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Find Your Muse ARTS & CULTURE BUCKET LIST

Dive Into Art BOULDER ART GALLERIES

Meet the Makers ARTISTS & ENTREPRENEURS

Savor the Flavors

BOULDER’S MOST POPULAR DISHES

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FROM THE EDITOR

FROM THE EDITOR

Summer/Fall 2018

SUMMER /FALL 2020

Some of my most beautiful memories are set to this backdrop. Sometimes it’s simple: my bare toes deep in the cool grass of the Chautauqua lawn. Other times it’s adventurous: foraging through the forest, stopping along the way to marvel at the views. A few times, it’s been the screaming burn of my thighs as I ran up the steep Chautauqua trail. OK, those last memories are a little less than beautiful. (More like sweating and sobbing, “Why? Why?”) But each moment is special to me. Because each moment is a part of Boulder’s famous Colorado Chautauqua. Chautauqua is Boulder. And the Colorado Chautauqua is celebrating its big When the world seems heavy, I bury myself in art. When I am stressed, I flip off 1-2-0 this year. the news and turn on music. It clears the space between my ears for some peace and Needless strength.to say, we wanted to give it a good gift. Enter: Instead TravelofBoulder’s premiere magazine, The Ultimate Guide flipping through social print media posts, I use Instagram to visit my favorite artists’You pages andfind I getthese lost inguides, their work. Paintings and photographs me process to Boulder. can written by locals so you canhelp experience understand my feelingstwice betterathan Boulderand like a local, published year.my own words can, and certainly better than my mouth can. (Metaphorically, if my message were an elegant cake designed by a And what better way to kick off a new mag than with Boulder’s shining star? famous baker, my speaking voice would be “Pinterest fails.”) An in-depth look at Chautauqua is our lead story in this edition. In this package, Art is humanity’s mirror. It tells the stories our consciousness struggles to grasp. you’ll learn whichbeyond cottagelanguages, to stay atsocial for the best views the most privacy); whichart, Art unifies, categories and(or history. The ability to create trails towhich hike iswith your kids; some of Chautauqua’s coolest events for 2018; an innate gift that distinguishes the human race, is the closest we canand be to also some historybecause that we bet will immortal, it gives us asurprise chance toyou. be a creator, making something — anything, everything out ofeven nothing. Whether you—don’t know what a “chautauqua” is (it’s OK; I didn’t for Because of this, in the yearexplored 2020, there is no better place grounds, to be thanthere’s Boulder. about a decade) or you think you’ve every inch of these Art ishere everywhere Boulder. Artnext is Boulder. something to help in enrich your visit. In fact, the city was ranked third in the country for working artists per capita. In addition, the Summer 2018 Ultimate Guide to Boulder includes the That’s why we decided to dedicate this summer/fall’s magazine to art. Our cover Ultimate Guide Neighborhoods (the likes of Reutimann. which has never story (pageto 54)Boulder’s features amazing Boulder sculptor Roger Then, been see how officially reported as well as guides to family fun and music in Boulder. many items on youbefore), can check off the “Arts and Culture Bucket List” (page 14), and inspired Boulder manyloved galleries (pagefor 28).itsWe also look at famous Asget a native to by these parts,County’s I’ve always Boulder ability to surprise. Boulder architect, Charles whose absolutely wildvegan houses have gourd probably Just when you think you’ve tried Haertling, it all, there’s some crazy new stuffed stopped you in your tracks (page 41). surrounded by flaming hay (that’s at Emmerson), or a wall-dancing class (that’s at Local chefs use food their form, as isMall evidenced in “The Most while Popular Iluminar Aerial), or some dudeason theart Pearl Street playing the piano Dishes in Boulder” (page 62), as well as a heartwarming profile at one of Boulder’s hanging by his feet from a tree (um, yup). most cherished hidden gems, the Greenbriar Inn (page 58). As John Brice, theread publisher andMax co-founder TravelBoulder.com, In addition, about how Martinez of turns fashion (and his lovesays, for the “You would be amazed at what is going on in Boulder that you don’t know about. community) into an art on page 34. We found itChallenging was difficult to find wasdeep happening in also Boulder times haveout the early powerenough to force what us to dig inside, and expand until after happened. We were tired of discomfort missing out.” and itconnect with others, which is why often leads to incredible art. We see you,you Boulder. seetoyou growing. And this We edition Well, don’tWe have miss out anymore. gothonors ya. your creations and your spirit within them. Enjoy our first of many magazines; I hope to see it used and abused, crammed We hopeand you splattered enjoy their stories as much we enjoyed sharing with you. in your backpack with cold brewas and craft beer andthem adventure, because that’s what’s Boulder’s made of. Aimee Heckel Get even more info online at TravelBoulder.com.

Aimee

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SUMMER/FALL 2018

PUBLISHER / CO-OWNER

JOHN R. BRICE PUBLISHER

Editor-in-chief

Aimee Heckel Editor-in-chief

JOHN R. BRICE CO-OWNER

JILL NAGEL-BRICE

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER JILL NAGEL-BRICE EDITORIAL

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / WRITER

EDITORIAL AIMEE HECKEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DESIGN DIRECTOR / MANAGING EDITOR

AIMEE HECKEL TYLER PERCY

MANAGING COPY EDITOR/WRITER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT SARAH KAITLYNKUTA PAYNE

PUBLICATION COPY EDITORDESIGNER CLAY EVANS MONIKA EDGAR

CREATIVE SERVICES / PRODUCTION

DIGITAL PRODUCTION MANAGER SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER SARAH MILLER MICHELLE FULLER

PUBLICATION DESIGNER

MONIKA EDGAR ADVERTISING SALES ADVERTISING DESIGNER ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES DAWNR.SHUCK JOHN BRICE JILL NAGEL-BRICE TRAFFIC MANAGER MEGHAN HOLTON SARAH EATHERLY

ADVERTISING SALES CONTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER COVER PHOTO RANDY GOLDNER

ROGER REUTIMANN

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

CONTRIBUTING MICHELLE ADAMS, PHOTOGRAPHERS RYAN GRAF AIMEE LEFFINGWELL, GEOFF HECKEL, HERDEN,MARK AARON LOVATO ISAAC NAGEL BRICE, JOHN BRICE CONTRIBUTORS

DIGITAL COVERTEAM PHOTO ANN DUNCAN DREW BARON TYLER PERCY

PHOTOGRAPHERS

ZACH ANDREWS, JONATHAN AUERBACH, On the cover: EMILY CARL, STEPHEN COLLECTOR, ANN DUNCAN, PAULA “Aphros,” at the Dairy ArtsGILLEN, Center, by Roger JACOB HELLECKSON, BRIAN LOPEZ, Reutimann. Courtesy photo.

JESSICA MORGAN, GRANT NYQUIST, WERNER SLOCUM, EMILYCo. TAYLOR, Copyright 2020 by Go Visit Media & Travel Boulder LLC. PRUNE VANDENOVER All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly proWRITERS hibited without publisher’s permission, including original BRITTANY ANAS, MORGAN, editorial, graphics, design,JESSICA photography, advertising and KAITLYNcontent. PAYNE, CALLIE PEDERSON sponsored Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are published by Go Visit Media Co., 2535 Meadow Ave, Boulder CO 80304 | Phone: 720-708-6803 Copyright 2018 by Go Visit Media Co. & Travel Boulder LLC. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com magazine or Travel Boulder website is strictly prohibited Sales: john@travelboulder.com, jill@travelboulder.com, without publisher’ s permission, including original editorial, meghan@travelboulder.com graphics, design, photography, advertising and sponsored Editorial: Aimeeheckel@gmail.com content. Travelboulder.com and Travel Boulder magazine are published by Go Visit Media Co., 2465 Central Ave. Suite 203 Travelboulder.com Boulder, CO 80301 | Phone: 303-544-1198 | Fax: 303-449-6121 Facebook.com/travelboulder Advertising Sales 303-544-1198 Ext. 102 Instagram.com/travel_boulder Email: customerservice@travelboulder.com


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Contents

54 10 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 14 ARTS & CULTURE BUCKET LIST 22 OUTDOOR SCULPTURE GARDENS 28 BOULDER ART GALLERIES 34 MAX MARTINEZ 41 CHARLES HAERTLING 46 WHERE TO SEE SUNSETS

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50 MCGUCKIN HARDWARE 54 ROGER REUTIMANN 58 THE GREENBRIAR INN 62 MOST POPULAR DISHES 66 MEET THE FARMERS 73 ADVERTISING INDEX 74 EXPERIENCE BOULDER

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1615 Pearl Street Boulder,Colorado

(303) 386-4638 facebook.com/Bocolifellc @shopbocolife Photograph by Connor DeMott

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ARTS & CULTURE

ARTS & CULTURE BUCKET LIST

HOW MANY OF THESE HAVE YOU DONE?

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BY A I M EE H E C K E L

BOHEMIA BOULDER. PHOTO COURTESY OF LAUREN CLICK

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ARTS & CULTURE

ART IS E V E RY W H E R E HERE :

on the streets, in more than 30 art galleries, in the world-famous Colorado Music Festival, Boulder International Film Festival and annual Colorado Shakespeare Festival. That’s barely the beginning. Between the Dairy Arts Center and Boulder Museum for Contemporary Art alone, you can find creative (and often surprising) entertainment any day of the week. The music and stage scene in Boulder is incredible, with indoor and outdoor venues for both live music and theater. Make sure to check the schedule at the Boulder Theater, Fox Theatre, Chautauqua Amphitheater, BDT Stage (the dinner theater), the famous Red Rocks Amphitheater and University of Colorado, to name a few. Not to mention the simple amusement of walking down the Pearl Street Mall past the ubiquitous stream of musical buskers. And while the coronavirus pandemic has certainly put a damper on this spring and summer, it hasn’t completely ruined the fun when it comes to arts and culture in Boulder and beyond.

MURAL BY GARY HIRSCH. PHOTO BY FLICKR USER JC SHAMROCK

STREET ART BY SMiLE. PHOTO BY @STREET.ART.BOULDER

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Make this your time to get artsy in Boulder. Here are some art-centric activities we bet you haven’t tried. How many of these hidden gems from the Boulder arts and culture bucket list can you check off?


Posters

Record Albums

Stickers

Photography

Apparel

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ARTS & CULTURE A QUICK NOTE: BE SURE TO PRACTICE SOCIAL DISTANCING GUIDELINES, WEAR YOUR MASK, WASH YOUR HANDS AND STAY AT LEAST SIX FEET AWAY FROM OTHER PEOPLE. CALL AHEAD TO GET THE MOST UPDATED INFORMATION ABOUT SPECIAL HOURS OR CORONAVIRUS-RELATED PRECAUTIONS YOU NEED TO TAKE. AND PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANTLY, SAVE THIS LIST FOR LATER. SOME OF THESE BUSINESSES ARE CLOSED AND ACTIVITIES ARE ON HOLD BECAUSE OF CORONAVIRUS, BUT THEY’LL NEED ALL THE SUPPORT THEY CAN GET WHEN THE WORLD GETS BACK TO NORMAL. BE SURE TO KEEP A COPY OF THIS LIST HANDY SO YOU CAN SUPPORT BOULDER’S ARTS AND CULTURE COMMUNITY WHEN IT’S SAFE AND APPROPRIATE TO DO SO.

1. Lay under the piano of multi-

Grammy award-winning pianist Peter Kater. You can book a personal meeting and performance by Kater, who will invite you to crawl under his piano while he plays improv music just for you, based on your energy and encounter with him. You can also do this via Skype or FaceTime. Learn more at peterkater.com/ piano-readings-by-peter-kater.

2. Take a mural tour

through Boulder’s neighborhoods. There’s a walking and biking tour, as part of the Creative Neighborhoods Mural Program, launched by the city’s Office of Arts and Culture in 2018. The goal: to use Boulder’s artistic abilities to design murals on local homes that the community can enjoy from public streets and paths. Learn

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more at travelboulder.com/take-a-mural-tourthrough-boulders-neighborhoods.Longmont also has great street art.

3. Learn to tango. The Boulder

Tango Studio offers beginner Argentine tango classes throughout the summer, as well as regular workshops with tango stars and Boulder residents Gustavo Naveira and Giselle Anne. Because of the pandemic, they’re teaching lessons online until further notice. Check the schedule at bouldertangostudio.com. For something even less common, the Avalon Ballroom holds Scandinavian social dances. Learn about the traditional dance styles of Sweden and Norway to the tune of live music. In-person classes have been cancelled because of coronavirus, but keep an eye on the ballroom’s website for when they return.

THE ART OF THE DUSHANBE TEA HOUSE. PHOTO BY FLICKR USER CARL MUELLER SUMMER-FALL 2020

4. Take an unusual art class at Bohemia. This is not an average sip -and-

paint studio. Here, you might build a shrine. Create your own “inner monster.” Rip the pages out of a book and paint all over it. That’s the “altered book club” workshop. Bohemia, in North Boulder, also offers a special art program for seniors called Purple Art. The studio is offering classes on Zoom until further notice.

5. Attend a classical music festival. The Boulder Bach Festival is just what

it sounds like: a music festival celebrating the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. This respected Boulder festival features high-quality musicians in concerts, educational events and more. Throughout the year the festival organizes other concerts and events in the community, too. The


SCULPTURES BY BILL VIELEHR AT THE CHARLES A. HAERTLING SCULPTURE PARK IN BOULDER. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

festival claims to be one of the most renowned festivals of its kind. Every May, Boulder is also home to the Colorado MahlerFest, a week-long music festival honoring the works of composer Gustav Mahler.

