Travel Boulder Magazine Summer-Fall 2022

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FAMILY ADVENTURES Fun Activities for Kids and Adults

VOLUNTEERING ON THE FRONT RANGE Give Back and Feel Good

MEET THE MAKER

Z2 Entertainment CEO Cheryl Liguori

BEST BOULDER WINERIES Where to Sip Reds, Whites and Rosés

ADVENTURE SUMMER/FALL 2022

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

SUMMER/FALL 2022 PUBLISHER/FOUNDER

JOHN R. BRICE

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/FOUNDER

JILL NAGEL-BRICE EDITORIAL

EDITOR-COPY MANAGER

SARAH KUTA

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

I am delighted to announce that Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are now five years old. It all started with a vision to share all that beautiful Boulder and the surrounding areas have to offer. The talented people behind the scenes brought the idea to life and made it happen. Thank you to my wife Jill, Aimee, Sarah, Tyler, Drew, Monika and all of our writers and designers for your contributions to creating a vibrant website and semi-annual magazine. Thank you to all of the advertisers who have supported Travel Boulder, and to the Boulder community for embracing a new and exciting media platform. We have become one of the fastest growing media companies in Boulder County, reaching an annual audience of over 405,592 users and readers who experience our website, magazine and weekly newsletter. The past few years have been challenging to say the least. This issue is a celebration of life, of getting out there and having new adventures and experiences. This issue presents ideas to enrich your life, from things to do, experiences and adventures to have, culture and entertainment options, volunteering ideas and local restaurants and seasonal cocktails to enjoy. We start the issue with our bucket list of adventures to enjoy. How many have you experienced? Boulder is also a great place to raise your children. Aimee Heckel, our local mom who knows best, explores free family adventures and activities throughout the area. We discussed the perfect Boulder County day with Pamela Meadows, the new curator at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art. Explore the rewards of volunteering, giving back while visiting or living in the area. There are all sorts of opportunities in Boulder. Boulder is unique to say the least. Aimee Heckel shows you the way to experience new stores that have opened in Boulder. For even more inspiration, meet Cheryl Liguori, who brings 30 years of experience to Boulder’s Z2 Entertainment. Living large while visiting Boulder: We also look at some of the best luxury Airbnbs and vacation rentals in Boulder and provide ideas about places for your visitors to stay. Visit the best wineries and tasting rooms in Boulder County, too. Meet Chef Daniel Asher of River & Woods and his newest restaurant, Ash’Kara. Sarah Kuta sat down with him to discuss his guiding philosophies for business and life. Create your own adventures this summer and fall. We hope that this issue has helped to inspire your thought process and maybe even create a longlasting memory.

— John R. Brice Publisher and Co-Founder of Travel Boulder

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AIMEE HECKEL SARAH KUTA JEFF BLUMENFELD BARRY BORTNICK BRITTANY ANAS ALICIA COHN

PUBLICATION DESIGNER/ART DIRECTOR

MONIKA EDGAR DESIGNER

DAISY BAUER ADVERTISING SALES

JOHN R. BRICE JILL NAGEL-BRICE DIGITAL TEAM DEVELOPER

DREW BARON SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

ISABELLE NAGEL BRICE

On the cover: "Jeff & Paige Get Outdoors!" Photo by: Caroline Colvin Photography, carolinecolvinphotography.com

Copyright 2022 by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly prohibited without publisher’s permission, including original editorial, graphics, design, photography, advertising and sponsored content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are published by Go Visit Media Co., 2535 Meadow Ave, Boulder CO 80304 | Phone: 720-708-6803 Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com Sales: john@travelboulder.com, jill@travelboulder.com Travelboulder.com Facebook.com/travelboulder Instagram.com/travel_boulder


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Contents

58 14 SUMMER & FALL BUCKET LIST 22 FAMILY ADVENTURES IN BOULDER 28 BMoCA CURATOR PAMELA MEADOWS 32 VOLUNTEERING ON THE FRONT RANGE 39 UNIQUE STORES 42 MEET CHERYL LIGUORI 50 LUXURY VACATION RENTALS 58 BEST BOULDER WINERIES 64 CHEF DANIEL ASHER 68 SUMMER SIPS 69 ADVERTISING INDEX 74 EXPERIENCES

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THINGS TO DO

THE

summer

& fall

BUCKET LIST

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FAIR WINDS HOT AIR BALLOON FLIGHTS

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LET’S ALL TAKE A MOMENT TO SMILE AND ENJOY THE LONG DAYS BATHED IN SUNSHINE. THE LAST TWO YEARS REMINDED US HOW LUCKY WE ARE TO LIVE HOW AND WHERE WE DO. IT’S TIME TO SHRUG OFF THE SLUGGISHNESS OF A COLD WINTER. IT’S TIME TO TURN UP THE ADRENALINE. TIME TO FLY, FLOAT, DRIFT, SPEED AND SWIM IN THE SUMMER SUN.

BY BARRY BORTNICK

TAKE A HOT AIR BALLOON RIDE Since the dawn of man, we’ve looked with wonderment at the creatures that flutter, float and fly across the sky. Greek legend speaks of Icarus, a young man who took flight but failed to account for the sun’s heat upon his waxed wings. Flight is an urge as old as time. You can satisfy that urge and enjoy a better fate than Icarus if you choose to float over the Front Range in a hot air balloon. Anyone up with the sun in the summertime has seen colorful giant spheres drifting during a cloudless Boulder dawn. Anyone can enjoy a 90-minute drift, with help from Fair Winds Hot Air Balloon Flights, which operates just outside of Boulder. One moment you’re on the ground and, in a few minutes, you are eyeball to eyeball with a bird. The company operates May 1 to Thanksgiving. Flights cost around $250 per person, or $700 per person for a private experience. You also get a parting gift bag with champagne or sparkling cider (sometimes juice), a t-shirt, balloon pin and a personalized flight certificate.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF MILE-HI SKYDIVING CENTER

Weather conditions allow for only one flight a day, right after sunrise. The experience is like no other. Imagine being seated in a comfy chair as it slowly, and gently, lifts thousands of feet skyward. You are the cloud. Enjoy it. For more information about flights, www. HotAirBalloonRidesColorado.com. PRACTICE INDOOR FLOATING Now that your gentle Rocky Mountain sky drift is done, it’s time to enhance a new challenge. How about some skydiving, without a plane or a parachute? You don’t need either to experience skydiving. In fact, at iFLY Indoor Skydiving, you barely get off the ground. The magic comes inside a giant wind tube, which provides the perfect conditions to simulate an actual sky fall. You simply enter a wind-filled tunnel and lean forward into the gushing air. An instructor holds on to help you find the best position for the simulated plunge. The flights last a minute, to replicate the actual time of a true skydive. But in this case, there is no falling. You just lean forward into the tunnel and let the wind support you like a bed. “You go from standing to floating,” said Meghan Evilsizor, general manager with iFLY Indoor Skydiving in Lone Tree. “You are never falling, and you never get that falling feeling.”

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THINGS TO DO

Evilsizor has extensive skydiving experience. She’s logged more than 1,300 jumps. “The experience is hard to describe,” Evilsizor said. “You’re flying. And it leads to a sense of freedom and stress release. It’s also very emotional, because you are trying something new, and you are happy about it.” Experienced trainers are on hand to instruct and guide the new divers through maneuvers. It takes time to adjust, but with experience, even novices can learn a range of flying turns and twists. The fun is open to anyone aged 3 and up. The flight simulator is also used by top-level skydivers. “Skydivers use our facility for training,” Evilsizor said. “Just like using an indoor climbing gym for climbing practice.” For more details, visit www.iflyworld.com. GO SKYDIVING Now that the simulated fall is in the bag, time for the real deal. No simulator, just you tethered to a pro in a small plane cruising at 12,500 feet. Mile-Hi Skydiving Center in Longmont is the place to cross skydiving off the old bucket list. “It’s an experience like no other,” said John Coleman, the company’s dropzone manager. “You get unbeatable views of the majestic Rocky Mountains from a perspective that is truly unique; jumping from an aircraft traveling over 100 miles per hour from 12,500 feet.” Freefall speeds hit 130 mph for nearly a minute before you — and your tandem professional skydiver — land together in an open field. Mile-Hi Skydiving Center has the state’s largest and longest-running dropzone. They’ve handled more than 1 million jumps so far. “While motivations to jump from a perfectly good airplane differ vastly, a common recurring theme is the ‘bucket-list’ jumper who simply wants to say they overcame their fears, gathered all their courage and took the leap of faith into the adrenaline-packed world of skydiving,” Coleman said. The skydiving is open to first-timers, licensed skydivers and aspiring students. For more information, visit www.mile-hi-skydiving.com. COMPLETE A ZIPLINE COURSE Of course, you don’t have to drop from a plane to enjoy a surge of adrenalized fun. Want to fly above Castle Rock while hitting speeds of 60

PHOTO COURTESY OF iFLY INDOOR SKYDIVING

mph? No worries, because the zipline course at The Edge has you dialed in for two miles of adventure. Ziplining is a whirlwind of an experience. Those who have taken part say is just like flying. For a moment, you are a bird, a plane or just a happy soul skimming above the earth. The no-fall factor of ziplining helps encourage guests to comfortably face their fear of heights, as it is a straightforward and gravity-fed ride. Ziplining is a confidence-boosting and team-building activity as well, especially for those who are facing their fears. You’ll even get your steps in for the day hiking the trails in Phillip S. Miller Park while navigating to the next zipline. Zipliners learn new skills such as self-braking and steering, creating an experience that allows guests to feel in control and trust of themselves and their gear while under guided supervision. There is a mile of native trail hiking throughout the zipline tour with extraordinary views of Pikes Peak, Devils Head and the Front Range. The tour begins at a small training course called “ground school,” where guides teach the incoming group how and

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THINGS TO DO

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE EDGE

when to steer and brake along the line. The first hike will bring you up to a 200-foot zipline to try out your new skills. Each hike will bring you to another line that is longer and faster, building all the way up to a 1,500-foot dual race line for the final ride. Pick a partner and make your bets on who will conquer the zipline tour first! There is no age requirement at The Edge. Anyone between 70-250 pounds can enjoy the zipline experience, so long as you’re comfortable with a little hiking. To learn more, visit theedgezip.com. TRAIN LIKE A WARRIOR Have you ever wondered if you have what it takes to compete for a shot on the TV show “American Ninja Warrior?” That seemingly impossible dream begins at Warrior Playground in Longmont. The Warrior Playground is a full-scale American Ninja Warrior and Obstacle Course Race (OCR) training facility for kids and adults to experience the thrill of tackling the obstacles they see on the TV show. The Warrior Playground features many obstacle replicas straight from the show.

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The ninja gym also hosts all types of special events like ninja competitions, fundraisers, team-building events, birthday parties, school field trips, private groups and mobile ninja events. You don’t have to be a super athlete to enjoy the scene, either. It is for anyone and everyone, said Sam Banola, owner of Warrior Playground. “The majority of people who come here are somewhat bored with the typical workout and want more challenge


THE

bes t co llectio n

I S Y O U R S.

