Close the GAP: Final Plan and Appendix - Council Draft

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C L O S E T H E G A P / City of Asheville, NC Greenway Plan ADA Transition Plan Pedestrian Plan

September 2022


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D E D I C AT I O N The GAP plans would not have happened without the commitment of these two women who dedicated their careers to improving the quality of life for the most vulnerable users of our transportation system and all the rest of us who live in Asheville.

Barb Mee Barb was the beloved bike and pedestrian planner for the City of Asheville since 2005. Kind and caring, Barb was a great listener and thoughtful communicator. She is famous for her ability to explain complex transportation issues with humorous analogies that any person could understand. Barb shepherded the many departments in the organization of the City of Asheville towards their best management practices for accessibility. Barb valued people’s opinions and was passionate about public engagement. Despite Barb’s gentle approach, she was a tireless and tenacious advocate for biking, walking, and accessibility.

Janet Barlow Janet was the founder and President of the research and consulting firm, Accessible Design for the Blind. We were fortunate to have someone considered a national expert on best accessibility practices for people with low vision and the blind living with us here in Asheville. Her work enlightened so many professionals and advocates on the importance of accessible urban design. As a local advocate, Janet dedicated countless volunteer hours to the City of Asheville to improve our bicycle, pedestrian, and greenway facilities. Additionally, Janet was a key player in the efforts to acquire the lands that make up what is now the Hominy Creek Greenway and continued to steward the trail with her neighborhood community. Without Janet, Hominy Creek Greenway may not exist today. Both women leave a lasting legacy in their professional fields, and we will be forever grateful for their contributions to Asheville. They will be missed. By Claudia Nix, Terri March, and Lucy Crown


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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S 1 THE VISION ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������1

Targeted Work Sessions ����������������������������������������������������������������������47

Introduction ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������3

City Task Force & Commission Presentations �������������47

Close the GAP �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������3

Community Surveys ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������47

Vision ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 3

Broad Community Feedback Survey ������������������������������������������47

The Results ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 4

Intercept Surveys ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 51

Greenway Plan (G) ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 6

Project Network Survey �����������������������������������������������������������������������52

ADA Transition Plan (A) �������������������������������������������������������������������������7 Pedestrian Plan (P) ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������7 Connecting to the Vision ���������������������������������������������������������������������� 9 Equity Statement �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 10

Policy Framework at a Glance ��������������������������������������������������������12 Vision �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������12 Goals ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������12 Recommended Actions �������������������������������������������������������������������������13

2 WHERE WE ARE TODAY �������������������������������������������� 17 Community Overview ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� 19 Demographics �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 19 Jobs and Housing ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������24

Network Overview ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������24

Final Community Opinion Survey �������������������������������������������������52

Public Meetings ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 54 Photo & Video Campaign ����������������������������������������������������������������� 54 Additional Engagement Strategies ����������������������������������������� 54

4 HOW WE GOT HERE ����������������������������������������������������� 55 The Birth of a Project �����������������������������������������������������������������������������57 Corridor Approach ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 58 Destination + Equity Score �������������������������������������������������������������� 58 Connectivity Score ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������62 Safety Score ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 64 Results ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 66

Project Categories Plan Identification �������������������������������� 68 Assign to a Primary Plan ������������������������������������������������������������������� 68

Transportation Network �����������������������������������������������������������������������26

How it All Comes Together �������������������������������������������������������������� 68

Greenway Network ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������26

Network Confirmation ������������������������������������������������������������������������ 68

Pedestrian Network ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������28

Project Development & Recommendations ����������������������� 69

Other Network Considerations ������������������������������������������������������ 30

What you need to know about roadway maintenance and funding requirements ����������������������������������������������������������������� 72

Current Walking Rates ���������������������������������������������������������������������������35 Strava ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������35

5 GREENWAY (G) PLAN AND RESULTS �������75

U.S. Census ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������35

Overview �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 77

Short-Duration Pedestrian Counts ����������������������������������������������36

Step 1: Refine Previously Planned Greenway Alignments �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 77

Long-Duration Pedestrian Counts ���������������������������������������������� 38 Relevant Local, Regional and State Plans ����������������������������� 38

Reviewing the 2013 Greenway Master Plan For Feasibility ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 77

3 THE COMMUNITY VOICE ��������������������������������������� 41

Step 2: Identify New Greenway Corridors �������������������������78

A Note About COVID-19 ����������������������������������������������������������������������43

Step 3: Define and Assign New Typologies (Types) ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 80

Core Engagement Strategy ��������������������������������������������������������������43 Think Tank Team (TTT) �������������������������������������������������������������������������45

Network Recommendations and Prioritization ����������� 88

Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) ������������������������������������������45

Network Recommendations ������������������������������������������������������������ 88

ADA Focus Group �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������45

More on Project Development Next Steps: ������������������������ 88

Asheville Unpaved Alliance ���������������������������������������������������������������45


Next Steps to the Neighborhood Greenway Program ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 96

6 THE ADA TRANSITION PLAN (A) SUMMARY �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������129

Develop a Neighborhood Greenway Plan and Signage Guide �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 96

What is the ADA Transition Plan For the Public Rights-of-Way? ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������131

Neighborhood Greenway Pilot Recommendations � 96 Step 4: The Prioritization Process and Results ��������100 Factors Determining Project Priorities ����������������������������������100 Public Input Summary �����������������������������������������������������������������������100

Top 10 Priority Greenway Projects for the City of Asheville ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������102 1 / Swannanoa Greenway (Greenway Spine) ����������������������102 2 / Beaucatcher Greenway (Arterial Greenway) ���������������102 3 / Reed Creek Greenway (Arterial Greenway) �����������������102 4 / French Broad River Greenway North (NRADTIP) (Greenway Spine) �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������102 5 / Hominy Creek Greenway East (Greenway Spine) �� 103 6 / West Asheville Rail-with-Trail Greenway and Deaverview Connector (Greenway Spine) ��������������������������� 103 7 / Hendersonville Road Multi-use Path and Jake Rusher Greenway (Arterial Greenways) �������������������������������� 103

The ADA Self-Evaluation �������������������������������������������������������������������133 Review of Policies and Practices ������������������������������������������������133 Review Infrastructure Needs ���������������������������������������������������������133 Methodology and Approach ����������������������������������������������������������134 The Corridor Approach ���������������������������������������������������������������������134

More about the ADA ����������������������������������������������������������������������������136 The ADA and its Relationship to Other Laws ���������������136 What are the Proposed Public Right-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG)? ���������������������������������������136

ADA Transition Plan Project Development Process ��������������������������������������������������������������������������137 Step 1: Corridor Prioritization - Round 1 �������������������������������� 137 Step 2: Corridor Prioritization - Round 2 (Public Feedback) ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 137 Step 3: Final Project Lists by Category ���������������������������������� 137

8 / Rhododendron Creek Greenway (Arterial Greenway) ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 103

Step 4. Project Development & Recommendations ����138

9 / South Asheville Rail-with-Trail/Sweeten Creek Road Greenway (Spine and Arterial Greenways) ������������������������� 103

Detailed Assessments During Corridor Implementation ����������������������������������������������������������������142

Step 5. Public Input Round 3 ��������������������������������������������������������138

10 / Smith Mill Creek Greenway (Arterial Greenway) ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 103

NCDOT Greenway (Multi-use Paths) Projects Prioritization ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 105

7 THE PEDESTRIAN PLAN (P) RESULTS �� 151

NCDOT Projects and Corridor Studies that Include Greenway Elements ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� 105

Step 1: Corridor Prioritization - Round 1 ��������������������������������153

Swannanoa River Greenway ��������������������������������������������������������� 108 Beaucatcher Greenway ����������������������������������������������������������������������� 110

Project Identification �������������������������������������������������������������������������153 Step 2: Corridor Prioritization - Round 2 (Public Feedback) ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153 Step 3: Final Project Lists by Category ����������������������������������154

Reed Creek Greenway ��������������������������������������������������������������������������112

Step 4: Project Development & Recommendations ����154

French Broad Greenway (North RADTIP) ������������������������� 114

Step 5: Public Input Round 3 ��������������������������������������������������������155

Hominy Creek Greenway ������������������������������������������������������������������� 116

More on Pedestrian Facility Selection ������������������������������� 164

West Asheville Rail-with-Trail & Deaverview Connector �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 118

Competing Needs and Complete Streets Resources � 164

West Asheville Rail-with-Trail & Deaverview Connector ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������120

Roadway Crossing Treatment Selection ��������������������������� 168

Resources for Complete Streets �������������������������������������������������165

Rhododendron Creek Greenway �����������������������������������������������122

Guides for Improvement Pedestrian Safety at Uncontrolled Crossing Locations ���������������������������������������������� 168

South Asheville Rail-with-Trail & Sweeten Creek Road ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������124

Project Elements for People Walking ����������������������������������� 172

Smith Mill Creek Greenway ������������������������������������������������������������126

Traffic Calming ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 172 Decorative Crosswalks ����������������������������������������������������������������������� 172 Access to Transit ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 173


Accessibility for All ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 173

8 PROJECT DEVELOPMENT & NEXT STEPS ������������������������������������������������������������������������ 177 Beyond Preliminary Planning �������������������������������������������������������179 Fine Tuning the Process �������������������������������������������������������������������181 What to Expect �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������183 Project Development When NCDOT or Federal Funds are Involved ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 184

9 DESIGN & POLICY ��������������������������������������������������������187 Introduction ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������189 Design Standards & Policy Review Tasks ������������������������189 Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) Findings and Recommendations ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 190 Asheville Standards Specifications and Details Manual (ASSDM) Findings and Recommendations ������������������������ 190 Targeted Focus Group Meeting Findings and Recommendations �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 191 Special Focus Areas ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 191 Questions for Each Category �������������������������������������������������������� 191 Categories ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 191 External Policy and NCDOT Coordination Findings ������195 Other Resources and Design Standards �������������������������������197

10 TAKE ACTION ������������������������������������������������������������������ 199 Organizational & Partner Framework �����������������������������������201 Asheville City Council �������������������������������������������������������������������������201 City Staff �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������201 French Broad River MPO ������������������������������������������������������������������201 Buncombe County & Neighboring Jurisdictions �������������201 NCDOT Division 13 �������������������������������������������������������������������������������202 NCDOT Integrated Mobility Division ���������������������������������������202 Developers �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������202 Non-Profit Partners �����������������������������������������������������������������������������202 Community Members �������������������������������������������������������������������������202

