 720-946-1433 | eattamayo.com If you don’t mind a short drive to Denver, the bottomless brunch at Tamayo — right on bustling Larimer Street — is a can’t-miss. Every Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., enjoy free-flowing small plates and endless brunch cocktails (including unlimited margaritas). Tamayo is a hip Mexican restaurant, so brunch options include tasty huevos, carnitas tacos and tres leches. If the weather allows (you never know in Colorado) and you can score a seat on the patio, the people-watching is the perfect dessert.

River and Woods, 2328 Pearl St. 303-993-6301 riverandwoodsboulder.com Now this is brunch. Specialty cocktails, French press coffee, brunch poutine with cheese curds and duck gravy and vanilla custard-dipped challah French toast — oh my. While many of the menu items here are indulgent as all get out (like dulce de leche churros with hazelnut dip for a brunchy dessert), River and Woods has mastered balance; there’s also a Colorado farmers market salad, a healthy quinoa burger with “magic sauce” and smoked salmon caesar salad. All of this is served in a century-old miner’s cabin converted into a cozy restaurant on the east end of Pearl.

READ MORE ABOUT FOOD AND DRINKS ONLINE: THE COLORADO STRONG BENEFIT BEER IS BACK

PHOTO BY AIMEE HECKEL

HTTPS://WWW.TRAVELBOULDER.COM/THECOLORADO-STRONG-BENEFIT-BEER-IS-BACK

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REFUEL

Winter Warmups Seasonal Drinks to Enjoy in Boulder County By Brittany Anas From cocktail bars and breweries with seasonal sips to cozy tea houses and chocolate shops serving hot drinks, Boulder County beverage outposts sure know how to warm up a crowd come winter. Whether you’re looking for a mug of decadent hot cocoa, a spiced cocktail, a hot toddy, a rich chocolate porter or a comforting cup of tea, here’s where you can find the absolute best soul-warming beverages in Boulder and its surrounding environs.

Jungle: Snow Globe 2018 10th St. in Boulder jungletiki.com Jungle, an island-inspired bar tucked off Pearl Street, has transportive powers. Enter into this swank, foliage-filled cocktail lounge and you’ll feel like you’re vacationing in the tropics. Adding to the escapist allure, general manager Cassidy Bradley created this fantastical cocktail called “The Snow Globe” that’s encased in a bubble of cinnamon smoke. The spiced cocktail is made with Bounty Aged Rum, Avua Amburana Cachaça (which has warm, woodsy notes), pear, cinnamon and lemon. Piece, Love & Chocolate: PL&C Hot Cocoa 805 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 449-4804 pieceloveandchocolate.com A hot chocolate hot spot, Piece, Love & Chocolate serves its velvety smooth hot cocoa with vanilla bean whipped cream and homemade marshmallows. Chocolate lovers can also enjoy thick, European-style sipping chocolates that come in an array of tasty flavors ranging from salted caramel to honey lavender.

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Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar: Espresso Martini 928 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 444-1811 jaxfishhouse.com/boulder Espresso martinis have made a comeback that’s as strong as the ‘80s-era cocktail itself. Enjoy one of these classic coffee cocktails at Jax. “Made with a shot of Coda espresso, Ketel One vodka, house-made almond syrup and house-made coffee liqueur, it’s the perfect closing stanza to a meal,” says Jax manager Fabio Stefani. The Post Chicken & Beer Lafayette: Empress 1908 Gin Martini 105 West Emma St. in Lafayette (303) 593-2066 postchickenandbeer.com/lafayette Colorado-style fried chicken and beer is the name of the game at this Lafayette outpost. But definitely save room for this gin martini, too. This frothy cocktail stars indigo-hued Empress Gin, which, thanks to the inclusion of ginger in the botanicals, has a nice wintry flavor profile. Centro Mexican Kitchen: Apple Hot Toddy 950 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 442-7771 centromexican.com A departure from Centro’s margarita-centric menu, this sipper is the perfect thing to keep you warm on the year-round covered patio as you take a break from shopping on Pearl Street. The hot toddy is made with Old Forester Bourbon, as well as apple, honey syrup, lemon and cinnamon.