Easy

ELEGANCE

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WARRIOR PLAYGROUND

and fun. We fit that well,” he said. The ninja training is great for kids because it lets them climb, run, jump, swim and challenge their bodies like TV ninjas. Banola, who has more than 25 years of fitness training experience, opened the facility in 2016. “I came to Colorado in 2014 and found a ninja gym. It was super fun, and I knew I needed to make that training part of my next gym,” Banola said. “This kind of training is a real adventure. It’s an adventure for your body and it is amazing to see what the body is capable of, no matter if you are 10 years old or an adult.” The gym is open to anyone. Memberships run between $100 to $200 a month. To learn more, visit www.warriorplayground.com. DRIVE GO-KARTS Enough of this flying, climbing and falling. Let’s get back to Mother Earth and put the pedal to the metal. It’s speed-racer time with the fastest go-karts in the state. Not far from Boulder rests a mecca for dirt motorsports: IMI Motorsports Complex. Here, you’ll find 120 acres of race track. “We have been here in Dacono since 1989,” said Jessy Gordon, an assistant manager with IMI Motorsports Complex. “We are Colorado’s best-kept secret.” The go-karts ride just an inch or so above the track, so the speeds seem much faster to those brave enough to take on the challenge. “The karts go over 65 mph, if you can handle it,” Gordon

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF RAPID IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY

said. “They can hold more Gs in the corners than cars.” The karts are automatic and easy to operate. Racers get a chance to zip along a banked mile-long track. You get 15 minutes of racing for $50. Average riders can get in 10 to 12 laps. Newer and faster karts are expected to arrive soon. “It’s a simple process,” Gordon said. “You show up and ask to rent a kart, fill out waivers and I send you to the pits.” You are then given instruction on the karts, provided a fire suit, neck brace and gloves. Next up: the open track. The Dacono fun park is filled with plenty of other activities for dirt bike riders, drift car drivers or pursuers of almost any kind of dirt motorsport. Those seeking a little Tokyo Drift can watch professional drifters practicing on the course. “This is a pretty interesting place and there is nothing like it,” Gordon said. “If you want dirt motorsport action, we have it all.” For more details, visit www.imimotorsports.com. GO WHITEWATER RAFTING Few things scream “Colorado” like a soaking wet adventure on a river. The state is loaded with whitewater rafting options. You can even take a tube float along Boulder Creek. But if whitewater is on your bucket list, you can take a short trip to Idaho Springs and check out the adventures at Clear Creek

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Rafting Company. Clear Creek Rafting Company guides rafting trips on two of Colorado’s most popular rivers, Clear Creek just west of Denver and the Arkansas River at the Royal Gorge near Colorado Springs. “You can’t find whitewater everywhere,” said Susan Paterson, one of the rafting company’s owners. “But Colorado is an essential place for it.” The action can require some physical effort and coordination. You’ll work up a sweat as you paddle hard and bounce along a rushing river.


PHOTO COURTESY OF PETE MCBRIDE

The company runs a range of rapid adventures. Beginners to seasoned rafters are all welcome. Kids seven and up can take part. “We have different levels of trips and can cater one to your level of adventure,” Paterson said. “We have enough options to make sure that you can get excited without being terrified.” Rafting on Clear Creek in Idaho Springs usually starts in mid-May. The season ends in mid-August, but the company runs trips on the Arkansas River through Labor Day. There is a risk involved in rafting that can’t be controlled, but Clear Creek Rafting Company uses experienced guides who can provide an exhilarating trip without falling into a danger zone. To learn more, visit clearcreekrafting.com. SWIM IN THE WILD Anyone can float or do laps in a pool. But few take swimming to the ultimate level and plunge into a wild, rushing river. Wild water swimming is not for everyone. It takes training, endurance and a support team for protection. But for those who are more manatee than man, the experience is beyond compare. “When people ask what’s the big difference between a pool and open water, I explain that swimming in open water is like being on a hiking trail around a beautiful mountain with varied terrain. Swimming in a pool is like running on a track,” said Matthew Moseley, a veteran wild water swimmer. “Wherever your travels take you this

summer, there is usually a place to swim if you look hard enough, whether it be a lake, river or ocean. Find water that will work for your ability and level of support. Grab a friend and go.” Moseley, an environmental activist and a partner with American Rivers, has taken on water across the world. “Swimming in an ocean is the most interesting and challenging of all the open water options,” he said. “In the ocean, you are prepared for currents, wildlife, choppy waters, saltiness and chaffing. But also, beauty and adventure.” Coloradoans don’t have an ocean to dip in, but open wild water is everywhere. Moseley adds that lakes such as the Boulder Reservoir, Carter Lake, Chatfield Reservoir and Nottingham Lake are good spots to start the challenge. The Colorado and Green Rivers, which go through Canyonlands in Utah, are also great locations to take a wild plunge. “Wild swimming is completely different,” Moseley said. “It is a liberating, more exhilarating experience than just the same old laps in a gym pool.” No matter where you swim, be sure to have support and be careful. “In wild swims, you must always expect the unexpected,” Moseley said. “When I swam across the Caribbean from St. John to outside of Puerto Rico, currents forced me to end up on the wrong island of Culebrita. Just because you are a good swimmer in the pool, open water swimming still requires practice, patience and perseverance.”

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Free Family Adventures in Boulder LEFT TOP & BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY OF MEADOW MUSIC; RIGHT MIDDLE: PHOTO COURTESY OF DOWNTOWN BOULDER

Here’s some creative inspiration for making the most of the time with your kids — without breaking the bank. By Aimee Heckel

But that’s just the beginning of the free fun in town. Here’s a look at some more incredible and affordable ways to entertain your kiddos in Boulder:

B

oulder isn’t known for being affordable. But it is known for being creative. So while it may be expensive to live here, there are still plenty of free, fun adventures awaiting your family this summer and fall. Popular ideas are to go hiking; stroll along the Pearl Street Mall (with a special stop at the pop jet fountain in front of the courthouse); attend Art Walks where you can people-watch and art-watch; and try free samples and dance to free music at the Boulder Farmers Market 4-8 p.m. Wednesdays from May-October and 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays from April-November. (The Farmers Market was crowned the No. 1 farmers’ market in the country by USA Today.) Kids also love walking along the shady Boulder Creek, a short walk from downtown (and snacks) (and toilets — we know how it goes). You can even dip your toes in the shallow waters. It’s also a blast to ride your bike along the creek path.

GO STAR-GAZING Of course, a blanket under the clear, summer night sky will lead to incredible star-watching opportunities. But the University of Colorado’s Sommers-Bausch Observatory is another free way to connect with the heavens. This observatory holds free star-watching events on Friday evenings year-round when school is in session (spring, summer and fall semesters). The events are held on the observation deck on the CU Boulder campus, when the skies are clear and the weather permits. Sessions typically last one to three hours, depending on the weather and quality of star-watching. Dress in layers, since the telescopes are outside where there are no space heaters. You can also book private group reservations of 10 or more people. MAKE MUSIC IN THE MEADOW Boulder kiddos love Jeff Kagan and Paige Doughty, performers of Meadow Music, an award-winning, environmentally focused music program for kids. These free, public, special shows take place at Chautauqua Park during warm months. Bring a blanket or low chairs, a picnic and water, and enjoy an hour of original science- and nature-based music and performances. Meadow Music is upbeat and interactive, touching on topics like energy conservation and insects. Meadow Music has been a Boulder staple for more than 15 years. Want

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PHOTO COURTESY OF BOULDER CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

to learn the lyrics before you go? Search for Meadow Music on Spotify. MUSEUM-HOP Boulder is home to a handful of free museums. The Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art is free on Saturdays. The CU Art Museum is free even if you’re not a student. The free CU Heritage Center highlights CU’s 150-year history through more than 25,000 photos, books, artifacts and more, including a LEGO model of campus made out of 1 million bricks. A big museum highlight in Boulder is the free CU Museum of Natural History on campus. Check out the museum’s Discovery Corner, a hands-on, interactive exhibit in the basement full of art activities, “discovery kits,” puppets, toys, books and all kinds of educational things meant to be touched. Identify fossils, touch real antlers and solve puzzles. The museum is home to several other exhibition galleries, too. Grab a drink in the BioLounge while you learn about biodiversity. Head to Anthropology Hall to learn about climate change in the Rocky Mountains and the fascinating artifacts that are being uncovered as ice melts. Horse-lovers will also appreciate the Horses in the North American West exhibit in Anthropology Hall. Overall, the museum boasts the largest natural history

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collection in the area, with nearly 5 million different objects. Talk about adventure. Also, don’t miss the National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder. Here, you’ll find exhibits on the sun, climate and atmosphere, as well as an art gallery. DANCE THE SUMMER AWAY Head to downtown Boulder on the Pearl Street Mall every Wednesday through the summer for the free, family-friendly Band on the Bricks events. This summer concert series runs June 15-Aug. 3. It features local musicians, from rock to reggae, from 5-9 p.m. Kids enjoy romping around downtown and dancing to the music. There are drinks to help entertain adults, too. EXPLORE THE LIBRARY The Boulder Public Library is so much more than books. It’s full of free, family-friendly events, including the super adventurous and creative state-of-the-art makerspace, Bldg 61. This free community workshop lets kids experiment with hands-on learning and making with all kinds of materials and tools. We’re talking screen printing, woodworking tools, 3D printers, welding tools, laser cutters, sewing machines, looms and more.


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TOP: PHOTO COURTESY OF BRAD FAGAN/FLICKR; BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY OF BRADY WIELAND/FLICKR

The library also screens free movies, offers free concerts and has other fun events for kids, like LEGO parties and storytimes. RIDE, RIDE, RIDE Try some new tricks at the Valmont Bike Park. This exciting park features 40-plus acres of cross-country trails, a slopestyle park, a dual-slalom racecourse, cyclocross courses and even kids-only courses. Bring your bike — and your board. Valmont Bike Park also has an impressive, 10,000-square-foot skate park with all the bowls and rails you could want. Skaters will also enjoy the skate park at Scott Carpenter Park. Both parks are great for wheels of all levels, from little newbies to older adrenaline junkies.