The Action Plan �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������202

APPENDICES ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 223


I N D E X O F F IG U R E S , I M AG E S , M A P S & TA B L E S FIGURES Figure 1.  Not All People Can (or Want to) Drive. ������������� 10 Figure 2.  Asheville Population by Gender and Age. �����21 Figure 3.  Types of Disabilities in the City of Asheville. �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������22 Figure 4.  Combining Housing and Vehicle Cost, We Begin to Understand the True Cost of Living in Asheville. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������23 Figure 5.  Analysis of Where People are Starting Their Work Commute Trips. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������24 Figure 6.  The Lifecycle of a Pedestrian and Bicycle Project. �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������26 Figure 7.  How Sidewalks and Crossings Get Built. ������28 Figure 8.  Previous City of Asheville Planning Documents Reviewed for Close the GAP. ��������������������������������39 Figure 9.  General Gap Survey Results ������������������������������������� 48 Figure 10.  ADA Survey Results �������������������������������������������������������� 50 Figure 11.  Project Network Survey Demographics Summary. �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������52 Figure 12.  Additional Engagement Strategies Including StoryMaps, Online Surveys, and Social Media Promotional Materials. ������������������������������������������������������������ 54

Figure 21.  A Portion of the Soon to be Constructed Swannanoa River Greenway . �������������������������������������������������������������102 Figure 22.  Components of Complete Streets. ��������������� 164 Figure 23.  Complete Streets Project Evaluation Methodology Process. �������������������������������������������������������������������������������166 Figure 24.  Facility Selection Matrix ������������������������������������������167 Figure 25.  Steps Involved for Selecting Countermeasures at Uncontrolled Pedestrian Crossing Locations ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������169 Figure 26.  Standard Contingency Methodology ������������181 Figure 27.  How to Get Roads Built �������������������������������������������� 184 Figure 28.  NCDOT Transportation Planning Process ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 185

IMAGES Image 1 / Neighborhood Greenway Showing a Small Roundabout and Facilities that Prioritize Bicyclists and Pedestrians. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 6 Image 2 / Traditional Greenway in Asheville.

�������������������� 6

Image 3 / Eugene, OR Neighborhood Greenway Signage. ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 6

Figure 13.  The Following Three Factors Guided the Creation of Projects for Close the Gap. ������������������������������������57

Image 4 / Navigating Our City with a Wheelchair is a Challenge. �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������7

Figure 14.  The Five Categories of Pedestrian Connectivity: Primary Spine, Secondary Spine, Major Collector, Minor Collector and Local/Neighborhood Connections. ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������62

Image 5 / Example of a Missing Curb Ramp. ����������������������7

Figure 15.  The Tiers of Projects as Defined by Combined Scores. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 66 Figure 16.  Transportation Planning Process: Predesign Steps for State and Federally Funded Projects. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 72

Figure 17.  Asheville’s New Greenway Types, Including Spine Greenways, Arterial Greenways, Neighborhood Greenways and Natural Surface Trails. �������������������������������������� 81 Figure 18.  Greenway Spine Typology �����������������������������������������83 Figure 19.  Arterial Spine Typology ���������������������������������������������� 85 Figure 20.  Next Steps Project Development Definitions Referenced in Tables 8-11. �������������������������������������� 88

Image 6 / Curb Ramp and a Crosswalk. ������������������������������������7 Image 7 / Worn Pathways, or Goat Trails, Indicate Where Sidewalks May be Needed. �������������������������������������������������� 8 Image 8 / Constructing New Sidewalks is More than just a Sidewalk - Wood Avenue. Required a New Retaining Wall. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 8 Image 9 / New Sidewalk Constructed through a New Development Project. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 8 Image 10 / Where the French Broad River West Greenway meets a sidewalk, bicycle facility, a bus stop and a street is a great example of a multimodal network. ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������25 Image 11 / The First Meeting of the Think Tank Team in December 2019. �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������45 Image 12 / The First Meeting of the Community Advisory Committee in January 2020. ��������������������������������������45


Image 13 / Chalk Art Advertising the Greenway Intercept Survey in the River Arts District. ���������������������������� 51 Image 14 / Linda Glitz with Connect Buncombe Interviewing a Woman in the River Arts District. ������������ 51 Image 15 / Based on Connectivity Scoring, Hendersonville Road Has a Higher Connectivity Score (5) than Joyner Street (3). �����������������������������������������������������������������������62 Image 16 / Based on Criteria and Rating Methodology, Murdock Ave in North Asheville Had the Lowest Safety Score (1) While Patton Ave Had the Highest Possible Safety Score (7). ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 64 Image 17 / Recommendations for Brevard Road in West Asheville Include ADA Upgrades to the Existing Sidewalk and a New Sidewalk on the Other Side of the Street. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 68 Image 18 / Hendersonville Road Corridor Study Rendering Showing a Planned Multi-use Sidepath With the Existing Sidewalk on the Other Side of the Street. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 68 Image 19 / The French Broad Greenway Near New Belgium Brewing is an Example of a Spine Greenway (see Defining New Typologies, Image by Equinox). ������78 Image 20 / Street Redesign is a Component of Implementing Neighborhood Greenways. ����������������������������97 Image 21 / Proposed West Asheville Greenway as part of I-26 Connector Project. ����������������������������������������������������������������� 105

Image 30 / Example of Steep Driveway Cross Slope on Tunnel Road. Anything Over 2% is Non-compliant and can be a Barrier for Travel. ������������������������������������������������������ 140 Image 31 / Roundabout Crossings are Challenging for Those with Vision Impairments; Treatments such as Signals and Flashing Beacons with Audible Messages can Help. �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 140 Image 32 / Example of Temporary Ramp used to Maintain Access through a Temporary Work Zone. ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 141 Image 33 / Example of Utility Poles and Other Obstacles in PAR Merrimon Avenue. ������������������������������������������ 141 Image 34 / Example of a Sidewalk in Poor Repair that Creates and Obstacle. ����������������������������������������������� 141 Image 35 / Example of Curb Ramp on Charlotte Street in Need of Better Drainage. ��������������������������������������������� 141 Image 36 / Signs in the Sidewalk Create an Obstacle on Merrimon Avenue. ������������������������������������������������������ 141 Image 37 / Vertical Clearance Requirements Ensure Visually Impaired Pedestrians can Navigate without Injury. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 141 Image 38 / Curb Ramp Elements �������������������������������������������������142 Image 39 / Watauga Street in Montford is an Example of a Sidewalk with an ADA Condition Rating of 5 - In Poor Condition. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������142

Image 22 / Hendersonville Road Proposed Multi-use Path (After) south of Long Shoals Road Entering the City of Asheville. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 106

Image 40 / The City Maintains Most Streets in Downtown Asheville like Haywood Street and Battery Park Avenue. ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153

Image 23 / A Person with a Vision Impairment Trying to Navigate the Public Right-of-Way. ������������������������������������������131

Image 41 / A Pedestrian Crossing at a Location with a Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon (RRFB) ����������������������155

Image 24 / Examples of Public Right-of-Way Include Streets, Sidewalks, Crossings, Pedestrian Signals and Bus Stops, Among Others. ��������������������������������������������������������������������133

Image 42 / Some of Asheville’s Busiest Corridors, like Tunnel Road, have a Myriad of Overlapping Land Use, Safety and Transportation Needs that Require a Detailed Study. �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������155

Image 25 / A Common Practice for Reviewing Infrastructure for ADA Compliance is a Detailed Inventory of Slope and Dimension of the Right-of-Way. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������134 Image 26 / People with Disabilities Navigating Asheville’s Public Right-of-Way. ������������������������������������������������������135 Image 27 / Art Installation Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the ADA Law ��������������������������������������������������������������136 Image 28 / Audible Push Buttons that are Properly Positioned are Essential for Individuals with Disabilities to be able to Cross Busy Streets. ���������������� 140 Image 29 / Example of Preferred Curb Ramp Configuration for Individuals in Wheelchairs and with Vision Impairments. ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 140

Image 43 / Recently Upgraded Transit Stop on Tunnel Road That Needs Additional Crossing Treatments. ���� 173 Image 44 / Unimproved Bus Stop on Tunnel Road Which is One of the Most Heavily Used Transit Corridors in the City. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������173 Image 45 / These Guidelines Propose Accessibility Guidance for the Design, Construction and Alteration of Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way ���� 174 Image 46 / Staff at Work on Sidewalk Upgrades in Asheville. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������179 Image 47 / A Sample Image and Table from Asheville’s Standards and Design Manual. ����������������������� 190 Image 48 / Temporary Traffic Control while RADTIP was Under Development �������������������������������������������������������������������������196


MAPS

TABLES

Map 1.  Close the GAP Proposed Network ����������������������������� 5

Table 1.  Total Crashes in North Carolina and Asheville, 2014-2019 ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������35

Map 2.  Asheville is in the heart of Buncombe County, in Western North Carolina. �������������������������������������������������������������������� 20 Map 3.  Existing Greenways and Sidewalks in the City of Asheville. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 27 Map 4.  Multimodal Corridor Studies ����������������������������������������31 Map 5.  Reported Pedestrian-Involved Crashes in the City of Asheville �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������34 Map 6.  City Collected Pedestrian Counts �������������������������37 Map 7.  Streets Mentioned in Close the GAP Surveys ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 49 Map 8.  Legacy Neighborhoods �����������������������������������������������������53 Map 9.  Equity Score ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������59 Map 10.  Destination Score ��������������������������������������������������������������� 60 Map 11.  Destination and Equity ������������������������������������������������������61 Map 12.  Connectivity Score ���������������������������������������������������������������63 Map 13.  Safety Score �������������������������������������������������������������������������������65 Map 14.  Total Score by Tier Groups ������������������������������������������67 Map 15.  Combined Greenway Network Map ������������������� 89 Map 16.  Greenway Spines Map ���������������������������������������������������� 90 Map 17.  Arterial Greenways Map �������������������������������������������������92 Map 18.  Neighborhood Greenways Map ������������������������������94

Table 2.  The Share of the Asheville Population (Percentage) that Walks to Work ������������������������������������������������������35 Table 3.  Number of People Walking (5:00-7:00 p.m.) and Percent Change in Various Areas of Asheville, 2014-2019 ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������36 Table 4.  Weekly Number of People Walking in Downtown and West Asheville, 2014-2015 ����������������������������38 Table 5.  Typology Details - Greenway ����������������������������������������82 Table 6.  Typology Details - Arterial Greenways �������������� 84 Table 7.  Typology Details - Neighborhood Greenways ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 86 Table 8.  City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Spine Greenways ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 91 Table 9.  City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Arterial Greenways ��������������������������������������������������������������������������93 Table 10.  City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Neighborhood Greenways ��������������������������������������������������������95 Table 11.  City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Neighborhood Greenway Pilot Projects �������������������� 99 Table 12.  Public Input Results and Comments (Arterial Neighborhood Greenways Below are Listed in Order of Public Rankings) ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 101

