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FARM FRESH Boulder’s Summer & Fall Bounty

A BOULDER ICON

50 Years of Flagstaff House

BOULDER EXPLORERS

EXPERIENCE SUMMER/FALL

Locals Making a Difference

MEET THE ARTISTS

2021

StudioDoorz Creates Connections

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Dining Through The Decades The Flagstaff House Restaurant invites you to join us for our 2021 dinner series celebrating our 50th Anniversary. Each dinner highlights menus from decades past, done with a modern twist.

1970s

WINE PARTNERSHIP WITH

BENEFITING

THURSDAY, JUNE 10TH

1980s

WINE PARTNERSHIP WITH

BENEFITING

THURSDAY, JULY 8TH

1990s

WINE PARTNERSHIP WITH

BENEFITING

THURSDAY, AUGUST 12TH

2000s

WINE PARTNERSHIP WITH

BENEFITING

WINE PARTNERSHIP WITH JACKSON FAMILY WINES

BENEFITING

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9TH

2010s

EXCLUSIVELY FEATURING

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6TH

FOR MORE DETAILS AND TO PURCHASE TICKETS, VISIT:

www.flagstaffhouse.com/dining-through-the-decades

$50

FROM EACH TICKET WILL BE DONATED TO THE FEATURED CHARITY OF THE EVENING SPONSORED BY

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SUMMER-FALL 20211138 FLAGSTAFF RD, BOULDER, CO 80302 303-442-4640

THANK YOU COLORADO!


r e d l u o B ertime m m Su

Twist Tops Flip Flops Late Nights Beer Flights

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FROM THE EDITOR FROM THE PUBLISHER

Summer/Fall 2018

PUBLISHER / CO-OWNER JOHN R. BRICE

SUMMER-FALL 2021

Some of my most beautiful memories are set to this backdrop. Sometimes it’s simple: my bare toes deep in the cool grass of the Chautauqua lawn. Other times it’s adventurous: foraging through the forest, stopping along the way to marvel at the views. A few times, it’s been the screaming burn of my thighs as I ran up the steep Chautauqua trail. OK, those last memories are a little less than beautiful. (More like sweating and sobbing, “Why? Why?”) But each moment is special to me. Because each moment is aIt has partbeen of aBoulder’s very difficultfamous time in Boulder and around the world. The pandemic Colorado Chautauqua. created loss of life, stay-at-home mandates and closed down our economy. While many localisbusinesses ourthe community tried to survive during these Chautauqua Boulder. in And Coloradohave Chautauqua is celebrating its trying big times, unfortunately, many businesses had to close. Please support your favorite local 1-2-0 this year. business, restaurants, retailers and hotels now more than ever. Needless to say, we wanted to give it a good gift. I couldn’t write this without mentioning the senseless gun violence that rocked Enter: Travel Boulder’s premiere print magazine, The Ultimate Guide our community on April 22nd. This violence, which took the lives of 10 people to Boulder. You can findofficer, thesebroke guides, locals friends so youand canour experience including a police thewritten hearts ofbyfamilies, community. BoulderIlike a local, published twice thought a year. that this could happen in Boulder. Clearly, guess I am naive, but I never AndI what betterPlease way toremember kick off aand newhonor mag than Boulder’s star? was wrong. these with innocent victimsshining who had their lives taken that day at King Soopers and do whatever you can to help stop An in-depth look at Chautauqua is our lead story in this edition. In this package,the unnecessary acts of to gunstay violence thebest future. you’ll learn which cottage at forinthe views (or the most privacy); which a your brighter note, Boulder is a resilient coolest community andfor with everyone’s trails to hikeOn with kids; some of Chautauqua’s events 2018; and support, canwe return to better days.you. We created this issue to provide a ray of also some historywethat bet will surprise sunshine and ideas for new experiences and adventure for you and your families. Whether you don’t even know what a “chautauqua” is (it’s OK; I didn’t for Check bucket list to becomeevery inspired, then local there’s explorers about a decade) or out youour think you’ve explored inch of read theseabout grounds, who have had amazing experiences to share with you. Want to get away for the something here to help enrich your next visit. weekend? Check out our ideas for day trips from Boulder for some inspiration. In addition, Summer 2018with Ultimate Guide to includesgeneral the Aimeethe Heckel sat down Adam Monett, theBoulder third-generation Ultimatemanager Guide to likes ofaswhich has never been andBoulder’s partner atNeighborhoods Flagstaff House(the restaurant they celebrate their 50th officiallyanniversary. reported onThey before), as well as guides to family fun and music in Boulder. discussed this institution and their “Dining Through the As aDecades,” native toathese parts, I’veseries. always loved Boulder for its ability to surprise. five-part dinner Just when you thinkwhat’s you’ve triedStudio it all, there’s crazy new stuffed gourd Learn behind Doorz, asome new website thatvegan allows you to visit many artists’ in hay Boulder andatthe surroundingorarea. Preview artist’s work and at visit surrounded bystudios flaming (that’s Emmerson), a wall-dancing class (that’s studios history of playing some ofthe Boulder Iluminartheir Aerial), or year-round. some dude Read on theabout Pearlthe Street Mall pianoCounty’s while musicfrom venues as we prepare hangingfavorite by his feet a tree (um, yup).for the return of live music. Sarah Kuta talked with Colorado farmers about their favorite summer and As John Brice, the publisher and co-founder of TravelBoulder.com, says,fall produce, plus how to cook with them. And now that you’re thinking about cooking, “You would be amazed at what is going on in Boulder that you don’t know about. take a peek inside Boulder’s iconic kitchen supply store Peppercorn. Grab a bag We found it was difficult to find out early enough what was happening in Boulder of heirloom flour from Dry Storage, helmed by award-winning chef-activist Kelly until after it happened. We were tiredBagels, of missing out.” Whitaker. The owners of Moe’s the best bagels in Boulder, also shared the Well, you to don’t to miss out anymore. We got ya. secrets theirhave success. Enjoy our firstyou of many magazines; I hopeBoulder to see itMagazine. used andFor abused, crammed I hope enjoy this issue of Travel more Boulder-area and adventures, visit travelboulder.com. in your experiences backpack and splattered with cold brew and craft beer and adventure, because that’s what’s Boulder’s made of. Get even more info online at TravelBoulder.com.

— John R. Brice

Publisher and Co-Founder of Travel Boulder

SUMMER-FALL 2021 10 10 SUMMER/FALL 2018

Aimee Heckel Editor-in-chief

CO-OWNER

JILL NAGEL-BRICE PUBLISHER EDITORIAL JOHN R. BRICE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / WRITER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AIMEE HECKEL

JILL NAGEL-BRICE

DESIGN DIRECTOR / MANAGING EDITOR

TYLER PERCY MANAGER EDITOR-COPY

SARAH KUTA

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

KAITLYN PAYNE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

COPYHECKEL EDITOR AIMEE CLAY EVANS SARAH KUTA JEFF BLUMENFELD CREATIVE SERVICES / PRODUCTION BARRY BORTNICK PRODUCTION MANAGER BRITTANY ANAS SARAH MILLER JOHN BEAR PUBLICATION DESIGNER

MONIKA EDGAR ART DIRECTOR/DESIGNER

MONIKA EDGAR

ADVERTISING DESIGNER

DAWN SHUCKSALES ADVERTISING

JOHN R. BRICE TRAFFIC MANAGER JILL NAGEL-BRICE SARAH EATHERLY ADVERTISING SALES DIGITAL DEVELOPER

DREW BARONPUBLISHER ASSOCIATE RANDY GOLDNER

DESIGNER

ACCOUNT TYLER PERCY EXECUTIVES

MICHELLE ADAMS, RYAN GRAF

GEOFF HERDEN, LOVATO SOCIAL MEDIA AARON MANAGER

ISABELLE NAGEL BRICE CONTRIBUTORS

COVER PHOTO ANN DUNCAN

On the cover: PHOTOGRAPHERS

ZACH ANDREWS, JONATHAN AUERBACH,

STEPHEN COLLECTOR, AEMILY youngCARL, girl holding organic beets. ANN DUNCAN, PAULA GILLEN, Photographer Yanadjan. JACOB HELLECKSON, BRIAN LOPEZ,

JESSICA MORGAN, GRANT NYQUIST, WERNER SLOCUM, EMILY TAYLOR, Copyright by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. PRUNE 2021 VANDENOVER All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly proWRITERS hibited withoutANAS, publisher’JESSICA s permission, including original BRITTANY MORGAN, editorial, graphics, design, photography, advertising and KAITLYN PAYNE, CALLIE PEDERSON sponsored content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are published by Go Visit Media Co., 2535 Copyright 2018 by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. Meadow Ave, Boulder CO 80304 | Phone: 720-708-6803 All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly prohibited Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com without publisher’ s permission, including original editorial, Sales: john@travelboulder.com, jill@travelboulder.com graphics, design, photography, advertising and sponsored Travelboulder.com content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are Facebook.com/travelboulder published by Go Visit Media Co., 2465 Central Ave. Suite 203 _boulder Instagram.com/travel Boulder, CO 80301 | Phone: 303-544-1198 | Fax: 303-449-6121 Advertising Sales 303-544-1198 Ext. 102 Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com


951 PEARL ST BOULDER 303 . 543 . 9191 JALBRECHTDESIGNS.COM

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Contents

42 14 SUMMER & FALL BUCKET LIST 20 FLAGSTAFF HOUSE TURNS 50 26 BEST DAY TRIPS 32 MOE’S BAGELS 36 MEET THE EXPLORERS 42 STUDIO DOORZ 50 BOULDER COUNTY MUSIC VENUES 52 FARM FRESH 58 PEPPERCORN 62 DRY STORAGE 66 SUMMER COCTAILS 73 ADVERTISING INDEX 74 EXPERIENCE BOULDER

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OPEN FOR REDISCOVERY

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THINGS TO DO

THE SUMMER & FALL BUCKET LIST

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WELCOME TO THE LIGHT OF SUMMER. BASK IN THE LONG DAYS AND ENDLESS HOURS THE SEASON OFFERS. TAKE COMFORT IN THE WARMTH OF JULY. APPRECIATE THE CRISP BITE OF OCTOBER. EMBRACE EVERY OPPORTUNITY TO DO THE THINGS THIS PAST YEAR DENIED US.

BY BARRY BORTNICK

THE COLD OF WINTER AND THE RAINS OF SPRING HAVE PASSED. THE FOOTHILLS ARE GREEN WITH NEW LIFE. HOPEFULLY, THE DARKNESS OF THE PAST YEAR HAS ENDED. IT’S TIME TO TRY NEW THINGS LIKE PARAGLIDING OVER THE FOOTHILLS OR DISCOVERING THE NATURAL BOUNTY THAT LITERALLY GROWS ALL OVER BOULDER. IT’S TIME TO GET BUSY WITH THESE SUMMER AND FALL BOULDER BUCKET-LIST ITEMS.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BOULDER FREE FLIGHT

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THINGS TO DO PLAY PICKLEBALL. In the history of sports, few games have exploded with the intensity of Pickleball. The game, which is a fun mix of mini-tennis, ping-pong and badminton, can be enjoyed by all. LET’S GET WET. Swimming is the perfect exercise to get yourself moving again after a year of semi-hibernation. Grab your swimsuit and goggles and pretend you’re Michael Phelps. Those interested in competitive swimming should look into the world of Boulder Aquatic Masters, aka BAM. The local swim group offers maximum exercise with very little impact or punishment to the body. “BEING IN WATER IS GOOD FOR YOUR HEAD,” SAID JOHN GRATZ, A LONG-TIME BAM MEMBER. “WHEN YOU SWIM, YOU GET TO BE IN A DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENT FROM YOUR NORMAL LIFE. IT’S NOT LIKE BEING IN THE WOODS; IT’S BEING IN A PLACE WHERE YOU DO NOT LIVE.”