6. Go on a self-guided art walk.

Though some of this summer’s art walks have been cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic, others are still on for later this summer or are being hosted virtually. A traditional art walk typically involves wandering around a neighborhood or downtown area, listening to live music and wandering in and out of art galleries. You can also take a self-guided art walk through the NoBo Art District.

7 Visit one of Boulder’s many music stores. We’ve got record shops,

a violin-maker’s shop, stores specializing in musical instruments and more. Check out Woodsongs for all your musical needs, including mandolins, ukuleles, guitars, banjos, music books and band and orchestra instruments (all available to rent or buy). The Boulder Piano Gallery, which is open by appointment only until further notice, is the place to go for all things piano. Bart’s Record Shop is where you’ll find new and used records and CDs — just be sure to wear your mask and check the shop’s website for other coronavirus guidelines.

8. Take a virtual studio tour.

Though the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art had to shut down because of the pandemic, you can still connect with artists like Lindee Zimmer, Alejandra Abad and Caleb Hahne through virtual studio tours. They’re literally inviting you into their studios for a behind-thescenes look, while practicing social distancing. You can find studio tours on the museum’s Instagram feed. The museum is also offering online artist talks and extending their current exhibitions so people can experience them once the museum reopens.

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ARTS & CULTURE

“THE SLEEPING BEAUTY” PERFORMED BY THE BOULDER BALLET. COURTESY PHOTO

9. Look for street art in your neighborhood. One benefit of the

a fun paint-your-own-pottery ceramics studio. Crackpots, about 30 minutes east in Longmont, bills itself as a “creative playground.” Like Color Me Mine, this is a paint-your-own-pottery studio that’s welcoming to families. Both studios are offering social distancing painting; make a reservation to ensure your group gets a spot.

10. Explore “art on the loose”

12. Check out the Boulder Bunny Rabbit Art Challenge.

pandemic? People are getting outside and creating art in their neighborhoods. You can find inspiration and post your own street art observations using the hashtag #ArtInsideOut.

through the Dairy Arts Center’s many virtual events and activities. They’re calling it Free Range Dairy, which is totally clever. A few examples of their online events include virtual film screenings and discussions (called “Zoombacks”) and a virtual variety show. Check out the Dairy’s website for the most updated list of events.

11. Paint your own art.

Check out Color Me Mine on the Pearl Street Mall,

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This open-air gallery is located in downtown Boulder and features art plaques attached to the exterior walls of local shops and restaurants. You’ll be able to see artwork created by 28 local artists who range from age 3 to 70. They’re all offering their interpretation of bunny rabbits through paintings, found object art, mosaics and other styles. Check out creativecatalyzers. org for the exact locations of all these bunnies!

13. Take a virtual class or attend an online concert through

Boulder Arts Online. They’re offering tons and tons of online options, ranging from virtual dance classes to art workshops to artist talks. Check out the calendar posted online and see which offering inspires you the most.

14. Drink tea at the Dushanbe Tea House. This ornate, artistic building,

1770 13th St., is a shining star for culture in Boulder. It was designed in Tajikistan, shipped in pieces from overseas and assembled here in the colorful building that you can enjoy today. Call to make a reservation and enjoy the outdoor patio.


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15 Send your kids to Comic Book Summer Camp

at the Museum of Boulder. Though the museum is currently closed until further notice, they’re planning to move forward with some summer camps for kids scheduled for later in the summer. Your kids will love dreaming up and creating their own superheroes and mystical creatures by creating their very own comic book at camp. They’ll get to flex their creative muscles while doing something they love.

16. Experience the Boulder Ballet,

Boulder County’s professional dance company and ballet school, either by taking a class or watching a show. They’re offering classes via Zoom and rescheduling many performances, so be sure to keep an eye on the website. Also check out classes and shows through the unique 3rd Law Dance and Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance.

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ARTS & CULTURE

TAKE AN ART WALK THROUGH THESE OUTDOOR SCULPTURE GARDENS B Y S A R A H K UTA

“HEARTS ON A SWING” BY GEORGE LUNDEEN. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

With art galleries and museum closed or offering more limited hours because of the coronavirus pandemic, your life might be lacking a little arts and culture. And even though you can watch free ballet and opera performances online from the comfort of your living room, that still can’t replace the enrichment of seeing art live, in the flesh. But you can get your recommended dose of fine art by visiting the various outdoor sculpture gardens in Boulder and beyond. It’s easy to follow social distancing guidelines at these parks, too, so long as you stay at least six feet away from other visitors, wear your mask, wash your hands and stay indoors if you’re feeling sick. If you’re in need of some inspiration, hop on your bike, take a walk or jump in the car and pay a visit to these top-notch outdoor sculpture gardens in the Boulder area.

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Pearl Street You already know and love Pearl Street for its peaceful atmosphere and great shopping. But when was the last time you really stopped to enjoy the various sculptures on the walking mall? There’s the well-loved buffalo sculpture from artist Stephan LeBlanc, the “Hearts on a Swing” sculpture of a woman sitting on a bench swing by artist George Lundeen and the bear with her two cubs by artist Scy Caroselli, just to name a few. The newest addition comes from Melanie Yazzie, a Boulder printmaker, sculptor and painter. The piece is titled “Strength from Within” and it’s located on East Pearl.


A LODGE

THREE LEAF CONCEPTS

“STRENGTH FROM WITHIN”, A SCULPTURE BY MELANIE YAZZIE ON THE CORNER OF 16TH AND PEARL STREET

THE CHAUTAUQUA DINING HALL | THE BOULDER DUSHANBE TEAHOUSE LEAF VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT | ZUCCA ITALIAN RISTORANTE | THE HUCKLEBERRY BOULDER TEA COMPANY | THREE LEAF FARM | CHAUTAUQUA GENERAL STORE

THREELEAFCONCEPTS.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

“CONTINUOUS FORM” BY JOHN HAERTLING, DEDICATED IN 1986, IN MEMORY OF CHARLES HAERTLING NEAR THE INTERSECTION OF 30TH AND ARAPAHOE IN BOULDER. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

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Boulder County Courthouse Courtyard Though, yes, technically the courthouse is also on Pearl Street, we feel this sculpture garden deserves its own spot on the list. At the old courthouse building, which now houses county offices, you’ll find several sculptures and statues, including: • “Miner Memorial,” by WR Vielehr, CK Vielehr and J Holmes • “Messenger of the Skies,” by Joellen Domenico • “Arapahoe Tribute,” by Steven Weitzman and Tara Brice

Charles A. Haertling Sculpture Park Charles Haertling is best known for his incredible architectural style, which can be found in buildings and houses all over Boulder (learn more on page 41). But did you know there’s an entire sculpture park dedicated to Haertling? Located at Canyon and 9th, the garden features a diverse collection of sculptures from a variety of artists: • “Double Arc” by Jerry Wingren • “Correspondence” by Dennis Yoshikawa Wright • “Chief Niwot” by Tom Miller • “Circus Fish” by Beth Juliar-Skodje

Chapungu Sculpture Park at Centerra Take a little trip out east to visit the Chapungu Sculpture Park at Centerra in Loveland — it’s worth the trip, without question. The sculpture garden is robust, with 80 stone sculptures spanning 26 acres. You can spend an entire afternoon here, with the kids, and you won’t get bored. Plus, the park has special significance. It’s the largest outdoor art center in the U.S. dedicated to sculptures of Zimbabwe. How cool is that? The garden is conveniently split into eight themed sections, so you can explore at your own pace.

Benson Sculpture Park And while you’re in Loveland, go ahead and stop by Benson Sculpture Park while you’re at it. There are a whopping 164 sculptures on permanent display at the park, located at 2908 Aspen Drive. It’s been showcasing sculptures from world-renowned artists since 1985 and just keeps growing. It’s such a fun place to wander around, gazing at the stunning sculptures, enjoying the wildlife at the small pond and getting a bit of fresh air.

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ARTS & CULTURE

A BRONZE BUFFALO STATUE BY STEPHAN LEBLANC ON THE PEARL STREET MALL. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

SCULPTURE BY UNKNOWN ARTIST. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

“CHIEF NIWOT” BY THOMAS MEAGHER MILLER. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

Downtown Longmont There are impressive sculptures scattered throughout Longmont, but head downtown for a condensed sampling of the city’s public art program. At 6th and Main, for example, you’ll be able to stare up at “Brick Sculpture” by Ken Williams, a tall abstract sculpture that was dedicated in 1992.

SCULPTURES ON THE PEARL STREET MALL. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

At 4th and Main, you can learn a bit about the city’s history with “Early Longmont” by Gregg LeFevre. It’s a 5-foot by 7-foot bronze map of Longmont’s original streetscape. Between 3rd and 6th, you’ll find “Los Arcos de Longmont” by Armanda Alvarez, an archway made of colorful steel and Byzantine glass tiles. It’s truly gorgeous. And don’t forget to say hi to ol’ Teddy Roosevelt at Longs Peak and Coffman. The life-sized bronze sculpture, titled “Roosevelt — the Conservationist” was created by artist Dan Snarr in 2004. It commemorates Roosevelt’s historic visit to Longmont in 1900. See if you can spot another one across the street on Long Peak!

READ MORE ONLINE

SCULPTURES ON THE PEARL STREET MALL. PHOTO BY JOHN BRICE

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ARTS & CULTURE

ART BOULDER GALLERIES

BY A IM E E HE CKE L

JEWLERY BY ALEX SEPKUS AT ART + SOUL GALLERY IN BOULDER. DESIGNED AND FABRICATED IN NEW YORK CITY

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IT’S EFFORTLESS TO PLAN AN INSPIRING, ARTSY OUTING HERE. WHEN IT COMES TO HIGHQUALITY, CURATED ART, BOULDER’S GOT SOME INCREDIBLE GALLERIES. HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME OF THE LOCAL GALLERIES THAT MAKE BOULDER SUCH AN INCREDIBLE ARTS HUB. DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC, MANY GALLERIES HAVE LIMITED HOURS OR ARE OPEN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, SO BE SURE TO CALL AHEAD IF YOU WANT TO CHECK THEM OUT IN PERSON.

ART + SOUL GALLERY. COURTESY PHOTO

BOULDER IS A MUSE.

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ARTS & CULTURE

ART + SOUL GALLERY. COURTESY PHOTO

Art + Soul Gallery 1505 Pearl St., Boulder

This is America’s coolest art gallery. InStore Magazine crowned Art + Soul Gallery one of the nation’s coolest art galleries. It’s definitely one of Boulder’s finest — bringing together some of the world’s best art and jewelry. It embodies everything that makes Boulder so special: creativity, class, originality, quality and friendly service. When visiting Boulder, add this to the top of your shopping list. Art + Soul is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. Two years ago, this Boulder gem moved from its long-time spot near 16th and Pearl streets to its current space, about half the size (now 1,450 square feet) right off the walking mall across from the parking garage. The change was driven in part by the rising costs of running a business in Boulder, but also in response to a new direction for Art + Soul. “Over the years, we developed a niche for designer jewelry and became known for alternative bridal,” says founder Debbie Klein. “The gallery evolved in a different direction than the original intention.” The fresh face of Art + Soul focuses around more than 20 nationally and internationally known jewelry designers, set to the tone of one solo select fine artist that changes every six to eight weeks. “One month it might be abstract or edgy and then the next it might be more romantic florals,” Klein says. “Every time we do a different show, it changes the entire vibe and feeling of the gallery.” This makes Art + Soul feel like a new gallery every time you return; you never know what to expect. The jewelry selection is always evolving, too, Klein says. Art + Soul features about 10 staple designers, but they regularly release new seasonal collections. The others are some of

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DAIRY ARTS CENTER. PHOTO BY LAUREN M. CLICK

the top jewelry designers in the world right now, Klein says. “I was just in New York and Tucson and came back with six different designers I’m dying to bring into the gallery between now and the end of the year in bridal and one-of-a-kind pieces,” she says. “Every day I discover new designers. The hardest part is waiting to present it to the community.” Expect special events this fall to celebrate Art + Soul’s big birthday. Also new this year is a service called Designlab, where clients can work directly with designers to collaborate on unique pieces. For example, a couple recently came in with a raw diamond of their own with personal meaning, Klein says. They picked their favorite designer and certain elements of his work, like the setting and texture of the band. He created a personalized sketch and wax casting of their vision and ultimately created a ring that no one else will ever have. “It’s a unique opportunity to be involved with the design process of internationally known designers, and it’s really fun,” Klein says. “The client’s able to put their stamp on it, their own flourish into it, and everything comes out a little differently.” The best way to experience Art + Soul is to work with a member of the sales staff, Klein says. They know the designers and all about their work: new techniques, old techniques and nontraditional ideas. For example, one designer does castings of ancient Greek and Roman coins.

Each has a story: where it came from, where and how it was found, what it symbolizes. “These are all part of the beauty of the piece,” Klein says. Everything in Art + Soul is handmade; nothing is made by machine. Klein opened Art + Soul in 2000, in an atmosphere that seamlessly blends creativity with sophistication. The store on East Pearl has a long list of awards backing up how outstanding it is. It always seems to be racking up another “best gallery” award. Pay it a visit when you’re downtown and you’ll see why.