Map 19.  Neighborhood Greenways Pilot Project Map ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 98

Table 13.  NCDOT: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 9 �145

Map 20.  Top Greenway Projects Map ���������������������������������� 104

Table 15.  NCDOT: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 9 ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������159

Map 21.  NC Department of Transportation (NCDOT) Projects ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������107

Table 14.  COA: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 5 ��������149

Map 22.  Public Input Score ������������������������������������������������������������139

Table 16.  COA: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 4 ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������163

Map 23.  NCDOT: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 9 �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 144

Table 17.  Seven Key Solutions to Improve Pedestrian Safety at Intersections. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������170

Map 24.  COA: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 5 ������ 148

Table 19.  Focus Group Meeting Findings and Recommendations ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������192

Map 25.  Public Input Score ������������������������������������������������������������157 Map 26.  NCDOT: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 9 ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 158

Table 18.  Other Resources and Design Standards �����197 Table 20.  Goal 1: Equity ���������������������������������������������������������������������� 204

Map 27.  COA: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 4 ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������162

Table 21.  Goal 2: Greenway Network ����������������������������������������205

Map 28.  Regional Connections ��������������������������������������������������203

Table 23.  Goal 4: Pedestrian Network ����������������������������������209

Table 22.  Goal 3: Pedestrian Network �����������������������������������207 Table 24.  Goal 5: Project Development ����������������������������������212 Table 25.  Goal 6: Policy ��������������������������������������������������������������������������214 Table 26.  Goal 7: Funding ��������������������������������������������������������������������216


Table 27.  Goal 8: Tools �������������������������������������������������������������������������� 217 Table 28.  Goal 9: Safety �����������������������������������������������������������������������219 Table 29.  Goal 10: Multimodal Vision ��������������������������������������221

QUICK SHEETS Quick Sheets #1:Things to Know Before You Read this Plan ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 14 Quick Sheets #2:Close the GAP Facility Types �������������� 15 Quick Sheets #3:Pedestrian Crash Analysis ��������������������32 Quick Sheets #4:Things to Know About Prioritizing and Funding for Projects Before the Design �������������������� 72 Quick Sheets #5: What is the Difference Between the ADA Transition Plan and Pedestrian Plan? ����������������� 132 Quick Sheets #6: Top ADA Focus Group Priorities: Facilities and Design Items ������������������������������������������������������140 Quick Sheets #7: Top ADA Focus Group Priorities: Maintenance and Policy Items ��������������������������������������������������������� 141 Quick Sheets #8:Key Elements of NCDOT Complete Streets Project Evaluation Methodology ������������������������166 Quick Sheets #9:Recommended Project Implementation Process ������������������������������������������������������������180 Quick Sheets #10: Pre-Design Project Development Checklist ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 182 Quick Sheets #11: FAQ’s on Project Development & Next Steps �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������183


Intentionally blank to facilitate double-sided printing


1

THE VISION


Bring able to cycle or walk off the road, paved or unpaved, to more schools, businesses, communities of worship, etc and area communities is a win for pedestrians, cyclists, the city and region” -

2 /// GAP Plan /

- Survey Respondent


1

THE VISION This chapter provides an overview of Close the GAP and the Plan’s framework, which comprises the vision, goals, and objectives, and it lays the foundation for implementation recommendations found in later chapters.

I N TRO D U C T IO N Through many different planning efforts, Asheville citizens and its leadership have said they want better and more options to get from place to place. Our community’s vision indicates that providing options to travel by methods other than driving - such as walking, biking, or riding the bus - are important for the future of the City. These methods of travel are known as multimodal transportation options, or modes of transportation. When streets and greenways accommodate different modes of transportation, it is easier for all people to move about in our City. Multimodal transportation choices promote our City’s values of equity, sustainability, and building a more vibrant community for our residents. Several plans guide the City’s efforts to build a better multimodal network. Close the GAP will replace some plans and complement or make recommendations to other City plans.

CLO S E TH E G A P Close the GAP is a three component plan that replaces the City of Asheville’s existing Greenway (G), ADA Transition (A), and Pedestrian (P) Plans. The combined plans, or Close the GAP, is the City’s new vision to update and expand the network

of accessible sidewalks and greenways in our community. In addition, Close the GAP makes recommendations pertaining to the City’s policies and design standards for these transportation elements.

Vision Close the GAP’s vision provides the foundation for improving walking in Asheville: Asheville is a place where vibrant, safe, and comfortable streets and greenways give everyone the opportunity to walk to their destinations and to enjoy the convenience and health benefits of walking. This vision sets the framework for Close the GAP’s goals and objectives. It also guides development of the policies, actions, and prioritization criteria, which are described in following chapters. In addition to the overall vision for walking in Asheville, each component of Close the GAP has a vision statement.

VISION Asheville is a place where vibrant, safe, and comfortable streets and greenways give everyone the opportunity to walk to their destinations and to enjoy the convenience and health benefits of walking.”

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GREENWAY PLAN VISION

TRANSITION PLAN VISION

PEDESTRIAN PLAN VISION

Asheville’s greenway network connects all areas of the City in order to allow people to move throughout the City on a continuous network, either on foot or by bike.

Asheville’s priority pedestrian corridors will allow people to move about without barriers on corridors that are ADA compliant to the maximum extent feasible.

Asheville’s new sidewalk network will close gaps in the pedestrian network so that people in Asheville can walk from their home to key destinations along a network of streets which prioritize pedestrian mobility.

The Results Realizing Close the GAP’s vision is dependent on achieving Close the GAP’s 10 goals and 56 action items. The desired result is the complete pedestrian and greenway network depicted in Map 1.

MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION “...we have to make sure that we allow people to experience the City in all ways.” - Mayor Esther Manheimer, November 2018, Charlotte Street Road Diet Council Vote

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Map 1. Close the GAP Proposed Network

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Image 1 / Neighborhood Greenway Showing a Small Roundabout and Facilities that Prioritize Bicyclists and Pedestrians. (Source: Active Transportation Alliance)

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Image 2 / Traditional Greenway in Asheville. (Source: Sealy Chipley) Image 3 / Eugene, OR Neighborhood Greenway Signage. (Source: City of Eugene, OR)

GR E E NWAY PLAN (G) A greenway is a multimodal transportation route that people can use for walking, biking, running, roller skating, using a wheelchair, and other activities. They are facilities for all ages and abilities and can be used for transportation and recreation. Currently, most of Asheville’s greenways are linear corridors of land that tend to follow features such as rivers or other natural features, or manmade features such as utility lines. The plan that guided the City’s greenway efforts before Close the GAP was the Greenway Master Plan Update (2013). Much has changed since 2013 when the vision for greenways was more recreational in nature. Since 2013, our greenways have become an important part of our multimodal transportation network, and Close the GAP was the City’s opportunity to rethink how it builds and connects the future greenway network. For example, Asheville’s early greenway strategy was to create greenways that are separated from the roadway. New plans, such as the

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Greenways Connector projects, offer plans for on-road greenway segments. The Close the GAP plan defines a new set of greenway options, including a Greenway Spine, Arterial Greenways, and Neighborhood Greenways. These types of greenways will be used to create the right size greenway for different locations. The new plan also defines greenway corridors, which could be a combination of on-road and off-road facilities. The Greenway component of Close the GAP also provides an implementation plan that describes the ideal order in which the projects will be planned and built. Finally, included in this effort are design standards and specifications for greenways, on-street connectors, and exploration of a natural surface trails effort, known as Asheville Unpaved.


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Image 4 / Navigating Our City with a Wheelchair is a Challenge. Image 5 / Example of a Missing Curb Ramp.

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Image 6 / Curb Ramp and a Crosswalk.

A DA T R A NS I T IO N PLAN (A) Many people with disabilities in our City rely on our multimodal network as their primary, or only, way to get from place to place. According to the 2019 American Community Survey, 12.2% of Asheville’s population has some type of disability. Other sources report a greater disability presence. It is the City’s responsibility to ensure that people with disabilities can move about its transportation network without barriers.

sidewalks, road crossings and pedestrian signals, greenways, bus stops, and on-street parking. The overall goal of the Transition Plan is to remove barriers in Asheville’s public rights-of-way so that pedestrians with disabilities can fully access all the amenities the City has to offer.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on someone’s disability. Title II of the Act requires cities and towns to have a plan to make accommodations for everyone. The ADA Transition Plan (or Transition Plan for short) component of Close the GAP is the City’s ADA Self-Evaluation and will result in a new Transition Plan for the City’s Public Rights-of-Way. The Transition Plan will result in a plan to upgrade the City’s existing public rights-of-way network. Examples of public rights-of-way include public streets,

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Image 7 / Worn Pathways, or Goat Trails, Indicate Where Sidewalks May be Needed. Image 8 / Constructing New Sidewalks is More than just a Sidewalk - Wood Avenue. Required a New Retaining Wall.

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P EDE S T R I A N P L A N ( P) Everyone is a pedestrian, whether they intend to walk/roll, or use walking and rolling as a means to take other modes of travel. When you walk from your car or bike parking spot into the grocery store, you are a pedestrian. When you take transit, you are a pedestrian. The Pedestrian Plan aims to create a great walking network for all pedestrians. The Close the GAP Pedestrian Plan identifies the new sidewalks, crossings, and other facilities that make walking safe and comfortable for all of us. The Pedestrian Plan also provides policy and procedure recommendations to improve how the City and other partners build new sidewalk connections.

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Image 9 / New Sidewalk Constructed through a New Development Project.


CO N N EC T I NG TO T H E V I SION Close the GAP’s vision, equity statement, goals, and actions will guide how the City implements the Plan. Additionally, the vision, the equity statement, goals, and actions reach beyond this Plan. Planning a great network for all walkers complements many of the goals found in other City plans, particularly the City’s comprehensive plan, Living Asheville. Building the Close the GAP network is guided by previous City plans and Close the GAP following elements: The vision provides the long-term direction for walking within the City of Asheville. It depicts the future vision Close the GAP will achieve when implemented.

The equity statement makes the case that building walk friendly communities is no longer a consideration - it is an imperative to building equitable communities.

The ten goals provide guidance on the condition the City is trying to achieve.

LIVING ASHEVILLE ENVISIONS THE CITY AS: “a great place to live because we care about people, we invest in our City, and we celebrate our natural and cultural heritage. Our City is for everyone. Our urban environment and locally-based economy support workers, entrepreneurs and business owners, families and tourists, and people of all ages. Cultural diversity and social and economic equity are evident in all that we do. Our neighborhoods are strong, participation in civic life is widespread, and collaborative partnerships are the foundation of our success. What makes us special is: • • • • • • • •

A diverse community A well-planned and livable community A clean and healthy environment Quality affordable housing Transportation and accessibility Thriving local economy Connected and engaged community Smart City

The 56 action items detail how the City can achieve each goal. The vision, goals, and action items comprise the Close the GAP Policy Framework, which is summarized in the Policy Framework at a Glance section below. Chapter 10 includes the full set of goals and recommended action items.