Visit https://www.bamswimteam.org for more information about competitive swimming. FLY LIKE AN EAGLE. If water is not your thing, go the opposite way and take flight on a paraglider. You can see paragliders float over North Boulder throughout the year. The pilots drift on air currents and dance with birds above the landscape. The learning curve is not as hard as you might think, according to instructor and tandem pilot Johannes Rath. “It’s too much fun,” Rath said. “When you do this, you wonder why everyone is not doing this. It captures the sensation of being a bird.” Though easy to learn, Rath said it takes a lifetime to master paragliding. Flights can be as gentle as a soft pillow or as rough as a bumper car. “Once you have good skills, a pilot can fly on air and ride the currents like a rodeo rider atop a bull,” Rath said. BOULDER FREE FLIGHT is a great place to learn the basics. A tandem flight gives you the chance to sit back and enjoy the view as the pro flies over Foothills Community Park in

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North Boulder. The paragliding company can also train you to be a certified pilot for about $2,000. See https://www.boulderfreeflight.com for all the details. GET VERTICAL. Now that you’ve mastered the art of flight, it’s time to cling to the edge of the 300-foot-tall rockface that has stood guard over Eldorado Canyon for eons. Risk-takers clamber and climb all over the giant sandstone monuments inside this wonderful state park. “When you enter this state park, it’s like entering a new universe,” said Jason Antin, an experienced rock climber and guide with Colorado Mountain College. On a sunny day, the sun bakes and reflects off the sandstone cliffs that invite climbers to ascend. “When you climb, you have a rope, you are locked in, you have a helmet,” Antin said. “The atmosphere is controlled. You have a harness. You are safe.” Want to get vertical? see www.coloradomountainschool.com for more information. PLAY PICKLEBALL. In the history of sports, few games have exploded with the intensity of Pickleball. The game, which is a fun mix of mini-tennis, ping-pong and badminton, can be enjoyed by all. Though the game started in the 1960s, it has ballooned as the population ages and older fitness enthusiasts seek to stay fit without damaging the body. “It’s a game for everyone, because it pulls from so many different sports,” said Scott Fliegelman, a Pickleball teaching pro. “Anyone can get into it, especially those familiar with racquet sports.” The sport is also popular because you can learn it quickly. “It is also easy on the body, Fliegelman said. “The paddle is light, half the weight of a tennis racquet. The ball is a whiffle ball and the court is a third the size of a tennis court.” The game is played all around Boulder. There are public courts at local rec centers and private ones scattered around town. To learn more go to: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/pickleball, usapickleball.org or boulderpickleball.net.

BIKE WITHOUT THE HARD WORK. Boulder is well known as a cycling mecca. But for some of us, the ride can be a bit much. That’s where electric bikes come in very handy. E-bikes are the perfect tool to cruise town with ease. Boulder Bike Tours offers locals and visitors the chance to glide all over town on an electronic bike and enjoy stops and lectures about Boulder history and important sites. “Enjoying a local tour on an electronic bike is a must,” said Herschel Goldberg, founder of Boulder Bike Tours. His bikes can hit 20 mile per hour, which makes the entire Boulder area easily accessible during regular bike tours. The company routinely takes people on two-hour journeys that include visits to Chautauqua, NCAR and Boulder Canyon. “The majority of people who take our tours have never been on an e-bike before,” Goldberg said. “The most common comment we get from clients is that they wished they did the bike tour on their first day in town, because it provides them with so much information about Boulder.” The tours run from June to November. Most groups have about eight riders and a guide. “Riding an electric bike makes you feel like a kid again,” Goldberg said. “The bikes are so powerful that even those who are not in very good shape can ride all over town without any issues. It really opens up the ability to enjoy the great outdoors and not use up all your energy.” See https://boulderbiketours.com for further details and bookings LEARN THE ART OF WILD PLANTS AND HERBS. Boulder is filled with wonderful things. Many are literally at your feet. Boulder is loaded with wild plants and healthy herbs that grow in abundance across the community. But most of us have never paid attention to the dandelions, purslane, wild spinach and other plants that can be collected and eaten. Brigitte Mars, a local herbalist, offers walking tours around town that teach people about the native plants and useful treasures that sprout all over our neighborhoods. The walking tours identify and explain the benefits of more than 50 plants that grow around the community. Dandelions, often


“YOU CAN FIND WONDERFUL PLANTS ANYWHERE LAWNMOWERS HAVE NOT GONE,” MARS SAID. “UNLESS YOU ARE A GOAT, WHY HAVE A LAWN? IT’S TIME TO LEARN HOW WE CAN FEED PEOPLE AND CREATE A BETTER PLANET.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF BOULDER BIKE TOURS

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIGITTE MARS

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PHOTO COURTESY OF BRUCE YEUNG; INSTAGRAM @YEUNGPHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

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considered the enemy of lawn lovers, are actually wonderful plants that benefit the bees. They also offer healthful uses. An herbalist will tell you that dandelions contain antioxidants, fight inflammation, help control blood sugar and can reduce cholesterol. “You can find wonderful plants anywhere lawnmowers have not gone,” Mars said. “Unless you are a goat, why have a lawn? It’s time to learn how we can feed people and create a better planet.” For more details, see Brigittemars.com. RUN RALPHIE RUN. By all accounts, the University of Colorado football team will be in full swing this fall. Games should be open to some fans. This is a total must for anyone, not just because the atmosphere inside Folsom Field is among the best in college sports, but also because the views from the east-side stands will blow your mind. “The stadium is pure magic,” said Jay Elowsky, a long-time Buffs booster and owner of Pasta Jay’s restaurant on Pearl Street. Elowsky has seen almost every home game over the past 30 years. “The views are beautiful. You can cheer for the team and enjoy views of the Flatirons and the Continental Divide,” he added. There always is a spectacular pre-game party outside Folsom Field. You can hang there and watch the game on a huge screen outside the stadium. If you do go, be sure to get there early, then walk down toward the field to watch the best mascot in college do her thing. Watch Ralphie, a huge female buffalo, charge onto the field as the team races behind her. It is a sight well worth seeing. Five handlers are used to guide Ralphie around the field. She can reach speeds of 25 miles per hour during her run. See https://cubuffs.com/sports/football for ticket details as the season approaches. SUNSET TIME. It’s time to toast the end of another great fall or summer day. One of the primary spots to take in the town is atop is a new food hall called Rosetta Hall. Located on the Pearl Street Mall, the new hot spot has a wide range of food and drink options and a rooftop lounge that presents some of the best views around. Snack on charred scallions and ricotta ravioli, some lamb shawarma or maybe Thai red curry. Then toast the success of your adventures with a classic margarita as the setting sun kisses the backside of the Flatirons to end another spectacular Boulder day. See https://rosettahall.com for details.

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REFUEL

flagstaff House Celebrates 50 Years 20

SUMMER-FALL 2021


50

By Aimee Heckel PHOTOS COURTESY OF FLAGSTAFF HOUSE

ADAM MONETTE SITS NEXT TO A CRACKLING FIRE IN A NEWLY RENOVATED, POSH SEATING AREA NEAR THE BAR AT THE FLAGSTAFF HOUSE RESTAURANT. You’d never guess it, amid the swanky furniture, dim lighting and cucumber and kiwi gimlet the bartender is pouring, but this front room used to be a rugged shack. In the 1920s, it was a Boulder County storage station, likely used for Gross Reservoir. A lot has changed since then. Everything. Monette, a Boulder native, holds a stack of old menus that date back to the 1970s, smiling down at the listing for a $5.25 steak and 95-cent dessert. “That was an expensive steak in 1971,” he says. At age 31, he doesn’t recall those days firstand, but what he has witnessed firsthand is the evolution of his family restaurant alongside his own growth. Monette — like his grandpa, grandma, all five of their kids and all of those five kids’ grandchildren (wouldn’t they be kids of the five kids of the grandparents not grandkids?Or, you could delete “”all of those five kids’”)— grew up here, in one of Boulder’s finest restaurants. The Flagstaff House is truly Boulder’s shining star (in fact, it’s perched on the side of the Flagstaff Mountain not far from Boulder’s famous “Flagstaff star” that is illuminated every winter and on special occasions). This French-American, family-run business boasts more dining and travel awards than any other restaurant on Colorado’s Front Range. This year, it’s celebrating its 50th birthday. And it’s doing it big.

The Flagstaff House’s 5-0 bash will stretch out across five months. From June through October, the restaurant will hold one themed event per month. These special dinners are called “Dining Through the Decades,” a five-part dinner series that will feature past dishes from the 1970s to the 2010s, complete with wine pairings. The dinners will feature real menu items that appeared in these old menus that Monette is holding. Like French onion soup, big in the ’80s. Only today’s versions of the old classics will be modernized, like French onion soup with baguette-crusted onion broth, sherry onion jam, gruyere and thyme gremolata. Or for the ’70s, a Flagstaff Cut prime rib — with pommes dauphine, spinach, baby carrots, rosemary, black pepper crust and natural jus. The dinners will also raise money for local charities. Tickets cost $135, with $50 going to the evening’s featured nonprofit, all of which have personal importance to the Flagstaff staff. For example, June’s 1970s-themed dinner benefits the Rocky Mountain chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; Monette’s brother-in-law has cystic fibrosis. July’s 1980s-themed dinner benefits the Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinson’s; Monette’s father, Mark, (and former executive chef/partner) has Parkinson’s disease, and Davis Phinney himself used to work at the restaurant. Mark Monette will be the guest chef for this event. And September’s 2000s-themed dinner benefits the Colorado Foundation for Conductive Education; executive chef/partner Chris Royster’s sister was born with cerebral palsy.

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A View Like No Other If you know Boulder, you know about Flagstaff House. But what many people may not realize is how this landmark came to be. Like why and how this (and only this) restaurant is built on the side of the mountain, 6,000 feet above it all, overlooking Boulder, smack in the middle of open space. With these kinds of views, you’d expect cliffside patios for days. Yet with Boulder’s avid protection of open space, how could any business be permitted in this location? The answer: Monette’s grandfather was, well, grandfathered in. The county originally built a cabin on this land in the 1920s as storage. As the story goes, a schoolteacher from Chicago, Hattie Bilchert, ended up buying it from the county to use as a summer cabin. Today, you can see an old photo of him sitting on a log smoking a cigar, hanging in the hallway to the restroom (next to a photo of the emperor and empress of Japan dining in the restaurant). Then in the late ’30s, a park ranger named Joe van Gorder bought the cabin to use for special events. Eventually, in the ’50s, the Buelkes family bought it to convert into a summer restaurant. Back then, the mountain roads weren’t plowed, so it shut down as soon as the snow fell. The couple lived upstairs (where the offices are today) and ran the small restaurant out of the main floor. They called it the Flagstaff House. In 1971, Adam Monette’s grandfather, Don Monette, bought the building and surrounding five acres. At the time, Don Monette had been running three different downtown restaurants. He initially moved to Colorado (after falling in love with the state during military training near Leadville) and worked as the manager of a Waffle House. Eventually, he ran a joint called Chimes (opened in 1966), a restaurant and bar called The Viking (1968) and a breakfast restaurant named the Golden Buff Coffee Shop (1970). It was a lot to juggle all three at once, Adam Monette says. Don Monette learned about the Flagstaff House’s sale before it went on the market; the owners were regulars at The Viking. So he bought the Flagstaff House and immediately liquidated all three downtown businesses, one after the other, to focus his efforts. “With five kids, living in a small place in Boulder, it was a risk,” Adam Monette says. “This place was a shack, not even insulated.” It was on well water, septic tanks and propane. The original restaurant barely had the amenities to cook food and flush the toilets. Don Monette moved into a house on the property and devoted everything to the restaurant. He weatherized it so it could be open year-round, added on a dining room and several outdoor terraces and got connected with city water; the latter came with an agreement to the city to stop expanding and to always blend in with the mountain.