Dairy Arts Center 2590 Walnut St., Boulder The Dairy Arts Center is a central point for tons of art in Boulder. It’s Boulder’s biggest multidisciplinary art center. This building, formerly a cow dairy, houses 12 different art organizations. It features multiple galleries, a movie theater, several stages, classrooms, a lobby with a bar and more. Find everything from ballet classes to lectures to stand-up comedy here. Its visual arts program spans four galleries and highlights rotating local and international artists (even sometimes local students). Admission to the galleries is free every day. The Dairy also offers art workshops and lectures for people of all ages.

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ARTS & CULTURE

BOULDER ARTS AND CRAFTS GALLERY. COURTESY PHOTO

The dairy (for cow-related purposes) stopped operating in the late ‘80s, when local artists began using it for art events and shows. The Dairy, as it is now, officially started in 1992. Today, the Dairy offers about 250,000 arts experiences per year, and classes for about 2,000 music and dance students. The Dairy spans 42,000 square feet.

Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art 1750 13th St., Boulder The Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art is an important art destination in Colorado. It was one of the state’s very first contemporary art galleries, founded in the early ’70s. BMOCA, as it’s called, attracts about 30,000 visitors annually. This museum focuses on (you guessed it) contemporary art. The visual art exhibitions that feature rotating local and international artists are the star here, but the museum also offers performances, workshops, tours and more (the museum works with more than 70 local organizations to offer programs). At least 60 percent of BMoCA’s exhibitions feature local artists. The museum draws about 47,000 visitors a year. The museum was founded in 1972 by local artists. Today, it offers about 500 programs annually across seven counties.

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SmithKlein Gallery 1116 Pearl St., Boulder The SmithKlein Gallery is a fun visit, and not just because it’s located on the Pearl Street Mall. This fine art gallery is a Boulder art leader, around since the ’80s, and you’ll find all kinds of creativity here: jewelry, glass, paintings and large sculptures. Browse the 2,800-square-feet of high-quality art and don’t hesitate to chat with the friendly staff, who can tell you all about the artists. Feel inspired? Take a piece home with you as a meaningful memento of your time in town. Another thing that makes SmithKlein special to Boulder is that it’s family-owned. It was opened by Deborah SmithKlein and is now run by her son, Nathan Klein, and his wife, Ann Klein. He was just 4 when the gallery opened, so he was raised around some of the finest art. In the beginning, the gallery was small. But it attracted major collectors, which sparked quick growth. And the interesting mixture of styles and the quality of the art has kept it thriving. PHOTOS ON NEXT PAGE: ART AT THE BOULDER MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART. PHOTO BY JIM HECKEL WONDER WONDER. PHOTO BY SYDNEY SLABS PHOTOGRAPHY

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OTHER BOULDER COUNTY GALLERIES BOULDER • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Boulder Arts & Crafts Gallery, 1421 Pearl St. Rembrandt Yard Art Gallery & Events Center, 1301 Spruce St. Ana’s Art Gallery, 958 Cherryvale Road University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St. Boulder Creative Collective, 2500 47th St. Mary Williams Fine Arts, 5311 Western Ave., Unit 112 15th Street Gallery, 1708 15th St. Wonder Wonder, 1685 29th St. Art Source International, 1237 Pearl St. Bohemia, 4919 Broadway, Unit 7 Confluence Arts, 2344 Pearl St. Kennedy Studio Art, 2810 Wilderness Place, Unit A/B Phil Lewis Art, 2034 Pearl St. Unit 102 R Gallery, 2027 Broadway Shankar Gallery, 1840 Violet Ave. Seidel City, 3205 Longhorn Road Art Work Space, 2810 Wilderness Place (more than 30 artists’ studios) Lael Gallery and Studios, 1025 Rosewood Ave., Unit 108 Elizabeth Black Art, 4340 13th St. Sally Eckert Fine Art, 1620 Lee Hill Drive, Unit 7

ELDORADO SPRINGS •

Eldorado Springs Arts Center, 8 Chesebro Way

NIWOT •

Osmosis Art and Architecture, 290 Second Ave.

LAFAYETTE • •

Alloy Fine Art Gallery, 402 S. Public Road pARTiculars, 401 S. Public Road, Unit 1

LOUISVILLE •

Creative Framing & Art Gallery, 916 Main St.

LONGMONT • • • • • •

City of Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave. Rabbit Brush Gallery, 7504 Hygiene Road Russell Coburn Gallery, 700 Tenacity Drive, Unit 102 The Walnut Gallery, 364 Main St. Colorado Nature Gallery, 1541 Elmhurst Drive, Unit 101

WARD •

Glass Tipi Gallery, 55 Utica St.

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MAX MARTINEZ, OWNER OF MAX CLOTHING STORE. COURTESY PHOTO

SHOPPING

MAX MARTINEZ AT MAX CLOTHING BY A IME E H E C K E L

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DRESS AND NECKLACE AT MAX IN BOULDER WANDLER PURSE AT MAX IN BOULDER

DON’T be intimidated by the big-name designers in this store. On the other hand, even if you wouldn’t recognize the names of a high-end clothing line, don’t let that stop you.

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HOLLY KABACOFF, MANAGER AT MAX, SPRUCES UP MANNEQUINS. PHOTO BY MARK LEFFINGWELL

Yes, this is, without doubt, one of the most fashionable shops in Colorado, and it helped transform Boulder from the tie-dye capital of the world to a more sophisticated and artsy destination. But there’s a lot about Boulder’s MAX Clothing Store you might not realize. In MAX, 1177 Walnut St., fashion is far from surface-level. It’s about self-expression, empowerment, art, family, community and purpose. That’s how the founder and owner Max Martinez explains it. This store — from the people who work here, some for decades, to the customers — is his family, he says. And as MAX celebrates its 35th successful year, Martinez wants to deepen its impact on the community. “I am launching 2020 as a new birth for me, after the divine intervention that my life was saved,” he says. “This is the next chapter of my career.” This decision was sparked by tragedy: Martinez says he was held at gunpoint in his home. “I was seconds from being killed,” he says. “But something happened, and they took my car and left.” He says he doesn’t know what made the attacker leave, but for Martinez, it felt like a second chance at life, reminding him of what truly matters.

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“Now, I am really committing, full-on, to my community,” he says. Starting this year, he says MAX will donate 10 percent of its profits to nonprofits it supports. The philanthropic side of MAX is not new; it’s just more important now, Martinez says. In the last 25 years, MAX has held fashion events that raised more than $2.2 million for nonprofits such as Children’s Hospital and Meals on Wheels. The last big fashion show was 10 years ago but “the fundraising never stops,” Martinez says. The store blossomed out of Martinez’s childhood dream. He says he always loved playing with Barbie dolls and dressing them up. “I started dressing my mom for church when I was five years old, and I’m lucky: 65 years and I’m still doing it,” he says. Over the years, his passion for designer clothes grew. He opened MAX in Denver with just $10,000. Today, there are three branches. The others are in Cherry Creek (with plans to move into a new location early 2021) and in Aspen. Boulder’s location opened in 1995. To some, it seemed outrageous to open a shop like MAX in a granola and fleece city like Boulder, but Martinez says he knew it was right in his gut. His first customer was a University of Colorado junior named Holly Kabacoff. She

was studying Spanish literature, but she loved clothes. She became a loyal shopper, and when she graduated from college, she began working at the store. That was 25 years ago. Today, Kabacoff helps Martinez buy for all three stores. She says she never expected to be in retail this long. It’s thanks to Martinez. “He’s the most amazing man on the planet,” she says. “He’s got such a big heart.” Which, incidentally, is just what he says about her. “As far as Boulder goes, the success is due to that girl Holly, who loves the store like it’s hers,” Martinez says. “It’s the foundation of love, friendship and community. It’s family and the love of customers. That’s what’s driven me and keeps me going.” Like Kabacoff, most of the Boulder staff has been at the store for more than a decade (Danette Stuckey: 17 years; Mari Pearse: 20 years; Laura Ricci: 12 years), which allows them to provide a level of service that Martinez says sets MAX apart. When the store gets in new clothes, Kabacoff says she pulls out her binder of regulars and sends texts or calls to let people know when there’s something they’ll love. She sends boxes of clothes to CU moms who are hooked on the store but live out of state, so they can try on


CLOTHING AT MAX IN BOULDER. PHOTO BY MARK LEFFINGWELL

clothes in their homes and send back what doesn’t work. “It’s almost like old-fashioned retail. We know the moms and the daughters,” Martinez says. Kabacoff says it’s easy to misjudge MAX and assume it’s excessive or too fancy. And yes, one side of the store is the European collection and high-end New York lines. Shoppers from the coasts often walk through the door and are shocked to find such a well-curated store in Colorado. Yet, across the store hangs casual clothes and jeans. “Some people are scared to come into a high-end store. We just put them in jeans and T-shirts and the less expensive tops. Once they drink the MAX Kool-Aid,” she says with a laugh, “we get into the higher-end. We have cult customers who’ve been coming here for 27 years.” MAX has put Colorado on the fashion map, carrying names such as Prada, Dries Van Noten (the store’s best-selling line), Stella McCartney, Celine, Yves St. Laurent, Calvin Klein, Nili Lotan and Bottega Veneta. In addition to the classics, Martinez has an eye for upcoming designers and newbies, too. “The Boulder clients can know they can get anything in Boulder that they can find online or at any major international city in

the world,” Martinez says. In the store, you can find fashion on par with New York and LA, but you can also find quality jeans and T-shirts. Because Boulder. In 2010, Harper’s Bazaar Magazine called MAX a “style leader” and one of the top stores in the country. In 2011, for the store’s 20th birthday (and to raise money for the Children’s Hospital), icon Diane Von Furstenberg brought her collection to MAX. This was the first time she ever took her show on the road. It brought the international runway experience to Colorado. The following year, designer Maria Cornejo brought her collection to the fashion show, again to raise money for the Children’s Hospital. But those mega names and national recognition aren’t what make Martinez proudest. “For me, success is the platform for my charity,” he says. “I don’t have to put kids through college. All I want is success so I can give back.” After 35 years, he says he’s more inspired than ever. He says he just returned from one of the most successful trips to Paris he’s had in decades. For the summer and fall of 2020, MAX has

a lot more color than its usual very black. Expect red, florals, rust, olive, burgundy. Look for plaid jackets for women and cropped, flared jeans. But MAX isn’t about the trends, per se. The clothes are timeless and made to be worn for the rest of your life. A big misconception that people have about a store like MAX is that it’s superficial and surface-level, Martinez says. “But there are so many ways of going deep in a world of beauty,” he says. “Colorado is beauty, in nature. Fashion is a level of beauty that some people think is shallow, but there are so many levels of connection going on here: women empowerment, service.” When a woman walks out of a store feeling empowered in a beautiful outfit, some good has been created in the world, he says. “From the beginning of my career, it was my No. 1 thing that I would stay focused on the path of fashion, but on a spiritual level,” Martinez says. It hasn’t been easy, and work in the fashion field is not all glamorous, he says. “It’s been a hard 35 years on so many levels, but that’s life. Not just self-employment,” he says. “So I’m always keeping my eyes on the road of gratitude.”

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John Allen Woodward

1505 Pearl Street Boulder, CO johnallenwoodward.com (720) 667-4846

Made on the premises, one piece at a time. Master craftsman John Allen Woodward and son craft works of art in the front window of their Pearl street store and workshop. People stop and stare as the magic of making one of a kind boots, shoes, belts, bags, wallets and belt buckles unfolds. There aren’t many places in the world where you can see a master leather craftsman creating their work but that’s exactly what you can do right here in Boulder. “I love the magic of making. Whether it’s shoes or boots or music… You have an idea that you pull out of space, and

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you gather a pile of raw materials on a bench and at the end of the day, that image becomes real. Real Magic”, says John Allen Woodward. John Allen Woodward got his start making cowboy boots in 1992 in Nashville while pursuing a music career. After years with stores in California, John relocated to Boulder. John’s work has recently been featured in shows for Netflix and Fox Television.


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THE ARCHITECTURAL ART

of

Charles Haertling BY AIMEE HECKEL

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J

oel Haertling says he has spent a lot of time defending his father’s work, since the architect died in 1984. Yes, the buildings Charles A. Haertling designed from the ’50s through ’80s are different. One was inspired by a yucca pod. Another was designed to resemble barnacles. There’s a house that resembles aspen leaves and another inspired by mushrooms. Unique art can be misunderstood, and Joel Haertling says the 40 or so Haertling buildings in the Boulder area have been appreciated by some, but misjudged by others. He thinks back on when one publication reached out to his family for a story about “weird Colorado.” That didn’t go over well. “His architecture and designs are not weird. They’re aesthetically coherent,” says Joel Haertling, who lives in Boulder and works at the Boulder Public Library. In addition to the nature-inspired themes, Charles Haertling’s work also followed mathematical and geometric themes. He was known for fusing modernism with organic architecture. In addition to running his own architectural practice, he served on the architecture faculty at the University of Colorado and was even the mayor of Boulder. He died of a brain tumor at the age of 55. Whether you like his architecture or not, no one can dispute that Charles Haertling quite literally thought outside the box — the typical shape of a building. He mostly built houses, although he also built churches and businesses, like an eye clinic in Boulder (aptly built to function like an eye).