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Equity Statement Building walk friendly communities is no longer a consideration - it is an imperative to building equitable communities. The benefits to better walking can be experienced by both the individual and the overall community. In a City like Asheville, where there are limited pedestrian facilities, these impacts are significant. Mobility for People Walking A person walking is the fundamental transportation system user and is the baseline for any system. By planning for people walking, we are planning for all users including the most vulnerable: young, aged and disabled. Walking provides quick and convenient access and is the most affordable transportation mode. Walking is a part of every trip; regardless of a person’s primary mode of transportation, whether that be bicycling, transit or a personal vehicle, each trip begins and ends as a pedestrian. Driving Isn’t an Option for Everyone Simply put, travel by vehicle isn’t an option for everyone. Many people are physically unable to drive a vehicle, cannot afford the onerous costs of car ownership, or choose not to drive for other reasons. Socio-economic factors such as age, disability,

Figure 1. Not All People Can (or Want to) Drive (Source: American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates (2014-2018)).

race and income all impact transportation choice. Providing transportation options and access for these individuals can mean freedom of movement, which translates to significant benefits to the individual and community. The Benefits Walking provides freedom of mobility and access, which is especially meaningful to youth, aged adults, people with disabilities and people with limited income. Mobility for people walking out of necessity is critical to access jobs, healthcare and resources. It is important to consider diverse mobility needs as we plan our transportation systems, giving everyone an opportunity to thrive. Safety People walking are known as vulnerable users of our streets given the inherent fact that they are not protected by a vehicle if involved in a collision, and also because they are disproportionately represented in crashes. This means that the number of people walking involved in crashes exceeds the number of people who choose to walk. The most recent data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reveals that in 2019 in the US, pedestrian deaths accounted for 17% of all traffic fatalities, which rose from 13% in 2010.1 Nationally, Black / African American and American Indian / Alaska Native people die while walking at higher rates when compared to white, non-Hispanic, Asian and Pacific-Islander people.2 Although these findings present significant challenges, there are proven engineering solutions at hand, which are explored in Close the GAP. When roads are designed to be safe and accommodating for people walking (and biking), they become safer for all transportation users.3 By designing for people walking, communities can build safe transportation systems that everyone deserves. Health, Economics & Sustainability Roads that are designed for people walking have positive health, economic, and sustainability outcomes for communities such as Asheville. Health benefits of walkable communities include not only the reduction of serious injury and fatality, but also positive outcomes such as reduction in chronic disease, heart disease and cancer. Walking improves the economy at many scales - the individual, business and community at-large. And finally, walking enables communities such as Asheville to achieve its goals towards sustainability and climate change.

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Building walk friendly communities is no longer a consideration - it is an imperative to building equitable communities.

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POLICY FRAMEWORK AT A GLANCE Vision Asheville is a place where vibrant, safe, and comfortable streets and greenways give everyone the opportunity to walk to their destinations and to enjoy the convenience and health benefits of walking.

Goals GOAL 1: Equity Close the GAP network implementation results in a walkable and accessible community for all, no matter where you live or who you are. GOAL 2: Greenway City of Asheville residents and stakeholders travel along the greenway network on existing and new types of greenways. GOAL 3: ADA Transition Using Close the GAP’s ADA Transition Plan as a guide, the City of Asheville’s pedestrian network is ADA compliant to the maximum extent feasible.

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GOAL 4: Pedestrian Using Close the GAP as a guide, the pedestrians in the City of Asheville can walk from home (however one defines home) to key destinations along a network of streets comfortable for people who walk. GOAL 5: Project Development Using Close the GAP as a guide, the City of Asheville has increased capacity to deliver quality pedestrian projects. GOAL 6: Policy Using Close the GAP as a guide, the City of Asheville has updated and new policies to guide pedestrian and greenway network development. GOAL 7: Funding The City of Asheville has identified adequate, consistent, and wide-ranging funding sources to implement the Close the GAP Network.

GOAL 9: Safety As a result of implementing pedestrian safety best practices, pedestrian crashes in the City are significantly reduced. GOAL 10: Multimodal Close the GAP is integrated with other multimodal plans and programs to reach the City’s overall multimodal vision.

Recommended Actions The 56 recommended action items will help the City of Asheville meet the 10 goals and the Close the GAP vision.

GOAL 8: Tools Using a variety of existing and new technology and communication tools, the City of Asheville and its residents and stakeholders are informed about Close the GAP implementation progress and can interact with the City to request / share emerging needs.

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Quick Sheets #1:

Things to Know Before You Read this Plan

The transportation field uses many words and acronyms that are not common in everyday conversation. Here we describe key concepts and infrastructure types. In the Appendix, a full glossary of definitions is available to readers.

Multimodal Transportation

Network

In Asheville, our multimodal options include the sidewalk network, greenways, on-street bicycle facilities, and our bus system, Asheville Rides Transit (ART). Additionally, Mountain Mobility provides a form of public transportation.

When we talk about a network, we mean a system of things that are connected and operate together. For example, Asheville’s multimodal network consists of greenways, sidewalks, onstreet bicycle facilities, and the bus system. A network functions well when people can conveniently get to the places they want or need to go using our bus, greenway, bicycle, and/or sidewalk systems.

Connectivity

Facilities

A community is connected (or has connectivity) when the transportation network links people to the places they want to go through safe, continuous and comfortable networks.

A facility is a general term referring to improvements and provisions made to accommodate bicycling or walking. A facility could be the surface on which one walks or bikes - such as a sidewalk - or the equipment that enables a person walking to activate a traffic light. The most common facility types in Close the GAP are indicated on the following page.

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Quick Sheets #2:

Close the GAP Facility Types

Sidewalk

Pedestrian Signal Head

A designated space along the side of a street for use by people walking.

Mounted on the traffic light, these are intended to communicate to the person walking whether it is safe to walk.

Multi-Use Sidepath

Curb Ramps

A two-way shared use path located immediately adjacent and parallel to the roadway. Photo courtsey of pedbikeimages.org / Reuben Moore

Sloped surfaces that connect the sidewalk to the street. When designed according to ADA law, ramps allow people using a mobility device to mount and dismount sidewalk curbs.

Greenway

Pedestrian Crossing

An on- or off-street connector used for transportation or recreation.

Locations where a pedestrian may legally cross the street and where curb ramps must be provided. Crossings can occur at intersections or mid-block locations and may be accompanied by signs, paint markings (e.g. crosswalks) and traffic control (e.g. stop signs, traffic lights or flashing devices).

Paved Shoulder Paved, designated space on the edge of the roadway that is striped and on the same level as the street.

Pedestrian Push Button A device at a traffic light that can be used by a pedestrian to activate the walk/don’t walk pedestrian signal.

Neighborhood Greenway While not a designated facility in the sense that a traditional greenway is, a neighborhood greenway occurs on an existing neighborhood street to improve safety, help people cross busy streets, and keep traffic volume and speeds low. Photo courtsey of pedbikeimages.org / Russ Roca

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Chapter 1 Endnotes 1. National Center for Statistics and Analysis. (2021, May). Pedestrians: 2019 data (Traffic Safety Facts. Report No. DOT HS 813 079). National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 2. Smart Growth America. (2021). Dangerous by Design. https://smartgrowthamerica.org/dangerous-by-design/ 3. Jacobsen, P.L., Safety in numbers: more walkers and bicyclists, safer walking and bicycling. Injury Prevention, 2003(9): p.205-209.

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2

WHERE WE ARE TODAY


More, longer greenways and better connectivity!” - West Asheville Resident

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WHERE WE A R E T O D AY In this chapter, we explore today’s conditions for walking and biking in Asheville. We begin by describing the City’s population and transportation trends and then offer an overview of the current sidewalks and greenways in the City. We close this chapter by describing some of the ways in which we measure what it is like to walk and bike in Asheville today, by investigating crashes and walking rates.

CO M M U N I T Y OV E R V I E W Asheville, incorporated in 1797, is the county seat of Buncombe County and located at the confluence of the French Broad and Swannanoa rivers. It is the largest city in Western North Carolina, and the 12th largest in the state of North Carolina (see Map 1). The city occupies 45.95 square miles and shares a border with several municipalities and the privately owned Biltmore Estate. Being in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina, Asheville’s geography is characterized by rolling hills, mountains, creeks, streams, rivers and small bodies of water. Asheville is a steadily growing community. The City is the fourth-fastest growing municipality in the region as indicated by the French Broad Metropolitan Planning Organization, with an 11% increase in population between 2010 and 2018.1 As a reference, the population in the state of North Carolina increased 9% between 2010 and 2018.2

In the Asheville region, leisure, hospitality, manufacturing and other services, and education and health services exceed the state averages in terms of employment. At the same time, the metro area has a lower portion of jobs in the following sectors, which are often higher wage positions: professional and business services, financial activities, government, and information.3

Demographics The following section is a summary of Asheville’s demographics as revealed in the 2019 U.S. Census American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS is conducted annually (while the full Census is conducted every 10-years) and allows the U.S. Census Bureau to study information based on a sample of the US population. Except for the cost-burdened data, all findings are reported for the 2015-2019 5-year estimates or 2019 1-year estimates. During the development of this plan document, in November of 2021, the U.S. Census Bureau released the 2020 ACS findings; however, due to data collection challenges with COVID-19, the Census Bureau released this “experimental data with weights” and cautioned in using this data as a replacement for standard 2020 ACS 1-year estimates. As such, these findings are based on the 1- and 5-year estimates. Equity Framework Some in our community face greater disparities and vulnerabilities because of factors like who they are, who they represent, and their background. The following are factors that are often used as indicators of those with less equitable outcomes: race, gender, income, English proficiency, disabled population, children and seniors, single parents, education, and those who don’t own cars. In the following demographics overview of Asheville, these indicators are shown in bold.

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Map 2. Asheville is in the heart of Buncombe County, in Western North Carolina.

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Population The population of Asheville was 91,560. The median age was 39 years. An estimated 17.8% of the population was under 18 years and 18.1% was 65 years and older. Much of the Asheville metro has seen an increase in the population over the age of 65 and the City is no exception: since 2010, Asheville has seen an increase by 12.1% of aged adults over 65. About forty-eight percent (47.8%) of the population was male in gender. Figure 1 shows the split of Asheville’s population by gender and age; generally, women represented more of the aged population.

Figure 2. Asheville Population by Gender and Age (Source: U.S. Census).