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The historic building was grandfathered in; you can’t build anything like it on the mountain anymore, says Adam Monette. “Otherwise, there’d be restaurants everywhere. It was a lucky property to have in the first place,” he says. The entire Monette family chipped in, and Don Monette’s son, Mark Monette, became the executive chef. That’s Adam Monette’s dad. “They started us young,” Adam Monette says. “Take-your-son-towork-days were every weekend.” In middle school, he served bread and poured water, complete with a mouth full of braces and a shiny gold vest. He worked every position, from dishwasher to maintenance to finance, from the grill station to fish station, from bartender to server, from valet to host, until he worked his way up to general manager/partner. Grandpa Don is 86 now, and you might still see him around the restaurant. In fact, he lives in a cabin right on the property of the business he brought to life. The food grew up, too. It started with prime rib and table-side caesar salads, but as the Monettes traveled, dining around the world inspired them. In particular, fine dining in France. Last year, the Flagstaff House earned its 42nd consecutive Forbes Four Star rating and 31st consecutive AAA Four Diamond status. It has been awarded the Wine Spectator’s Grand Award every year since 1983, and OpenTable named it one of the most romantic restaurants in America. The wine collection, surpassing 16,000 bottles, earned the restaurant one of only 85 Wine Spectator’s Grand Awards. “We were a dirty rock on the side of the mountain, but we are trying to be a diamond,” Adam Monette says. (Literally: The goal is to earn that fifth AAA diamond.) “We do everything we can to elevate it.” He gestures to the new sitting area and fireplace — what once was that original shack. He points out the new lighting, new floors, new chairs. The menu is always changing. “We continue renovating so we don’t fall off the mountain,” he says, and of course, he doesn’t mean it literally.

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While the Flagstaff House is an important part of Boulder’s history, Adam Monette says he doesn’t want the past to define it anymore than the size (and seriously short ceilings) in the original shack limited the potential of this family business. “You have to evolve,” he says. “After this past year, people have been cooking at home and eating the same foods, buying the same foods. Going to a restaurant with a new chef, new template and new food that is constantly changing is exciting. If you already know what you’re going to eat before you get there, it’s time to change.”

Dining Through the Decades Here’s a look at the Dining Through the Decades dinners: June 10: 1970s decade dinner, benefiting Rocky Mountain Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Wine partnership with Maisons Marques & Domaines. July 8: 1980s decade dinner, benefiting Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinson’s. Wine partnership with Fontanafredda. Guest chef Mark Monette (former executive chef). Aug. 12: 1990s decade dinner, benefiting There with Care. Wine partnership with Maison Louis Jadot. Sept. 9: 2000s decade dinner, benefiting Colorado Foundation for Conductive Education. Wine partnership with ZD Winery. Oct. 6: 2010s decade dinner, benefiting Community Food Share Colorado. Wine partnership with Freemark Abbey Winery. Tickets are $135 per person through OpenTable or by calling 303442-4620.

check out the most popular dishes at boulder’s restaurants www.travelboulder.com/the-most-populardishes-at-boulders-restaurants


Camping & Fishing

Lawn & Garden

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THINGS TO DO

BEST DAY TRIPS FROM BOULDER

TRAVEL IS DIFFERENT NOW. BUT IT’S NOT DEAD.

LAKE DILLON. PHOTO COURTESY OF TOWN OF FRISCO

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Even

BY AIMEE HECKEL

if

you’re

not

comfortable

Here

are

some

of

our

favorite

hopping on an airplane and partying

weekend getaways from Boulder —

at a mega resort in Mexico, there

featuring destinations that are private

are still tons of ways to explore the

and intimate, as well as other ways to

world and scratch that travel itch. As

adventure safely. Not to mention, a

the world tries to recover from the

quiet and peaceful vacation is always

coronavirus pandemic, road trips and

desirable, regardless of the state of

day trips closer to home are more

global health. You can do any of these

popular than ever.

trips over a summer or fall weekend.

DOWNTOWN FRISCO. PHOTO COURTESY OF TOWN OF FRISCO

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THINGS TO DO

Colorado Springs Colorado Springs is about an hour and 40 minutes from Boulder and just under 100 miles away, making it ideal for a weekend getaway. There’s endless fun in the Springs, from the country’s only mountainside zoo (feed the giraffes!) to natural wonders galore. For example, the Cave of the Winds is a jaw-dropping, underground cave system, and then above ground, the Garden of the Gods is a collection of huge red rocks reaching toward the sky. The latter, fully outdoors (go early on a weekday when it’s least busy), is a top attraction if you’re cautious about crowds. STAY HERE: Stay at the luxurious Broadmoor, which boasts multiple different intimate lodging offerings.

First, the Brownstones’ residential-style accommodations have mountain views and private, gourmet kitchens. There are four floors of space, and everything you could need to feel like you’re home away from home. Or stay at the Cottages (our favorite), right on the golf course. These elegant, private properties have between one and eight bedrooms, massive patios and fireplaces. You can stay the weekend here, order room service, dine on your patio and barely have to interact with another human. For more private lodging, also ask about the Estate House (great for groups) and the totally isolated Fire Tower Suite at Cloud Camp — total seclusion several thousand feet above the city atop Cheyenne Mountain.

THE MAVEN HOTEL. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MAVEN HOTEL

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EAT HERE: The Broadmoor has various restaurant options, including outdoor dining at the Lake Terrace Dining Room. Overlook the lake for an extravagant Sunday brunch. DO THIS: There are two new things not to miss (depending on your level of comfort in public places). First, this spring, the Broadmoor is scheduled to open the newly renovated Broadmoor Manitou and Pikes Peak Railway. This historic railway dates back to 1891 and remains the highest railway in the country and the world’s highest cog train. Ride up to where the song “America the Beautiful” was inspired. (The train capacity will be capped at 50 percent.) If you don’t want to ride the train and are up for a challenge, you can hike up to Pikes Peak on the 13-mile Barr Trail.


There is also a mountain bike path. Boulderites will also love Colorado Springs’ new U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Museum. The museum has timed tickets and attendance caps, as well as other safety precautions. This 60,000-squarefoot museum is all about this country’s best athletes, their stories, the artifacts and inspiration.

Denver For a close-to-home staycation, Denver’s less than 45 minutes (less than 30 miles) from Boulder. Every corner of Colorado’s capital is filled with adventure, but for a bit of a hidden gem that won’t be as crowded as the 16th Street Mall, head to the quirky Dairy Block micro-district. The Dairy Block is still walking distance to LoDo (and two

blocks from Union Station), but it’s off the beaten path. STAY HERE: The award-winning Maven Hotel is in the heart of the Dairy Block. The hotel feels like a private art gallery, with more than 400 pieces of original art by Colorado artists throughout. Rooms are spacious, with high ceilings, oversized windows and balcony options. A more laid back, family option is a weekend at the Gaylord Rockies Resort and Convention Center. There are ways to make even a big hotel like the Gaylord more private, while still enjoying the on-site, seasonal activities that make it so fun. Request a suite with a full kitchen, and limited pool reservations are required. EAT HERE: The patio at the Kachina Cantina, a tasty southwestern grill connected with

HIKING AT RITZ-CARLTON BACHELOR GULCH. PHOTO COURTESY OF RITZ-CARLTON BACHELOR GULCH

the Maven (no need to drive). Take in the sunshine outside with a margarita and chips. Also, check out nearby Poka Lola, with specialty sodas made with locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. DO THIS: The Dairy Block is host to all kinds of fun events, like Drag Queen Bingo Brunch in the alley. This spring, look for a “Local AF” pop-up, outdoor market featuring the likes of sustainably made fanny packs, zero-waste fashion and vegan candles. Later in the year, look for the “Glamp AF” pop-up for stylish outdoor gear. While in Denver, visit the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, which has ticketed, limited capacity. New this year, running through Labor Day: an intriguing exhibit about the mystery of Stonehenge.

SNOW MOUNTAIN RANCH WATERFALL HIKE. PHOTO COURTESY OF SNOW MOUNTAIN RANCH.

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THINGS TO DO

Beaver Creek After the snow melts, the ski town of Beaver Creek feels like a magical, peaceful escape from reality. Beaver Creek still has the mountains and outdoor activities that make ski towns so fun in warmer weather, but it’s smaller than some popular towns like Aspen. It’s a little farther from Boulder than Denver, at just over two hours and 120 miles up Interstate 70, but still close enough for a quick one- or two-night staycation. STAY HERE: Add another layer of intimacy when you stay at the Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch. The lobby and outdoor terrace are spacious; request a private residence with a full kitchen. Bonus: This elegant resort, built on sprawling open space, is pet-friendly and even has its own hotel dogs (the newest is a Saint Bernard puppy, Bachelor).

If you want even more privacy, book a private residence through Moving Mountains. This local, family-run company manages luxurious, independent properties (from sprawling villas to penthouses), and it recently expanded to Beaver Creek and Vail. Think of it like a high-end Airbnb concept, plus a concierge to help you plan and coordinate special features, like a private, in-room chef or pre-packaged meal kits with a QR code to video instruction. Moving Mountains says it has seen an increased demand for family gatherings and vacations from people who want to get out in a safe and private way. The model is based on the European “catered ski chalet” service, except in Colorado, it’s offered year-round. EAT HERE: Eat outside on the terrace at WYLD, the Ritz’s on-site restaurant. No need to leave the property for some of Beaver Creek’s best plates.

DO THIS: The Ritz offers guided hikes with a naturalist, which are small-group, outdoor explorations to learn about the wildlife and history of the area. Also ask about art classes, photography hikes and the Edge of the Wild package (May 27-Sept. 6), which includes three nights and a resort credit to use toward a guided mountain hike, mountainside dining and more.

Granby A two-hour drive west will bring Boulderites to the small mountain town of Granby, in Grand County, not far from Winter Park Ski Resort. A small town like Granby (population: 2,000) is ideal for travelers who crave new scenery and adventure without crowds. Explore the Arapaho National Forest and spend the weekend in nature.

RITZ-CARLTON BACHELOR GULCH. PHOTO COURTESY OF RITZ-CARLTON BACHELOR GULCH

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STAY HERE: Snow Mountain Ranch. Book a dog-friendly yurt or a private cabin with a fireplace. Eat here: Order take-out dining from the resort’s on-site restaurants or get groceries delivered to your door. The Buckboard Grill is a good option on site for pizza, salads, sandwiches and snacks. DO THIS: No need to plan. Just show up and play. The cool thing about Snow Mountain Ranch is it’s packed with free, family-friendly activities, many of which are outdoors. We’re talking mini golf, lawn games, biking trails, fishing, guided hikes, private pool sessions, campfires, disc golf, visits to historic sites and even Hanging With Huskies, where you can play with dogs from the ranch’s dog sled team. Don’t miss the summer tubing hill.

Frisco Less than two hours from Boulder (about 80 miles away), you can explore the charming Summit County destination of Frisco — another one of the smaller mountain towns with a population around 3,000. At the foot of the 10,000-foot Mount Royal, outdoor activities are central to a weekend in Frisco. There’s biking, stand-up paddleboarding, golfing, fishing and Thursday night concerts in the park, to name a few. It’s easy to spend a weekend in Frisco barely seeing the indoors. STAY HERE: For a socially distanced home base, rent a condo with Summit Mountain Rentals. This property management company has a great selection of options (including family-friendly and pet-friendly) and offers the comfort of private spaces. For example, the Casa de Montagne is a high-end log home that’s

tucked in the trees but also walking distance to Main Street. EAT HERE: Frisco has a great selection of outdoor dining options. Rising Sun Distillery has a new tasting room and expanded outdoor seating, complete with international street food and views of Mount Buffalo. Or enjoy innovative comfort food outside by the fireplace at Tavern West Restaurant. DO THIS: Not many towns at 9,000-feet-plus also have an alpine lake, but Frisco’s got Lake Dillon and the Frisco Bay Marina. Spend solitary time on the lake while canoeing, kayaking, sailing and more. If kayaking is your jam, check out the Frisco Kayak Park on Ten Mile Creek.