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Jill’s Restaurant and Bistro: The Julien Old Fashion 900 Walnut St. in Boulder (720) 406-7399 stjulien.com/eat-drink/jill’s-restaurantand-bistro From the fireplaces to the live music to the spa offerings like a gemstone chakra balancing treatment, a staycation at St Julien is sure to stave off any winter blues. For a warming nightcap, you’ve got your pick of well-balanced cocktails. The house old fashioned is a good choice. It’s made with Woodford Rye, housemade bitters and perfectly sour Italian Amarena cherries. The Root Kava Co.: Kavas and Teas 1641 28th St. in Boulder (303) 856-3851 therootkavabar.com Enjoy kava, small-batch kombucha or a rotating selection of herbal teas at The Root Kava Co. For a winter pick-me-up, try a kava drink like the Ghostbuster, which has more than a dozen juice flavors including grapefruit, passionfruit, blueberry, guava and citrus. Stem Ciders: Banjo Try some at Acreage, 1380 Horizon Ave. in Lafayette (303) 227-3243 acreageco.com Stem Ciders teamed up with Denver’s Laws Whisky House to create this dry and crisp winter cider. The cider was aged in bourbon casks for eight months, which gives it notes of toffee and caramel without exhibiting any residual sweetness. The cider has a light and refreshing finish.

The Kitchen American Bistro: The Longness of Autumn 1039 Pearl St. in Boulder thekitchenbistros.com When it comes to well-balanced, seasonal craft cocktails, The Kitchen consistently delivers. Exhibit A: This tequila cocktail, which is a nice segue into the chillier months. It’s made with a walnut blanco, spiced pear liqueur, chili liqueur, lime and grapefruit. The cocktail is available at The Kitchen and Upstairs Cocktail Lounge. Boulder Beer: Shake Chocolate Porter Find it at boulderbeer.com/beer-finder/ Using a blend of five different grains, this rich layered porter creates cascades of velvety flavors blending notes of cream, cacao nibs, coffee, rich milk chocolate and caramel. The porter has a dark roasted aroma that’s best enjoyed by the fireplace. Boulder Dushanbe Tea House: Afternoon Tea 1770 13th St. in Boulder (303) 442-4993 boulderteahouse.com A crown jewel of Boulder, afternoon tea just feels like a special treat at the Dushanbe Tea House. The tea spot has a long list of black, green, herbal, puerh, oolong and white teas. But during chilly spells, the peppermint, cinnamon and tangerine, chamomile and hazelnut teas are extra comforting. Afternoon tea is traditionally served from 3 to 5 p.m.


Avanti Food and Beverage—Boulder: Winter Warmer Cocktails 1401 Pearl St. in Boulder boulder.avantifandb.com In addition to hosting the uber-festive Christmas pop-up bar “Miracle on Pearl Street,” Avanti’s rooftop bar is slinging $8 boozy “winter warmers” all season long. For hot cocoa lovers, there’s a Finnish Hot Cocoa that comes with a crown of whipped cream. Or, you can get an Irish coffee, hot toddy, or mulled wine with brandy and winter spices. Deki: Spiked S’Mores 802 S. Public Road, unit E in Lafayette (303) 284-3683 dekispirits.com S’mores—but make ‘em boozy! This Lafayette distillery has a seasonal cocktail menu with delicious winter cocktails, including the Spiked S’mores drink that’s made with steamed milk, chocolate, bourbon and topped with charred marshmallows and graham crackers. Other dessert-inspired cocktails on the winter menu include a gingerbread martini and Hot Apple Pie made with spiced rum, cinnamon liqueur and apple cider. Abbott & Wallace: Peppers & Palms 350 Terry St., Suite No. 120 in Longmont 720-545-2017 abbottandwallace.com Home to Longtucky Spirits, Abbott & Wallace Distilling in downtown Longmont is a “grain-to-glass” distillery. The cocktail menu features classic and inventive signature cocktails like the Peppers & Palms drink that’s made with a Pueblo chili-infused rum, lime and Falernum, which brings notes of ginger and clove.