85 and over 80 to 84 75 to 79 70 to 74 65 to 69 60 to 64 55 to 59 50 to 54 45 to 49 40 to 44 35 to 39 30 to 34 25 to 29 20 to 24 15 to 19 10 to 14 5 to 9 Under 5 10%

8%

6%

4%

2%

Males

0%

2%

4%

6%

8%

10%

Females

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Figure 3. Types of Disabilities in the City of Asheville (Source: U.S. Census).

Hearing difficulty - 3.3% Vision difficulty - 2.3% Cognitive difficulty - 5.7% Ambulatory difficulty - 6.1% Self-care difficulty - 2.7% Independent living difficulty - 6.6%

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Households There were 40,791 households, with the average household size being 2.16 people. Families made up 47.2% of households in the City. Seventeen percent (17.0%) of households included a child under 18 years of age, and 14.5% of households represented a person over the age of 65 living alone. Single male householders with children under the age of 18 made up 2.9% of the population while single female householders with children under 18 made up 8.9% of the population. Asheville households are relatively stable; 82.3% of people were living in the same residence as one year earlier. Eight percent (7.6%) of households in Asheville had no vehicle available to them; 43.8% of households had one vehicle available and 35.5% had two vehicles available. In Asheville, 48.2% of housing units are owner-occupied. Education Nearly half of Asheville’s population (49.9%) had a bachelor’s degree or higher. An estimated 7.4% did not complete high school. Disability Twelve percent (12.2%) of Asheville had a disability of some form, which are described in Figure 2.

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Transportation to Work Two percent (2.1%) of workers in Asheville over the age of 16 had no vehicle available. An estimated 74.4% of city workers drove alone to work, and 7.3% carpooled, and 11.3% worked from home (telecommute). Nearly four percent (3.9%) of people walked to work, 1.1% used public transportation and 0.7% biked to work. Among those who did commute to work, it took them an average of 17.9 minutes to travel. Asheville’s commute time to work is relatively less than the County’s average of 20.5 minutes. Asheville’s telecommuting rate is worth noting; it is the sixth highest for any metropolitan area in the country and likely even higher with telecommuting changes with the COVID-19 pandemic.4 Income Asheville’s median household income was $49,930. 13.8% of people in Asheville were living below the poverty level. Compared to the County, the median household income in Buncombe County was $52,207 with 12.2% of people living in poverty.


Race & Ethnicity Eighty-four percent (84.0%) of Asheville identified as white and the remaining identified as BIPOC: Black or African American (11.2%), American Indian or Alaska Native (0.4%), Asian (1.7%), Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Alone (0.3%) or some other race alone (0.5%). An estimated 6.8% of the people in Asheville were Hispanic. Language Of those residents over the age of 5, 90.6% spoke only English and 5.9% of residents spoke English “less than very well” at home. Housing Costs For owner-occupied houses in Asheville, the median property value was $270,400. The median monthly housing cost for owners with a mortgage was $1,457 and for renters was $1,043. Households that pay 30% or more of their income on housing costs are considered cost burdened. Cost burdened households in Asheville accounted for 31.2% of owners with a mortgage and 54.1% of renters). It should be noted that the “true” cost of housing factors in transportation costs to provide a more accurate assessment of housing choice and thereby housing cost. This is a concept known as Housing+Transportation Affordability Index,5 which was not calculated for this analysis but should be considered.

WHAT IS BIPOC? BIPOC stands for “Black, Indigenous, and people of color”, and is personfirst language that acknowledges people and humanity. This language is intended to shift away from words like “minority” or “disadvantaged.” Other person-first language used in this Plan is “people walking” and “people driving” which is intended to remind us that we are all people and humans are our highest priority.

Figure 4. Combining Housing and Vehicle Cost, We Begin to Understand the True Cost of Living in Asheville (Source: City of Asheville and NerdWallet).

AFFORDABLE HOUSING Vehicles are Expensive

AVL RENTERS Housing Wage Ave. Rent Shortfall

$831 $1,148 $317

$700 AVERAGE MONTHLY VEHICLE COST

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46,421

21,017

15,845

70,529

2002 Asheville

21,830

17,925

2018 Asheville

Figure 5. Analysis of Where People are Starting Their Work Commute Trips (Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics).

Computer & Internet Access An estimated 11.2% of households in Asheville had no access to a computer; 77.6% had access to a desktop or laptop and 78.3% had access to a smartphone. Eighty-four percent (84.0%) of households had an internet subscription of some type. Putting It Together: Transportation Currently, Asheville sees low, but growing, walking and biking rates, as reported for transportation to work. Many households in the City are cost-burdened in terms of their mortgage or rent costs. The City’s poverty rate is higher, and the median household income is lower, than the county average. Asheville is seeing a growing aged adult population, and the disabled population is on-par with county- and state-wide averages. Asheville has a larger portion of their population over the age of 16 that is currently employed.

Jobs and Housing The Census makes data available related to employment, job flows, earnings, and commute patterns in a tool called OnTheMap. An analysis of 2018 data shows that, of the jobs in Asheville, 70,529 of people lived outside of the City and commuted

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in. The remaining 21,830 jobs in Asheville were held by people who lived in Asheville.6 In Figure 5, these findings are compared to 2002 data: of the jobs in Asheville in 2002, 46,421 of people lived outside the City and commuted in; the remaining 21,017 were held by people who lived in Asheville.7 Over the last two decades, the number of non-city residents who commuted into the City has risen dramatically from 46,421 to 70,529 while the portion of City residents who stay for work has remained steady. This large daily influx of people to the City is a strain on its infrastructure and resources. These values are illustrated in Figure 5.

NET WORK OVERVI E W Asheville’s transportation network includes City roads, NCDOT-managed roads, and private roads. To understand how Close the GAP fits into the bigger picture of transportation planning in the City, County and region, it is helpful to understand how the transportation network operates and is functioning. This section of Close the GAP provides an overview of the network including the key components: transportation broadly, pedestrian, greenway, transit and bicycle.


2002

WALKABLE STREETS “Walkable streets encourage people to experience an area on foot and provide a comfortable, enjoyable and safe pedestrian experience, including those with disabilities.” -Living Asheville Comprehensive Plan (2018) Image 10 / Where the French Broad River West Greenway meets a sidewalk, bicycle facility, a bus stop and a street is a great example of a multimodal network.

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Figure 6. The Lifecycle of a Pedestrian and Bicycle Project.

Transportation Network Asheville’s major transportation infrastructure includes Interstates 40, 240 and 26 as well as the Asheville Regional Airport. Major corridors that traverse the City include: Merrimon Avenue, New Leicester Highway, Patton Avenue, Haywood Road, Charlotte Street, McDowell Street, Hendersonville Road, Biltmore Avenue, Tunnel Road, Fairview Road and Broadway Street. Most of these roads are owned and maintained by the NCDOT. The mountainous terrain of Asheville has resulted in a limited street network that challenges interconnectivity; as a result, there is not an extensive grid system that commonly provides alternative streets or parallel roadways in a network. Asheville's multimodal network contains a system of sidewalks for pedestrians to walk, on-street places to ride a bicycle, and greenways (sometimes called multiuse or shared-use paths) to walk or bicycle. The City's bus system, Asheville Rides Transit (ART), is an important part of our multimodal network. While Close the GAP has not resulted in new bicycle or transit plans, it is attentive to how the pedestrian and greenway networks interact with the City's other modes of transportation. Throughout the City, we have a variety of planned network connections, many of which were identified through an earlier City-led planning process, such as the 2013 Greenway Master Plan Update or the Asheville in Motion Mobility Plan. The City is also a member of the French Broad River MPO (the MPO), our area's regional transportation planning

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organization. Initial funding for some planned projects, which are developed in cooperation with the City and often with NCDOT, begins with the MPO. NCDOT also plans and develops multimodal projects. Close the GAP will help the City, the MPO, and NCDOT redefine and re-prioritize planned projects. The Close the GAP plans will serve as the document that guides projects from ideas through implementation. Figure 6 describes the part of the lifecycle of a pedestrian and bicycle project; the green circle represents the stage that the Close the GAP Plan exists within. The following sections provide an overview of Asheville's greenway, sidewalk, and other multimodal facilities.

Greenway Network Close the GAP will evaluate, revise, and re-prioritize planned greenway corridors. While Asheville doesn't quite have a connected greenway network, we're busy building the backbone of our future network. Today, we have 6.61 miles of existing greenways segments. All but the Hominy Creek Natural Surface Trail are paved. What We’ve Built Map 3 illustrates where current greenways exist in Asheville. The long-anticipated River Arts District Transportation Improvement Plan (RADTIP) was completed during the development of this Plan, in June 2021. Among many other elements, RADTIP includes the new 2.2-mile-long section of the Wilma Dykeman Greenway. Just across the river, the French Broad River West Bank greenway corridor was also


Map 3. Existing Greenways and Sidewalks in the City of Asheville.

Beaver Lake

Woodfin 26

Source: City of Asheville Open Data

240 240 40

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

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Lake Julian

AVL Regional Airport

Fletcher

Mills River Buncombe County, NC, State of North Carolina DOT, Esri, HERE, Garmin, SafeGraph, GeoTechnologie NASA, USGS, EPA

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2013 Greenway Master Plan The original Greenway Master Plan was approved in 2009. Buncombe County implemented a master plan in 2012, identifying priority corridors that overlapped with some of the City’s corridors. The French Broad Greenway section from Hominy Creek Park to Amboy Road as well as Reed Creek Greenway were the earliest constructed greenways, followed by the Swannanoa Greenway (Riverbend section) near Walmart. In 2013, the City updated the Greenway Master Plan to reflect County plans, coordination with I-26 widening efforts, and refine the network. Since this Master Plan, the following progress has been made: the French Broad Greenway section along New Belgium Brewing was built (2017); Wilma Dykeman Greenway (part of the RADTIP project) was built, and the French Broad Greenway West is under construction (2022 completion).

Figure 7. How Sidewalks and Crossings Get Built.

City-Led / Wood Avenue

under construction during the development of Close the GAP, with anticipated completion in Summer of 2022. Once completed, this section will be 1-mile long.

How Sidewalks and Crossings Get Built There are many ways in which new sidewalks and crossings get built. These programs build new sidewalks and crossings, improve existing sidewalks and crossings and fill in gaps where no sidewalks or crossings exist. In general, a sidewalk or crossing gets constructed through three main categories as illustrated in Figure 7: City-led, NCDOT-led and private development.

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Private Development / Gerber Road

Through the GAP Plan, we evaluated the existing network (Map 3) containing 188 miles of sidewalk to determine network gaps; this will result in a plan to close gaps through new pedestrian facilities. The most extensive network of existing sidewalks and crosswalks in Asheville exists in the parts of the City that were first annexed in the late 1800s and through the turn of the century. Outside of this core sidewalk network, many of the City’s key corridors, such as Tunnel Road and Patton Avenue, have sidewalks. To further understand what sidewalks have been built, it is helpful to understand how sidewalks, crosswalks and crossing treatments are constructed in the City.