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THE LEANEAGH HOUSE

“THE DESIGN PROCESS IS ONE PAINFUL EXHILARATION WHERE ONE GIVES ULTIMATE IMPORTANCE TO THE PROBLEM BEING SOLVED, LETTING THE PROBLEM ITSELF BE AN INTEGRATED SOLUTION,WHICH USES MATERIALS AND STRUCTURE VOID OF DISTORTION OF USES UNTRUE TO THE N ATURE OF THE MATERIAL OR PROCESS , TESTING THE BOUNDARIES OF THE APPLIC ATION SO AS TO GIVE EXCITEMENT, VARIETY, ADVENTURE, HUMAN INTEREST, AND HUMAN RELATION TO THE PROJECT.” — CHARLES A. HAERTLING


THE LEANEAGH HOUSE

He Called Boulder His Gallery Don’t call them “homes.” Charles Haertling saw a distinction between a house and a home. He mostly built houses. When you move into a house, you turn it into a home, he believed. He also believed, “A house is more of a home by being a work of art.” Judi Lesta echoes that sentiment. Lesta, the owner of The Amazing Garage Sale in north Boulder, lives in the Noble House, built in 1958. This triangular house has been called the “space craft home.” “It’s unique and unusual, like living in a museum or art gallery,” Lesta says. Her house features 14 sides that create two intersecting peaks, based on sacred geometry, says Lesta. At the top of each point is a glass skylight. The roof consists of 16 large green triangles. Inside, you won’t find a single right angle. Not even the triangular windows, not even the stove, nor the garden outside. To Lesta, this didn’t pose any design challenges. “It would be more of a challenge if it was a box with tall walls. I built my design around the house,” she says. In that, she says she doesn’t have a favorite room or space. Everywhere is her favorite in the Noble House. Other surprises: a sunken kitchen, cabinets that seem to float and a construction budget (back in the day) of just $16,000. Gregory Creek, on its way to Boulder Creek, trickles past the side of her bedroom.

Lesta moved into the Noble House (named after the original owners) when she came to Boulder in 1989. She has made some changes. When she moved in, she says it was black and white; she added bright colors on the walls. “Some people won’t like that because it’s colorized and museums are supposed to be white and clean. Haertling himself might not have liked it. But I like it,” Lesta says. “It’s like a beach home, all yellow and sunny and beautiful.” She says it’s inspiring to live inside a famous architect’s creation. “I can watch out of the ceiling and see the moon and the stars,” she says. All of the local Haertling houses are vastly different, she says — “all unique, amazing spaces in different ways.” Indeed, Joel Haertling says, “The distinctive characteristic of my father’s work is every house looks different, but each is aesthetically coherent in a similar way.” Even if you don’t know the architect’s inspiration, the buildings typically conjure images of nature in the eyes of people who see them. In that, Joel Haertling calls them a “local aesthetic resource” that is worth protecting. “They’re a resource you can go to and get enlightened and in touch with how architecture can be different,” he says.

THE NOBLE HOUSE, DESIGNED BY CHARLES HAERTLING. PHOTO BY JUDI LESTA

THE NOBLE HOUSE, DESIGNED BY CHARLES HAERTLING. PHOTO BY JUDI LESTA

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THE BUILDINGS

MOST OF THE HAERTLING STRUCTURES ARE ON PRIVATE LAND (AND SOME ARE HIDDEN BY LANDSCAPING SO THEY’RE NOT EASY TO SEE), SO YOU CAN’T JUST WALK INSIDE. OTHER ADDRESSES ARE NOT BROAD PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE. STILL, YOU CAN PUT TOGETHER YOUR OWN, UNOFFICIAL CHARLES HAERTLING DRIVING TOUR AND HOPE TO CATCH A GLIMPSE OF SOME OF BOULDER’S MOST INTERESTING ARCHITECTURE. KEEP IN MIND THAT MANY OF THESE ARE PRIVATE RESIDENCIES, SO BE SURE TO RESPECT THE OWNERS’ PRIVACY.

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PHOTOS ABOVE: 2 3 5

1 4 6

1, 2 THE BOULDER EYE CLINIC. PHOTO BY ISAAC NAGEL-BRICE 3 THE BRENTON HOUSE. PHOTO BY ISAAC NAGEL-BRICE 4 THE WILLARD HOUSE. PHOTO BY ISAAC NAGEL-BRICE 5 ST. STEPHEN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH IN NORTHGLENN. PHOTO BY RAY LUCE 6 KAHA HOUSE. PHOTO BY ISAAC NAGEL-BRICE


A SELF-GUIDED (UNOFFICIAL) HAERTLING TOUR OF BOULDER Boulder Buildings HERE ARE SOME (BUT NOT ALL) OF HAERTLING’S BOULDER BUILDINGS, LISTED IN ORDER THAT THEY WERE CONSTRUCTED. THIS LIST EXCLUDES BUILDINGS BEYOND BOULDER COUNTY. WHEAT HOUSE, 1515 BASELINE ROAD NOBLE HOUSE, 650 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. WHITE HOUSE, 630 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. KNUDSEN HOUSE, 420 CHRISTMAS TREE DRIVE KRUEGER HOUSE, 1025 ROSEHILL DRIVE WILLARD HOUSE, 125 BELLEVIEW DRIVE VOLSKY HOUSE, 711 WILLOWBROOK ROAD ALBERSHEIM HOUSE, 1440 BELLEVIEW DRIVE DAMMANN I HOUSE, 460 COLLEGE AVE. MCCONNELL HOUSE, 450 COLLEGE AVE. CALDWELL HOUSE,415 DRAKE ST. BOULDER EYE CLINIC, 2405 BROADWAY BRENTON HOUSE, 3752 WONDERLAND HILL AVE. KAHN HOUSE, 760 FLAGSTAFF ROAD MENKICK HOUSE, 165 GREEN ROCK DRIVE DAVIS HOUSE, 65 BELLEVIEW DRIVE GILL HOUSE, 730 15TH ST. JOURGENSEN HOUSE, 780 FLAGSTAFF ROAD MATHESON HOUSE, 6087 MARSHALL DRIVE WILSON HOUSE, 550 COLLEGE AVE. DAMMANN II HOUSE, 259 SPRUCE ST. FORD HOUSE, 4 BENCHMARK DRIVE JOHNSON HOUSE, 630 NORTHSTAR COURT LEANEAGH HOUSE, 52 BOULDER VIEW LANE

Haertling Highlights Here’s a closer look at a few of the highlights you can see throughout the Boulder-Denver area. The Willard House (1962), 125 Bellevue Drive: This house, near Chautauqua Park, sits at the base of the Flatirons. It integrates into the natural site, with glass-lined angles intended to complement the rock ledges. The city of Boulder calls its composition linear and sculptural. Volsky House (1963), 711 Willowbrook Road, Boulder: This circular house has been likened to a spaceship on Boulder’s hillside, with a 360-degree view from the curtain-less living room. Originally, neighbors submitted a protest to the city, saying it would harm their property values. Instead, it ended up in Life Magazine and launched Haertling’s fame, comparing him to Frank Lloyd Wright. St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church (1963), 10828 Huron, Northglenn: This church, which is open to the public today, has a hyperbolic paraboloid roof. Its white swooping roof almost looks like elephant tusks. The church is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Warburton House (1964) in Gold Hill: This house was designed to withstand the heavy winds in the area, perched at 9,000 feet in elevation. The solution: a curved, concrete yucca pod shape that the wind could just blow right over and around. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church (1962), 915 E. Ninth Ave., Denver (Capitol Hill): This church’s design was based on a series of isosceles triangles. Kahn House (1968), 760 Flagstaff Road: “The highly unconventional form strikes a balance between light, airy pavilions, and their solid, opaque foundations,” according to the city of Boulder. Boulder Eye Clinic (1969), 2401 N. Broadway at the corner of Broadway and Maxwell Avenue in Boulder: Some people think this seemingly floating structure looks like a concrete white spaceship, but it was designed to function like an eyeball. The protruding windows originally housed eye charts.

The eye clinic has since closed, but it has housed other businesses over the years. The Brenton House (1971), 3752 Wonderland Hill Ave. on Maxwell Lake/the Wonderland Hills neighborhood in Boulder: This is the most famous Haertling house. It was inspired by the shape of barnacles, using polyurethane foam sprayed on a rebar skeleton. The pods project out from a center point, where there’s a garden. It appeared in the 1973 sci-fi Woody Alley film, “Sleeper.” Some people think this 6,400-square-foot house with curved walls, round windows and domed ceilings looks like a mushroom, earning it the nickname “the Mushroom House.” But in truth, it was inspired by the barnacles Charles Haertling removed from ships when he served in the U.S. Navy. The Menkick House (1971), 165 Green Rock Drive in Boulder: This awardwinning Usonian design house was built to complement a rock outcropping. The outcrop is integrated into the outside of the house in multiple areas. The Boulder Public Library’s documentary says the house had “major renovations” in the ’80s. The 5,780-squarefoot house was on the market and sold in 2018 for $4.675 million, according to Realtor.com. Dammann II House (1974), 259 Spruce St., Boulder: This private house features a continuous skylight and large concrete wall. The goal: to provide both openness and privacy. The Aspen Leaf House (1980), 52 Boulder View Lane, Boulder: Twenty-seven stone columns hold up 20-foot ceilings. The roof is shaped like an aspen leaf, with a copper top and wooden slats, like the veins of a leaf. This was the last house Haertling designed. .

WANT TO LEARN MORE? YOU CAN WATCH A SILENT FILM, “THE DESIGN PROCESS OF CHARLES A. HAERTLING, ARCHITECT,” ON THE BOULDER PUBLIC LIBRARY’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL.

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BEST SUNSET SPOTS BY A I ME E HE CKE L

BOULDER

boasts some of the best, most colorful sunsets in the world. Sometimes it will seem like the entire sky is pink and orange. Along Colorado’s Front Range, the sun goes down behind the mountains, which automatically incorporates the Rockies and the foothills into the scene. In celebration of Boulder’s beautiful skies, here are six different ways to experience dusk in the summertime. Just make sure you wear a face mask and stay at least six feet away from other sunset-chasers to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. You can even enjoy the colors from behind a screened-in porch or the window of your car or hotel room. An unforgettable way to see the sun set in the Boulder area is from the top of the world, or at least a mountain or hill. Photographer Zach Dischner took this shot while hiking up near James Peak near Nederland, west of Boulder. He managed to capture (with a 30-second exposure) remnants of the sunset glow mixed with city lights, along with the night stars. Even if you’re not a photographer and know nothing about exposure times, the views from up high are as Boulder as it gets. Plus, they come with a scenic hike and some peace and quiet. 1. FROM UP HIGH:

4. FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO CAMPUS:

There’s something magical about a sunset surrounding old buildings, and you can get a taste of that if you happen to be on the CU campus at dusk. Here, photographer Casey A. Cass caught the shadow of Old Main in front of the Boulder glow. Denver Broncos fans like to say Colorado’s sunset is orange and blue for the football team, but in Boulder, we see the gold and black. 5. THE FLATIRONS FROM SOUTH: Head outside of Boulder

2. FROM EAST BOULDER: While it seems like common sense

city limits to get a glimpse of the sun setting over the Flatirons to gravitate closer to the sunset and, therefore, westward, you from the south. Photographer Zach Dischner found a spot can actually get spectacular, sweeping views if you step back a off Colorado 72 and Indiana Street in Arvada. The mirror-still bit. Find a spot in east Boulder with open views of the Flatirons, Welton Reservoir near that intersection provides a peaceful although sometimes the sunset will seem to come right to you, frame with the setting sun behind Boulder’s famous rocky as seen in this photo by photographer Carol Jacobs-Carre. This landmark. Dischner stood on the roof of his truck for this view. photo was taken near the now-closed AstraZeneca plant, not far 6. BEFORE THE COLORS POP: Colorado’s famous pink, from the Boulder Municipal Airport and the Valmont Dog Park. orange and blue sunsets get a lot of photographic attention, Nearby Hayden Lake is another scenic sunset spot on the east but there’s another kind of beauty right before the sun drops side of town. behind the mountains. As the sun crests the mountaintops like Truly, every angle of the sun setting over the mountains casts its own beauty. Head north of Boulder to the open space between Boulder and Lyons to feel like you’re a million miles away. If you’re lucky, the event might offer up an unreal, fiery show like photographer Jeff Ruane caught on film. You never know what Boulder’s sky will look like as it wraps up the day. 3. THE FOOTHILLS FROM THE NORTH:

a crown, the whole Front Range seems to glow. Photographers Max and Dee Bernt captured a crisp image of the sun touching the Flatirons.