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COOL OFF BY A WATERFALL The Boulder Falls hike is a great way to get outside with a major reward at the end: a beautiful waterfall. This trail is located off Highway 119 in Boulder Canyon, and the path


PHOTO COURTESY OF DIGITAL BOOKMOBILE/FLICKR

LOOKING FOR MORE IDEAS? ADD THESE TO YOUR BUCKET LIST: TEBO TRAIN Take a ride on the free Tebo Train. This 100 percent electric kiddie train chugs through downtown Mondays-Friday from May 31-Sept. 2.

is short and easy enough for kids and hikers of all abilities. Pack a picnic and plan the perfect breakfast (before the other hikers start spilling in). Even if you aren’t up for the walk, the drive up Boulder Canyon offers stunning scenery and beautiful photo opps. PLAY IN THE PARKS Boulder’s got great parks. Highlights for families include Arapahoe Ridge Park, with flagstone tunnels, rocky mazes and nooks for kids to explore. Wonderland Lake Park (on Poplar Avenue west of Broadway) offers easy access to Wonderland Lake and many trails. Shanahan Ridge Park is a bit of a hidden gem, featuring a human sundial and equipment kids can climb on that’s made to the scale of Boulder’s various altitudes. Then there’s Crestview Park, with a futuristic-looking treehouse play structure and climbing trapezes. And final-

PEARL STREET ARTS FEST Swing by the Pearl Streets Arts Fest. This annual event for art-lovers runs July 15-17 in downtown Boulder, featuring artists from around the country. For kids, you’ll find art activities and live performances. DOWNTOWN BOULDER FALL FEST Welcome Fall with the annual Downtown Boulder Fall Fest, Sept. 16-18 in downtown. This three-day event is packed with food, drinks, live music, a market and children’s activities.

ly, East Boulder Community Park is beloved for the massive dinosaur-shaped play equipment and bridge-filled playground, not to mention a dog park, pond, sand volleyball courts, bike route access, athletic fields, a tennis teaching center, two outdoor squash courts, four outdoor handball courts, a pond and a demonstration garden.

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EXPERIENCE

One Perfect Day: Pamela Meadows The new curator at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art shares her dream day in Boulder County WHEN SHE BECAME THE NEWEST CURATOR AT THE BOULDER MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART IN JANUARY 2020, PAMELA MEADOWS VOWED TO TAKE RISKS AND BE DARING. OVER THE LAST TWO YEARS, MEADOWS HAS DONE EXACTLY THAT WHILE AT THE SAME TIME OVERCOMING HURDLES CREATED BY THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC WITH GRACE AND EASE.

By Sarah Kuta

M

eadows, who was hired after a nationwide search to fill the curator position, served most recently as the director and curator of the University of Northern Colorado Galleries in Greeley. Before that, she helped envision exhibitions at The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston; the Find & Form Space in Boston; The Samek Art Museum at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania; the Diego Rivera Gallery and the Receiver Gallery in San Francisco; and The New Art Center and Montserrat Galleries in Massachusetts. We wanted to get to know Meadows a little better, so we asked her to share her dream day in Boulder County, from sun-up to sundown. Here’s how she’d spend her time. MORNING First stop: Laughing Goat Coffee (1709 Pearl St.). The downtown coffee shop has a warm atmosphere that Meadows loves. “ I like to stop in for a morning coffee, but this location offers live music later in the day for a more relaxed nightlife vibe,” she says. Next, she’d visit with artist Liz Quan in her North Boulder studio (4593 Broadway Unit C120). “Doing studio visits with artists in and around Boulder is one of my favorite

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parts of being a curator,” she says. “Meeting artists where they work and develop their practices is a great adventure that often leads to trying new coffee shops, bakeries or galleries in the area.” She’d wander into Moxie Bread Co. (4593 Broadway), then scope out North Boulder arts venues like The Gallery at the Bus Stop Apartments (4895 Broadway) and East Window (4949 Broadway Unit 102B), a micro-gallery that offers screenings, exhibits and installations. “I enjoy seeing what other lo-

PHOTO BY LAUREN DEFILIPPO/MOXIE BREAD CO.

LEFT: PHOTO COURTESY OF BOULDER MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART; RIGHT: PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN COLORADO


TOP: PHOTO BY RICHARD PETERSON/BOULDER MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART; BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY OF NCAR/UCAR

cal arts organizations are doing and how they are supporting artists. It better informs my work and often sparks inspiration or ideas for cross-community partnerships,” she says. AFTERNOON To load up on snacks before a hike, Meadows heads to Cured (1825 B Pearl St.). “If I’m headed out on a hike, I’m already thinking about what I’m going to eat when I’m finished,” she says. “While Cured is known for its hand-picked selection of cheeses, charcuterie, wines and spirits, their grab-and-go sandwiches, salads and charcuterie plates make for a nice impromptu picnic.” Meadows is a big fan of the hiking trails at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (1850 Table Mesa Drive), so during her dream day, that’s her next stop. “When I first moved to Colorado six years ago, one of the first

weekend hikes I tagged along on was at NCAR,” she says. “Over the years, I’ve frequented their many hiking trails with new friends, old friends visiting from back east, and many four-legged friends. It’s become a go-to of mine for a satisfying, easy to moderate hiking spot with stunning views that never disappoint and several trail options.” If she didn’t pack a picnic (or she’s still hungry afterward), Meadows would head to Mountain Sun Pub & Brewery (1535 Pearl St.). “Nothing tastes better after a hike than a juicy burger and beer and Mountain Sun

has that and more,” she says. “There’s something for every beer-drinker here, including Belgian-style tripel — my favorite!” Of course, her perfect day wouldn’t be complete without a stop at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (1750 13th St.). On any given day at this downtown museum, guests can see innovative, compelling and engaging contemporary art exhibitions and public programs that activate the artworks on view. The museum also extends beyond the walls of its historic, 1906 building offering satellite exhibitions and public art projects at locations around the community such as One Boulder Plaza, Frasier Retirement Community and BMoCA at Macky Auditorium. “I welcome and encourage guests to stop by the museum to check out our latest exhibitions,” she says. “We offer family education materials and activit ravelb ou lder.com

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EXPERIENCE

PHOTO BY WES MAGYAR/BOULDER MUSEUM OF CONTEMPARY ART

ties for younger audiences and our visitor services staff are on-site to assist with interpretation questions and more information about upcoming shows and programs.” Meadows likes to venture to Jones + CO (1949 Pearl St.), a modern mercantile with a contemporary vibe that’s a short walk from BMoCA, to clear her head and stretch her legs during her lunch break from work. “Jones + CO collaborates with artisans of all kinds, connecting artists and customers to quality materials with high craftsmanship. As a curator whose life passion is working with artists, it’s a place where I feel like the products that are carried are loved and thoughtfully selected.” EVENING On Wednesdays after work (and some Saturday mornings), you can find Meadows at the Boulder County Famers Market (13th Street between Canyon and Arapahoe), which is one of the many things she looks forward to every spring and summer. “Leaving the museum, I’m greeted with a vibrant array of local vendors sharing the impact and importance of eating locally. I like to delay my commute home and walk the market choosing a few items to take back with meal planning the following week,” she says. At the end of her ideal day in Boulder County, Meadows is all about experiencing the local food and drink scene.

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First, she’d grab a beer at Bohemian Biergarten (2017 13th St.). “What I love about this spot is that it’s not your ordinary Boulder bar — its vibe is Central European,” she says. “With a cozy street-side patio area for outdoor drinking and people watching, this spot has become a favorite of mine for meeting friends after work for a beer within walking distance.” If family or friends are in town (or if she’s just missing Sunday dinners with her Italian family back home in New Jersey), Meadows loves to dine at Frasca (1738 Pearl St.). “In search of some delicious Italian, I first tried Frasca when my brother came to visit me in Colorado. He was gearing up for a trip to Italy for his 40th birthday we wanted to celebrate. The food is truly memorable and every course was exceptional.” And, finally, for dessert as the sun sets on another dreamy day in Boulder: Shamane’s Bakery & Cafe (2825 Wilderness Pl. #800). “I first fell in love with Shamane’s sweet treats after tasting the lemon meringue pie. An all-time favorite dessert of mine, theirs was next-level good. Next on my list to try is their key lime.” Read More: BMoCA Wants to Build a New North Boulder Campus travelboulder.com/bmoca-wants-to-build-a-north-boulder-museum


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VOLUNTOURISM

PHOTO COURTESY OF VOLUNTEERS FOR OUTDOOR COLORADO

VOLUNTEERING ALONG THE FRONT RANGE

Whether you live here or you’re visiting on vacation, Colorado nonprofits have a volunteer job for you.

By Jeff Blumenfeld

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ike Evanoff, a retired electrical engineer and data scientist from northern Virginia, moved to Boulder in 2020 after visiting the city on business. Volunteering has long been in the DNA of this former Navy commander: He volunteers for the Veteran Community Project in nearby Longmont and you’ll often find him hammering nails, sweeping floors and caulking at Habitat for Humanity affordable housing projects. Some weekends, he’ll volunteer at events, such as the Venus de Miles, Colorado’s original and largest all women’s bike ride, and this summer he will be a driver for a

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cross-country paragliding event. “Volunteering introduces me to people I wouldn’t normally meet, helps me learn new skills and educates me about Boulder, which is an athletic city that perfectly matches my interests,” Evanoff says. Giving back is a great way to meet new people and learn more about your community, whether you just moved here or you’re a long-time resident. And if you’re visiting Colorado on vacation, volunteering side-by-side with locals — a practice known as “voluntourism” — can provide insight into the best places to hike, bike, eat or simply enjoy the scenery from a new vantage point.


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EXPERIENCE

You get to make the world a better place through your time and dedication on the road. Voluntourism opens the door to new people and experiences; it helps you experience different cultures and help improve the lives of others. It doesn’t require great strength, wealth or connections. And for flatlanders, there’s the added benefit of acclimatizing in Denver or Boulder, altitude 5,280 to 5,600 feet, before traveling 4,000 to 5,000 feet higher further west in Summit County (which isn’t called “Summit” for nothing). Volunteering in Boulder, Denver or anywhere else in the Centennial State isn’t necessarily time-consuming either. The time commitment is totally up to you. You can play an important role volunteering for a few hours, a day, a few days or a week, while your good deed gives you a Rocky Mountain high. If travel expands the mind, meaningful travel expands the heart. You’re not going to save the world. In fact, you’re likely to learn and gain more from your volunteer experience than you give. Houston real estate developer Joe Watson, a commit-

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ted voluntourist, sums it up simply, “Voluntourism sure makes traveling more interesting and meaningful and you have better stories when you get home.” Here’s how to get started volunteering along the Front Range — and some inspiration for how you can help.

FIRST STEPS

Looking for a new way to give back in Boulder, whether on vacation or in your everyday life as a local? There are two website resources that can help you get started. VolunteerMatch.org believes everyone should have the chance to make a difference. To that end, the website makes it easy for good people and good causes to connect. Since 1998, the service has connected 17 million volunteers to 137,000 organizations. A recent search on the site turned up 1,246 volunteer opportunities in Denver and 709 in Boulder. Prospective candidates enter their preferred city and select from one of 30 specialized skills to offer, ranging from Children &


LEFT AND RIGHT PAGES: PHOTOS COURTESY OF VOLUNTEERS FOR OUTDOOR COLORADO

Family, Sports & Recreation, or Computers & IT skills to Academics, Performing Arts, and Trades. You dial in your dates, select your Colorado city, and sit back as opportunities are presented. GreatNonProfits.com is yet another matchmaker linking non-profits with volunteers. It will help you find those with the best reputations, dozens in fact, from Cozy Coats for Kids to the Rocky Mountain French Bulldog Rescue, Some non-profits require a longer commitment than others. A few that involve dealing with children will require a background check and specialized training. Still, there are plenty of simple drop-in opportunities available with flexible schedules.