NCDOT-Led / Fariview Road

Pedestrian Network


City-Led Generally, City-led projects fall into three areas. In 2014, the City of Asheville began setting aside specific money for building new sidewalks in neighborhoods. This annual funding established the Neighborhood Sidewalk Program, which prioritizes the construction of new neighborhood sidewalks throughout the City. A recent example are the sidewalks along Wood Avenue between Future Drive and the Target shopping center. The City oversees these projects through the Transportation and Capital Projects Departments. In 2016, Asheville voters favorably supported a general obligation bond referendum that allowed the City to issue new debt for parks and recreation, affordable housing, and transportation projects. Included in the general obligation bond for transportation projects were 24 sidewalk construction and improvement projects. These capital projects were identified through community input with consideration to equity and fairness across the City. An example of recent bond-funded sidewalks include new sidewalks on Hill Street. The City also funds various maintenance programs through bond funding, such as street repaving and upgrades to traffic lights which also repair and replace sidewalks and curb ramps at intersections. The City oversees these projects through the Transportation Department, Capital Projects Department, and Public Works Department. The City actively seeks grant funding for sidewalks. Typically, only new sidewalk projects can be funded by grants, which usually comes from federal transportation funds, and are awarded through the French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization and administered through the NCDOT. The City received funding for most of the River Arts District Improvement Project (RADTIP) through a federal TIGER (now known as RAISE – Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity) grant. The City oversees these projects through the Transportation and Capital Projects Departments. A local match of at least 20% of the project cost is normally required for grants.

guides the statewide agency to partner with the local agency (in this case, Asheville) to make necessary accommodations for pedestrians through sidewalks and other facilities. A 2022 update to the policy offers additional methodology and guidance for Complete Streets Review. Depending on the type and origin of the project, NCDOT may pay for the entire project or share in the cost with the City. The NCDOT also makes various funding available that can support sidewalk construction and maintenance projects. For instance, the NCDOT installed new sidewalks on Fairview Road from Swannanoa River Road to Sona Pharmacy through its SPOT Safety funding program. Private Development or Redevelopment According to the City’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO), sidewalks are required for some levels of new construction and for renovations, additions or expansions to existing structures. This means that sidewalks should be installed when land is developed or redeveloped if required by City standards. Similarly, as parcels of land are redeveloped to a certain extent, sidewalks will also need to be constructed. For example, most of the sidewalk along Gerber Road was built by developers during new construction projects. The City oversees these projects through the Development Services Department. Sidewalk Maintenance In Asheville, it is the abutting property owner’s responsibility to keep sidewalks, grass strips, drainage and gutters clear and clean. This includes clearing dirt, grass, weeds, mud, trash and vegetation of any kind to prevent a hazard to the public. In the event of a winter weather event, this responsible property owner must remove snow, hail, sleet or other accumulations within 48 hours after the precipitation ceases to fall. As quoted from the City’s UDO, if ice accumulates from any source other than from a weather event, the property owner must remove the ice, “from the sidewalk on or before 10:00 a.m. each day in which the temperature exceeds 40 degrees Fahrenheit.”

NCDOT-Led Another way that sidewalks get built are with the City working in close coordination with NCDOT. Whether it is a roadway, bridge or sidewalk-specific project, NCDOT’s 2019 Complete Streets policy

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Other Network Considerations Close the GAP's focus is the greenway and sidewalk networks the City will develop. However, other multimodal transportation projects are essential to building a complete greenway and sidewalk network in the City. Asheville Rides Transit ART (Asheville Rides Transit) provides bus service throughout the City of Asheville and to the Town of Black Mountain. There are a total of 18 routes that are named based on the approximate area of Asheville they serve (e.g., S1 serves south Asheville and N1 for north Asheville). All routes originate at the ART Transit Station at 49 Coxe Avenue in downtown. Everyone is a pedestrian at some point in their trip, and this is especially true for transit. Understanding transit in relation to a pedestrian and bicycle network is important as both modal opportunities offer enhancements to each other and are most effective when they operate as a unit. The phrase “first and last mile” is frequently used when understanding transportation systems and is a reference to the first and last leg of a transit trip – the parts of the trip that go from the origin to the bus stop, and the bus stop to the destination. For transit systems to be effective, the “first and last mile” of a person’s trip is often taken as a pedestrian. When both systems are in place, transit is safe, efficient and connected. Transit and pedestrian planning go together, and the City integrates transit into its pedestrian planning efforts. For example, in its Neighborhood Sidewalk Policy, proximity to a transit stop is a factor in project selection and prioritization. Similarly, proximity to transit was a critical area in understanding pedestrian gaps for this plan document. Bicycle Network In the same way that Asheville has streets, sidewalks and crossings that are good for people walking, the same is true for people biking. Asheville has on-street bicycle facilities, such as bike lanes and shared-use arrows, and has a plan to expand that network. These on-street bike facilities can have a great benefit to the pedestrian environment. While some choose to ride their bicycle on the sidewalk because it feels safer,8 evidence shows that it is not safer for people biking and it puts pedestrians at peril.9 Studies conducted by cities that have implemented high quality bike infrastructure, such as Washington DC10 and New York City,11 see a decline in sidewalk bicycle riding when dedicated, comfortable on-street bike facilities are constructed. When bicycle

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facilities are well-designed, they discourage people from riding their bikes on the sidewalk, thereby improving conditions for pedestrians. As an added benefit, streets with bicycle facilities are proven to be safer for all users, including pedestrians.12 Bike facilities contribute to a higherquality pedestrian environment as they buffer the sidewalk from the traffic on the road and shorten the distance that pedestrians need to cross vehicle travel lanes at intersections and mid-block locations. As Asheville begins to plan for its multimodal connections, we are no longer thinking of greenways as off-road paths, only. Portions of our greenways may be on-street and may join or complement our City’s bicycle network. Similarly, neighborhood greenways (low traffic, neighborhood streets) serve both people walking and biking. Corridor Studies Some of our City’s busiest corridors are difficult for pedestrians to navigate. The City, the French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization (FBRMPO), and the County have worked together to study the multimodal transportation mobility and land use on the corridors illustrated in Map 4. While each corridor is unique, their current challenges share this common thread: the land surrounding the corridor has changed significantly, due to residential population growth and complementary commercial development. This puts pressure on the corridor which has not significantly changed in several decades. Each of these studies provide a deeper analysis of transportation needs, consider a range of solutions, and offer recommendations that are incorporated with Close the GAP.


Map 4. Multimodal Corridor Studies MERRIMON AVENUE CORRIDOR STUDY This is a study and process to determine how multimodal goals can be achieved during NCDOT’s plans to repave Merrimon. The City of Asheville is advocating for a 4 to 3 lane road diet.

Source: City of Asheville, FBRMPO

I-26 CONNECTOR PROJECTS As a part of the I-26 Connector Project, the City of Asheville worked with NCDOT to identify multimodal facilities to connect West Asheville to Downtown. The projects will be implemented during I-26 construction.

BILTMORE MCDOWELL CORRIDOR STUDY The City of Asheville adopted this corridor study in November 2022. It contains a mixture of multimodal options to connect downtown to Biltmore Village.

TUNNEL ROAD CORRIDOR STUDY The Tunnel Road Corridor Study evaluated multimodal connections and safety improvements spanning from Beaucatcher Tunnel to Tunnel Road’s intersection with Swannanoa River Road. The plan was adopted in November 2022.

HENDERSONVILLE ROAD CORRIDOR STUDY The Hendersonville Road Corridor Study outlines multimodal and safety options from Rock Hill Road to Sweeten Creek Road. City Council adopted the plan in November 2022.

MERRIMON AVENUE CORRIDOR STUDY

I-26 CONNECTOR PROJECTS

BILTMORE MCDOWELL CORRIDOR STUDY

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Quick Sheets #3:

Pedestrian Crash Analysis

Studying the 271 crashes involving pedestrians between 2014 – 2018, we can get a glimpse of trends and measures of pedestrian safety in the City.13 The findings described in this section are for reported crashes where a police officer arrives at the scene and issues a crash report. The team developed its crash analysis during the existing conditions portion of the project, at which time 2018 data was the most current. Map 5 illustrates the location of these crashes. A review of reported crashes is one way to measure safety, however, this does not provide the full story of safety on a corridor. For instance, in some cases, there may be few or no crashes on a corridor because there are no dedicated sidewalks or because it feels so unsafe. In this scenario, studying crash reports only provides a limited understanding of safety. In the following chapter, we explore pedestrian safety as it is perceived by people walking and biking, which adds another dimension to understanding comfort in the walking environment. And in Chapter 4, we will describe how this crash data is paired with other measures of pedestrian safety, such as vehicle speed, to develop a safety score and prioritize projects. Collectively, these findings help us have a broader understanding of pedestrian safety.

CRASH IMPACT This investigates the level of severity, or how bad, pedestrian crashes are across Asheville.

Crash Severity Statewide, 18% of on-road pedestrian crashes resulted in a fatality or severe injury. 8.5% of Asheville's crashes were fatal or severe. Of the 271 reported crashes from 2014 – 2018, 14 involved a fatality.

Ambulance-Called Statewide, ambulances were called to the scene for 77% of on-roadway pedestrian crashes. Ambulances were called for 64% of Asheville's pedestrian crashes.

Hit and Run Crashes Statewide, 22% of on-roadway crashes involved a hit and run of a pedestrian, which is lower than Asheville's 24%.

ROADWAY CONDITIONS This explores factors pertaining to roadway conditions at the crash location.

Speed In NC, the highest percentage (41%) of crashes are on 30-35 mph roadways. In Asheville, the higher percentage of crashes are also on 30-35 mph roadways (40%).

Number of Lanes In NC and Asheville, the highest percent of crashes occur on 2-lane roadways: 52% in NC, and 40% in Asheville.

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Presence of Traffic Control A traffic-controlled location is when something like a traffic light (signal) or a stop sign is present. Double yellow lines, warning signs, and no control of any type are examples of no presence of traffic control. In NC, 70% of pedestrian crashes are at uncontrolled locations with no traffic devices; compared to 40% in Asheville.

Crash Location Statewide, 71% of pedestrian crashes occurred in intersections or were intersection related, compared to half (50%) of Asheville crashes.

It is important to note that Asheville has a high percentage of Unknown or Missing race data; 30% of pedestrian crashes in Asheville do not have known race data.