FRISCO MARINA AND LIGHTHOUSE. PHOTO COURTESY OF TOWN OF FRISCO

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MAKERS SERIES

By Aimee Heckel

“TO BE AN AUTHENTIC BAGEL, IT MUST BE BOILED. YOU MAKE THE DOUGH, LET IT SLOWRISE FOR A FEW DAYS IN REFRIGERATION TO ACTIVATE THE YEAST AND THEN BOIL IT. THE LAST STEP IS BAKING. THAT’S WHAT LEADS TO THE TEXTURE, WITH A SHELL ON THE OUTSIDE AND CHEWY INSIDE.” – JOHN SHERMAN

MOE’S BAGELS: A Boulder Classic Since 1992 POP INTO MOE’S BROADWAY BAGEL ON A THURSDAY, AND IT ’LL FEEL LIKE YOU WALKED INTO A MINI FAMILY REUNION.

Sherman’s great-grandfather. Moe the namesake wasn’t a baker though. Peter Sherman’s parents, Patty and John, learned how to make bagels back East from a “master bagel maker,” a third-generation The Sherman family — Peter Sherman, his parents, baker in Vermont. uncle and two sisters — get together every Thursday morning to bake and braid traditional Jewish challah Patty and John Sherman met decades ago in bread. Later that afternoon when it’s cooling, you Boulder. She was from Colorado, and he had moved can buy a challah hot out of the oven. The sweet here from New York, where he grew up. As a young honey scent fills the shop; the Shermans use honey couple with two daughters, they were looking for instead of cane sugar. It’s more expensive, but it’s the a career direction. Patty Sherman had always loved baking, and they both wanted to run their own right way to do it, they say. Plus, mmm, the taste. business. This tradition has been going strong for at least 12 So they moved to Vermont, studied under the years now, since Peter Sherman started working at bagel master and then moved back to Boulder to Moe’s after college. This is far from the only family tradition at this open their own store. At the time, homemade, authentic bagels were rare; there was only one other Boulder bakery. bagel shop on Pearl Street, The Bagel Bakery. In fact, Moe’s Bagel is built on family tradition, and The first Moe’s Broadway Bagel opened when it has been since they opened their first location in Peter Sherman was just 4 years old. He can barely 1992. remember a life without the scent of bagels in the Today, there are six total shops (four in Boulder, air. The kids took naps on sacks of flour in the back, one in Louisville and one in Denver), with plans to and they were the official cream cheese taste-tesopen the seventh location in Longmont this summer. ters. (It’s also made in-house.) Peter Sherman says he enjoyed the bakery life from day one. Family is how Moe’s Bagel rolls. “I grew up loving it,” he says. Even the name. It’s named after Moe, Peter

The Family Kitchen 32

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BAKERY LIFE

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MOE’S BAGELS

When they got old enough, the kids worked there (doing more than eating cream cheese), alongside their parents. Nearly three decades later, their parents still come to the shop every day. John Sherman is up by 3 a.m. daily to make sure the bagels are warm and fresh. “I have people saying, ‘Aren’t you and John going to retire?’” Patty Sherman says. “What would I do? This is such a big part of my life.” In 2004, her brother Steve Pagnotta left his restaurant career in New York City to join the Moe’s team. Today, Pagnotta is the general manager. And son Peter Sherman runs the daily businesses alongside him. Peter Sherman says it’s like Thanksgiving every day. “And it’s wonderful,” he says. “We’re such a close-knit family, and we really do enjoy being together.” Pagnotta says he feels lucky to work with family every day. “We know each other so well,” he says. “We have different talents and abilities, and I think we complement each other well.” Today, Patty Sherman says her grandchildren have become the new cream cheese taste-testers. And the family extends beyond biology, she says. Some of the non-family employees have been around for more than 15 years and knew Peter Sherman when he was a little boy (he’s now 32 and 6-foot-4). Between the different branches,

Moe’s has about 90 employees, and Patty Sherman knows every one of their birthdays by heart. She makes sure everyone gets a cake on their birthday. Regular customers feel like family, too, she says. Like one group of about five senior citizens who have been visiting Moe’s for years. They’re at the 28th Street store every morning at 5:30 a.m., sometimes even before the doors open. In 2020, they began volunteering to take day-old bagel donations to police stations, hospitals, nursing homes and fire stations. Patty Sherman says the number one priority of Moe’s is to treat customers well, like family. “Each person is an individual, and we care about who they are,” she says. Maybe that’s why Moe’s doesn’t really advertise, but has continued to grow. Instead of buying advertisements, Patty Sherman says they prefer to give away free bagels to customers. “Why spend $2,000 on this ad if I can give away $2,000 to the people? That’s my thinking,” she says. If you see an ad with Moe’s name on it, it’s probably just to announce they’re giving away free bagels with cream cheese. They do it for parents on Mother’s Day and Father’s Day (and that includes “parents” of dogs). In the past, they’ve hidden free coupons around town in eggs on Easter, and they’ve helped refuel runners for free at the Bolder Boulder.

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MAKERS SERIES

PHOTO COURTESY OF MOE’S BAGELS

“We donate pretty much every single day of the year,” says Pagnotta. “We donate to assisted living facilities. John loves going to the hospitals and to senior centers, fire stations. Every single morning without anyone asking, he brings out donations — to schools, churches, nonprofits, just donating bagels, every configuration you can think of. Waste not, want not.”

Boiled and Baked Although the family has grown bigger and so has the store’s reach, the core values and the bagels — boiled and baked, the traditional way — remain the same. About 15 different types of cream cheese are still handmade fresh every day at all stores. The biggest change has been in the ingredients, from traditional to organic flour. Today’s eggs come from pasture-raised chickens and Moe’s uses no-nitrate meats in its sandwiches. “We tried to evolve with Boulder and what we want to feed our kids,” says Peter Sherman. “We try to make wholesome food for the whole community.” One reason Moe’s bagels taste similar to authentic New York bagels is Boulder’s fresh water, which is similar to the water in New York, says Pagnotta.

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“As with all baking, it’s an exacting science. The ingredients are simple — just flour, water, yeast, a little salt and honey — but you have to be very exacting about it,” he says. To be an authentic bagel, it must be boiled, he adds. You make the dough, let it slow-rise for a few days in refrigeration to activate the yeast and then boil it. The last step is baking. That’s what leads to the texture, with a shell on the outside and chewy inside. Peter Sherman says Moe’s bagels are so expertly created that they don’t need to be toasted. His mom says she still eats a bagel every day. “I still love them, after about 30 years,” she says. Her bagel of choice? A hot poppyseed bagel straight out of the oven with butter. Her son agrees. So does Uncle Steve. “You cannot beat that,” Patty Sherman says. “It is simple, and it is the best.” For more information and a full list of Moe’s locations, visit moesbagel.com.

other boco bagel developments www.travelboulder.com/new-bagels -in-boulder-county


Posters

Record Albums

Stickers

Photography

Apparel

PosterScene 1505 Pearl St #101 Boulder 303-443-3102

PosterScene.com

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MEHGAN HEANEY-GRIER, COURTESY PHOTO MIKKI MCCOMB-KOBZA, COURTESY PHOTO

MEET BOULDER’S EXPLORERS

by Jeff Blumenfeld

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LOCALS ARE MAKING A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE


BRIAN BUMA, COURTESY PHOTO

WHAT IS IT ABOUT BOULDER THAT WOULD ATTRACT A WOMAN TO EXPLORE THE OCEANS TO PROTECT SHARKS, OR ANOTHER

PRESTON SOWELL, COURTESY PHOTO

Time to Rock

German native Isabel von Rittberg is uniting the beauty and fluidity of rock climbing with dance and music. Her AscenDance Project is a well-known dance troupe that performs on a 12-foot climbing LOCAL SCHOOLS? Then there are Boulder-area explorers searching wall for the public and schools. In 2010, the group received internaPluto and the outer solar system, diving deep below a high altitude tional exposure competing on “America’s Got Talent” in Las Vegas, Peruvian lake and one determined to find the northernmost form of progressing as far as the semifinals. terrestrial life. She moved to Boulder in 2011 and over the next 10 years and dozens There’s something about the mountains flanking this Front Range of performances, grew frustrated by the seven-hour set-up and city that makes its residents uniquely adventurous and dedicated to take-down time the wall required. The problem was solved with a exploring what lies on the other side of the hill. Consider the con- used school bus she converted into a mobile performance stage. centration of hiking trails surrounding this college town, the number Now it can be ready to go in an hour. of high-level government research institutions, 300 days of sunshine “Boulder had this palpable creative energy that felt like home to a year, the food-y and start-up cultures and the spirit of people who me,” she says. “In 2019, I decided that it was time to put our wall live here by choice, not happenstance. on wheels in order to bring our performances more easily to new Pick any list of outdoor cities and Boulder consistently ranks high locations, including schools, underprivileged neighborhoods, inner for residents who live a life of adventure and exploration that, in cities, small towns and places where people simply don’t have the some cases, is literally out of this world. The city and surrounding same exposure to art. Access to art should not be a privilege, but foothills inspire them and in return, they’re making a difference. rather a right.” Here are some of their stories: Learn more: ascendanceproject.com TO MOUNT A CLIMBING WALL ON A SCHOOL BUS AND TOUR

Thanking His Lucky Stars

The Shark Has Pretty Teeth Or so the song goes. When sharks show their pearly whites to marine conservationist Mikki McComb-Kobza, Ph.D., it’s likely she’s down there face-to-snout studying their sensory biology and ecological physiology. The educator and executive director of Ocean First Institute based in Boulder, McComb-Kobza credits her fascination with sharks to being traumatized as a young child watching the movie “Jaws.” She soon got over it and dedicated her career to shark conservation. “I came to Boulder because of its healthy, progressive, nature-loving community that embraces the outdoor lifestyle, including scuba diving,” she says. “As a marine biologist and ocean explorer it’s the perfect home for our new Ocean First Discovery Center where, in a few short months, hundreds of students participate - in-person or virtually - in marine science and microbiology programs.” Learn more: oceanfirstinstitute.org

On July 14, 2015, more than three billion miles from Earth, a small NASA spacecraft called New Horizons screamed past Pluto at more than 32,000 miles per hour, focusing its instruments on the long-mysterious icy worlds of the Pluto system, and then, just as quickly, continued on its journey out into the beyond. The New Horizons mission, whose principal investigator is Boulder County resident and planetary scientist Alan Stern, set the record for the most distant exploration of worlds in history, a feat witnessed by more than two billion people worldwide. Stern, a New Orleans native who grew up in Dallas, first moved to Boulder in 1984, drawn to the area for its outdoor recreation, particularly skiing, hiking and camping. After receiving a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado Boulder, and following a stint working in San Antonio, he made the area his permanent home, thanks to what he calls the Front Range’s

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EXPERIENCE

MEHGAN HEANEY-GRIER, COURTESY PHOTO

ISABEL VON RITTBERG, COURTESY PHOTO

MIKKI MCCOMB-KOBZA, COURTESY PHOTO

“FOR THE SIZE OF THE TOWN IT IS, BOULDER IS LIKE A BIG POND -

THERE ARE PEOPLE OPERATING HERE AT THE TOP LEVELS OF SCIENCE AND ADVENTURE.” –PRESTON SOWELL

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(TOP) PRESTON SOWELL, COURTESY PHOTO (LEFT) BRIAN BUMA, COURTESY PHOTO

“BOULDER HAS SUCH A

COMMUNITY OF WORLD

TRAVELERS, EXPLORERS,

SCIENTISTS AND ADVENTURERS THAT I COULD NEVER LACK

MOTIVATION,” SAYS BRIAN BUMA.