WHERE TO VOLUNTEER IN COLORADO

Habitat for Humanity: This international nonprofit builds homes, revitalizes communities, responds to disasters, provides financial education and helps seniors renovate their homes, among other efforts.

Habitat for Humanity’s overarching goal is to “build strength, stability and self-reliance through shelter,” according to the organization. Volunteers can help the organization build or repair homes — and you don’t need to be a superstar with tools to participate, either, as Evanoff learned. “I don’t have serious handyman skills,” he says. “I have done work around the house, but never professionally. Habitat for Humanity site managers told me exactly what to do. Volunteers can also help unload trucks, stock shelves and price inventory at Habitat for Humanity ReStores, which are home improvement outlets that sell new and gently used appliances, furniture, cabinets, building materials and more at discount prices. All proceeds go toward affordable homeownership programs. Learn more at habitat.org. Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado (VOC): Join a veritable army of volunteers passionate about maintaining Colorado’s outdoor environment. Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado is a statewide non-profit volunteer organization founded in 1984 that engages thousands of people to provide a volun-

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RESOURCE CENTRAL

TOP: PHOTO COURTESY OF OUR CENTER; BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY OF VOLUNTEERS FOR OUTDOOR COLORADO

teer workforce for recreation and habitat improvement projects in partnership with land agencies, non-profits and community groups. These projects take place across Colorado — from city parks and open spaces to grasslands and foothills to alpine meadows and peaks. Volunteers seed hillsides after fire, reconstruct trails damaged by flood, remove invasive species and create new trails that can withstand heavier foot and bike traffic. A handy online calendar allows volunteers to plug in their preferred volunteer dates between April and October and the type of work they’re prepared to perform. You can even select an activity according to physical difficulty, from easy to difficult. Learn more at voc.org. The Boulder International Film Festival (BIFF): Depending upon your travel schedule, think about volunteering for a day or so at one of the dozens of events that have resumed as the pandemic has eased. BIFF is practically

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run by its dedicated volunteers. Commit to 10 hours and receive full volunteer benefits including ticket vouchers to movies, BIFF t-shirt and badge, access to the virtual cine-


TOP: PHOTO COURTESY OF VOLUNTEERS FOR OUTDOOR COLORADO; BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY OF THORNE NATURE EXPERIENCE

ma, and additional perks throughout the season. Learn more at biff1.com. BOLDERBoulder: This annual Memorial Day race needs plenty of volunteers. Schedule your trip over the holiday and help run the 10K race – at over 54,000 runners, walkers, and wheelchair racers, it’s the second-largest 10K race in the U.S. and the fifth-largest road race in the world. You’ll receive a BOLDERBoulder VolRUNteer shirt, snack bag and a front-row seat to all the action. Learn more at bolderboulder.com.

Ocean First Institute (OFI): Based in Boulder, OFI offers educational programming, research and conservation projects that enable young minds to explore marine science and innovate new ways to understand and protect the ocean. Volunteer coordinator Skye Whitney says: “Most of our projects involve being around minors so we have to get background checks for each volunteer prior to them working with us, which can always take a little bit to process and clear. They are also somewhat intensive projects that require training, commitment and consistency from our volunteers.” Learn more at oceanfirstinstitute.org. OUR Center: The OUR Center, a non-profit in Longmont, assists individuals and families in the St. Vrain Valley in need of meals, groceries, clothing and financial resources. The OUR Center seeks enthusiastic individuals 16 years of age and older wishing to volunteer their time and talents. The non-profit could use helping hands in the kitchen,

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LEARNING BY VOLUNTEERING PHOTO BY ALEXANDER BLISKOVSKY

BY JEFF BLUMENFELD I WAS BORN MISSING THE HANDYMAN GENE. TO THIS DAY, MY WIFE TALKS ABOUT THE TIME EARLY IN OUR RELATIONSHIP WHEN I ATTEMPTED TO FIX A LEAKY TOILET WITH A DRILL. THUS, IT WAS WITH SOME TREPIDATION THAT I VOLUNTEERED AT A DENVER-AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RESTORE, ONE OF 875 NON-PROFIT HOME IMPROVEMENT STORES AND DONATION CENTERS NATIONWIDE.

food pantry, warehouse and clothing bank. Get started by completing a volunteer application and attending an orientation session. Learn more at ourcenter.org. Thorne Nature Experience: Founded in 1954, Thorne was one of Colorado’s first environmental non-profits. All told, the organization has connected more than 300,000 young people and adults to nature. Volunteers and interns play a critical role in the success of Thorne’s programs and are involved at every level of the organization, from providing general administrative support to teaching programs and serving on the Board of Trustees. With proper training about birds, water insects, land insects or mapping — and a deep personal connection to nature— you can become a teaching volunteer at Thorne’s Boulder or Lafayette locations, or help out on field trips. “Be sure to call first to make sure you’ll be a good fit,” says Sarah Grove, volunteer coordinator and environmental educator. Learn more at thornenature.org. Read More: Resource Central Celebrates 75 Years in Boulder travelboulder.com/resource-central-45-years-ofconservation/

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There are four ReStores in the Denver area. Volunteering at a ReStore couldn’t be easier, even if you happen to be born like me with all thumbs. First, you sign up on their website, pick a location, select a five-hour shift and print out your assignment. No questions asked. At the appointed time, one bright and sunny Sunday morning, I reported for duty at a ReStore that shares space with a Goodwill store. The crew chief had my name on an iPad and was expecting me. In front is a retail store, but it’s behind the scenes where all the fun happens. As I began my shift, I watched a safety video to avoid tripping, falling or injuring my back. I don gloves and safety goggles. On this particular morning, the donations came pouring in. For five hours, in a constant procession of SUVs and trucks, my fellow ReStore volunteers and I greeted the drivers, opened their trunks and loaded donations onto hand trucks. It was like Christmas in May. “Ding, ding,” went the driveway bell, which reminded me of the sound of local automobile service stations, back when they still made repairs. “Ding, ding.” Here comes a glass TV stand. An unopened home entertainment system. A set of Harry Potter books. A Celestron reflecting telescope. A lawn seeder. “Ding, ding.” They called me out to pick up two pedestal bathroom sinks that would prove to be my nemesis. I spent the five-hour shift moving donated goods around, using tape to remove dog hair from a donated sofa (a slightly icky assignment), screwing in table legs and dismantling three porch lights. I’m asked to clean two plastic Adirondack chairs with Clorox wipes. They later sold for $8 each — a steal. Marcus, the crew chief, walked around with a pirate’s hat on his head while a donated boom box played country music. Appliances get plugged in, checked and cleaned. In this throwaway society of ours, it was good to think that not everything is destined for a landfill. ReStore claims it diverts hundreds of tons from landfills each year accepting the hard-to-dispose-of flotsam and jetsam of everyday life. And, besides helping the underprivileged and unhoused for a few hours, you might also learn a thing or two about maintaining marital bliss during your next home plumbing repair. Jeff Blumenfeld, a resident of Boulder, is author of Travel With Purpose: A Field Guide to Voluntourism (Rowman & Littlefield). www.TravelwithPurposeBook.com


PHOTO COURTESY OF HIMALI

Check Out These Unique Stores in Boulder BOULDER IS SO UNIQUE THAT THE WORD “BOULDER” ISN’T JUST A CITY NAME. IT’S ALSO A DESCRIPTION. SOMETHING IS A LITTLE DIFFERENT? IT’S SO BOULDER. “ONLY IN BOULDER” AND “KEEP BOULDER WEIRD” STICKERS MARK THE STREETS. SO IT’S ONLY FITTING THAT THE CITY HAS SOME INTERESTING STORES. AS A SUPER OUTDOORSY COMMUNITY, IT’S ALSO FITTING THAT MANY OF THESE SHOPS ARE ATHLETIC AND OUTDOOR-FOCUSED. By Aimee Heckel

Whether you’re looking for a quirky souvenir or just want to experience Boulder’s “Boulder-iness” in another way, here’s a glance at some of Boulder’s many interesting shopping options. Boulder is always growing and evolving. And that goes for its shops, too. So these are some of the city’s newer stores that you may not have experienced yet. Add these to your 2022 bucket list to check out for their unique offerings — and great backstories. HIMALI 1418 Pearl St. Himalilife.com This Boulder-based outdoor-adventure shop opened downtown in October, founded by Dave Schaeffer and Tendi Sherpa, a climbing guide who has summited Mount Everest 13 times. The partners met while climbing the highest mountain in South America. Himali sells high-quality, performance-based mountaineering clothes. Trans-seasonal, light, versatile vests. A breathable, moisture-wicking button-down shirt. Collections named after renowned mountaineers. The most unique item Himali offers is its 8000-Meter Downsuit, a full

head-to-ankle, down-filled suit designed to withstand extreme conditions. But what makes Himali truly outstanding is that the shop gives back to the community in Nepal. A portion of proceeds get donated to the Himalayan region, with an emphasis on helping schools and providing clean water for the residents there. Himali also partners with various social programs and donates its gear to people in need. As the company says, “This is not business as usual. It’s about going the extra mile to develop products that take our communities further, helping them unleash capabilities they … never knew existed.” STIO 1505 Pearl St. stio.com This store, which opened in July 2021, is all about connecting with nature through products with “mountain soul.” What’s that look like? Products with Bluesign-approved textiles; audited supply chains for best practices; and an eye always on conservation and sustainability. It also means innovating products — fresh, new items you can’t find just anywhere. We’re talking groundbreaking styles

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of bike shorts, waterproof jackets and protective gloves. Stio carries clothing for men, women and kids, as well as all kinds of gear, from bags to beanies. For example, the Basin LT Camp Tote is a lightweight, convertible tote made out of recycled ripstop designed to “merge action with errands.” You know, for those days you want to ride your bike up Flagstaff but need to stop by the farmer’s market to pick up some veggies on the way back home. It’s one part tote, one part backpack and super lightweight. TIMBER TRADE CO. 1717 Pearl St. timbertradecompany.com Timber Trade Co. is a newer face in the Boulder retail scene, selling menswear catered to Coloradans, by Coloradans. In fact, its owners lost their Louisville home in the tragic Marshall Fire in December while they were on a family trip for Christmas. “I saw my own house burn from 2,000 miles away with every little thing I hold dear become dust,” wrote owner Josh Greenlee on his Facebook page. “My 1965 Mustang I bought and restored with my dad when I was 16, my van I spent thousands of hours making a camper, my partner Cait’s wedding dress she never got to wear, the turquoise wedding ring of my late grandfather and every little thing we never meant to take for granted was gone.” The community rallied to help Greenlee and his partner, Caitlin Evans, surpassing their GoFundMe goal. And Boulder continues to support their business as Greenlee and Evans rebuild their lives.