Gender Across NC and Asheville, men are more likely to be involved in a pedestrian crash; 62% of crashes involved men in NC and 43% in Asheville. It is important to note that Asheville has a high percentage of Unknown/Missing gender (33% Unknown in Asheville, 3% across NC).

Pedestrian Position In NC, well over half (62%) of pedestrians were in the travel lane when the crash occurred. In Asheville, 50% of pedestrian crashes occurred in a travel lane.

CRASH TIMING The following shares some insight to when the crash occurred.

PEDESTRIAN INFORMATION The following detail describes the demographics of the person walking who was involved in the crash.

Age Group In NC, the adult group (age 19-59) comprises the majority, or 68% of pedestrian crashes. The same is true for Asheville (70%).

Race In NC, 52% of pedestrian crashes involve BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color), 4% are unknown, and 44% involve pedestrians that are white. In Asheville, BIPOC crashes represent 20% of crashes, and white pedestrians are involved in 50% of crashes.

Crash Month In NC, the months with the highest number of crashes are October, November, and December, representing 31% of all crashes. In Asheville the top crash months are October, September, and July, representing 30% of all crashes in the City.

Crash Day In NC, Fridays have the highest percentage of all crashes (16%). In Asheville, Monday is the day with the highest percentage of crashes (20%).

Crash Year In NC, crashes increased by 13% between 2014 and 2018 while in Asheville they increased by 49%. Table 1 provides a snapshot of annual crashes in NC and Asheville.

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Map 5. Reported Pedestrian-Involved Crashes in the City of Asheville Source: NCDOT, 2014-2018 Pedestrian Crashes

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C U RREN T WA L K I NG R AT E S Strava Understanding bicycle and pedestrian patterns through the Strava platform was part of the Close the GAP analysis. However, due to the data use agreement between the City and Strava, the City cannot report specific findings from the data. Some of the general findings gleaned from the data include:

Table 2. The Share of the Asheville Population (Percentage) that Walks to Work (Source: U.S. Census)

• Total pedestrian commute trips have increased between 2019 and 2020, and the number of trips in 2021 has surpassed 2020

2010

• Total number of people recording walking trips while using Strava increased between 2019 and 2020, and the number of people recording trips in 2021 has surpassed 2020

2012

2.7%

2011

3.3% 3.7%

2013

• People between the ages of 20 and 54 are more likely to use Strava to record trips

2014

U.S. Census

2016

4.1% 4.2%

2015

Transportation to work data is collected by the U.S. Census Bureau and is described in the demographics section of this chapter. Table 2 describes the share of the Asheville population that chose to walk to work for the last decade. These are approximations provided through the American Community Survey, 5-year estimates for each year reported. The data shows an increase in the walking commute rate through 2015, with a decline in 2016 followed by a leveling out around 3.9% in the ensuing years to 2019.

4.8% 4.5%

2017

3.8%

2018

3.8%

2019

3.9% Commute to Work - Share by Walking

Table 1. Total Crashes in North Carolina and Asheville, 2014-2019 (Source: NCDOT)

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2,119

2,158

2,246

2,237

2,405

2,240

1.8%

4.1%

-0.4%

7.5%

-6.9%

38

54

51

76

31

-26.9%

42.1%

-5.6%

49.0%

-59.2%

NC

Annual % Change AVL Annual % Change

52

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Short-Duration Pedestrian Counts Annually, the City of Asheville’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Task Force hosts a volunteer survey to count the number of people walking and biking through an intersection. The survey typically takes place from 5:00-7:00 p.m. on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday of the second full week in September. The data reviewed here is for the 2019 collection year. Map 6 and Table 3 show the pedestrian counts at various locations in Asheville, comparing the average from 2014-2018 and the 2019 collection year. Downtown along College St sees the highest numbers of people walking, although the 2019 year reported a decline from previous year averages. Other areas with higher numbers of people walking include South slope area and Haywood Road in West Asheville, both of which saw an increase from years past. Counting along the Chestnut corridor has seen a decline in people walking as well as along W. T. Weaver Boulevard.

Table 3. Number of People Walking (5:00-7:00 p.m.) and Percent Change in Various Areas of Asheville, 2014-2019 (Source: City of Asheville)

Two-Hour Pedestrian Count Region 2014-2018

2019

Percent Change

Downtown (Woodfin & Roundabout)

146

157

7%

Downtown (College Street)

949

808

-17%

South Slope (Hilliard Avenue)

228

297

23%

West Asheville (Haywood Road)

202

352

43%

Chestnut St. Corridor

106

62

-71%

North Asheville (W. T. Weaver Boulevard)

84

64

-31

Glenn’s Creek Greenway

137

136

-1%

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Map 6. City Collected Pedestrian Counts Source: City of Asheville Bike/Ped Task Force

DATA NOTE The City of Asheville’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Task Force coordinates bicycle and pedestrian counts each September. While there is consistency in some locations, not all locations are counted every year. Additionally, the data is not adjusted to reflect weather and other variables. Therefore, the counts presented here represent the highest recorded count for the reporting period, 2016 - 2020.

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Long-Duration Pedestrian Counts

Relevant Local, Regional and State Plans

The French Broad River MPO has count equipment that is capable of collecting week-long count data for people moving along sidewalks and greenways. Since 2014, the MPO has placed this equipment at various locations in Asheville. Of the MPO’s dataset, there are two locations with repeated data collection: downtown on Biltmore Ave (west side of the street, approximately 150-feet south of Patton Ave) and West Asheville on Haywood Road (north side of the street between Vermont and Herron Aves). Although this data collection was repeated within 6-months, and is therefore not ideal for annual comparisons, it does provide an understanding of overall volume and peak usage. Not surprisingly, in both locations the peak number of people walking was Saturday afternoon in December and Saturday evening in May). The equipment that collects this data does not differentiate by user type so in some cases the user may have been a person on a bike, on the sidewalk.

As a part of the Asheville Close the GAP Project, relevant planning documents have been reviewed and summarized. The purpose of this exercise is to ensure any recommendations that are developed from this plan are consistent with precedent, and to help establish vision and goals as Close the GAP advances. The plan review was limited to sections that related to pedestrian, ADA and greenway facilities within the City. In the Appendix, the full review of local, regional and state plans is provided. The plans pertaining directly to Asheville are shown in Figure 8 The City of Asheville and other partners have a wide variety of planning documents to guide pedestrian, ADA and greenway related decisions. Through the Close the GAP planning process, the City is presented with a prime opportunity to integrate the ideas and policies from previous studies into this project; the City also can bring forth new ideas and update concepts and policy documents.

The findings for these two locations are provided in Table 4 and the Appendix offers the data for all sites collected by the MPO).

Table 4. Weekly Number of People Walking in Downtown and West Asheville, 2014-2015 (Source: FBRMPO)

Biltmore Avenue ​

Haywood Road

Dec 2 - 9, 2014 (Tues-Tues)

May 29 - June 5, 2015 (Fri-Fri)

Dec 12 - 19, 2014 (Fri-Fri)

May 21 - 28, 2015 (Thus-Thus)

Total Users (Count)​

27,200​

35,474

8,881

9,407

Average Users/Hour​

162

211

53

56

Peak 2-Hour Count​

1,393 (2-4 p.m., Saturday Dec 6)

1,750 (8-10 p.m., Saturday May 30)

362 (1-3 p.m., Saturday Dec 13)

370 (8-10 p.m., Saturday May 23)

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1992

2003

ADA Transition Plan

2009

2005

2008

Wilma Dykeman Riverway Master Plan

Pedestrian Plan

Comprehensive Bicycle Plan

2010

2013

2015

Parks, Recreation, Cultural Arts & Greenway Master Plan

Shiloh Community Plan 2025

Greenway Master Plan

Neighborhood Sidewalk Polciy

2016

2018

2018

2018

Asheville in Motion Mobility Plan

Burton Street Neighborhood Plan

Living Asheville & Neighborhood Plans on a Page

Transit Master Plan

2019

Swannanoa River Greenway Corridor & Feasibility Study

2021

Tunnel Road Corridor Study

2019

2020

Greenway Connector Project

Downtown Master Plan Update: Public Space Management

2021

2021

Biltmore Avenue & McDowell Street Corridor Study

Advancing Racial Equity in Asheville

2021

Hendersonville Road Corridor Study

Figure 8. Previous City of Asheville Planning Documents Reviewed for Close the GAP (Note: County and MPO Plans Were Also Reviewed and Findings Can Be Found in the Appendix).

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Chapter 2 Endnotes 1 French Broad River MPO. (2020). Metropolitan Transportation Plan: 2045 Our Path to the Future. http://frenchbroadrivermpo.org/wp-content/ uploads/2020/07/MTP_2045_Web.pdf 2 U.S. Census Bureau (2010 and 2018). American Community Survey 5-year estimates. [Data set]. https://data.census.gov 3 French Broad River MPO. (2020). Metropolitan Transportation Plan: 2045 Our Path to the Future. http://frenchbroadrivermpo.org/wp-content/ uploads/2020/07/MTP_2045_Web.pdf 4 French Broad River MPO. (2020). Metropolitan Transportation Plan: 2045 Our Path to the Future. http://frenchbroadrivermpo.org/wp-content/ uploads/2020/07/MTP_2045_Web.pdf 5 Center for Neighborhood Technology. (2020, December 30). Welcome to the H+T Affordability Index. https://htaindex.cnt.org/ 6 U.S. Census Bureau (2018). Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics. Retrieved from [https://onthemap.ces.census.gov/]. 7 U.S. Census Bureau (2002). Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics. Retrieved from [https://onthemap.ces.census.gov/]. 8 Marshall, W. E., Piatkowski, D., & Johnson, A. (2017). Scofflaw bicycling: Illegal but rational. Journal of Transport and Land Use, 10(1). https://doi. org/10.5198/jtlu.2017.871 9 Wachtel, A., & Lewiston, D. (1994). Risk Factors for Bicycle-Motor Vehicle Collisions at Intersections *. Ite Journal-institute of Transportation Engineers, 64, 30-35. 10 Jaffe, E. (2014, August 14). Tired of Cyclists Riding on the Sidewalk? Build More Bike Lanes. Bloomberg.com. Retrieved September 15, 2021, from https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2014-08-14/tired-of-cyclists-riding-on-the-sidewalk-build-more-bike-lanes. 11 Sadik-Khan, Janette. (2011 October 11). [PowerPoint Slides]. New York City Department of Transportation. http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/downloads/ pdf/2011_columbus_assessment.pdf. 12 Wesley E. Marshall, Nicholas N. Ferenchak. (2019). Why cities with high bicycling rates are safer for all road users. Journal of Transport & Health. DOI: 10.1016/j.jth.2019.03.004. 13 NCDOT Traffic Safety Unit. (2021). NCBikePedCrashes. [Data set]. North Carolina Department of Transportation. https://ncdot.maps.arcgis.com/ home/item.html?id=2a18016d2f1c469cb2edf5cc53e36f32.