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EXPERIENCE “ecosystem of aerospace and science.” Stern is preparing to become the first scientist to fly for NASA on a commercial space flight. During a mission aboard a planned 2022-2023 flight of Virgin Galactic’s two-pilot, six-passenger SpaceShipTwo suborbital spaceplane, he will oversee two experiments. “It’s rare that I’m outside and don’t thank my lucky stars that I moved here. I’ve traveled all over the world. I would count Boulder as one of the small handful of places that has this much going for it,” he says. Learn more: alanstern.space

Cool Cat Using an array of camera traps, Boulder’s Preston Sowell and his team successfully documented the presence of the Andean mountain cat high in the Peruvian Andes. Barely larger than a house cat, it’s one of the five most endangered felines in the world. Then a few years later, the environmental consultant, scientist and explorer was featured in the National Geographic documentary “Lost Temple of the Inca,” a behind-the-scenes look inside a cutting-edge expedition at the 16,000-foot headwaters of the Amazon River, a race against time as mining companies seek to exploit the Peruvian Andes Lake Sibinacocha region. The documentary currently streams on Disney+ In all, the explorer has led, supported and photographed expeditions to 21 countries around the world, including 17 scientific expeditions to remote areas of South America. Sowell, a Southern California native who moved to the mountains in 1994, credits living in Boulder as a source of his motivation and inspiration. “For the size of the town it is, Boulder is like a big pond - there are people operating here at the top levels of science and adventure. The natural beauty and access to the outdoors are what originally attracted me here,” Sowell says. “I can break for lunch and easily go fly fishing or hiking, or in winter snowshoeing 30 minutes away at 10,000 feet to photograph snowshoe hares. This is where I recharge and stay centered.” Learn more on Instagram: @kosokun

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Searching for the Boulder’s Ocean Tribe Imagine holding your breath for more than four-and-a-half minutes and diving 155 feet below the water’s surface - no scuba gear, just a mask and fins. That was the life of Mehgan Heaney-Grier in 1996 at the age of 18 when she made history by establishing the first U.S. freedive record for both men and women in the constant weight category. Although a native of Duluth, Minnesota, Mehgan grew up in the Florida Keys and over the past 20 years her busy schedule has been, well, breathless. She is a professional speaker, fashion model, marine educator, expedition leader, long-time conservationist and television personality. Throughout her eclectic water-based career, Heaney-Grier, among the first inducted into the Women Divers Hall of Fame, has performed underwater stunts for Hollywood films such as “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Into the Blue” and has been featured in numerous publications such as “Life,” “People” and “Outside Magazine.” She moved to Boulder in 2007 to study ecology, evolutionary biology and anthropology at the University of Colorado Boulder, attracted by the surrounding mountains, access to nature and a progressive environmentally-conscious community. Upon graduation, she never left. Today, she’s the host of an original web series called “The Imperfect Conservationist,” offering bite-sized, easy and impactful ways to bake conservation action into busy everyday life. Want ideas for kicking your plastic bag habit? Tune in. “There is a thriving ocean community embedded in the conservation culture in Boulder where all of the sectors work together,” she says. “With the university and NOAA headquarters being right here, this city is a hotbed for scientists and cutting-edge conservation science.” She adds, “While I’m far from the ocean, I get my nature fix jogging by the creeks and lakes, hiking, camping and backpacking in the mountains with my son, and tapping into my local ocean tribe who thrive on 300-plus days of sunshine for their land-locked survival. Learn more: mehganheaneygrier.com

Edges of All Life Dressed in orange and black rain gear, biologist and explorer Brian Buma, Ph.D., is on a singular mission to find Earth’s southernmost tree. His field research typically mixes sleuthing with adrenaline in hard-toreach forests in miserable conditions. During an arduous 29-day expedition, he finds it – a Magellan’s beech, more like a bush really, that grows two feet high and almost a dozen feet long in the strong winds of Tierra del Fuego on the tip of South America. “Now we have a tangible record of where tree life ends on Earth - and as the climate warms, we can track against that signpoint,” he says. Today, this Bellingham, Washington, native who first moved to Boulder in 2008, is determined to find the northernmost limit of terrestrial life. Probably somewhere in the high latitude region of Northern Greenland. Somewhere far from human habitation and somewhere that will require the kind of resourcefulness that recently qualified him to be a member of the 116-year-old Explorers Club based in New York. “Boulder has such a community of world travelers, explorers, scientists and adventurers that I could never lack motivation,” says Buma, an assistant professor in the integrative biology program at the University of Colorado Denver. “I could be working out of a local café and hear conversations about Himalayan expeditions, adventure racing and extreme treks all around me.” To stay fit for his demanding field expeditions, Buma hones his skills taking full advantage of Boulder-area recreation: backcountry and in-bounds snowboarding and skiing in winter, biking, climbing, running and hiking during warmer months. “I’ve lived in a lot of cool places but few have so many recreational opportunities year-round,” he says. Learn more: www.brianbuma.com

learn more: www.travelboulder.com/ where-to-go-birding-aroundboulder/


SEASONAL AMERICAN CUISINE AWARD-WINNING WINE CELLAR ON-SITE HERB & PRODUCE GARDEN WEDDINGS & EVENTS |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||

Dinner WED-SUN 5pm-9pm Offering our Bistro and Classic Dinner Menus Happy Hour WED-SUN 5pm-6pm Brunch SUN 10am-1pm To-Go Orders Available

ENJOY AN UNFORGETTABLE MEAL IN OUR ELEGANT DINING ROOMS, COZY BAR OR BEAUTIFUL PATIOS

8735 North Foothills Highway, Boulder

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303.440.7979

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ARTS & CULTURE

BY AIMEE HECKEL

STUDIO THESE DOORS STAY OPEN

LEARN MORE: STUDIODOORZ.COM

SUSAN WASINGER’S STUDIO AS AN ARTIST IN ULTRA-CREATIVE BOULDER, YOU CAN FEEL LOST AMONG THE CROWD.

Until three special weeks of the year: Open Studios, when local artists open their studios to anyone who wants to come in, chat and watch art being made. That’s Bill Snider’s favorite time of the year, as an artist. So much, in fact, that he wants it to last year-round. And while he’s at it, he wants to help other artists around the world do it, too. That’s how StudioDoorz began.

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JEROME COFFEY

StudioDoorz.com is a Boulder-based start-up designed to connect art-lovers with artists who want to share their stories and studios with visitors — by appointment any time of year, one-on-one. At its core, it’s a free-to-use database of artists who welcome visitors. Just search by location, browse the various profiles (complete with work samples) and connect with your artists of choice to book a visit. Although it has an “open studio” feel, StudioDoorz is not affiliated with the Open Studios Tour, and it’s meant to complement the annual event, not compete with it.


DOORZ

New Website Connects Art-Lovers With Artists in Unprecedented Way

SALLY ECKERT

Snider calls StudioDoorz the OpenTable of art. (OpenTable is a restaurant reservation website; read reviews and reserve a table at restaurants around the world.) Even more, he writes on his website, “Just as the farm-to-table movement is putting people in touch with their food sources, StudioDoorz is creating a connection between people and the artists who make the art.” From a visitor’s perspective, it gives you up-close access to artists that you wouldn’t normally have (or be able to arrange quickly with

a click), whether you’re looking for a unique experience in your hometown or when you are traveling. StudioDoorz is currently offered in 30 different cities and towns in six states, with plans to grow in 2021. For artists, it’s an inexpensive and effective marketing move. “The whole notion of ‘getting found’ as an artist is really an issue,” Snider says. In an artist-rich town like Boulder, he says, there simply aren’t enough galleries to accommodate all of the artists, and the ones that

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ARTS & CULTURE

THERESA HABERKORN NATASHA MISTRY

BELGIN YUCELEN BILL SNIDER

SUSAN ALBERS

MEGAN MCCARTHY

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MITCH LEVIN

BOBBI VISCHI

TIFFANY CROWDER SUSAN WASINGER

MARGARET DONHARL

VISITORS TO BILL SNIDER’S STUDIO

learn more: www.travelboulder.com/studiodoorz

SHAUN MINNÉ (RIGHT) & STUDIO VISITOR

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ARTS & CULTURE

INGA PAE

do exist can be difficult to get into. Beyond Boulder, some bigger galleries can get upwards of 1,000 submissions a month, he says. “That’s the gallery world,” Snider says. “For a lot of artists, a real, full-blown gallery is simply not an option.” That’s not an indictment of galleries, however. Snider acknowledges galleries are a business, and if they curate a group of artists that are well-received, it doesn’t make sense to change that. But even if you can get your art featured in a gallery, that doesn’t necessarily lead to positive cash flow, he says. He speaks from experience. His paintings have hung in galleries in Boulder and Denver. “The vast majority of what I sell is out of my studio,” he says. The catch: getting people to come visit the studio. That’s why Open Studios was so effective; Snider says he noticed two things during these events. First, he made meaningful connections with art-lovers and the community. And second, that’s when he sold most of his art. The two seemed to be connected, he says. People seemed to appreciate art more when they could attach a person to it. See where it came from, and how it was made. He says visitors are often surprised by how detailed his painting process is. He works on wooden panels, building up layers of paint, then

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sanding and grinding it off, before adding more layers. You have a captive audience, and they’re there because they want to be; they’re interested in your work. “It changes the relationship,” he says. “When you buy a piece of artwork over the internet, it comes in a box and it might as well be a pair of shoes. When you buy it in person, there’s a memory attached to it and more meaning.” Snider looks around his Boulder home and points out various pieces of art he purchased while traveling. An Eskimo carving on the table came from an Eskimo village in the Bering Strait, when he was visiting for his past career in the film business. “I remember that place and the guy who did this,” Snider says. “It’s hard to say it adds value, but the story is a form of value.” Because of that, many visitors come back year after year, he says. This leads to repeat sales. “You travel. You buy something. When you take it home, it comes with a story,” he says. He thinks about a wooden bowl he bought from a man on the beach in Costa Rica. Whenever he sees that bowl, he thinks about that memory.


KELLY PETERS

Then there’s the world of typical online art collections. It might be easier to be picked up by an online gallery, but that can feel overwhelming. “The online world is huge in numbers. You can easily be swallowed up in it and people will never find you,” Snider says. StudioDoorz has a built-in filtering system. It breaks down artists by location. If bigger cities get too full, the website might even filter by neighborhood. Although the website is new (the idea began early 2020 but didn’t fully launch until that fall), he says, it’s an extension of an established idea. Countless cities offer open studio tours, some of which are 50 years old with hundreds of artists, he says. “We haven’t reinvented the wheel,” Snider says. He hopes they’re just making it more accessible — for locals and visitors the 49 other weeks of the year. This taps into the continued trend of “experiential travel.” For example, more than 78 percent of millennials want an educational adventure, according to thewanderingrv.com. In its early phase, StudioDoorz currently features more than 100 artists. They pay $5 per month, and the visits are free. Boulder County has the biggest saturation of artists, taking up about two-thirds of

CAROLINE DOUGLAS

the listings (due to Snider’s local connections). Next biggest is Sedona, Arizona. You can also find artists in Sante Fe, California, Missouri, Oregon and other New Mexico and Arizona towns. Any artist is welcome to join. In addition to a website, StudioDoorz has two newsletters: one for artists to coach them on enhancing their listings and another for art-lovers that features different artists to check out. In the future, Snider says they might create an app. Until then, he says it’s best to browse and plan on your computer (although the mobile version of the website works well when you’re on the road). Each listing says how to arrange a visit. Tip: Book it in advance. Not all artists will be ready — or there — if you drop in for a surprise visit.

meet the maker: ted bradley www.travelboulder.com/meet-the-maker -boulder-artist-ted-bradley

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ARTS & CULTURE

Local Artists HERE IS A LOOK AT SOME OF THE MANY BOULDER COUNTY ARTISTS FEATURED ON THE STUDIODOORZ WEBSITE.