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Timber Trade curates high-quality, durable clothes and accessories for men. It also sells home goods, such as plants, house-poured candles, alpaca blankets and a barber tonic. The shop specializes in Japanese- and USA-made premium denim. They’re one of the few stores that carries these offerings. Timber Trade also sells socks that are made in Japan on antique machines. And per the name and what makes Timber Trade Co. especially unique, the shop also sells woodwork (like a Colorado Forest Desk and charcuterie boards). It even offers custom interior furniture that blends durability with modern style. BLACK DIAMOND 1427 Pearl St. blackdiamondequipment.com Black Diamond opened in July 2021. This outdoorsy shop is for both climbers and skiers. After all, these are both sports you do in the mountains. Ice, snow and rock. And they’re two of Boulder’s favorite pastimes. Black Diamond brings to downtown Boulder the most innovative gear (including skis and every color possible of climbing rope), goodies (hello, rechargeable headlamps and a wall of backpacks) and clothes (like wind shells and jackets galore). You’ll also find the unexpected here, like exclusive coffee blends and denim jeans specifically made for climbing. It’s no wonder Black Diamond calls itself Boulder’s “basecamp.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TIMBER TRADE CO.

SHOPPING

BACKCOUNTRY 1537 Pearl St. backcountry.com Backcountry is where to head for outdoor gear and apparel, as well as educational demos on everything from building mountain bikes to fitting ski boots. It covers the full gamut of adventures: hiking, camping, biking, climbing, skiing, snowboarding, running, fly-fishing and more. What makes Backcountry unique is its exclusive brands and products, like the Tricot Peak Tech Hoodie with a built-in neck gaiter and face mask, a zippered kangaroo pocket and zippered shoulder vents to cool you off while hiking. Or hook up the best car camping getaway with the exclusive Stoic Portable Camp Kitchen Island, a collapsable, aluminum-frame, portable kitchen, complete with a tabletop, storage bins and sturdy feet suitable for uneven surfaces. One cool deal at Backcountry is that all college students get 20 percent off full-priced gear. Backcountry opened downtown in July 2021. Read More: Common Threads Celebrates 15 Years travelboulder.com/common-threads-celebrates-15-years


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8 QUESTIONS

PHOTO BY KIRSTEN COHEN; TOP RIGHT: PHOTO COURTESY OF Z2 ENTERTAINMENT

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Cheryl

MAKER SERIES

WITH Z2 ENTERTAINMENT CEO

LIGUORI CHERYL LIGUORI BRINGS 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE TO BOULDER’S Z2 ENTERTAINMENT By John Bear

T

hough she’s been involved in Colorado’s music scene for 30 years, Cheryl Liguori feels like all that time passed in the blink of an eye. Liguori is chief executive officer of Z2 Entertainment, which operates Boulder’s Fox Theatre and Boulder Theater and the Aggie Theatre in Fort Collins. The company also books and promotes shows for various other venues around Colorado, including Boulder’s Chautauqua Auditorium. She remembers having a conversation with Charles Hambleton, of Boulder’s famous alternative rock, rock, reggae, folk band the Samples, while she was managing a New York City music club where the band would perform in the early 1990s. She says she was considering a move out west at the time. “He was excited about a new venue they were building, so when I moved to the area, I went to check it out,” she says. “I had marketing experience from my advertising agency days, so I handled the opening and was the show marketing manager for a few months around the opening of the Fox Theatre.” That was in March of 1992. Later that year, she was promoted to general manager of The Fox, located on University Hill, and in 1998, became the general manager of the nearby Boulder Theater, just off of Boulder’s iconic Pearl Street. “Having a love for both venues, in 2009, I proposed a merger of the Fox and (the Boulder Theater),” she says. The owners of both companies agreed to form Z2 Entertainment and I was named CEO.” The company officially launched in 2010 and Liguori became its CEO, a role she has enjoyed for nearly 12 years. We chatted with Liguori to learn more about her career overseeing two of Boulder’s most iconic performance venues.

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TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF KIRSTEN COHEN; MIDDLE PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVE ARNOLD; BOTTOM PHOTO BY GARY SHEER

WHAT BROUGHT YOU INTO THE LIVE MUSIC BUSINESS? I started going to shows in high school, but it was quite by accident that I ended up in the business side of things. I had become friends with (club owners) Larry and Laura Bloch when we all lived in Los Angeles. A few years later we all ended up moving back to the East Coast where they eventually created Wetlands Preserve, a live music club in NYC, and asked me to join them. It was an easy choice to leave my ad agency job to adventure with them into the live music world. WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT THE LIVE MUSIC BUSINESS? As venues and live music professionals, we help create that “happy place” for a whole community. We work in the industry because we probably all got hooked by live music at some point along the way. WHAT IS THE MOST CHALLENGING ASPECT OF THE INDUSTRY? For independent music promoters, the competition is fierce and the margins are slim. COLORADO IS KNOWN FOR ITS BUSTLING LIVE MUSIC SCENE WHAT SETS BOULDER APART FROM THE REST OF THE FRONT RANGE? I think it’s because we have great venues, and there is always something interesting going on, whether it is a ticketed show or smaller venues showcasing local talent. The Fox was named one of the top four venues in the country by “Rolling Stone” magazine. Many artists on their way up, such as Radiohead, Dave Matthews Band, Michael Franti, Gov’t Mule, Flaming Lips and John Legend have played that room. The Boulder Theater and Chautauqua Auditorium bring a fantastic range of national and international talent. There is usually a show for any musical taste in this town.

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TOP PHOTO BY LISA SICILIANO; MIDDLE PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVE ARNOLD/ Z2 ENTERTAINMENT; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF BOULDER HISTORICAL SOCIETY/MUSEUM OF BOULDER; RIGHT PHOTO BY ALIVE COVERAGE

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PHOTO BY TARVER SHELTON

HOW HAS Z2 WEATHERED THE ONGOING COVID PANDEMIC? HOW HAS THE COVID PANDEMIC AFFECTED THE LIVE MUSIC SCENE IN BOULDER MORE BROADLY? COVID was hard on the live music ecosystem and Boulder was no exception. When we were able to open to a very limited capacity, we were lucky to have many talented local artists who played and supported our venues. Boulder is recovering quickly and there are a few smaller venues that are opening soon, which is always a healthy sign. WHAT DETERMINES THE TYPE OF SHOWS THAT COME THROUGH THE FOX THEATRE VS. BOULDER THEATER? It mostly comes down to which capacity is right for the artist at a certain point in their trajectory. The Fox is primarily a standing-only venue and, while we book for the college crowd, we also have acts like Lukas Nelson, George Porter and a fair number of indie acts. The Boulder Theater has a larger capacity and can be a standing

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or a seated venue, so we have a lot of flexibility with our bookings and can bring in larger acts. I think both venues offer a uniquely intimate concert experience that isn’t as palpable at larger venues. WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY PERSONALLY? ARE THERE ANY SHOWS YOU ARE PARTICULARLY LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING? Oh, so many. I do tend toward indie, but I am looking forward to Ólafur Arnalds and Bela Fleck at Chautauqua this summer. At our indoor venues: Warpaint, Les Claypool, James McMurtry . . . there are too many to name. Everyone is coming out on tour now after such a long pause. IN THESE UNCERTAIN TIMES, WHAT’S NEXT FOR Z2? A lot of amazing shows! Read More: Boulder County’s Best Record Stores travelboulder.com/boulder-countys-best-record-stores/


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EXPERIENCE

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REST A luxurious vacation doesn’t always look the same. Sometimes, it looks like a Forbes four-star hotel with an award-winning spa (like Boulder’s St Julien). Other times, it’s a charming, remodeled Victorian house in a historic neighborhood. Or maybe a 6,300-square-foot mansion with a private pool located in Boulder’s foothills. All of these are real lodging options here in Boulder.

Luxurious Airbnbs & Home Rentals in Boulder By Aimee Heckel

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOME HOST CONCIERGE

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acation rental properties, like those found on platforms like Airbnb or Vrbo, may have a reputation for inexpensive lodging that’s cheaper than hotels. And sure, you can find some killer deals on these home rental websites. But there’s another side to vacation rentals, one that elevates the travel experience to the highest heights: luxurious houses where you can live like a king. Browse Airbnb for Boulder and you’ll find a mansion on 38 acres; an estate with its own private beach on Boulder Creek; a colorful house with a hot tub on its deck overlooking the Front Range from up high. You can find houses that average $2,800 a night (but also a lot less). And that’s just the start. Beyond Airbnb, Vrbo and other popular websites, Boulder is home to its own short-term home rental business, Home Host Concierge. This seven-year-old company, run by Boulder native Kate George, not only rents out some of Boulder’s most impressive properties, but it also offers five-star concierge services. “We transform family residences into something closer to a vacation rental: We bring all our own linens, we empty refrigerators and clean out bathroom drawers. Our team transforms the property into something that doesn’t feel like you’re staying at your aunt’s house,” George says. Home Host Concierge offers restaurant and activity recommendations (it helps being run by a Boulder native), but really, it’s about customizing the experience to the guest’s needs. One wealthy heiress who stays in Boulder over the summers requested a full-time house manager to handle laundry, food prep, walking the dog and other daily tasks — but the Covid-conscious guest was worried about being exposed to the virus, so Home Host Concierge found her an assistant who agreed to isolate herself from anyone else throughout the duration of the stay.

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EXPERIENCE WELLNESS

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOME HOST CONCIERGE

Another extended-stay guest thought the mattress in the master bedroom was too firm, so Home Host Concierge worked with her personal assistant to determine the exact same mattress style she had at home. Home Host stores her mattress in their unit when she is gone, and when she comes to town, they swap it out so she never misses a night’s sleep, wherever she stays. George says they have organized private tours of the University of Colorado campus for future students; set up a private art session with a famous artist living in Boulder; and organized training with renowned Olympians in Boulder to help guests train and prep for competitions. “It’s not one size fits all. We cater our experiences and offerings, based on what the guest wants and needs and why they’re in town,” George says. Home Host Concierge actually blossomed out of George’s own experience with Airbnb. Years ago, she rented out her own Boulder home and it was so successful that her friends and family asked her to help them rent out their homes, too. This service continued to grow through today; in addition to Home Host Concierge, George also runs an ultra-highend, international vacation rental/concierge service called Omnifique (starting at $25,000 a night; the average stay is half a million).