SEE MORE SUNSET SPOTS TRAVELBOULDER.COM/17-ROMANTIC-PLACESTO-WATCH-THE-SUNSET-NEAR-BOULDER-COUNTY

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McGuckin: This Isn’t Your Regular “Hardware Hardware”Store BY A IM EE HECKEL If you’re not from around here, it might seem strange that a hardware store is considered a local hangout in 2020 and one of Boulder’s top attractions. But spend a few minutes wandering through the aisles of McGuckin Hardware, and you’ll get it. A few steps in, someone will greet you. A few more steps, and they’re your new buddy. Soon, you’re family. This caring attitude remained a steady and constant presence during the coronavirus pandemic, as McGuckin Hardware did everything it could to serve to the Boulder community. The store created special shopping hours for seniors and at-risk customers, offered curbside pickup, required customers to wear masks and allowed customers to place orders over the phone or online. It all started small and simple on a sunny September in 1955 with a fisherman named Bill McGuckin, four workers and four departments. Over the years, McGuckin Hardware has grown — now employing around 250 people in 18 departments across 60,000 square feet — and it has remained strong, despite doing just about everything the opposite of how a typical business runs. In that, it embodies the Boulder spirit. Perhaps that’s why the aisles are still bustling, despite the ease of Amazon and discounts at Walmart. Randy “Doc” Dilkes, of Nederland, has been working here for 42 years. He’s not a Phd (unless you count his “Professional Hardware Degree”). His nickname is short for “Doctor of Darts,” his department of expertise. “Everyone who comes in the door is our neighbor. This is our town. We love the people who shop here,” he says. And the staff is even closer, he

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says. “Our extended family is thousands of people, and we all consider them to be family.” A handful of the older workers used to have their own ski team and take regular trips to Salt Lake City. Some try to retire, but return because they miss it. They have annual reunions. “We still get along,” Doc says. “We do?” That’s Barry Hight. He’s got a smirk on his face, like a teasing brother. The first time they met, Doc tried to bust him for shoplifting. Barry was behind the counter in sporting goods, going through the knife cases, trying to fit a Swiss Army Knife in a case. That’s when Doc learned Barry’s dad owned the store. Barry literally grew up inside these walls. His grandpa was the McGuckin who founded the store. His dad is the CEO; at age 90, he still comes in every day. Barry’s kid worked here. So does his wife. Oh yeah, he met her here when she was a cashier. His buddy Vinny met his wife here, too. Typical stories, on a typical day in this atypical store that carries everything. If you can’t find it amid the 200,000 items, someone will order it for you. As marketing coordinator Nicolette Power puts it, “If we don’t have it, you don’t need it.” Even ninja throwing stars. Live ladybugs. Venus fly traps. Everything from humidifiers to plants to lava lamps. Essential oils, kitchen gadgets,


toys, clothes and, of course, nuts and bolts and all the hardware. In fact, that’s how McGuckin built its inventory: via requests. Due to that, it carries lines you can’t find at chain stores, like Stihl power tools, as well as locally made products. McGuckin is huge, but it still supports the little guys. “If you were to take this business to an economics professor, they would shake their head and say, ‘This will never work,’” Barry says. “‘It’s too big. There are too many items and too many employees.’” But those were the tenets the store was built on: personalized service, selection and first-hand experience. While the location and size have changed over the past 65 years, a lot hasn’t. When investors offered to franchise the store and open branches across the country, CEO Dave Hight says he turned it down. “I said, ‘You bring me 50 families who want to have a store, and I’ll teach them everything I know and give them all my suppliers,” he says. “I don’t want to control this industry. Let other people put their name on the store.” Dave and his wife, Dee Hight, sit across from each other at the kitchen table in their Boulder home, built by her younger brother. She’s knitting a colorful blanket. Their friendly white dog, Jessie Lou, bounces at their ankles, hoping to get attention. They’ve been together so long that they can finish each other’s sentences. She was 14 and he was 16 when they met in a dance class. They got married four years later. That was 69 years ago. Dee says her dad decided to open a sporting goods store because he no longer wanted to be a seven-day-a-week, on-call pharmacist, running a drug store during the war. The McGuckin family was renting a house in Fort Lupton for $25 a month when they decided to move to Boulder. Dee and Dave were newly married and running a general store in Climax. A few years later in 1960, Bill McGuckin asked Dave to become a partner in the store. “He was sick of business,” Dee says. So they moved their family of three boys into a trailer on 28th Street. Just six years later, her dad died. Dave was left to lead the family business, and the founder never got to see what became of his dream. “My dad would be shocked at all this,” Dee says. “He would be so proud.” Although Dave never wanted to franchise McGuckin Hardware, he did open his own second branch in East Boulder near Frasier Meadows, but it never made money. He says it was more of a “community service” to make products available to that side of town. They shut it down in 1985 and moved the inventory to the main branch — trip by trip, packed into a convertible. The central Boulder store itself also moved several times as it outgrew its space, but it’s remained on the same block in the Village Shopping Center. Barry says one of his earliest memories was in 1978 moving to the current location, a former brick factory with a “red-light motel” and a drive-through liquor store across the dirt parking lot. Back then, this was the edge of Boulder. They moved the store in four nights, from 6 a.m. to 3 a.m. every day.

JULIANA DENNIS STOCKS SHELVES AT MCGUCKIN. PHOTO BY MARK LEFFINGWELL

MEL GROVES, LEFT, LAUGHS WITH DENNIS GUNDERSON, RIGHT, WHILE RINGING HIS PURCHASES AT MCGUCKIN. PHOTO BY MARK LEFFINGWELL

RANDY "DOC" DILKES, OF NEDERLAND, A LONG-TIME MCGUCKIN EMPLOYEE. PHOTO BY AIMEE HECKEL

RICHARD ORR CHECKS THE INVENTORY OF THOUSANDS OF BOLTS, SCREW AND NUTS AT MCGUCKIN. PHOTO BY MARK LEFFINGWELL

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MCGUCKIN HARDWARE STARTED WITH JUST FOUR EMPLOYEES AND NOW HAS ABOUT 250 STAFF MEMBERS, DEPENDING ON THE SEASON. COURTESY PHOTO

“It was so much fun, though,” he says. “We had a little diesel-powered train with carts on the back. We’d load them and drive it across the parking lot back and forth.” Boulder was growing, he says. “It was time for us to grow, too. It was time to do something else,” he says. “We grew with Boulder, size-wise and product-wise.” As a family-run business, partnering with family-run wholesalers was a priority for Dave. But the rising price of goods put many wholesalers out of business, he says. He lost 50 wholesalers that he considered good friends, he says, but he still maintains relationships with the ones that remain. He thinks one of the biggest changes in business is more people today buy for price, not principle. That’s not how he works. “I’m a loyal person,” he says. He’s wearing a green McGuckin sweatshirt. “I buy from people who take care of us. We’ve helped a lot of companies and manufacturers get started over the years.” He pauses, thinking back. “The years go by so fast. Enjoy them,” he says.

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“All of the sudden it’s gone so fast,” his wife adds. “We were busy.” Dave thinks back on the store. “We don’t own it,” he says. “It’s just a part of the community.”

The McGuckin Secrets to Success The green vests, as the workers are called, are the heart of McGuckin Hardware. The large staff is what allows for attentive customer service, which is what makes this business stand out, says Clay Bonnyman Evans, author of “Behind the Green Vest,” a book about McGuckin. The book dives into the store’s history, starting with the 18th-century immigrants who ultimately worked their way into business ownership, alongside the city of Boulder’s own transformation over the years. Clay calls the McGuckin story a “living example of ethical business practices” through customer service, supporting the community and treating employees well — something you see all too rarely amid corporate and online companies. “They’ve never tried to chince their employees,” Clay says. “They pay them a living wage, even in Boulder. Their philosophy was never that


people are disposable. Treat them as best as you can, and it becomes a family. If you go down there and observe, you’ll meet these people who have been there forever.” This isn’t just a story about a Boulder business, he says. “These people are salt-of-the-earth. They grew up in rural Colorado and run this business that amazingly has fended off every single challenge it faced,” he says. “And they did it in this super old-fashioned way: ‘Yeah, we want to make money, but we want to pay our people well and treat them well so they stick with us for 50 years.’ That, to me, is an astonishing story.” How’d they do it? First, he says McGuckin has smart buyers who find holes in the market and fill them (like if you want the coolest holiday decorations that you can’t find anywhere else, you go to McGuckin). Second, that customer service. The third factor, he says, is Boulder, itself. “We have an educated community that understands the value of having businesses that are responsible to the community they serve,” Clay says. “Some of the stuff you get might be more expensive, but most people have the kind of income where they’ll pay a little extra to support a company supporting the community.”

All of this combined is what he calls the “McGuckin Way.” The “grandpa attitude,” Dilkes calls it in the book. Be friendly. Treat everyone the way you wanted to be treated, like your neighbor. “A family-owned hardware store like McGuckin’s is one of the last, great places of Americana in business,” Dilkes says in the book. “We epitomize that.” As you walk through the aisles of McGuckin, look for the 90-year-old in a green vest pushing a cart to help him walk. He visits every department every day, so he’s hard to miss. He hangs out a lot in 12B, an aisle with his name on it. That’s where they keep the brooms, mops, floor supplies and garbage cans. Although he’s the head honcho, Dave Hight says he tries to never criticize staff. “I let them run it,” he says. His wife calls him the “ambassador.” “Everyone knows him. He knows everyone,” she says. “Ask him to tell you a joke.” She turns to him with a smile. “What was that joke you told me? The zipper one?” He chuckles. “I can’t remember now,” he says shyly. But you can tell he does remember. He’s just saving it for another day in aisle 12B.

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ARTS & CULTURE

ROGER REUTIMANN BY A IM EE HECKEL

ROGER REUTIMANN AND ONE OF HIS SCULPTURES. COURTESY PHOTO

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SCULPTURE ROGER REUTIMANN’S LARGE-SCALE SCULPTURES ARE OWNED BY CELEBRITIES, FROM ACTOR NEIL PATRICK HARRIS TO CNN’S ANDERSON COOPER. SIR ELTON JOHN OWNS FOUR OF THEM AND HAS BEEN QUOTED SAYING HE WAS “BLOWN AWAY” BY REUTIMANN’S WORK. BUT THE BOULDER-BASED ARTIST WON’T BRING UP THOSE NAMES UNLESS HE’S ASKED. THAT’S NOT WHERE HE STAKES HIS SATISFACTION. HE SAYS HIS PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT IS TO HAVE FOUND HIS OWN ORIGINAL ARTISTIC STYLE.

That’s the most difficult thing to achieve, something most artists will never find,” Roger Reutimann says. “You have to be brutally honest with yourself and not be influenced by other people.

ROGER REUTIMANN WORKING ON ONE OF HIS SCULPTURES. COURTESY PHOTO

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ROGER REUTIMANN’S ART. COURTESY PHOTOS

Reutimann’s large sculptures (most are seven or eight feet tall, but the biggest reached 20) are figurative-abstract, often brightly colored and like nothing he says he’s ever seen before, anywhere in the world. Not even when he helped run the world’s largest contemporary art fair in Europe. Reutimann comes from Switzerland, where he majored in economics before attending a culinary institute, working in hotels and launching his own modern light-fixture design company. He never studied art and began his career as a sculptor relatively late in the game, around his mid-40s, old enough to no longer be alluring to bigname galleries who want to invest in young, lifelong artists, Reutimann says. But galleries have never been his thing, anyway. He says he’s more interested in landing spots in busy, public spaces, like high-end hotels and cruise ships and public parks. He says he’s not interested in hiding his art inside quiet museums, but instead making a statement where it can reach many more people. Indeed, this self-taught artist has carved out his own pathway to success. And perhaps it’s thanks to that nontraditional route that he discovered his sculpture style. Even a casual passerby can identify a Reutimann, once you’ve seen one. In Boulder, it’s “Aphros,” at the Dairy Arts Center. This nearly 7-foot-tall, shiny, fuchsia sculpture was inspired by the famous, 2,100-year-old Greek “Venus de Milo” sculpture of Aphrodite at the Louvre in Paris. Only Reutimann uses fiberglass and automotive paint to make a point.

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“With this series of figurative-abstract sculptures I am showing that there is no fixed physical reality, nor single perception of the world,” he explains. “I am challenging the viewer by presenting dialogues of perception versus reality.” As you walk around the sculpture, the different viewpoints transform the piece. “There is no single truth,” Reutimann says. “There is only perception. These works of art meant to be mediators of the inexpressible truth.” This is one of the rare Reutimann sculptures you can see in Colorado; others live in private residences of art collectors. If you venture to Denver, you can see pieces at the Jacquard Hotel in Cherry Creek and the Arvada Center for the Arts. Most of Reutimann’s work is bought and sent overseas or to big cities (New York, Los Angeles, Miami). Many institutions don’t have space for his work, he says. Working in large sculpture has its share of challenges in logistics and engineering. Some sculptures need internal reinforcement. An average eight-foot sculpture weighs about 500 pounds, plus another 300 for the base. When shipping a sculpture, whether for sale or for an event, the final package can weigh upwards of 1,000 pounds, which must be shipped via plane. (Reutimann has had several sculptures “lost” on a ship, so that’s no longer an option.) But the size has its advantages, too. He says large work is more likely to be chosen for a public collection and display, and they’re durable — not a liability for hotels if, say, a child climbs on top. (He’s seen that happen.)