JULIA BRIGHT, BOULDER Originally from the Soviet Union, Julie studied with the renowned artist and teacher David Leffel, and now specializes in representational still lifes and seascapes in the abstract realism style. Living and working in Western Europe allowed her to observe the timeless beauty in the work of the “Old Masters” whose masterpieces still inform her art.

LAURA BRENTON, BOULDER Brenton is an abstract painter who has made her mark throughout the state and internationally. She grew up in Boulder. Her inspiration is “the unexpected, the magic of uncovering form and color.”

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LISA GAKYO SCHAEWE, BOULDER

KAZOO OBA, LAFAYETTE

Lisa has a background as a Zen student, and she considers her creative process as a form of meditation. Her serene artwork embodies that.

This potter and sculptor was born in Kobe and spent his early years in Japan. His handmade pottery “may be slightly odd-shaped and irregular, just like us, but that’s a part of the beauty.”

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N E W D AT E S + V E N U E S !

JUNE

24-27 2021

F I L M S / F O O D / M U SI C / PARTIES / MORE DOWNTOWN BOULDER A ND CHAUTAUQUA B I FF 1.c o m

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EXPERIENCE

THE STORIES BEHIND ICONIC BOULDER COUNTY MUSIC VENUES By John Bear

PHOTO COURTESY OF BOULDER THEATER

LIVE MUSIC WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS ON THE CHOPPING BLOCK WHEN THE COVID PANDEMIC STRUCK IN 2020. FORTUNATELY, LIVE MUSIC IS ON IT’S WAY BACK THROUGHOUT COLORADO AS THE WORLD OPENS BACK UP.

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WHETHER YOU’RE HOPING TO ATTEND CONCERTS WITH GUSTO OR YOU PLAN TO PROCEED A BIT MORE CAUTIOUSLY INTO THE LIVE MUSIC SCENE, YOU MIGHT BE CURIOUS TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SOME OF BOULDER COUNTY’S MOST ICONIC VENUES. AFTER YOU LEARN THE BACKSTORIES OF THESE VENUES, BE SURE TO VISIT THEIR WEBSITES FOR THE MOST CURRENT LIST OF UPCOMING CONCERTS AND SHOWS, AS WELL AS ANY COVID-19 RULES AND PROTOCOLS.

Dickens Opera House 300 Main Street, Longmont 303-834-9384 dickensoperahouse.com

opened the theater and used it to stage operas, musicals and movies. The Fox Theater Company bought the building in 1935 and the art deco design that currently graces the theater dates from about this time. The theater has gone through several owners and it is still used for musical performances. The Boulder International Film Festival also uses the space- actually, BIFF uses the Boulder theater as one of its main venues for showing movies all throughout the festival, not just the red carpet event according to the theater’s website.

and the Steve Miller Band in 1969. Music was briefly stopped at the stadium after a loud Van Halen concert in 1986 and again in 2001 when Dave Matthews Band went over their time limit. Music returned in 2016 with a much celebrated appearance by Dead & Company, a reconstituted version of The Grateful Dead.

Chautauqua Auditorium Chautauqua.com Located on the Chautauqua National Historic Landmark in the foothills of west

William Henry Dickens, a distant relative of the author Charles Dickens, came to the Longmont area in 1860 and built the Dickens Opera House in 1881 on a tract of land given to his father by President Ulysses S. Grant. Dickens wanted to imbue the area with a sense of culture and constructed lavish sets inside the building, which has also housed a college, a bank and numerous other businesses throughout the past century and a half, according to the current owners. The Dickens 300 Prime Restaurant is also housed in the building, downstairs from the venue.

The Fox Theatre 1135 13th Street, Boulder 303-447-0095 foxtheatre.com The Fox Theatre is the premier music venue on University Hill in Boulder. Rolling Stone Magazine once voted the venue the fourth best live music spot in the country, according to its website. The building came up in 1926 and went through a slew of owners before the current owner bought the building in 1994. It has housed a variety of businesses. In 1960, a fire destroyed much of the building, which was later remodeled.

Boulder Theater 2032 14th Street, Boulder 303-786-7030 Bouldertheater.com Like the Dickens in Longmont, the Boulder Theater began its life as an opera house in 1906. Billboard sign owner James Curran

DEAD & COMPANY AT FOLSOM FIELD. COURTESY PHOTO

Folsom Field 2400 Colorado Avenue, Boulder colorado.edu Although it’s the playing field for the University of Colorado Buffaloes football team, Folsom Field has a storied, and sometimes controversial history of live music. According to the University of Colorado, the stadium first became the stage for a large concert featuring The Byrds

Boulder, the auditorium hosts numerous concerts throughout the year from artists like Indigo Girls, the Jayhawks and David Crosby. The city of Boulder owns the site and leases it to a non-profit. The area is the entry point to the iconic Flatirons that rise above the city, and the buildings on the site date to the late 19th Century, according to the landmark. travelboulder.com

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Farm Fresh

By Sarah Kuta

THE BOULDER COUNTY FARMERS MARKET IS A GREAT PLACE TO PICK UP FRESH FRUITS AND VEGGIES, CHAT WITH FARMERS AND LEARN MORE ABOUT THE STATE’S AGRICULTURAL ECOSYSTEM. MARKETS ARE HELD ON SATURDAYS IN BOULDER, LONGMONT AND DENVER, AS WELL AS ON WEDNESDAY EVENINGS IN BOULDER. LEARN MORE ABOUT WHAT’S IN SEASON AND GET RECIPE INSPIRATION ON THE BCFM WEBSITE: HTTPS://BCFM.ORG/

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF BOULDER COUNTY FARMERS MARKETS

SUMMER IN COLORADO MEANS WILDFLOWER HIKES, ICE CREAM CONES AND DAYS SPENT SPLASHING IN BOULDER CREEK OR THE POOL. BUT PERHAPS ONE OF THE SUREST SIGNS THAT SUMMER IS HERE? STOCKING UP ON FRESH, LOCALLY GROWN PRODUCE AT THE FARMERS MARKET. NATURE’S BOUNTY IS ON DISPLAY IN THE SUMMER AND FALL, WHEN FARMERS START TO PICK THEIR COLORFUL, NUTRITIOUS AND DOWNRIGHT DELICIOUS FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. FROM THE FIELDS TO OUR DINNER TABLES, HERE ARE SOME OF THE TASTIEST COLORADO FRUITS AND VEGETABLES TO SNATCH UP AT THE FARMERS MARKET — AND SOME FARMER-BACKED TIPS FOR HOW TO EAT THEM.


FARM FRESH

Nectarines You already know and love Colorado’s famous peaches. But for Kacey Kropp, a farmer at First Fruits Organic Farms, summer is all about nectarines, a fruit that her family lovingly calls “nectarbeans.” “Nectarines are peaches’ fuzzless, flavor-concentrated cousins,” says Kropp, who helps harvest nectarines on the family’s Paonia farm from July through September. When nectarines start making an appearance at the farmers market, follow Kropp’s lead and try making some nectarine salsa, made with nectarines, red onion, cilantro, jalapenos, cumin, maple syrup and salt and pepper. “The complex, syrupy nectarine pieces do the heavy lifting in this salsa recipe,” she says. “Add this salsa to tacos, pork dishes, vanilla ice cream or scoop it up with corn chips along with a cold Mexican lager. To me, this is a favorite taste of summer in Colorado fruit country.“

Mokum Carrots Mokum carrots are sweet, floral, juicy and refreshing, which makes them a favorite summer vegetable of Catherine Hess, farm manager for Brown’s Farm in Niwot.

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Since they’re packed with flavor on their own, Mokum carrots don’t require much jazzing up. Peel them into veggie ribbons and toss them in salads, or quick-pickle them for a little extra tang, Hess recommends. If you’re looking for a heartier way to add these tasty carrots to the dinner table, consider turning them into little carrot fries, Hess says. Toss the carrots with a little honey, salt and rosemary, then roast them in a 425-degree oven until they’re perfectly tender. “There are many wonderful carrots, but Mokums will always have a special place,” Hess says.

Sweet Corn You really can’t improve on perfection, which is why farmer Steve Cockroft of Croft Family Farm in Kersey recommends eating his fresh sweet corn right off the cob. The fresher, the better. The trick to keeping sweet corn as sweet as possible for several days? Picking it in the morning, then keeping it cool until you’re ready to eat it. “Real food tastes better, but real food that is picked and handled with care gives people that over-the-top experience,” he said.


THE FARMERS MARKET ISN’T JUST A SUMMER THING. IT ALSO EXTENDS TO THE FALL, WITH BOUNTIFUL PRODUCE RANGING FROM PUMPKINS AND SQUASH TO TASTY ROOT VEGETABLES AND FRESH GREENS. SOME OF THE STAPLES YOU’LL FIND INCLUDE: PEPPERS, CORN, APPLES, CELERY, CABBAGE, WINTER SQUASH, APPLES, PEARS AND SO MUCH MORE.

Broccoli Broccoli is tricky to grow in Colorado’s climate, but the Bailey family has managed to perfect growing this crunchy green vegetable on the Western Slope over the years. To get crisp, flavorful broccoli, they usually plant a small crop in the spring and a larger crop in the fall. Your best bet for finding their broccoli at the farmers market is in September and October, when cooler temperatures produce an abundance. “We focus a lot of attention on building our soil and using regenerative farming practices, which we believe is the primary reason our broccoli tastes so good,” says Bradi Bailey, who owns Stubborn Roots Farm in Fort Collins with her husband, Calvin. “Broccoli, like most vegetables, thrive in well-drained soil rich in organic matter. By taking care of our soil, it provides our crops with all they need to grow, and in turn, it will give us nutrient-dense, healing food we can enjoy.” Their broccoli is so good that even their kids love to eat it — and all parents know that’s really saying something. When they’re not eating raw broccoli as a snack, they also recommend adding it to various soups or roasting it in the oven with a little salt.

Tomatoes Is there anything more summery than biting into a fresh, juicy, ripe tomato? Not according to Brian Coppom, executive director of Boulder County Farmers Market, who grew up eating sun-warmed tomatoes straight from the vine in his grandfather’s garden. “The complex flavors and subtle sweetness of a truly vine-ripened tomato is unbeatable,” he says. Coppom keeps his tomatoes on the counter at room temperature for maximum flavor preservation, then uses them in this flavor-packed recipe, created by Jodie Lindsay Popma, a holistic nutritionist and chef.

learn more: www.travelboulder.com/boulder-county -farmers-markets-are-back

K I M C LA RY

L I L LA P

CPSHADES

INJIRI

OUTDOOR VOICES

M AT TA

MAGNOLIA PEARL

JOHNNY WAS

1122 Pearl Street | Boulder, CO 80302 3 0 3 - 4 4 4 - 0 2 8 2 | www.islandfarm.com

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FARM FRESH SHOPPING

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Farm Fresh Recipe Roasted Pepper & Tomato Salad INGREDIENTS 3 sweet peppers 5 ripe tomatoes 1/2 tsp chili flakes (Picaflor is great) 1 red onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 lemon, grated rind and juice olive oil - drizzle chopped parsley - for garnish INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 420 degrees. Place peppers on a baking sheet and roast. Turn every few minutes, for about 10 minutes, until the skins blacken. Add tomatoes to the baking sheet and roast for another 5 minutes. Remove from oven, place peppers in a brown paper bag, and set aside to cool. Allow tomatoes to cool, until they can be handled. Remove the skins from the peppers, carefully, then remove the seeds. Chop peppers and tomatoes, then place in a mixing bowl. Add chili flakes, onion, garlic and lemon. Sprinkle parsley on top with a bit of salt. Serve at room temperature.