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Even if that’s not your budget, you can still find a long list of other incredibly high-end lodging options in Boulder. Here’s a look at some of the highlights. See this story online at TravelBoulder.com for the direct links to these properties, or search them by name or price, although listings and their details are subject to change. CHIC HOME WITH EXPANSIVE GARDEN & LUSH MOUNTAIN VIEWS $2,800/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/47782906 This is a dream home in Boulder, with three bedrooms and four baths located in a quiet neighborhood less than 10 minutes from downtown. The mountain views and interior design make this house stand out, with stunning lighting and modern-chic decor. This house comes with access to a fully equipped kitchen and a great outdoor lounge area to have your meals al fresco. It is hosted by Home Host Concierge. TRAILHEAD MODERN HOME AT BASE OF MT. SANITAS $2,000/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/38596714 Book an entire five-bedroom, six-bathroom house right at the base of the Mount Sanitas trailhead and a short walk


to the Pearl Street Mall. This spacious house features tons of windows, a deep soaking tub and a full kitchen with everything you could need to feel at home. Entertain yourself with a billiard table and theater in the basement, a stunning mountain view, a game console, children’s books and toys (even a bunk bed and large dollhouse), a backyard and more. Relax by the indoor or outdoor fireplace, and then grill outside. After eating, stretch out on the well-designed, comfy patio. Breakfast is included in this stay. POOL IS OPEN - HUGE MOUNTAIN HOME WITH SPA $914/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/38359051 Stay in a mountain mansion in the valley just 10 minutes from downtown Boulder. This luxurious home has a pool and spa, expansive decks and three different fire pits you can sit at while you take in the canyon views. The home sleeps 12 people in six bedrooms. Other high-end features include a grand piano, spacious outdoor BBQ and indoor fireplace. The outdoor pool, open seasonally June to September, has a slide and can be heated upon request. The spa is heated and open year-round. You can also watch films in the movie room with surround sound.

MOUNTAIN MEADOW MAGNIFICENCE $1,450/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/16767729 Live like royalty in this incredible Boulder mansion, situated on an impressive 38 acres just 15 minutes from Boulder. The entire 6,300-square-foot villa hosts 12 guests in six bedrooms with just as many baths. Enjoy a serene escape with panoramas of the foothills. Go hiking on the trails outside your front door before taking a dip in the home’s pool. This is the ultimate in luxury, with architectural details, a spiral staircase and so much privacy. BEST HOUSE IN BOULDER: LOCATION, STUNNING IN/OUT $1,050/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/1613904 Inside and out, this home has charm. Eleven guests can stay in this totally remodeled 1905 Victorian house in Boulder’s historic Whittier neighborhood. It’s just four blocks from Pearl Street. The house has a beautiful yard and patio, a secluded master bedroom, private decks and a high-end kitchen. Luxurious amenities that you won’t find just anywhere include an electronic shower and steam room, two ovens, two

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PHOTO COURTESY OF HOME HOST CONCIERGE

dishwashers, multiple fridges and freezers and smart-controlled entertainment, lights and temperature. GORGEOUS FIVE-BEDROOM HOME - FIRE PIT AND HOT TUB $1,000/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/49109736 Stay in a newly redone, 5,000-square-foot house located near Crestview Park and Wonderland Lake. This home has many luxury amenities and special features, like a chef ’s kitchen, hot tub, fire pit, built-in grill, oversized dining tables, pool table, dartboard, a Sonos speaker system, smart lighting and heating and a fenced backyard with a spacious lawn. Pop open the trifold doors and windows for an indoor-outdoor space that has access to the grill and bar. The primary bedroom features a steam shower and soaking tub. HIGH-END FOUR-BEDROOM BOULDER HOME, SLEEPS 10 $1,000/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/1560968 This luxurious Boulder property in the Whittier neighborhood can sleep 10 with its four bedrooms with 3.5 baths.

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It’s a relatively new build, finished in 2007, and within walking distance to the Pearl Street Mall, trails and restaurants. Feel like you’re tucked away in the mountains, while still remaining close to all the action. Highlights include a spacious master suite with a balcony with Flatirons views and a jetted tub; a beautiful kitchen with a large dining table; and a wood-burning fireplace in the living room. In warmer weather, grill on the oversized deck. This home is even pet-friendly. STUNNING HISTORIC HOME CLOSE TO PEARL STREET $445/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/plus/19430832 Here’s an elegant space to stay for a lower price point than other comparable properties. This four-bedroom, remodeled, historic home is located just a block from St Julien Hotel and Spa in downtown Boulder. It sleeps 13 people. Rooms feature air conditioning, blackout shades, free parking (in downtown, that’s a plus), cable TV with a sound system, a private balcony, a fruit and flower orchard, an oversized dining table and a full kitchen. Luxurious amenities include crystal glasses, plush bathrobes and a soaking tub. But beyond that, it has a great story. This house, built


PHOTO COURTESY OF HOME HOST CONCIERGE

How to Find the Perfect Rental for Your Next Trip Liz DeBold Fusco, a spokesperson for Airbnb, recommends the following when looking for a vacation rental:

in 1906, used to be the home of the first president of the University of Colorado, according to the homeowner, Hillary Camilla. Find other historical nods throughout, such as a 1920s French antique vanity, original Art Deco lamps, an antique bed, antique dinnerware and original wood floors. COUNTRY LIVING JUST OUTSIDE OF TOWN $1,129/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/44281468 If you want to stay in Boulder with plenty of outdoor space, you can rent this entire four-bedroom house. It’s located on two acres, complete with yard games and a barn for outdoor dining for up to 25 people, making this home great for special, small events. (It sleeps 10.) The house has a fireplace inside and a fire pit outside. It also has on-site exercise equipment, a grill, and an outdoor eating area adorned by party lights and hanging lanterns. Bonus: The neighbors have farm animals. LUXE BOULDER: ‘BARRETT HOUSE’ ON MOUNTAIN PEAK WITH HOT TUB $830/night Where to book: evolve.com/vacation-rentals/us/co/ boulder/263720 Here’s a vacation rental like no other. Stay in an architecturally significant, historic residence, the Barrett House, designed by famed Colorado architect Charles Haertling

• Search “I’m flexible” for the location if you aren’t set on a specific location. This will help you pull up unique places to stay in a variety of locations. With so many quirky and interesting lodging options, increasingly more travelers are centering their trips around their lodging, not necessarily the location, DeBold Fusco says. • Search for flexible dates using the “I’m flexible” tool. If your schedule is open, you can discover more stays via a wider window of time. • Check the amenities. Last year, Airbnb began allowing hosts to “verify” their WiFi speed and services for people who work remotely. Airbnb also recently introduced electric vehicle charging stations as a feature, and nearly 1 million hosts have added that in the past year. You can also check the amenity list for features like pools, BBQ grills and full kitchens. Between fall to winter in 2021, searches for listings with pools jumped by 50 percent in the United States and Canada. • Read the reviews to make sure the experience of other guests aligns with the experience you want to have. • Talk to your host in advance. Ask them for tips and advice and get to know them personally to make sure their home is a good fit.

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September 30–October 9 Explore Boulder with your tastebuds!

firstbiteboulder.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF HOME HOST CONCIERGE

for a famous artist. This quirky, mid-century modern home is perched on a three-acre mountain peak near Boulder. In addition to a one-of-a-kind design, this property offers a fireplace, theater room, hot tub, outdoor dining on a private balcony, a hammock, skylights, a Bose sound system and a “Mad Men”-inspired dining room and bar. It sleeps six in 3,000 square feet. The Barrett House is also environmentally friendly, with cork flooring and rugs made from recycled plastic bottles. MODERN DOWNTOWN BOULDER HOME, ROOFTOP DESK AND FLATIRON VIEWS $725/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/plus/39129793 No matter the interior of a vacation rental, the most incredible part of staying in Boulder are the views. And this downtown home serves them up big, complete with not one, but three private decks. Rent the entire, minimalist-style home with two bedrooms and you can walk three blocks to Pearl Street. High-end details include an Aboriginal painting and an espresso machine in a full kitchen. Guests can also enjoy an indoor fireplace, high-resolution computer monitor, walkin shower and outdoor furniture. But the highlight here is the large, private rooftop deck. Sit out there under the Colorado sunshine and enjoy the blue skies. COUNTRY HOUSE 10 MINUTES TO BOULDER $890/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/19175464 Just outside of Boulder, you’ll find a jaw-dropping house with oversized windows that sleeps 10. This home, in Longmont, is located a short ride to some of Boulder County’s favorite trails. Live the luxurious country life with fresh eggs from the on-site chicken coop and plenty of space inside and out — and views for days (also inside and out, thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows). This house has a massive balcony, an indoor fireplace, four bedrooms and all five-star reviews from previous guests.

EXPANSIVE LUXURY IN CENTRAL HOME WITH DOWNTOWN VIEWS $930/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/plus/12408426 This colorful and artistically-decorated home in Boulder sleeps 12 in five bedrooms. Inside, guests can sit beside the fire under exposed-beam ceilings, surrounded by original art on the walls. Outside, guests can enjoy a BBQ, sit in the hot tub, wander through the gardens and sit on the multiple decks, appointed with sun loungers and an Amazon Echo. Mountain views and a view of downtown Boulder are included. Some highlights: a convection oven in the full kitchen, a rain shower, and a piano. Bedrooms feature the likes of a pillow-top mattress, room-darkening shades, and more mountain views from bed. Relax in the hot tub on one of the decks and enjoy sweeping views of the Front Range from up high. LUXURY CREEKSIDE ESTATE NEAR CU AND DOWNTOWN $1,100/night Where to book: airbnb.com/rooms/51485993 Ten guests can stay in this incredible estate located in downtown Boulder, right on Boulder Creek. This home is secluded, yet a short walk to downtown/Pearl Street and the University of Colorado stadium. Sit outside in the multiple seating areas and watch the creek by a fire pit. The house is located on 1.2 acres. Guests can enjoy the chef ’s kitchen, three indoor fireplaces, a multi-person steam shower and large soaker tub, a basketball hoop, shuffleboard and chess table. Best of all: This house has its own private beach on the creek.

Read More: 9 Things You Didn’t Know About Longmont ravelboulder.com/9-things-you-didnt-know-about-longmont

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REFUEL

By Sarah Kuta

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LEFT: PHOTO COURTESY OF BOOKCLIFF VINEYARDS

Best Wineries in Boulder County The

ABOVE: PHOTOS COURTESY OF AUGUSTINA'S WINERY

YOU DON’T HAVE TO TRAVEL TO NAPA OR SONOMA TO SIP DELICIOUS WINES: YOU CAN TRY INCREDIBLE REDS, WHITES, ROSÉS AND OTHER WINES RIGHT HERE IN BOULDER COUNTY. IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A WAY TO SPEND A FUN AFTERNOON OR YOU WANT TO IMPRESS GUESTS VISITING FROM OUT OF TOWN, CHECK OUT THESE BOULDER COUNTY WINERIES.