ROGER REUTIMANN WELDING A SCULPTURE. COURTESY PHOTO

Reutimann moved to Boulder about 13 years ago. He says the mountains reminded him of Switzerland, he liked the cultured and educated environment without having to live in a big city, he appreciated the four seasons and Boulder was conveniently close to Loveland, the center of sculpture in the United States — and where he gets his sculptures cast at a foundry. All of his work is cast. “It’s not an easy process and is probably one of the oldest ways of fabricating that’s still preserved,” Reutimann says. “It hasn’t really changed much since the Roman or the Greek era.” But he adds a modern twist. Reutimann blends these ancient methods with modern forms and materials. He finishes his work with high-gloss automotive paint. He does it all himself (usually with an assistant or two) in his east Boulder studio, except for the actual casting of the metal. This is rare. Most artists sculpt something and bring that to the foundry; the foundry makes the mold, wax, welds it, does the patina, welds it to the base and the artist gets the finished sculpture back, he says. “I find it important to be able to do all that yourself,” Reutimann says. “The process of doing it gets you to new ideas.” He even learned how to apply automotive paint himself, finished with a clear coat on top. In addition to looking different than typical patinafinished sculptures, the paint job lasts as long as a car and contains a UV filter, which keeps the color vibrant for longer. “Colors in nature are such a big contrast. If you have a garden or park setting and you have patina, they blend into the landscape, which in

some cases might be desired,” he says. “But I want my work to stand out. I want that contrast to nature. That’s what makes it so interesting. It’s kind of not supposed to be there. It throws you off a little bit.” Plus, he says, why should painters be the only artists who get to experiment with color? He also uses a mirror polish stainless steel and a textured white matte finish. Reutimann’s sculpting began with the human form but quickly took on an abstract quality when he learned how unwelcome nudity in public art was in the United States. Today, much of his work still suggests the human form, but with a focus on simple geometric lines; “the purity of shapes,” he calls it. Another unique quality of Reutimann’s sculptures is their bases. Most recently, instead of traditional stone bases, he has begun making white concrete bases out of a fabric mold. The fabric imprints an organic texture into the concrete. He says he has always been drawn to abstraction. While he considers himself a figurative artist, he says he’s not a realist. He thinks when you copy something that already exists, the artist becomes just a craftsman. “With abstract, you have much more artistic freedom and can develop your own style,” he says. In that, he says he’s grateful he never went to art school. Ideas can corrupt you, he says. “You can’t learn to be an artist. Either you are or you are not.” See more at rogerreutimann.com.

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A Boulder Oasis: The Greenbriar Inn BY A IM EE H E CKE L

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he very thing that makes this restaurant so special is why you may not know about it. For longtime residents, the Greenbriar Inn is far from a secret. It’s been a locally-run Boulder County staple for 53 years — even before Prohibition ended in Boulder. In fact, the founders originally transformed the historic building into a restaurant in order to serve alcohol to Boulderites; just outside of city limits, it was legal here. But its remote location, at 8735 N. Foothills Highway, also makes the Greenbriar a bit of a hidden gem. It’s outside of Boulder on U.S. 36 headed north, perched at the base of Lefthand Canyon. This elegant Boulder County restaurant is set on nearly 20 acres of foothills land — spaciousness that’s hard to fathom in today’s Boulder. It’s the Greenbriar’s historic roots that connected it with so much land, ground that now includes dining patios, a bright sunroom, a historic cabin, ancient artifacts, a trout pond, waterfall, wedding site, hundreds of trees and the restaurant’s very own on-site herb and produce garden. There’s truly no restaurant in Boulder County like this. On a regular summer day, you might see a chef walk out to the garden to snip a fresh herb that will go straight onto your plate. “That is as fresh as you can get,” says owner Phil Goddard. “It’s not like a package shipped to you, even from down the street. The chefs are out there with scissors, picking fresh chives and tarragon, beets and flowers.” The restaurant changes its menus up to eight times a year to accommodate what its 7,000-square foot garden is giving. On average, the garden yields 80 to 90 varieties of veggies and herbs. And they’re all natural. No pesticides. The compost is made from kitchen scraps and the neighbor’s grass-fed cow manure. The irrigation is all sourced from the restaurant’s trout pond, which is filled with naturally occurring snails, crayfish, minnows and trout. The

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nutrients from the water help the plants grow, as well as keep the bugs away. Goddard calls it a “closed loop.” The Greenbriar has done farm-to-table long before it was a trend. This is the garden’s 25th year. It’s also Goddard’s 25th year as owner. His story is the quintessential American dream. Goddard, now age 62, started at the Greenbriar as a line cook in 1981 and worked his way up to chef de cuisine. Goddard says despite the expectation that he would become a doctor, like the rest of his family, food was always his passion. One of his first memories was baking bread with his mother when he was 4. He began working in restaurants at age 12. In 1989, he nearly bought the Greenbriar, but the deal fell through. He left the restaurant to work as a chef at a country club, but ended up back at the Greenbriar years later in 1995 — this time as a real estate agent showing the property to a potential buyer. They didn’t want to take on such a big operation. But Goddard still did. This time, in partnership with his childhood best friend, he bought the restaurant. Over the years, they completed $3.4 million in renovations. They added a sunroom and more windows; they remodeled the bar and extended the patios. They planted more than 400 trees and added the 50,000-gallon pond system and the herb and produce garden. Then, in 2013, Boulder suffered a massive flood, costing the restaurant $75,000 in lost revenue and wiping out gas service. Staff pulled together and continued operating on rented equipment. Then, the restaurant’s bar caught on fire — on the evening of the University of Colorado’s winter graduation celebrations. “It was a wild experience, one of the scariest experiences in my life. I thought my dream was going up in smoke,” Goddard says.


PHOTO BY EMMA GODDARD

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REFUEL OWNER PHIL GODDARD. PHOTO BY EMMA GODDARD

GREENBRIAR INN. PHOTO BY EMMA GODDARD

The History

PHOTO BY ALIVE STUDIOS

But it was also eye-opening. He says the challenges showed him how incredible his crew was and much they cared about the restaurant. And likewise, how much he cared about them. “The flood followed by the fire was a stimulus to make changes,” Goddard says. He ended up buying out his best friend’s share of the restaurant, leaving him to own it entirely. Today, Goddard runs the Greenbriar with his wife, Emma. They met at the restaurant, when she was the bookkeeper. Goddard can name at least 20 couples whose relationships started at the Greenbriar. “There’s a good energy here,” he says.

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This land at the base of the canyon originally served as an outpost of Fort Valmont, according to Goddard’s research. In fact, you used to be able to visit a cellar built into the side of the hill, a well and a flat spot dating back to the 1800s. These historical sites were all wiped away in the 2013 flood. Archeological digs of the area date even further back, to Chief Niwot, a leader of the Southern Arapaho people in the 1800s. A cabin on the property was used for miners at the turn of the century, but it has since been refurbished and the Greenbriar’s groundskeeper currently lives there. He has for 10 years. The main building itself (the stone structure) was built in 1873 and used to provide support for the then-mining town of Altona. In the ’30s and ’40s, it transformed into a gas station (you can see photos in the restaurant’s lobby). This continued until a big fire in the early ’60s. (Yes, a different fire.) The gas station’s owners’ children still occasionally dine at the restaurant and share their memories. Then, in 1966, the founders (Rudy Zwicker and Rudy Beaumel, known as “Big Rudy” and “Little Rudy”) decided to turn it into a restaurant. In the dining room, you can see a window made out of recycled glass bottoms (miraculously spared in the bar fire). Chefs are always excited by the oversized, rotating, four-rack oven in the upstairs kitchen (the restaurant has two full kitchens), leftover from when the restaurant was also a bakery in the early ’70s. Instead of making bread, today, this unique oven slow-roasts turkey, prime rib and leg of lamb. Even with this old oven and even with its long history, the Greenbriar continues to innovate, Goddard says. It was founded as food-centric and remains true to that. Some people may think because the Greenbriar was their grandmother’s favorite restaurant that the food is old-fashioned, but in truth, the age of the restaurant is just a testament that the business could withstand the (sometimes big) tests of time, come flood or fire or, most recently, health pandemic, Goddard says. After all, he says, food is his passion, so he still gets involved in the menus and stays at the forefront of foodie trends. “This has been a lifelong dream of mine,” Goddard says. “And it has been an awesome life.”


GREENBRIAR INN. PHOTOS BY EMMA GODDARD

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HETHER YOU’RE INDECISIVE, OPEN FOR ADVENTURE OR TOO HUNGRY TO THINK, SOMETIMES THE BEST WAY TO ORDER AT A RESTAURANT IS, “I’LL HAVE WHAT SHE’S HAVING.” THE MOST POPULAR DISH AT A RESTAURANT HAS LIKELY EARNED THAT HONOR FOR A REASON. OFTEN, IT’S A RESTAURANT’S SIGNATURE ITEM. THIS IS ONE TIME WHEN FOLLOWING THE CROWD IS UNLIKELY TO LEAD YOU ASTRAY. HERE’S AN INSIDE PEEK INTO WHAT MOST PEOPLE ARE ORDERING AT SOME OF BOULDER COUNTY’S RESTAURANTS — THE CROWD FAVORITES. BEC AUSE OF THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC, YOU MAY NOT BE ABLE TO DINE AT THESE RESTAURANTS (AT LEAST NOT YET), BUT MANY ARE OFFERING DELIVERY AND TOGO OPTIONS, SO BE SURE TO C ALL AHEAD AND ASK.

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Brickstones Kitchen and Bar The Colorado Bison Burger

a carpaccio in addition to the loin). The preparation changes depending on the season, produce availability and the chef’s inspirations. Recently, it was on the menu as Cervena venison loin with Colorado quinoa, cranberry, cinnamon and parsnip cream.

Oak at Fourteenth Peanut Butter Cup

2601 Canyon Blvd., Suite A Brickstones, located inside the Embassy Suites by Hilton, is known for its signature 100 percent Colorado bison burger. This homegrown meat is served on a brioche bun and layered with balsamic red onions, roasted garlic aioli, shredded kale-frisée-radicchio slaw and finally topped with local Haystack Mountain goat cheese. Don’t eat meat? The most-ordered vegan or vegetarian dish is seared cauliflower steak.

Flagstaff House Venison

1400 Pearl St. Dessert is king here. Everyone seems to want to try the Oak Peanut Butter Cup after dinner. This drool-worthy dish features warm white chocolate and peanut butter mousse with toasted peanuts, Valhrona dark chocolate brownies, chocolate fudge and chocolate ice cream. “We added this dish to our dessert menu about four months ago, but it has turned into a house staple, kind of like our kale salad,” says executive chef and partner Steven Redizkowski. “Guests go crazy for it and are constantly asking us for the recipe. It’s been a big hit.”

“Although it is just a bread service, it really encompasses what’s special about the restaurant,” says executive chef and partner Amos Watts. Corrida bought an entire eight-year-old steer from Wyoming, which itself is rare; older cattle are the definition of “anti-commodity” beef because they still have a purpose and that use is sustainable, Corrida says. While breaking down the grass-fed steer, staff found more fat than that of a processed piece of meat. They decided to render it (highly labor-intensive), then added a bit of confit onion for depth of flavor. They poured it into a mold, added a wick and froze it. To order, the candle is put on a plate with flaky salt and herbs and the wick is lit. It goes out to the table with fresh bread and looks like a birthday surprise. Wait for it to melt some, and then use it like butter. After about 10 minutes, it melts completely. “As a substitution for butter or oil, it is a decadent choice,” says Watts. “It is simple, profound, delicious, interactive and truly tells the story of a sustainable future for beef. Whether you call it slow food, or nose to tail, whole-animal butchery, or farm-to-table, this is the real deal.

Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar Emersum Oysters and Calamari

Corrida Vela de Sebo Tallow Candle Bread Service 928 Pearl St. 1138 Flagstaff Road The venison is a star at Boulder’s upscale Flagstaff House. This most popular and iconic dish is quintessentially Colorado. Chef Chris Royster — an accomplished and experienced hunter — says he thinks venison is one of the best wild meats to prepare and serve. Regular customers have come to expect it, new guests are intrigued and the menu doesn’t disappoint. The restaurant serves venison in many forms (tri-tip, loin, tartare — even as a terrine and

1023 Walnut St., unit 400 This unique bread service, with seasoned grass-fed beef fat and herbs, has hit many tables at Corrida since it was introduced early fall.

Jax is known for its oysters. In fact, this restaurant actually partnered with Virginia’s Rappahannock River Oyster Co. to develop its own proprietary oyster, served only at Jax Fish House. The oyster, the Emersum, has a mild salinity and nice creaminess, making it a good choice for oyster beginners and connoisseurs alike. Plus, it’s sustainable. Another popular option and menu staple (since 1994) is the calamari. Calamari and cuttlefish are coated in breadcrumbs and fried until crispy, then served with mango-chile mojo sauce and lime aioli.

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REFUEL

Organic Sandwich Company Turkey and Bacon Jam Sandwich

drink is the Gandhara Forever, a blend of Indian rum, aquavit, mango kefir and lemongrass. The cocktail has a super silky texture, is not too sweet and is comfortably exotic. Another hot menu item is Tropic Like It’s Hot: Oaxacan rum, mezcal, cactus fruit, ancho chili and sour orange. This one’s smoky and earthy with savory and dried fruit aspects.

Zolo Southwestern Grill Chicken Enchiladas

Centro Mexican Kitchen The Quesadilla 2525 Arapahoe Ave. The chicken enchiladas have been a Zolo menu staple since it opened in 1994, and they have remained a crowd favorite all these years. Served alongside smoked queso, achiote rice, pinto beans, crema and your choice of red, green or Christmas chile, they’re a Boulder classic. Pro tip: Add the fried egg.

1500 Pearl St., Suite F The house-made bacon jam is a Boulder fave at this Pearl Street restaurant. (You’ll know when they’re making the jam because it smells incredible.) It takes a lot of time and effort to make the bacon jam. Chefs add bacon, onions, garlic, red pepper flakes, apple cider vinegar, coconut sugar and brewed coffee (to balance everything out) and cook slowly until it reaches a spreadable consistency. Try it on the pretzel bread with turkey, with romaine, tomato and avocado aioli. It’s such a staple that the bacon jam even has its own T-shirt for its fan club.