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SHOPPING

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PEPPERCORN

Peppercorn:

Boulder’s Iconic Kitchen Supply Store BY SARAH K UTA THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC DISRUPTED NEARLY EVERY FACET OF OUR LIVES — SCHOOL, WORK, SOCIALIZING, EXERCISING. BUT FOR MANY PEOPLE, PERHAPS THE BIGGEST CHANGE BROUGHT ABOUT BY THE PANDEMIC WAS ALL THE EXTRA TIME SPENT AT HOME.

And with restaurants closed or offering limited seating, a curious trend began to emerge: People started cooking. Even people who’d never touched a saute pan or whose cooking skills stopped at pressing a few buttons on the microwave suddenly found themselves in the kitchen, exploring and experimenting with food. Peppercorn — the long-standing kitchen supply store on Boulder’s Pearl Street — was right there with them, every step of the way. Like many businesses during the pandemic, Peppercorn had to pivot its business model toward online shopping and delivery, but

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remained true to its core mission of providing high-quality kitchen essentials to home cooks. “People were ordering a lot of cookware online — that’s how it all started,” said Janice Manville, Peppercorn’s vice-president and a long-time employee of the store. “All of a sudden, we were getting all these cookware orders and we thought, ‘We’d better fill them.’ It was a lot of junior chefs and more men were cooking. Everyone started thinking, ‘Well, I’m home now, might as well just do this.’ It did show people they were capable of doing it.” Long before the pandemic, Peppercorn has been supplying home chefs with the tools, gadgets, decorations, accessories, books and materials they need to be successful in the kitchen. The company’s history dates back to 1977, when Doris Houghland and a friend moved to Boulder and started a cooking school.


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SHOPPING

Over time, however, the school began to evolve into the Peppercorn store we know and love today. “They were showing so many products (while teaching) that people would ask, ‘Where did you get that spatula? Where did you get that pan?’ and they realized there was a need there,” Manville said. “They decided to have something small and just bring in a couple of items and sell them to people who went to the cooking school.” Eventually, the store outshone the cooking school. Houghland bought the building at 1235 Pearl Street, where Peppercorn is now located, and began growing her kitchen supply paradise. The store has since expanded into the building next door and now encompasses more than 17,600 square feet, according to Manville. Peppercorn, which typically employs 40 to 50 people, has remained an iconic Boulder store for 44 years because of its diverse selection of products and personalized customer service, Manville said. Though Peppercorn stays abreast of the newest trends and fads — and always makes sure to have trendy colors and styles in stock — the store’s staff members always encourage shoppers to be themselves. They’re happy to lend a hand helping customers find linens to match their dinnerware, whatever their style or aesthetic. “Crate and Barrel would say, ‘The color story for the year is gray,’ but we don’t do that,” Manville said. “We don’t change everything to be gray because a lot of people still want purples, blues and pinks.

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We don’t say to someone, ‘Gray is the seasonal color and that’s what you get in your house. We want them to have a whole gamut of things they can pick from versus someone dictating, ‘These are your colors for the season. These are your styles for the season.’” In addition to cookware from brands like Cuisinart and All-Clad, some of Peppercorn’s best-selling items include knives, kitchen gadgets and cookbooks. The store also began preparing and selling gift baskets during the pandemic, and those have continued to be popular. Peppercorn thrives on tourism business, particularly during the spring and summer months, but also has a loyal following of Boulder residents. No matter what the future holds after the pandemic, one thing is certain: Thanks to its vast array of kitchen gear and welcoming atmosphere, Peppercorn will remain a Pearl Street staple for years to come. “Boulder is very eclectic,” Manville said. “People in Boulder are very laid back and when they come in, they don’t look like the person who would want upscale dinnerware. You really have to be aware because just because people look casual doesn’t mean they don’t want beautiful things in their home.” For more information, visit peppercorn.com


PHOTO BY EMMA GODDARD

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REFUEL

Dry Storage CHEF-ACTIVIST KELLY WHITAKER IS ON A MISSION BY SARAH KUTA TO CHANGE HOW WE VIEW FLOUR PHOTOS COURTESY OF DRY STORAGE

WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU REALLY LOOKED CLOSELY AT THE FLOUR IN YOUR KITCHEN? IF YOU’RE LIKE MOST PEOPLE, PROBABLY NOT RECENTLY — OR, MORE LIKELY, MAYBE NEVER. There’s not necessarily anything wrong with that bag of all-purpose flour on the shelf of your pantry. But according to Kelly Whitaker, the James Beard Award-nominated chef-activist with restaurants in Boulder and Denver, flour can — and should — be so much more than just an afterthought. Whitaker, the restaurateur behind Basta in Boulder and The Wolf’s Tailor, Brutø and BØH in Denver, is on a mission to change how home bakers and professional chefs feel about flour. More specifically, he hopes to change their minds about the grains used to make flour. To that end, he founded Noble Grain Alliance, a nonprofit that promotes the use of domestic, milled-to-order grains by educating farmers and chefs. He also opened Dry Storage, an artisan grain mill and bakery in Boulder specializing in heirloom flours and baked goods. We sat down with Whitaker to learn more about his grain-based endeavors in Colorado. How did you first become interested in heirloom grains? Since the beginning of my journey as a chef and restaurateur, I have been interested in how food affects the people and planet. I have never stopped learning, and my commitment to sustainability helped shape me as a chef activist. I started Basta in 2010 and, at the same time, there was a surge in Italian-style, wood-fired pizza in the U.S. American chefs thought they had to use Italian flour if they wanted “true” Italian wood-fired pizza. This seemed to run counter to what I had learned about local

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and regional food from the chefs I had trained under and the journey I had been on. I worked in Naples, Italy, and I knew the chefs there would never fly their flour in from somewhere else; they believed in local foods. I started testing domestic flours milled fresh and immediately knew that I was right. The flour had a freshness and a performance that created a much better product compared to the flown-in Italian flours. I took this mentality to all of our kitchens and started looking beyond pizza and wanted to know everything about grains. Corn, rice, wheat — all grains found their place and it became the center point for our restaurant group. After educating myself, I started Noble Grain Alliance. I wanted to help promote this movement and share what I had learned about local grains. I saw an opportunity for me to have a direct impact on this movement by taking a leap to start a mill that would provide flour for chefs and create a direct-to-consumer product. I was tired of hearing “someone should do this and we need to act now,” so I decided to be that person. Why are you so passionate about heirloom grains? Grains are a high-impact crop. They make up more than 50 percent of the caloric intake of humans and, in other countries, that percentage is much higher. Bad grains cause really bad things for people and the planet, and the smallest positive shifts in this movement can have tremendous outcomes for all of us. It’s personal in that grains affect our individual health but, on a large scale, they also impact climate change. Industrial wheat has a small root structure that causes soil erosion, and many large-scale grain crops are sprayed with chemicals. Heirloom varieties have a much larger root structure that helps the soil; grain grown in a regenerative way through crop rotation gives back to the planet. Also, commercial grains tend to be a race to the bottom — how much can we produce, how much can we extract from the soil. It’s a take-all mentality.


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What role do growers play in this work? We started our work with farmers first. It’s important that we prove the model and understand the supply chain rather than just buy grains. If we could do this, then it would encourage other farmers to think about regenerative farming. It has not been easy. We found a farmer who was already rotating crops and using regenerative agriculture practices. I asked that farm to take out their cover crop and plant our heirloom wheat varieties. They took a huge chance on us and we were at the mercy of the weather and the idea that these varieties would work. I offered to pay them much more than traditional organic grains and significantly more than commodity wheat. We are in our third season and I love the framework we have built. They grow our wheat, and we commit to buying it all. What are the goals of Dry Storage? Our goal is to change the way that everyone looks at flour. We often compare it to coffee — 15 years ago, there was Folgers’ pre-ground coffee in the middle of the grocery aisle. Now, thanks to Starbucks and several other coffee companies, people buy beans and grind them at home. We want to change every home in America, and we are starting with chefs. And we want to make sure all people in the supply chain are taken care of. Chefs have still not fully taken on local flour or regional grains in their restaurants, but they are starting. It’s fun to be on the wave and watch it happening.

How does milling work? How is flour made? Flour is made by grinding whole wheat berries into a fine powder. There are multiple ways to do this, but we stone-mill our grain. It is very simple, where you feed the wheat berries in between two large, circular stones, one of which is spinning and set to spin very close to the other stone. This grinds the entire wheat berry very finely, which keeps more of the whole grain intact in the final flour while still performing well because of its fine particle size. The flour will then be bagged as whole wheat flour, which contains 100 percent of the grain in the final flour, or sent through our sifter, which will take out the largest 10 percent of the flour. This allows chefs to have versatility with whole grain flour and/or slightly sifted flour. What else do you wish more people knew? These grains and flours are not just for professional bakers. Look around your pantry and understand that grains make up a huge amount of our diets. Choose better grains, don’t rely on over-processed grains to deliver what your body needs and what your mouth craves. Better grains equal more delicious and more nutritious foods. As a chef, it has impacted our food more than any item in our kitchen. When you see these flours as a base for gravy, chocolate chip cookies or a pie crust, you will understand what I am saying. For more information, visit drystorageco.com

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Summer Cocktails By Brittany Anas

13 Essential Summer Cocktails In and Around Boulder CLASSIC SUMMER COCKTAILS

HAVE THE SPECIAL ABILITY TO MAKE YOU FEEL AS THOUGH YOU’RE ON VACATION, HELPING SATIATE WANDERLUST AFTER A LONG YEAR IN LOCKDOWN. ORDER AN APEROL SPRITZ AND CHANNEL THE VIBES OF ITALY’S AMALFI COAST, WITH IMAGES OF THE CRAGGY SEASIDE CLIFFS AND PUNCH-COLORED UMBRELLAS STUDDING THE BEACH. LIKEWISE, A TIKI DRINK TRANSPORTS YOUR TASTEBUDS TO THE TROPICS AND A WELL-CRAFTED SPICY MARGARITA CAN HOLD YOU OVER UNTIL YOUR NEXT MEXICAN VACATION. FROM FROZEN COCKTAILS TO FRUITFORWARD DRINKS TO HERBACEOUS LIBATIONS, WE’VE ROUNDED UP SOME OF THE TASTIEST SUMMER SIPS THAT YOU CAN FIND IN AND AROUND BOULDER. SOME OF THESE MAKE LIMITED-TIME CAMEOS ON SUMMER COCKTAIL MENUS; OTHERS ARE YEAR-ROUND STAPLES, BUT FEEL ESPECIALLY APROPOS FOR SUMMER. HERE ARE THE 12 CRAFT COCKTAILS THAT WE THINK DO A GOOD JOB EVOKING SUMMER VIBES (NO POOL REQUIRED; BUT A PATIO SOAKED IN COLORADO’S FAMOUS SUNSHINE IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED). PIZZERIA LOCALE: SPRITZES. PHOTO BY CASEY GILTNER

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TENNESSEE TEA. PHOTO COURTESY OF WEST END TAVERN

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Jill’s Restaurant and Bistro: Blackberry Smash 900 Walnut St. (720) 406-7399 stjulien.com/eat-drink/jill’s-restaurant-and-bistro-new Toast farewell to summer with the Blackberry Smash at Jill’s, the signature restaurant at the St. Julien Hotel & Spa. Blackberries hit their peak in late summer and early fall and these ripe, sweet and tangy berries are the star ingredient in this cocktail. It’s mixed with Buffalo Trace bourbon, which has an aroma of vanilla and mint, and lemon. Enjoy it al fresco on the St. Julien’s patio which gives you a front-row seat to the flatirons.