By Sarah Kuta AUGUSTINA’S WINERY 20 Lakeview Dr., Nederland 303-520-4871 Augustinaswinery.com

Founded in 1997, Augustina’s Winery is a one-woman show directed by Marianne “Gussie” Walter. The winery, which recently moved to Nederland, uses Colorado-grown grapes from the Western Slope, the Eastern Plains and Boulder County. Head up Boulder Canyon for a relaxing wine tasting in the mountains — try the Bottoms Up White (a sauvignon blanc with notes of grapefruit and melon), the Harvest Gold (a slightly sweet white with notes of pear) or Bredo’s Blue Diamond (a red named for Grandpa Bredo, the inspiration behind Frozen Dead Guy Days!). And don’t forget to take a few bottles home with you.

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ABOVE PHOTOS COURTESY OF BOOKCLIFF

BOOKCLIFF VINEYARDS 1501 Lee Hill Road #17, Boulder 303-449-9463 bookcliffvineyards.com

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BookCliff has two tasting rooms — one in Palisade (near their vineyards) and another in North Boulder. The Boulder location (which is right next to Settembre Cellars, perfect for planning an afternoon of winery-hopping!) offers tastings of BookCliff ’s sumptuous wines made with all Colorado-grown grapes. The winery, which makes syrah, muscat, malbec, chardonnay, riesling, cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, petit verdot and several other types of wine, offers tours of its facility and tastings. BookCliff, which was founded by Ulla Merz and John Garlich, also has a great wine club.


LEFT/RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF SETTEMBRE CELLARS

SETTEMBRE CELLARS 1501 Lee Hill Road #16, Boulder 303-532-1892 settembrecellars.com

Another North Boulder winery to visit: Settembre Cellars, founded by Blake and Tracy Eliasson in 2007. Settembre makes an array of whites and reds with all Colorado-grown grapes, such as rosato, syrah, chardonnay, sangiovese, cabernet franc and riesling. You can try all of these wines — and more — when you visit their tranquil tasting room. If you like what you taste, you can have wines shipped directly to your house multiple times a year through their wine club — and what could be more delicious than that?

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THIS PAGE: PHOTOS COURTESY OF SILVER VINES WINERY

SILVER VINES WINERY 2015 13th St., Boulder 720-535-9712 silvervineswinery.com

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Though Silver Vines Winery is based in Arvada, you don’t have to leave Boulder County to sample the company’s offerings. They recently relocated their Boulder tasting room to a spot downtown, so you can pop in for a tasting (or share a bottle with a friend!) while you shop and dine on Pearl Street. Silver Wines uses grapes from the Western Slope, as well as the Columbia Valley in Washington, to make its various white, red, sweet and chocolate dessert wines. And if you need a little something to help you cool off in the summer, go ahead and give their innovative wine slushie a try.


THIS PAGE: PHOTOS COURTESY OF VINNIE FERA

Read More: Inside Denver’s New Beer Spa travelboulder.com/inside-denvers-new-beer-spa

VINNIE FERA 3012 Sterling Circle, Boulder 720-287-1252 vinnieferawine.com

Head to East Boulder to try Vinnie Fera’s delicious small-batch wines made from grapes grown in Colorado, Oregon and California. Founded by Tim Moley (who is also the brains behind the Boulder company Chocolove), Vinnie Fera’s name is a whimsical play on words: “vitis vinifera” is the species name for grapes used to make wine. Their tasting room, which has huge west-facing windows (where you can see great sunsets!), is located in the same building where they make their malbec, pinot noir, sparkling rose, chardonnay and other wines.

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REFUEL

Daniel Asher

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF DANIEL ASHER

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Meet the thoughtful Boulder County chef behind beloved restaurants River and Woods and Ash’Kara. By Sarah Kuta


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aniel Asher doesn’t believe in taking the easy route. In fact, he believes that words like “easy,” “fast” and “convenient” — and their accompanying mindsets — have done irreparable harm to our families, our food systems and our planet. “I prefer living with words like ‘thoughtful,’ ‘meticulous’ and ‘patient,’” says Asher, a father, food activist and chef. Those words perfectly encapsulate Asher’s approach to hospitality at his many restaurants and food businesses, including Driftwind, River and Woods and Ash’Kara in Boulder (and the first Ash’Kara location in Denver); Tributary Food Hall and Drinkery in Golden; and Barrio75 in Ketchum, Idaho. Asher also runs a catering and food consulting company called EcoChef Culinary and is involved with a variety of food-related organizations, including EatDenver, the Slow Food Chefs Alliance, the James Beard Foundation’s ”Chef Action Network,” the American Lamb Board and the Chef ’s Manifesto Food Advocacy Hub. We sat down with Asher to learn more about his approach to food, sustainability and hospitality. WHAT GOT YOU INTERESTED IN FOOD AND COOKING? WHY HAVE YOU STUCK WITH IT? Food is my love language. It is how I heal, how I nourish and how I communicate. I have been obsessed with clean, healthy food since my mom put a step-stool next

to the kitchen counter when I was seven years old so I could help her mix organic greens from her garden for a dinner salad. My mom’s kitchen was the soul of my childhood and the foundation of my emotional attachment to feeding people. I was baking bread and frying kettle chips before I was the legal height to ride most roller coasters. I was volunteering for the first Green Festival in Chicago when I was in high school, I was protesting chemical additives in food before most people knew what corn syrup was and I was pairing food for biodynamic wine dinners in the fading light of the sunset while most of my friends were off trying to decide what they wanted to be when they grew up. I have spent the majority of my teenage and adult life in professional kitchens, and I don’t feel at home unless I am surrounded by gleaming stainless steel, the ticking of a printer and the elegant clamor of a properly functioning culinary ecosystem. WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT BOULDER COUNTY? WHAT HAS KEPT YOU HERE? Boulder County is an amazing region that has captivated me since the day I first arrived 14 years ago. It has such a strong sense of purpose and community. It is a launchpad for the most amazing natural foods businesses I’ve ever seen. The mountains are a powerful energy that influence daily life and are a majestic backdrop to

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gaze upon in challenging moments. This is where my wife and I began dating. This is where we are raising our family, nestled in the forest of Jamestown, the greatest little mountain community I’ve ever dreamed of. I feel honored to have stumbled into this remarkable place and to have the opportunity to be a business owner here is truly exceptional. WHAT EXCITES YOU THE MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB? WHAT MOTIVATES YOU? I wake up every day inspired to have dialogue and take action around how we can use our kitchens and dining rooms to impact positive change in our communities. It is about working to educate and inspire our teams to be leaders and change agents, to use our voices, our influence and our purchasing power to move the needle of sustainability and hospitality in the right direction. It requires focus, long hours, late nights and faith in how the universe functions. The act of serving strangers requires a certain mindset, a sense of humor and the ability to adapt to the unexpected. In almost three decades of a life fully immersed in hospitality, I’ve never had a dull moment, and every

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day I learn something new about people, cooking, food and the world in general. It is an endlessly humbling educational experience. WHAT ARE YOU ESPECIALLY PASSIONATE ABOUT AS IT RELATES TO FOOD, COOKING AND HOSPITALITY? Some of the basic things are balancing waste streams (compost, recycling and landfill); educating staff on personal responsibility and impact; thoughtfully sourcing ingredients from mindful ranchers, farmers and producers; and constantly evaluating opportunities to be better. Whether it’s utilizing vegetable trim into a sauce, vinaigrette, crackers or soup, or taking extra protein cuts to use for family meal, or using whey left from hanging yogurt and incorporating that into a marinade, using pickle juice left from bison burger sets to brine chicken . . . there are many creative ways to incorporate scraps and trim from one process into a completely different dish. This is a theme I want more folks at home to contemplate. Food waste and food insecurity are two of my biggest points of advocacy. We can solve hunger in America by utilizing a percentage of what we throw away.


HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT COLLABORATING WITH GROWERS AND FARMERS? Cooking food demands a constant awareness of seasonality, soil and circumstance. The most connected humans on the planet are the folks who grow our food, who are up at 4 a.m. dealing with a hailstorm or a sudden freeze. They are in the dirt, sowing seeds, hoping for the perfect combination of sunshine and irrigation and 100 other inputs so that, months later, a beautiful and delicious crop is harvested. It is a life lived at the complete mercy of nature, luck and sheer resilience. It is the hardest work that demands the utmost respect and gratitude. Collaborating with growers, ranchers and farmers is what gives our local restaurant community a heartbeat. Telling their stories informs our ability to write our own, every night, on every plate. I love this quote from Daniel Webster, an influential statesman in the 18th and 19th centuries: “When tillage begins, other arts follow. The farmers, therefore, are the founders of human civilization.” WHAT DO YOU WISH MORE PEOPLE KNEW ABOUT DINING OUT, ABOUT THE FOOD SYSTEM, ABOUT HOSPITALITY? Sustainability has become this “thing” that people and companies can “decide” to care about, but it’s not just a line item on a spreadsheet at a board meeting. It’s a lifestyle that we wake up into every day by being human. It’s

about wondering where your toothbrush was made and if the farmer who grew the fiber in your T-shirt was fairly compensated for his labor. Are you drinking coffee that exploits a small village in Ethiopia, or are you contributing to something better and more thoughtful than that? It’s more important in the foodservice world than other industries because the hospitality world notoriously is one of the worst contributors to waste and pollution. Sustainability is crucial to adopt as a philosophy for any business. Being sustainable is rooted in connectedness and thinking about all the little things that make up our daily experiences. It’s about being kind and careful. Why would you let some lettuce go unused and wilted in your fridge when there is someone a few blocks away who would look at that lettuce as a bar of gold? It’s about recognizing the intrinsic value of everything we encounter, from people around us to potatoes in our pantry. To honor that value as the most profound currency, and not be quick to discard it or turn away from it because it’s easier or more convenient to do so. Life is hard. Relationships are hard. Working is hard. Taking care of the kids is hard. Growing vegetables is hard. Raising livestock is hard. Read More: New Boulder Restaurants to Visit travelboulder.com/new-boulder-restaurants-to-visit

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SUMMER SIPS

A Dozen

Cocktails To Try In and Around

Boulder

A Guide To Drinking in Boulder This Summer By Brittany Anas

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COME SUMMER, YOU CAN’T GO WRONG WITH A MARGARITA OR A SPRITZ. BUT SOME OF THE CLASSICS ARE DUE FOR AN UPGRADE—AND YOU CAN CERTAINLY COUNT ON BOULDER COUNTY’S CREATIVE COCKTAIL ARTISANS TO RAISE THE BAR. FROM A BOOZY LEMONADE THAT CHANGES COLOR (A MAGIC SHOW IN A GLASS!) TO A RIFF ON THE PAINKILLER AT A NEW LONGMONT TIKI BAR, THERE’S NO SHORTAGE OF COCKTAILS TO PAIR WITH WARM WEATHER. AHEAD, A DOZEN COCKTAILS THAT ARE PERFECT FOR SUMMER SIPPING AND THAT YOU CAN FIND AT BARS IN AND AROUND BOULDER.