Spruce Farm & Fish: Ginger Pear Fizz 2115 13th St. in Boulder (303) 442-4880 spruceboulderado.com Skip the partridge, but imbibe with something from the pear tree. The Ginger Pear Fizz from Spruce Farm & Fish inside Hotel Boulderado is made with Breckenridge Gin and St. George Spiced Pear Liqueur and topped with ginger beer. Other seasonal drinks at hotel outposts include an Herbal G&T with rosemary lavender syrup and the Pumpkin Spice White Russian. Dry Land Distillers: Hot Buttered Rum 519 Main St. in Longmont (720) 600-4945 drylanddistillers.com For a decadent winter treat, warm up with a hot butter rum at Dry Land Distillers’ patio or tasting room. The agricole style of Dry Land’s rum lends itself nicely to the richness inherent in this classic holiday drink that’s made with butter, spice and brown sugar. 300 Suns Brewing: Mexican Hot Chocolate Stout 335 1st Ave. Unit C in Longmont (720) 442-8292 300sunsbrewing.com Released at the end of November, the Mexican Hot Chocolate Stout boasts cinnamon, vanilla, cocoa nibs and black onyx cocoa. The rich stout has a trio of peppers that make it extra warming.

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EXPERIENCES

New Platform Connects You With Outdoor Adventure Guides

PHOTO COURTESY OF 57HOURS

FIND YOUR ADVENTURE WITH 57HOURS Boulder offers such unparalleled access to nature that, at times, it can be overwhelming. How do you get into rock climbing, backcountry skiing or mountain biking, without any experience? Sure, you can ask a friend to lend you some gear and take you out, but that’s not always an option, nor is it always the safest plan. A new platform called 57Hours wants to help you make the most of your precious weekend time by connecting you with the best, certified guides in the business. Whether you want to try surfing while you’re on vacation or go rock climbing closer to home, the platform can help. Simply select an adventure from the website’s dropdown menu, then enter your preferred location. Or choose “All Adventures” to see what’s available in a specific region. Voila, you’ll see a list of guided adventures you can book on the site. There’s even information about each individual guide, as well as a variety of pricing options depending on the duration of the experience and other factors. In Boulder, you can book a guide for a women’s climbing camp, a climbing excursion on The Flatirons or a climbing adventure in

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By Sarah Kuta Boulder Canyon. In Colorado more broadly, you can hire a guide to hike Longs Peak with you, or take you mountain biking in places like Fruita, Crested Butte and Aspen. WE CHATTED WITH 57HOURS’ FOUNDER VIKTOR MAROHNIC TO GET THE SCOOP ON WHAT THIS PLATFORM IS ALL ABOUT. What’s the story behind 57Hours? What inspired you to launch the platform? The transformative effect of being outdoors is the reason we created 57Hours. We want to make outdoor sports and adventures available to everyone, anywhere in the world, all while fueling a new generation of more mindful people. We also seek to help independent guides make a living doing what they love. 57Hours provides a platform for guides to offer their trips to an excited audience, fueling the creativity that is benefiting both guides and a new generation of adventurers. What does the name 57Hours mean? Where does it come from? There are 57 hours from 3:00 pm, Friday, to midnight, Sunday. For years, we maximized those hours, skipping out on work early at the end of


the week, packing the car with gear, driving off to climb, hike, ski, run or sail, and returning late Sunday, tired, happy and fully recharged. 57Hours is a nod to the fellow weekend warriors out there.

What problems does 57Hours solve? What voids does it fill? If you want to go out for a day of climbing or skiing with a guide, most people don’t know where to start. And once you do find a certified guide, it might take dozens of email threads and phone calls before you confirm a trip. 57Hours has streamlined this process so that booking a guided adventure can be as easy as ordering an Uber or reserving an Airbnb. It’s also a great resource for discovering outdoor adventures. Most people have never heard of trips like skiing and sailing in Norway or hiking the hidden trails of Iceland. 57Hours hopes to be a point of inspiration for booking some of these bucket-list adventures of a lifetime.

What’s the process like for guides and what should they know about working with the platform? What’s in it for them? It takes 10-15 years for a guide to build a client list that allows them to book enough work to make a living. We speed up that process by providing marketing and audience reach for guides so they can focus on creating the most amazing adventures all over the world.