Jungle Gandhara Forever

950 Pearl St. Yes, the simple quesadilla is where it’s at at Centro. Only this isn’t your typical gringo quesadilla. Centro’s is rustic and grilled until lightly charred. It’s then stuffed with vegetables and three melty cheeses (oaxaca, asadero and cheddar) and served with fresh pico de gallo, guacamole and crema. Add grilled chicken, garlic shrimp, carnitas or grilled skirt steak if you want more protein.

2027 13th St.

Jungle, in downtown Boulder, is a Caribbean tiki bar. Not sure what exotic drink to try in this landlocked mountain town? The most popular

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Tableside Caesar Salad

The Post Brewing Co Fried Chicken and Howdy Beer

2018 10th St.

Steakhouse No. 316:

Featured on “Diners, Drive-Ins, & Dives,” The Post’s award-winning fried chicken is the most beloved menu item. This dish starts with humanely raised chickens, which are brined for hours, dipped in milk, seasoned with glutenfree flour and then fried. The local way to round it out: paired with a Howdy Western Pilsner.

1922 13th St. Of course, steak is the spotlight at this boutique steakhouse. But don’t overlook the unique experience of ordering a tableside caesar salad. Servers have mastered this traditional art; it’s entertaining to watch, made right before your eyes. Servers macerate fresh ingredients with two forks in an 18-inch, hand-carved, cherry wood bowl. The real art lies in the emulsification of oil into the mixture with precision, making a creamy and nuanced dressing. Tossed with romaine lettuce and croutons, the salad is plated and finished with white anchovies and fresh-cracked black pepper.


West End Tavern Smoked Ribs

926 Pearl St. West End’s ribs are cooked twice a day, every day, to ensure that guests get them fresh out of the hickory smoker. They’re St. Louis cut and served with West End’s KC-style barbecue sauce. A half rack of ribs comes with a cornbread muffin, kale-cabbage slaw and house-made pickles. Pair them with bourbon from the tavern’s massive collection.

The Rio Grande Restaurant: Grilled Fajitas

1101 Walnut St. The Rio’s grilled fajitas are always the top-seller. Enjoy the mountain of veggies (portabella and squash) or add meat: steak, chicken or shrimp, or try it “Diabla style” with a chile de árbol sauce. Fajitas are served with rice, black beans, grilled veggies, guacamole, sour cream, pico de gallo and flour tortillas. Love them so much you want to take them home with you? The Rio has released the recipe (see right above).

Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant’s Fajitas Recipe This makes two portions of fajitas and plenty of marinade. One pound of skirt steak will feed two people, so just scale up the meat if you want more servings. Marinade recipe: Makes 6 cups.

Ingredients 1.5 cups pineapple juice 1 cup soy sauce 1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 2 ¾ tablespoons brown sugar 9 fluid ounces orange juice 1 ¾ ounces lime juice 1 ¾ cups water 1 ¾ tablespoon kosher salt 1 pound of skirt steak Mix all ingredients. Set aside a portion of marinade to drizzle on top of your meat after cooking. Marinate the meat in four ounces of the marinade. (For every pound of meat, use four ounces of marinade.) Remove meat from marinade and grill on a hot grill until medium/medium-rare or your preference. The residual heat will continue to cook it as it rests. Remove from grill and let rest for 10 minutes. Cut meat against the grain, drizzle with some reserved marinade and serve with your favorite accompaniments like a “build your own fajita taco.” Serve with grilled vegetables, such as sweet yellow onions, red and green peppers and roma tomatoes. At the restaurant, they also serve fajitas with warmed homemade tortillas, black beans, Spanish rice, pico de gallo and guacamole.

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REFUEL

Meet the Farmers HAVE A SLICE OF BOULDER’S FARM-FRESH FOOD

BY AIMEE HECKEL

KILT FARM. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: PAULIE ANDERSON, MICHAEL MOSS, CAYLA MOSS, ELIZA PETERSON, KYLE JOHNSON. COURTESY PHOTO

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Y

ou don’t have to run your own farm to eat farmfresh food in the Boulder area. Many local farms offer special community supported agriculture memberships. They’re essentially farm shares, where you pay a pre-set amount in exchange for regular baskets of produce and other locally sourced food. Think of it like a local produce box subscription. You can buy into a CSA for fruits and veggies, but also meat, eggs, flowers, milk, honey and more. Exactly what you get in a produce box often depends on the weather and harvest, but you know exactly where it came from and who grew it. Many local farms offer organic or biodynamic food. Most CSAs are open to the public, but they can be in high demand; some sell out

as soon as registration opens, typically at the beginning of the year. Others keep registration open year-round. For this, check out McCauley Family Farm, Settembre Cellars and Light Root Community Farm. Ela Family Farms opens its apple share March 1-mid-June. To join one of the Boulder-area’s CSAs, the cost ranges from about $280 for an individual share (BonaVida Growers) to $1,150 for a full share, which may feed up to five people (63rd Street Farm). Many family-sized produce shares are around $700, but the prices often depend on frequency, length and size of the share and the details of the offerings. For extra money, you may be able to add on local products, such as coffee, mushrooms, bread and more. For people on a budget, some farms offer discounts if you help work on the farm. Shares are typically given out weekly on set

dates at specific pick-up locations. Some farms beyond Boulder County’s lines offer Boulder pick-ups; for example, Monroe Organic Farm of Kersey (just past Greeley) offers pick-ups throughout Broomfield, Louisville and Boulder at slightly lower rates than many Boulder County farms, an option that may be suitable for people on a budget who don’t mind buying from beyond the Boulder bubble. And Ela Family Farms, the big local purveyor of apples (as well as cherries, peaches and plums) hails from Hotchkiss, about five hours away, outside the Palisade mountain area. Find a full spreadsheet comparing the local CSAs online at https://www.travelboulder. com/guide-to-boulder-area-csas. To get a closer look at some of Boulder County’s farms, we talked to some of their farmers. Here’s how it went down.

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BONAVIDA GROWERS. PHOTO BY AMY QUINN

travelboulder.com


REFUEL

Michael Moss at Kilt Farm 8140 Oxford Road, Longmont WHAT MAKES YOUR FARM DIFFERENT OR UNIQUE? My farm is unique in a few ways. One, I am totally organic and completely on Boulder County open space. I have taken neglected properties and turned them into highly-productive fields. With my focus on building healthy soils, we have been able to build a farm around growing the richest and most nutritious food in Boulder County.

WHY DO YOU RUN THIS FARM? My degree and first career is hotel-restaurant management. When I was living in Steamboat Springs, I realized how poor the food quality was in our Colorado mountain towns, and I decided to do something about it. I worked with farmers in Palisade and Fort Collins to bring food to mountain communities. While this was great work, it was the magic in the field that truly drew me. By 2011, I was back in Boulder, learning how to farm, and in 2013, Kilt Farm was started on one-half acre. Now I have grown to more than 35 acres with a 200-member CSA, distributing our food from Fort Collins to the Denver-metro area.

WHY ARE LOCAL FARMS IMPORTANT IN 2020? In a world where food has been commodified and shipped thousands of miles, local food gives us the chance to experience what food can taste and feel like. Boulder County has an agricultural heritage that stretches back to the first settlers in the valley. As we move into the ’20s, local food can help improve our health and the health of our land. This is truly a priceless benefit.

WHAT’S SOMETHING ABOUT YOUR FARM THAT PEOPLE MAY NOT KNOW? I started wearing kilts when I went to Burning Man in the early 2000s. Kilts, especially the working-man’s kilt I wear, make sense when you’re building a city in the desert. Farming is hard work in harsh conditions, and it was a perfect fit to wear my kilt to carry all my tools when I was the only person running a small, halfacre farm. One day, I was in Whole Foods and someone stopped me and told me they saw me farming and wanted to learn more about what I do. It was an aha moment; I realized instead of naming my new farm Michael’s Place, I could have some fun and call it Kilt Farm. It stuck. Now my wife and some of my staff have also fallen in love with working in a kilt .

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WHAT’S A TIP FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF WHAT YOU OFFER? People often tell me that our produce is the best they have ever eaten. The more energyconscious folks tell me often that it is the highest-vibrational food they have ever seen or experienced. With our customizable CSA, you can get more of the local food you like, so you can eat more veggies. In the end, the best thing you can do is eat more veggies.

WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST CHALLENGE WITH RUNNING A FARM? Farming is a business where you dance with nature. She can throw crazy weather at you, like the 2018 hail storms, and you just have to keep dancing. While unpredictable weather can be hard, it is just a part of nature. Here in Boulder County, finding people who want to do the hard work to grow our food is seeming to be harder and harder. We live in a very expensive town, and sometimes the farm economics make it tough to pay people what they need or feel they are worth. Farm work is very skilled and should be paid a living wage or even higher. This is our food, our health and our future we are talking about. As our community becomes more and more expensive, the farm economics become harder and harder, maybe even harder than the wild weather.

TIM QUINN AT BONAVIDA GROWERS. PHOTO BY AMY QUINN

WHY ARE LOCAL FARMS IMPORTANT IN 2020? We are facing mounting environmental challenges and actions such as eating local are going to help to steer us in the right direction. These choices do matter to the overall health of our planet.

WHAT’S SOMETHING ABOUT YOUR There are so many rewards from doing the hard FARM THAT PEOPLE MAY NOT KNOW? WHAT IS THE BIGGEST REWARD?

work of farming . Two of my favorites are having young kids tour the farm and leave beaming with excitement about where their food comes from. The other is knowing that the food I put into my community is making my community a better place, while at the same time making them better for it.

Tim Quinn at Bonavida Growers 10729 Airport Road, Longmont WHAT MAKES YOUR FARM DIFFERENT OR UNIQUE? My entire operation is on just an acre of ground, so every little patch of ground is used every season. There is a focus on keeping the soil healthy to keep the ground productive and disease-free.

WHY DO YOU RUN THIS FARM? I have a lot of energy and wanted to put it to use in a positive and meaningful way. Growing food for my immediate community was the path I chose.

I do all of the labor myself, save for the time that my friends pitch in to lend a hand.

WHAT’S A TIP FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF WHAT YOU OFFER? Try to focus on eating a mostly, if not an entirely, plant-based diet. You would be surprised with how many vegetables you can eat.

WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST CHALLENGE WITH RUNNING A FARM? Working alone is, well, lonely sometimes.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST REWARD? The great food.

Amanda Adare at Table Mountain Farm 8181 N. 41st St., Longmont WHAT MAKES YOUR FARM DIFFERENT OR UNIQUE? We are a small goat dairy in southwest Longmont focused on regenerative agriculture practices and human-animal husbandry.


“We love our animals and make sure we’re giving more to the land than we are taking.” –Amanda Adare, Table Mountain Farm

AMANDA ADARE AND HER DAUGHTER & A GOAT AT TABLE MOUNTAIN FARM. COURTESY PHOTO

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REFUEL

BRIAN AND AMANDA SCOTT AT 63RD STREET FARM. PHOTOS BY KIRSTEN BOYER PHOTOGRAPHY

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WHY DO YOU RUN THIS FARM?

DIFFERENT OR UNIQUE?

We are passionate to serve our family and community with quality food that is raised locally, sustainably and to eliminate so much of the waste that comes from large-scale farming and distribution.

63rd Street Farm is a CSA-only run farm. We sell all of our vegetables, meat, eggs and more to our CSA members only. On our CSA pick-up days, we invite those interested in our CSA to come by between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. and check out the farm. We offer wood-fired pizza, local wine and more for all to purchase and enjoy out on the farm.

WHY ARE LOCAL FARMS IMPORTANT IN 2020? I believe there has been a revolution with the natural food industry and individual consumers ensuring they are sourcing food locally, requiring higher standards for animal welfare and seeing the great value add of fresher tasting food.

WHAT’S SOMETHING ABOUT YOUR FARM THAT PEOPLE MAY NOT KNOW?

WHY DO YOU RUN THIS FARM? We are passionate about bringing wholesome, local food to our community while being able to steward the land and animals in a holistic manner.

WHY ARE LOCAL FARMS Not only do we provide milk and meat CSAs, IMPORTANT IN 2020?

but we also sell a delectable goat milk caramel sauce that will begin to be seen on many more store shelves in the near future.

WHAT’S A TIP FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF WHAT YOU OFFER? We encourage our CSA members to try their best to pick up their items consistently, which helps us keep our items affordable and eliminate wasted products—and to pick up items on the farm to see the animals and have a true view of the work we do.

WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST CHALLENGE WITH RUNNING A FARM? Time. It seems there is never enough time during our busy seasons, but as soon as winter comes we somehow find ways to do even more the next year.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST REWARD? Watching growth, whether it is the growth of our caramel at farmers’ markets or baby goats (kids) growing into nursing moms, watching the bare spots in our pasture grow fresh grass to feed our animals, or my daughter growing in this environment and our growth as stewards of this piece of land. Watching everything grow and appreciating the different lengths of time for each thing to grow, I’ve truly come to cherish the entire process, whether its growth over a few weeks, several months or multiple years. I continue to grow alongside it all.