1. WEST END TAVERN: GALACTIC LEMONADE 926 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 444-3535 Thewestendtavern.com Nothing screams summer like lemonade, and the addition of peaberry-infused vodka gives this summery cocktail a fun-to-watch twist. It morphs from a blue-purple to a bright purple as the peaberry hits and reacts with the acid in the lemon.

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2. THE KITCHEN: LA LUZ DE FLORES 1039 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 544-5973 thekitchenbistros.com The La Luz de Flores is a fun, seasonal take on a classic coin-style margarita. “Taking its name from Pablo Neruda’s Sonnet XVII, this drink highlights one of my favorite spirits: Genepy,” says Lex Madden, head bartender at The Kitchen. “Bitter, herbaceous and floral, Genepy is absolutely perfect for warm weather, and this drink offers a wonderful introduction to the alpine spirit as the mezcal and tequila play beautifully against the wildflower notes.” By replacing the Cointreau found in a traditional coin-style marg with the Genepy, Madden says she was able to create a margarita that is both more floral and more citrus-forward. “It’s bright, refreshing and tastes just as good on a snowy spring day as it does on a sunny, hot afternoon,” she says. 3. FRASCA FOOD AND WINE: FRASCA GIMLET 1738 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 442-6966 frascafoodandwine.com The Frasca Gimlet is a classic gin gimlet with a fresh, Italian twist. It incorporates Dimmi (a floral, herbaceous Italian liqueur) and a drop of celery bitters to help the vegetal notes in the gin shine. “The bright green color of this drink is achieved by adding just a touch of pea puree to the simple syrup, which also bolsters the vegetal flavors,” says Margaret Leidenfrost, bar lead at Frasca Food and Wine.


4. GHOST BOX PIZZA: BERRY SPICY GHOST 103 S. Public Road in Lafayette (970) 200-8880 ghostboxpizza.com

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ICYMI: A new Detroit-style pizza joint opened up in downtown Lafayette. Ghost Box Pizza has lots of local beers on tap and a great lineup of cocktails, too, from a lavender-infused vodka lemonade to a smoky mezcal drink with basil. But a boo-zy favorite here is the Berry Spicy Ghost, which is a blackberry- jalapeño marg that’s hauntingly good. 5. JAX FISH HOUSE & OYSTER BAR: PRICKLY PEAR MARGARITA 928 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 444-1811 jaxfishhouse.com/boulder The bar team at Jax creates a house-made orgeat to sub in for triple sec to give this bright cocktail a creamier feel, which also helps cut the sweetness of the prickly pear. “My favorite prickly pear fact? It’s known to be a hangover cure!” says Jax’s Mitchell Kasperkiewicz. “It’s fun to let guests in on this fact when they order their second round that they’re getting a little detox with their drink.”

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6. PIZZERIA LOCALE: NEGRONI 1730 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 442-3003 Localeboulder.com

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Inspired by the iconic pizzerias of Naples, Pizzeria Locale brings a slice of Southern Italy to Pearl Street—with Napoletana-style pizzas, a regional Italian wine list, and a lineup of spritzes and amaro-based cocktails. For a classic Italian order, opt for the Negroni. “It’s a super refreshing spring and summer cocktail that embodies our pizzeria and pairs brilliantly with the menu,” says Will Lewis, general manager of Pizzeria Locale Boulder. 7. DV8 DISTILLERY: PRIDE 2480 49th St. Suite E in Boulder Dv8.fun

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A craft distillery making vodka, gin, whiskey and liqueurs, DV8 also fills the niche as Boulder’s only gay bar. The distillery has lots of great libations made with its house spirits, including a Pride cocktail that’s crafted with pineapple vodka, lemonade and cranberry juice, topped with a lime garnish. “This is our cocktail that celebrates all things queer,” says Rawley Gunnels, a co-founder of DV8 Distillery. 8. CENTRO MEXICAN KITCHEN: TAMARIND MARGARITA 950 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 442-7771 Centromexican.com Slightly sweet, slightly tangy and super delicious, tamarinds are known to have “refrigerant” (aka cooling) properties as a traditional herbal medicine, making them a perfect addition to a refreshing summer cocktail. “In a world full of strawberry margaritas, the tamarind margarita is unique. I love it because it’s a nod to a popular Mexican flavor,” says Bobby Mitchell, general manager of Centro Mexican Kitchen.

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9. SWAYLO’S TIKI RESTAURANT AND BAR: VANILLAKILLA 1315 Dry Creek Dr. in Longmont (303) 651-0527 swaylostiki.com It’s always summer at the new Swaylo’s Tiki Restaurant and Bar, which opened up in a former Outback Steakhouse restaurant in Longmont. Here, you can pair dishes like mahi-mahi tacos, banana leaf braised pork and mango tempura fried shrimp with tasty tropical cocktails that come in Instagram-worthy glasses (think: the rum Junglebird served in a pink flamingo glass). One must-try cocktail here is the Vanillakilla, which is a play on the classic painkiller cocktail. “We wanted to add another layer to play with the spice of the nutmeg and sweetness of the coconut and pineapple,” says beverage director Matt Grimes. “We added whole Madagascar vanilla beans to a cognac barrel-aged rum and loved the additional layer it added to this cocktail. It’s become an instant favorite.”

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10. POST CHICKEN & BEER: WHITE TIGER 105 West Emma St. in Lafayette (303) 593-2066 postchickenandbeer.com Chicken and beer is the obvious pairing at the Post. But there are some darn good cocktails on the menu, too. The White Tiger features a split base of local gin and Chareau aloe liqueur, as well as a housemade sage-honey syrup. It’s topped with a fizzy Limonata San Pellegrino. The result is an herbaceous cocktail that’s perfectly balanced with sweet honey and bubbly citrus. “As with any cocktail I create, crushability is a must and the same goes for any great summer drink!” says Case Kazeck, assistant general manager and bar manager.

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Read More: Boulder’s Best Brunches travelboulder.com/boulders-best-brunches

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11. SUSHI-RAMA BROOMFIELD: JUNMAI NEGRONI 8181 Arista Place in Broomfield, CO (303) 862-7913 sushi-rama.com Sushi-Rama is bringing its conveyor belt loaded with sushi rolls to a new outpost in Broomfield’s Arista development. Here, you can order a Junmai Negroni, which is made with Beefeater gin, campari and Junmai Sake. “We use sake in our Negroni because it adds an earthiness character that sometimes gin can lack,” says Sushi-Rama chef Jeff Osaka. The sake Negroni pairs wonderfully with the Salmon New Style Roll with salmon tartar, avocado, cucumber and topped with smoked salmon, jalapeno, lemon and a jalapeno ponzu.

12. T-ZERO AT ST JULIEN: ISLA DIABLO 900 Walnut St. in Boulder (720) 406-7399 stjulien.com/eat-drink/jill’s-restaurant-and-bistro-new Fun fact: St. Julien Hotel and Spa’s rooftop is home to a pair of bee colonies, with each hive housing between 20,000 to 60,000 bees depending on the season. The hives can produce honey for the hotel’s bar program and a guest favorite is the Isla Diablo, which is a tequila cocktail with fresh pineapple and lime juice, a dash of tiki bitters, and a dollop of the rooftop honey. When Palisade peaches are in season, the bar incorporates Palisade Peach puree. Isla Diablo is so popular it’s often used as the signature cocktail for weddings at the St Julien.

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BOULDER RESERVOIR. PHOTO BY FLICKR

EXPERIENCES

How To

Cool Off in Boulder's Hot Summer Months

IT’S HOT, HOT, HOT THIS SUMMER. FORTUNATELY, THERE ARE PLENTY OF OPPORTUNITIES TO HOP IN A REFRESHING LAKE OR RIVER FED FROM COLORADO’S COLD MOUNTAIN WATER. WE ROUNDED UP SOME FAVORITES BELOW. BY ALICIA COHN

TUBING Tubing a river can require a little more planning than other activities. It’s a good idea to map about three miles of the river (which will take three to four hours to float) and leave a vehicle at both ends. You can call a local outfitter that rents equipment for the river to get up-to-date information on the river at the time you want to float it so you know whether there are any rapids or other hazards to be concerned about. Cache la Poudre River One good run (about 3 miles) is from Gateway Natural Area to Picnic Rock. $7 parking at Gateway. South Platte River One good run (about 3 miles) is from Deckers Bridge to Bridge Crossing Picnic Area in Sedalia. $6 parking at Bridge Crossing. St. Vrain Creek Longmont has set up a convenient tubing run on this creek that you can access east of Main Street and exit at takeout points that are marked by signs east of Martin Street or at 119th Street. Free admission. SUP OR NON-MOTORIZED BOATING Many bodies of water around Boulder allow “on top of the water” activities — like kayaking, canoeing, stand-up paddleboarding — but no swimming. It’s still a good opportunity to get on the water and enjoy some natural social distance. Plus, non-motorized boats are available to rent at shops around the Front Range for a low-commitment water adventure. Boulder Reservoir Recreational swimming and tubing is banned at the reservoir this year. Small motorized boat permits are also sold out for the year. The best way to enjoy the water here is to sign up for an activity such as kayaking, paddleboarding or SUP yoga through Rocky Mountain Paddleboard. $9 daily admission. Gross Reservoir This watery gem is tucked into the woods south of Boulder and feels remote. Free admission.

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WHEREVER YOU GO, REMEMBER YOUR PACKING LIST: • Water (always) • Snacks and other drinks (check the individual facility’s regulations on alcohol) • Sunscreen (and other methods for managing the sun – shirt, hat, sunglasses) • Water shoes (there is no concrete flooring around these locations!) • Towel (if you’re tubing, remember to leave it in the car at the end of the run) • Cooler (look into a floating cooler if you’re rafting or tubing!) • Money for parking/entry fees (check the individual facility)

McIntosh Lake Swimming is prohibited, but bring your canoes, kayaks, paddleboards, belly boats, sailboards, sailboats and small carry-able boats to this lake with an incredible view near Longmont. Free admission. Union Reservoir Wakeless boating, canoeing, kayaking and paddleboarding are currently permitted at Union near Longmont, but no swimming. Rocky Mountain Paddleboard also offers lessons and rentals here. $10 daily admission. SWIMMING Swimming (for fun and to cool off) might seem hard to come by this summer, but it’s not impossible. The natural non-wilderness areas that are allowing swimming this year have strict requirements for limited capacity and social distancing on any beach area. Aurora Reservoir Swimming is available in a coned-off area, along with non-motorized boating options elsewhere in the water. $10 daily admission. Cache la Poudre River Picnic Rock is a popular, though small, rocky beach area near Fort Collins. It’s also the take-out spot for a lot of river rafters and can get busy. The large rock that gives this spot its name is a great place to take a flying leap into the cold mountain water. Free admission. Chatfield State Park Chatfield’s swim beach in Littleton is open until Labor Day with capacity limits including limits on group size (must be under 25 people). $10 entry fee. Read more online at travelboulder.com


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