Can you share a bit more about some of the social/sustainability initiatives you have in place with the company?

We recently joined 1% For The Planet and are also working with AccessFund and POW-Canada. This involves donating 1% of our gross sales to environmental non-profits and choosing an environmental partner for each trip we promote, who will receive a portion of those proceeds. We also run 100% carbon neutral whenever possible and the rest we offset with contributions to climate change initiatives. Our servers run carbon-free, our adventures are all human-powered and our guides educate around “Leave No Trace” methods and how to be environmentally conscious in the outdoors. We also want to make an impact on diversity in the outdoors. We are starting an education fund to support guides’ training and certification, especially BIPOC and female guides. What else do you want people to know? Our biggest goal is to make the outdoors more accessible to all. Whether you’re exploring a new location for the first time, interested in trying a new sport or hoping to improve at an existing hobby, 57Hours will connect you with the best fit guide for your needs and skill level.

READ MORE ONLINE: HTTPS://WWW.TRAVELBOULDER.COM/NEW-PLATFORM-CONNECTS-YOU-WITH-OUTDOORADVENTURE-GUIDES

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EXPERIENCES

Transport Yourself to Meow Wolf by Sarah Kuta

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEOW WOLF

By Aimee Heckel

This fall, Denver opened an interactive art experience like nothing else on Earth. Meow Wolf has landed.

the laundry room is more than meets the eye). Follow your curiosity through wormholes and portals, through strange staircases and inside lockers and a massive, glowing, indoor castle; wander through glowing hallways and a labyrinth of mirrors. Sit in vehicles. Open drawers.

Meow Wolf is a massive museum of psychedelic, colorful, mind-bending art centered around a fun, fiction story. As the narrative goes, a crazy cosmic event merged four different worlds; the result is called Convergence Station, Meow Wolf’s third permanent installation and the biggest yet. It’s set up like an intergalactic bus station (complete with the actual bus that helped spark the Americans with Disability Act years ago).

Get the most out of the experience by reading up on the storyline before you start, and don’t be afraid to ask the costumed actors questions and for tips. Meow Wolf is the combination of one-ofa-kind artwork created by more than 300 creatives (more than 100 of which are local), so take time to read the signs and dive deep. Meow Wolf is fun for people of all ages, and it spans four different floors. You could spend all day there.

And what better way to step off at this otherworldly stop than to make a full transportation-centric trip out of it? Stay at historic Union Station (where you can also grab a Meow Wolf glittery cocktail and a flight of pancakes in the morning), and indulge in dinner at Citizen Rail, named after its proximity to Denver’s big train station.

It’s only fitting to stay in Denver’s only train station hotel, the luxurious Crawford Hotel at Union Station. Crawford ‘s special Meow Wolf package includes a night’s stay and two Tropical Vertigo cocktails at the Cooper Lounge, also located inside the bustling station; transportation to and from Convergence Station in a Tesla; and free valet parking.

This trip is all about being transported: to Denver’s past, and far beyond your trippiest imagination. Plan at least a few hours to walk through this wild installation, and don’t be afraid to touch, play and explore. Try doors, look up, look down, you never know what you’ll find. Uncover secret rooms through tunnels and secret doors (hint:

READ MORE ONLINE: HTTPS://WWW.TRAVELBOULDER.COM/TRANSPORTYOURSELF-TO-MEOW-WOLF/

YOU DON’T HAVE TO GO FAR TO TRAVEL OUT OF THIS WORLD

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RETURN TO DOWNTOWN BOUDER

MARCH

3-6 2022

F I L M S / F O O D / M U SI C / PARTIES / MORE Excited to return to our traditional March dates and downtown locations. Plus the Century Theaters, and the return of the Adventure Film Pavilion and Longmont screenings!

B I FF 1.c o m

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Let’s Find Your Boulder! MEGHAN BACH Realtor || Boulder Bolder Home Realtor HomeTeam Team 619.955.2788 MeghanBach.com Meghan Bach is a Broker Associate affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate Broker in Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity Laws.

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