Amanda Scott at 63rd Street Farm 3796 63rd St., Boulder WHAT MAKES YOUR FARM

They are important in every year. When people shop at grocery stores or Amazon, they may be missing the nutrients in their diets that local farms can provide. Since we harvest the foods you eat that day or a day or two ahead of time, you will find more nutritional value in them than from those from box stores that have to ship food in from around the world. As fruits and vegetables travel, they lose their nutritional values each day.

WHAT’S SOMETHING ABOUT YOUR FARM THAT PEOPLE MAY NOT KNOW? We are an open book, and our website tells our story pretty thoroughly. We did just receive a 37-acre parcel of land to steward from the City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain parks this past spring. With that property, we got some Scottish Highland steer, alpacas and lots of hay.

WHAT’S A TIP FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF WHAT YOU OFFER? It is important to sign up for a CSA share for the season and keep coming back year after year to really engage in how a small farm can survive. Bouncing around from farm to farm is tough on the farmers, as we depend on you as much as you depend on us to feed you.

WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST CHALLENGE WITH RUNNING A FARM? Mother Nature is our biggest challenge, as we never know what we will be getting as the seasons change. With that, it is also challenging to compete with market places such as Amazon that can deliver fruits and vegetables to people’s front door at a fraction of the cost. A small, family-run farm can get you a higher nutrient-dense food, but it costs more to do so and that is where folks tend to buy cheap,

which will eventually catch up to you in your health.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST REWARD? The biggest reward to being a CSA farmer is watching the children in our CSA community grow. They come in on their first day absolutely disgusted with vegetables, and by the end of the season, they are coming in yelling for some carrots. Then as they grow, we get to watch them make decisions for their life about the foods they consume and the education they received, coming to the farm and learning what is “good” food and what it takes to get it.

Taylor Drexler at Growing Gardens 1630 Hawthorn Ave., Boulder WHAT MAKES YOUR FARM DIFFERENT OR UNIQUE? We are both a farm and a nonprofit that is dedicated to enriching our community through sustainable urban agriculture education and food donations. We have hands-on programs for children, teens, adults, seniors and those with developmental disabilities that reconnect people with the land, their food, and each other. In addition to Growing Gardens’ education programs, we donate thousands of pounds of produce, as well as plant starts and seeds, to low-income community members each year in order to impart greater food security and hunger relief in our community. Growing Gardens CSA shares fresh produce with our community, grown organically and with regenerative agriculture principles. Our CSA is unique in that it is run in partnership with our Cultiva Youth Project, a program that employs teens ages 12 to 18 to learn leadership, agriculture and job skills throughout the growing season. Teens seed, care for and harvest fresh produce each week and prepare it for weekly CSA pickups at our Boulder farm. During these pickups, community members have the chance to meet their teen farmers and get to know other community members.

WHY DO YOU RUN THIS FARM? Our mission is to enrich the lives of our community through sustainable urban agriculture. We practice regenerative agriculture to ensure the long-term viability of our land and water resources to feed future generations. We run this farm to reconnect our community with fresh, locally grown food,

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CULTIVA. PHOTO COURTESY OF GROWING GARDENS

as well as gardening, cooking and nutrition education.

WHY ARE LOCAL FARMS IMPORTANT IN 2020? It’s now more important than ever that people of all ages understand where their food comes from and the impact that food systems have on the natural world, future food security and on the human body. People are more likely to foster a connection with their food when they see where it’s grown, how and by whom. Locally sourced food generally carries significantly more nutrients and flavor than food shipped from around the world, which is enough to get anyone, even our 7-year-old summer campers, excited about harvesting and eating fresh arugula. By purchasing locally grown food, we minimize the distance that food travels from seed to plate, which drastically reduces its carbon footprint. On average, food in the U.S. typically travels 1,500 miles from farm to plate — resulting in a massive amount of fossil fuel usage. Buying locally produced food also keeps money within local economies, benefiting various members of the community at large. Localized farming often means smaller-scale farms — which are innately different than largescale, conventional agriculture operations, in how the farm interacts with the soil, the environment and its community. Smaller-scale farms are often more likely and able to enact age-old farming principles that advocate working with the local ecology and natural systems in order to maximize the longterm viability of their soil (essentially, the long-term stability of our food systems). This typically means working with fewer pesticides

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CULTIVA. PHOTO COURTESY OF GROWING GARDENS

and fertilizers, responsibly managing water resources and using less fossil fuel energy. These practices result in healthier soil that is better able to withstand drought, wind and other natural elements; grow more nutritious crops; and maintain viability for future generations — not to mention these practices minimize our carbon footprint. Lastly, with the high cost of farm machinery, smaller-scale farms typically rely on more manpower and human labor (instead of machine labor), which employs and gives jobs to more community members.

WHAT’S SOMETHING ABOUT YOUR FARM THAT PEOPLE MAY NOT KNOW? Growing Gardens is blessed by the generosity of its landowners, the Long family, from whom we lease 11 acres of farmland. The Long family has owned the 25-acre Long Family Farm for over 100 years, making it one of Colorado’s Centennial farms. The Long Family Farm is the last remaining piece of agriculturally zoned land in the city of Boulder. In the fall of 2019, thanks to the generosity of the Long family and the overwhelming support from the local community, the city of Boulder purchased a conservation easement on the property, permanently protecting its agricultural legacy and limiting any future development on the land.

WHAT’S A TIP FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF WHAT YOU OFFER? Engage with our farm. You’ll meet your teen farmers each week during CSA pickup, as well as have the opportunity to participate in our various programs and classes related to sustainable agriculture. From children’s summer

camps and field trips to cooking, gardening and beekeeping classes, we invite you to learn how to make the most of your CSA pickup or garden harvest this year. Our community events are open and free to the public, including our May plant sales and Community Harvest Festival in October. Visit growinggardens.org to learn more and get involved.

WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST CHALLENGE WITH RUNNING A FARM? Probably farm labor. Balancing the educational and operational aspects of the Cultiva Youth Project teens’ involvement in the CSA program is deeply rewarding and challenging. As anyone might imagine, running a 2-acre farm with the help of 60-plus teenagers is not the most efficient way to go about farming, but it is incredibly meaningful and impactful to our teens. At the end of the day, for any farm, there is always more work to be done then there are hands (and financial resources) to make it happen.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST REWARD? The biggest reward is getting to see people of all walks of life able to reconnect with their food system in an urban environment. It’s amazing to work so hard throughout the growing season and see the fruit of our labor at our weekly CSA pickup — the joy and excitement of CSA members as they pick up fresh, bright purple cabbage and heads of broccoli. And the teens’ pride in presenting the food they grew to their community.

SEE MORE ON CSA OPTIONS WWW.TRAVELBOULDER.COM/ GUIDE-TO-BOULDER-AREA-CSAS


ADVERTISER INDEX

24 Carrot Bistro

John Allen Woodward

(See Our Ad On Page 40)

(See Our Ad On Pages 38-39)

Hotel Boulderado

Max Clothing

(See Our Ad On Page 6)

(See Our Ad On Page 9)

A-Lodge Boulder

Meghan Bach Residential Realtor

(See Our Ad On Page 23)

Art + Soul Gallery (See Our Ad On Page 8)

Barbara & Company (See Our Ad On Page 21)

BOCO Life

(See Our Ad On Page 13)

Burgess Group Realty (See Our Ad On Page 7)

The Dairy Arts Center (See Our Ad On Page 40 )

Fanas Architecture (See Our Ad On Page 5)

The Greenbriar Inn (See Our Ad On Page 27)

Hazels Beverage World (See Our Ad On Page 3)

LIST

(See Our Ad On Back Cover)

Native Roots Cannabis Company

YO U R

(See Our Ad On Inside Front Cover)

Neptune Mountaineering (See Our Ad On Inside Back Cover)

Organic Sandwich Company (See Our Ad On Page 27)

Poster Scene

P L AC E

(See Our Ad On Page 17)

PrAna (See Our Ad On Page 4)

Three Leaf Concepts (See Our Ad On Page 23)

Travel Boulder (See Our Ad On Page 73)

J. Albrecht Design

LIST YOUR PLACE FOR FREE IN TRAVEL BOULDER’S BUSINESS DIRECTORY

(See Our Ad On Page 11)

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LAINA ALBRECHT CLEANS AND POLISHES A RING FOR A CLIENT.


EXPERIENCE BOULDER

AN OUTSIDE IMAGERY TOUR NEAR SHADOW CANYON ON THE HOMESTEAD TRAIL. PHOTOS BY OUTSIDEIMAGERY.COM

VIEWS FROM THE FLAGSTAFF HOUSE. COURTESY PHOTO

MAKE THE MOST OF SUMMER IN BOULDER Bars and restaurants may be closed to on-premise dining because of the coronavirus pandemic, but many local businesses are offering to-go and delivery options, including cocktails. Tour operators may be limiting reservations to smaller groups or may require you to wear a mask and practice social distancing. It’s best to call ahead to get a status update. Plus, you’ll want to bookmark this list for later so that you can support Boulder small businesses when they need it most.

BOULDER’S BEST PATIOS

It’s summer in Boulder, and it just doesn’t feel right to be indoors. When it’s time to cool off with a drink or meet up for a meal, there are plenty of great options to do either — without having to go inside. To help you find a spot this summer, here are some of Boulder’s best patios. Centro Mexican Kitchen, 950 Pearl St.: The patio at Centro combines so many of the elements you need for a great summer afternoon. It’s right on Pearl Street, the food is tasty, the cocktails are refreshing and most importantly, there’s shade. Sanitas Brewing Co., 3550 Frontier Ave.: From bar seating to sail shades and a bocce court, there’s plenty of space in a way that just isn’t possible downtown. The Bitter Bar, 835 Walnut St.: There aren’t many bars in Boulder with a patio area this large. That gives Bitter Bar the edge in this discussion because no one wants to squeeze past a dozen people to get to a stool somewhere; they want to stretch out at a table and relax with a drink. Bitter Bar fills both those needs to a T. Add to it weekly live music and a hip vibe.

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WANT MORE? Read the full list of Boulder’s best patios online at travelboulder.com/ how-to-stay-outdoors-boulders-best-patios.

HAPPY HOURS WITH A VIEW

If you like your happy hours served with a great view, here’s where you want to tip back a glass this summer in Boulder. Flagstaff House Restaurant, 1138 Flagstaff Road: The Flagstaff House’s popular summer “happy hour” equivalent is called Tastes on the Terrace. All summer long, guests can enjoy bites and drinks from a special menu offered exclusively on the terrace patios. The Flagstaff House has been awarded many times over for its views, overlooking Boulder and beyond. Greenbriar Inn, 8735 N. Foothills Highway: The sweeping mountain views and open space add to the ambiance. The Greenbriar is a stunning restaurant set inside a historic house, built at the base of the foothills and the canyon. Start your afternoon with a walk through the 20 acres, past multiple ponds, trees, gardens and flowers. You might even see some wildlife. Corrida, 1023 Walnut St., Unit 400: Corrida is only located on the top floor with direct views of the Flatirons and an oversized rooftop area that provides nearly 360-degree views above downtown Boulder. The outside is spacious — about 3,100 square feet. WANT MORE? Find our full list of the best views at travelboulder.com/ happy-hours-with-a-view.

GUIDED OUTDOOR TOURS IN BOULDER

Imagine if there was a way to explore Boulder’s wilderness — from the highest peaks

to the waters, from bikes to belays — like a pro, even if you’re a total newbie. A way to significantly reduce risks, automatically know the best places to visit in Boulder, instantly get all the gear and details sorted out and magically impart a ton of knowledge into your brain with the snap of a finger. That’s what an outdoor tour is for. While you can absolutely explore all the popular attractions in Boulder on your own, there are also a ton of reputable tour guides in town to organize outdoor excursions. Here are some of our favorite tour guides and just a sampling of some of the adventures they offer. Front Range Anglers: This Boulder-based tour company specializes in guided fly-fishing trips in Boulder, along the Front Range and in Rocky Mountain National Park. Beyond Boulder Adventures: These tours feature relaxing, scenic bike tours all year. Pedal off the beaten path, to tasting rooms and through nature in a non-competitive, low-stress environment. Boulder Climbing Guides: This company brings you climbing, whether it’s an easy scamper up the Flatirons or extreme endeavors in Eldorado Canyon. Outside Imagery Photo Tours: This Boulderbased tour company offers half- and full-day photo tours run by John Kieffer, long-time photographer and author on the topic. WANT MORE? Head to travelboulder.com/ guided-tours-in-boulder-2 to read the full story, with many more tour companies and details about their offerings.


CLIMB SKI

NEPTUNE IS Boulder’s locally owned outdoor store

CAMP HIKE

Neptune has been gearing people up for their outdoor adventures since 1973 with an outstanding selection of the best outdoor gear and friendly, knowledgeable advice. Just visiting Boulder? We also rent the gear you need to explore our amazing area. Come visit our huge store in south Boulder and plan to spend a little time touring Gary Neptune’s renown climbing and ski museum.

A LEGEND AMONG MOUNTAIN SHOPS NeptuneMountaineering.com | 303-499-8866

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Let’s Find Your Boulder! MEGHAN BACH Realtor | Boulder Home Team 619.955.2788 MeghanBach.com Meghan Bach is a Broker Associate affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate Broker in Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity Laws.

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Profile for Travel Boulder

Travel Boulder Magazine Summer 2020  

Travel Boulder Magazine Summer 2020  

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