Upstairs Cocktail Lounge: In Time of Marigolds 1039 Pearl Street, Suite B in Boulder (303) 544-5973 thekitchenbistros.com/location/the-kitchen-bistrosupstairs-cocktail-lounge/ “A take on the traditional Vesper martini, this cocktail takes advantage of herbaceous marigolds flowers to bring out the botanicals in the gin,” Madden says. “Bar Hill Gin, marigold-infused Zero-Waste Mell Vodka, Kina L’aero d’or, and St. Germain infused with green cardamom, juniper berries, and toasted almonds all come together to form a martini that is beautifully floral while still being boozy enough to please even the most seasoned martini drinker”, Madden says.

Upstairs Cocktail Lounge: Jack the Giant Slayer 1039 Pearl Street, Suite B in Boulder (303) 544-5973 thekitchenbistros.com/location/the-kitchen-bistros-upstairs-cocktail-lounge/ Green bean-infused Reyka vodka mixes with house-made orgeat (an almond milk syrup), lemon juice and green bean syrup to make a delightfully vegetal cocktail. “It’s shaken with a salted egg white to form a beautiful crown of merengue atop the pale green drink, and garnished with fresh cracked pepper and a fresh green bean,” says Lex Madden, head bartender at Upstairs and The Kitchen in Boulder. “Creamy and ethereal — and more than anything, green-beany — this drink is perfect for adventurous drinkers.”

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE KITCHEN RESTAURANT GROUP LEAH MCCLAY @BATHTUB_TURKEY (INSTAGRAM)


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Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar: Cucumber Lemon Press J928 Pearl St. in Boulder (303) 444-1811 jaxfishhouse.com/boulder Spend a summer afternoon slurping oysters and sipping cocktails at Jax. With a refreshing blend of cucumber-infused vodka, lemon and soda water, this house-favorite cocktail is light and bright.

Jungle: Blue Hawaii 2018 10th St. in Boulder Jungletiki.com This cheerful tiki bar meets burger shack exudes an “always summer” vibe. With lush plants, palm-printed wallpaper and rattan accents, the decor solidifies the island spirit. Jungle slings tropical beverages year-round and every single craft cocktail on the rum-forward menu fits perfectly into the “summer cocktail” category. But one of the summer-iest drinks is the Blue Hawaii, a blend of vodka, pineapple and lemon that’s turned blue with the addition of an organic blue Curacao. Tucked off Pearl Street, Jungle also expertly covers the classics from mai tais to piña coladas. They’ve also dreamed up some inventive drinks. With ingredients as creative as its name, the Tiki Me Softly is a rum and brandy drink gussied up with salted guava and celery bitters.

Pizzeria Locale: Spritzes 1730 Pearl St. (303) 442-3003 Localeboulder.com No passports required, but you’ll feel like you’ve been whisked away for a summer in Italy at Pizzeria Locale where an artisan Stefano Ferrarra wood-fired oven bakes Napoli-style pizzas and you can sip on summer spritzes. The Pearl Street pizza spot serves a classic Aperol Spritz with Aperol, prosecco, soda and orange. Or, you can get a Limoncello Spritz made with limoncello, prosecco, soda and basil.

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Avanti F and B—Boulder: P.O.W.derhound 1401 Pearl St. in Boulder boulder.avantifandb.com Order from a vendor at this hip food hall on the Pearl Street Mall and then ascend to the rooftop deck for Flatirons views and a cocktail. The P.O.W.derhound is a refreshing vodka cocktail with cucumber and the bitterness of Aperol leveling out the sweetness from the honey. A portion of the proceeds from this cocktail benefit P.O.W. (Protect Our Winters), a nonprofit that turns outdoor enthusiasts into climate advocates.

Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant: The Classic Rio Margarita 1101 Walnut St. (303) 444-3690 riograndemexican.com/locations/boulder With one of the best rooftops in Boulder, Rio Grande is a destination for imbibing in the summer. The classic margs here are famous. Created with a recipe that’s so secret it should be considered classified information, the margs here come classic, or in mango, blood orange, strawberry or a mix known as manberry. You can order mini margs if you want to sample the flavors and you’ve got a choice between on the rocks or frozen.

PHOTO BY JONI SCHRANTZ

Centro Mexican Kitchen: Si Chef Margarita 950 Pearl St. In Boulder (303) 442-7771 Centromexican.com For a perfect spicy-but-sweet tequila cocktail, try the Si Chef Marg on Centro’s iconic Pearl Street patio. Pepper-infused 100 percent blue weber agave tequila gives the Si Chef marg a nice kick. Passion fruit puree, orange liqueur, fresh-squeezed lime juice and agave. Bonus: You can order the margarita by glass or the pitcher. Pair it with a taco board (you’ve got choices like baja fish, chicken asado, crispy cauliflower and carnitas al pastor).

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Cocktails Around Boulder LONGMONT | LOUISVILLE | LAFAYETTE Abbott & Wallace: Mai Thai 350 Terry St Suite #120 in Longmont 720-545-2017 abbottandwallace.com Abbott & Wallace is a whiskey and rum distillery in Longmont that serves some stellar craft cocktails. Plenty are bidding for your attention this summer, from the Longtucky Julep made with bourbon, maple syrup, fresh mint and soda to the Under the Palapa, a blend of jalapeño rum, lime juice, mango, and Angostura bitters. For a quintessential summer libation, though, go for the mai tai. Abbott & Wallace concocts its version with an overproof rum, orgeat syrup, curacao, lime, Leviathan float and garnishes the tropical drink with a cherry and lime.

/Pôr/ Wine House: Mango Sangria 701 Main St. in Louisville (720) 666-1386 Porwinehouse.com Come summer, you can’t go wrong with a bright and crisp rose. But make your next round a pitcher of one of pôr’s sangrias that you can share with the table. This traditional Spanish wine cocktail comes with summer fruits. At pôr, you can order red or white sangria. But might we suggest the mango version that feels spot-on for summer? If you can, sync up your visit with the live music schedule.

Teocalli Cocina: Prospector 103 N Public Rd Unit C in Lafayette 303-284-6597 teocallicocina.com Margaritas are an obvious choice in the summer. For one of the best in the state, head to Old Town Lafayette. Teocalli Cocina has a modern Mexican menu with tacos galore, pork shank pibil and chicken enchilada suizas served with a jalapeno cream sauce. While you’re dunking chips in housemade salsas and guac, order the Prospector. It’s a spin on a margarita that’s made with muddled cucumber and a housemade cilantro syrup. For the next round, opt for the Diamante. It’s a tequila cocktail made with chocolate mole bitters.

learn more: www.travelboulder.com/cocktails -to-order-in-boulder-this-summer

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PHOTO COURTESY OF FLAGSTAFF HOUSE

A COCKTAIL TO FALL FOR While we’re suckers for a good summer cocktail, spiced fall cocktails are also bidding for some attention. To welcome autumn, head bartender Jay Beard from Flagstaff House draws from fall flavors to create this bourbon cocktail. Here’s how to make it at home with your own batch of pecan and fig infused bourbon.

Falling For You Ingredients: 1 1/2 oz Pecan and Fig infused bourbon 1/2 oz Benedictine 1/2 oz Flor de Cana Rum 1/2 oz Apple Cider 1/2 oz Honey Dash of Underberg Bitters Instructions: Combine all ingredients in a Scotch-washed martini glass. To really get this right, create a rim on the glass with a blend of brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, white pepper & Szechuan pepper. Garnish with a candied pecan.


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EXPERIENCE

LEAF PEEPING AROUND BOULDER

THE CHANGING LEAVES ALONG THE PEAK-TO-PEAK HIGHWAY. PHOTO COURTESY OF KAREN ANTONACCI

COLORADO REALLY COMES ALIVE ONCE FALL ARRIVES. MANY LEAF-PEEPERS SET OUT ON DAY TRIPS OR WEEKEND GETAWAYS TO REALLY SOAK UP THE VIVID COLORS IN THE SHORT WINDOW BEFORE THE LEAVES TUMBLE TO THE GROUND AND THE VISTAS TURN FOREST GREEN, SNOW WHITE AND SLATE GRAY. So gas up the car or the motorcycle, grab your camera and don your favorite autumnal outfit. Here’s how to treat yourself to one of the most essential activities on the Colorado checklist: Leaf-peeping on the Peak to Peak Highway.

Nederland From Boulder, head west on Highway 119 toward Nederland. If you want to start your leaf-peeping excursion with a refreshing hike, head on over to the West Magnolia Trailhead, south of Nederland for eight miles of roads and trails popular with hikers, campers, mountain bikers and horseback riders. The trails are perfect for beginner to intermediate hikers as they wind over the West Magnolia hilltop and through brilliantly colored trees that will shower you with foliage confetti as you trek. If you want to hunker down for the night, dispersed camping at the 22 numbered designated sites is permitted. Hiking West Magnolia can make your stomach grumble. In Nederland, you might chow down at The Mineshaft (menu here, 35 E 1st St,

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Nederland, 303- 258-0649). The eatery serves up modern comfort food with a southern twang such as a Eureka Scramble, which is a kitchen sink-type ensemble with homefries, spinach, red peppers, mushrooms and your choice of meat. Plus, The Mineshaft is dog-friendly, so if you need somewhere to go with your four-legged friend after a hike, this is a prime choice. Perhaps instead of a hike and hearty lunch, you’d prefer to pick up a picnic and eat it lakeside as you take in the clear water reflecting the bright golden aspen trees. If that’s the case, before leaving Nederland for the Peak-to-Peak Highway proper, stop at The Deli at 8236’ (menu here, 34 E 1st St, Nederland, 303258-1113) to load up on sandwiches and salads. Then you might pop into The New Moon Bakery & Cafe (menu here, 1 W 1st St, Nederland, 303-2583569) to satisfy your sweet tooth, caffeine habit or need for a sandwich on a bagel. For maximum picnic points, consider The New Moon’s deli packs for two. Ranging in price from $19.50 to $25, the packs are available with breakfast food, deli meats and cheeses, gluten-free goodies or vegetarian fare.

get the full leaf-peeping itinerary: travelboulder.com/how-to-spend-the-day-leafpeeping-on-the-peak-to-peak-highway


CLIMB

HIKE CAMP SKI

DISCOVER BOULDER’S LEGENDARY OUTDOOR STORE Neptune has been gearing people up for their outdoor adventures since 1973 with an outstanding selection of the best outdoor gear and friendly, knowledgeable staff. Just visiting Boulder? We also RENT the gear you need to explore our amazing area. Come visit our huge store in south Boulder and plan to spend a little time touring Gary Neptune’s renowned climbing and ski museum and enjoy a barista-made coffee at the Neptune Café.

Boulder’s locally owned outdoor store SINCE 1973 Located in the Table Mesa Shopping Center next to the Southern Sun Pub

303-499-8866 | NeptuneMountaineering.com

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Let’s Find Your Boulder! MEGHAN BACH Realtor || Boulder Bolder Home Realtor HomeTeam Team 619.955.2788 MeghanBach.com Meghan Bach is a Broker Associate affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate Broker in Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity Laws.

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Profile for Travel Boulder

Travel Boulder Magazine Summer-Fall 2021  

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