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3

THE COMMUNITY VOICE


Disabled voices should be highlighted, as disabled people have much greater awareness of what is currently lacking in our community.” - East Asheville Resident

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3

THE COMMUNIT Y VOICE Community engagement made this document possible. Preferences and project ideas were identified by residents, community members, visitors and local interest groups. While COVID-19 limited the amount of face-to-face interaction, the team was able to work through limitations and shift the approach to achieve broad feedback and engagement. This chapter describes the timeline for all of the engagement activities and the purpose of each; full details on the meetings are provided in the Plan Appendix 4.

CO RE EN G AG E ME NT S TR ATEGY Coalescing the community vision for a three-part plan in a diverse urban environment necessitated guidance from a core group of individuals throughout this 2.5year project. This core engagement strategy took the form of several stakeholder groups described in this section. Specific individuals in each group are listed in the Appendix.

A NOT E ABOU T COVID-19 Like many people that encountered the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Close the GAP project team was challenged to rethink the engagement that is so integral to a project like this. With a seven-year-old Greenway Master Plan, no dedicated ADA Transition Plan for Public Rights-of-Way, and a fifteen-year-old Pedestrian Plan, Asheville was in need of guidance on projects and policies to realize its visions for a walkable community. And yet, on March 11, 2020, when COVID-19 was declared a global pandemic, Close the GAP had not yet launched broad community engagement and only hosted a few small, in-person, engagement events. The overall pandemic engagement strategy was to transition meetings and surveys to a virtual format, target overlooked or underrepresented voices, lean on community partners for help, launch a social media campaign and, where feasible, go to communities for in-person gatherings. The team was dedicated to ensuring that Close the GAP would represent the voice of Asheville despite the limitations posed by a pandemic.

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PROJECT TIMELINE

TTT Meeting #1

DEC 18

2020

KICK-OFF PHASE OCT ‘19 - MAR ‘20

TECHNICAL PROVIDER ENGAGEMENT

Start of Community Survey & Marketing Campaign

OCT 30

GAP at Pumpkin Pedaller

OCT 31

Greenway Intercept Survey #1

AUG 10

Greenway Intercept Survey #2

AUG 14

Public Meeting #1 (Virtual) & Start of Project Network Survey

AUG 25

JAN 23

CAC Meeting #1

JAN 27

CAC Drop-In Meeting

AVL UNPAVED ALLIANCE MEETINGS

INFORMATION GATHERING Apr ‘20 - Aug ‘21

Public Meeting #1 (Virtual)

2021

AUG 27

MAR 23

CAC Meeting #2

SEP 14

ADA Focus Group Meeting #1

SEP 16

ADA Focus Group Meeting #2

JAN 20

Start Stakeholder Outreach (NCDOT, COA Committees / Commissions)

APR 22

Start Community Review of Draft Plan

SEP 11

End Community Review of Draft Plan

GAP IDENTIFICATION & NETWORK CONFIRMATION Aug ‘21 - Feb ‘22

PLAN ADOPTION

Start of Final Community Survey

FEB 21

End of Final Community Survey

MAR 31

Mar ‘22 - Oct ‘22

2022

KEY TTT / Think Tank Team CAC / Citizens Advisory Committee AVL / Asheville ADA / Americans with Disabilities Act

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Projected Council Adoption Date

OCT 11


Think Tank Team (TTT) Close the GAP is one of Asheville’s largest multimodal planning efforts, spanning multiple City departments, Buncombe County staff, and other outside agencies, such as NCDOT. Given the impact that this plan will have on a broad range of City policies, projects and departments, the planning effort convened a team of technical advisors, known as the Think Tank Team, to steer the project. The individuals on the TTT were subject matter experts who assisted in guiding project development and policies, sharing perspectives, needs and expertise.

Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) The Close the GAP team developed the Citizens Advisory Committee to serve as an initial touchpoint in engagement activities. The individuals on the CAC represented an organization, neighborhood or interest group and brought forth their ideas in this smaller setting. CAC members acted as liaisons to the community voice, in idea generation and in promotion of GAP activities.

ADA Focus Group Close the GAP was also guided by a group of individuals with disabilities or representing those with disabilities. The ADA Focus Group provided input on

11

areas that needed better access, on prioritization for investment and review of accessibility recommendations.

Asheville Unpaved Alliance The Asheville Unpaved Alliance was built around the desire of many to implement a natural surface trail system within the City. While the City is supporting the effort, the hope is that it will grow to be a community initiative led by many organizations that have expertise in trail building, maintenance, volunteer recruitment, grant writing, and more. The group contains a broad spectrum of members from County and City parks and recreation staff, mountain bike and bicycle advocacy groups, trail running clubs, campus representatives (AB Tech and UNCA), and others. As part of this planning process, early facilitation helped the Alliance get off the ground. Since summer of 2021, the Alliance has been meeting on its own, led largely by the City, Asheville on Bikes, and Pisgah SORBA, to advance the goals and projects that were identified early on. The Asheville Unpaved Guidebook (found in the Accompanying Documents) was developed as a document to support and formalize the group’s alliance agreements, identify projects, define trail standards, strategize potential policy and structure how the Alliance works with the City.

12

Image 11 / The First Meeting of the Think Tank Team in December 2019. Image 12 / The First Meeting of the Community Advisory Committee in January 2020.

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“Asheville is an extremely difficult city to navigate using a wheelchair (especially manual), not only due to the steep and hilly terrain but also due to the deteriorating and pre-ADA pedestrian infrastructure and lack of inclusive accessibility in many places.” - Asheville Resident

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TARGETED WO R K S E S S IO NS The Close the GAP team hosted work sessions with several City departments and external agencies to discuss the following topics as it relates to walking needs and the ADA: resources and planning, recommendations, policy and implementation. The goal of these sessions was to close the gap between existing and needed resources and methods, to gather feedback on recommendations, and to map the course for implementation. The following agencies were interviewed throughout the planning effort; unless otherwise indicated, the agency represents City of Asheville departments: • Transportation Department • Public Works Department • Legal and City Manager’s Office • Planning and Urban Design Department • Development Services Department • Capital Projects Department • NCDOT • Buncombe County • Blue Ridge Southern Railroad • US Access Board

C IT Y TA SK FO RC E & CO M M IS S IO N P RES EN TAT IO NS The GAP team presented project updates for feedback from the Multimodal Transportation Commission and the Greenway Committee. These presentations took place during the information gathering and network confirmation phases.

CO M M U N I T Y S UR V E Y S

questions and the other was targeted to those with a disability or someone representing a person with a disability. General GAP Survey See Figure 9 for an overview of results. • There were nearly 1,570 responses to the GAP general survey with 4,259 written comments. The demographics of the respondents generally reflects that of the City. • We asked survey-takers to share what they would do if they were in charge of the City’s greenway and pedestrian programs. Top ranked responses included connecting major greenways, adding more sidewalks, and more neighborhood connections. • Respondents didn’t have a strong preference for the type of facility they would like to see - what they really wanted were more and better connections. • Survey-takers wanted to feel safer at intersections than they currently did. • Respondents liked direct and complete connections and did not like gaps where there was no sidewalk or greenway. • Survey-takers expressed a willingness for a small property tax increase to fund pedestrian and greenway projects; generally, around 1.5 pennies was acceptable. Map 7 illustrates a map of Asheville indicating areas of the City’s and streets that had a greater number of mentions in comments. Generally, arterial streets were mentioned more frequently for their pedestrian needs. The top 10 streets that received some type of comment include, either in a positive or negative context, include: 1. Merrimon Avenue 2. Kimberly Avenue 3. Broadway Avenue 4. Lexington Avenue 5. Tunnel Road

Three survey types were developed for the Close the GAP project. These vary from online to in-person and are described here.

6. Biltmore Avenue

Broad Community Feedback Survey

9. Beaverdam Road

During the information gathering phase of Close the GAP, two surveys were released concurrently, asking people about current and desired states of walking and rolling in Asheville. One survey asked general

10. Cumberland Avenue

7. Haywood Road 8. Lyman Avenue

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Figure 9. General Gap Survey Results Budget Prioritization

Who Took the Survey?

If you were in charge of Asheville’s pedestrian and greenway programs and budget, which of the following efforts would you prioritize to make walking and greenway use more convenient, safe and well connected.

1,570 Participants / 93,000 (1.7% of population)

Connect the major greenways that can get

75% us across the City (greenway network)

4,259 Comments

67% Add missing sidewalks

89% White / 83% White in City

Add more neighborhood greenway

59% connections 54% Female / 52.2% Female in City

42% Connect sidewalks & greenways to transit 87% Not Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish / 77.9% in City

Address speeding traffic

41% (e.g. traffic calming)

Preference for Separated Facilites How likely are you to use the following greenway or greenway connector types for recreation and transportation needs?

Traditional Asphalt or Concrete Greenway

Not Very Likely

Very Likely

Not Very Likely

Very Likely

Traditional Greenway with Natural Surface Shoulder Sidewaks with Bike Lane Sidewalks with Buffered Bike Lane Sidewalks with Bicycle Boulevard Shared Streets Designated Roadway Shoulders Combo Sidewalks with Cycletrack Multiuse Sidepath

Pedestrian Intersection Experiences Select the top factors that make a street crossing difficult at locations with and without traffic lights

83%

People in cars (turning) who don’t stop/yield at unsignalized locations

81%

Locations unsafe because people driving travel too fast, too few breaks in traffic

77%

People in cars (turning) who don’t stop/yield at signalized locations

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Preference for Separated Facilities How willing would you be to pay a small increase in property tax to fund projects? How much of an increase would you support?

Not Willing

Very Willing

No Pennies

Two Pennies

Walking Experiences A direct & complete sidewalk route defines their favorite walking street.

68%

79%

A missing sidewalk or significant gaps defines difficult routes.


Map 7. Streets Mentioned in Close the GAP Surveys Source: Close the GAP Survey Results

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ADA Survey Here is an overview of the survey results: • There were 251 responses to the ADA survey, 451 written comments. The demographics of those who responded generally align with those characteristics of Asheville residents.

People with disabilities most valued the following infrastructure in their transportation network: onstreet parking, sidewalks, access to bus stops, street crossings and curb ramps. Priority areas for improvement included parks, libraries and community centers; grocery stores and shopping centers; and transit lines/stops.

• Respondents had a variety of disabilities, largely those that impact their ability to move about the street system. • A large portion of respondents reported using a car when they would have preferred to walk or roll but couldn’t do so because of barriers in the network.

Figure 10. ADA Survey Results Who Took the Survey?

Barriers Are there times when you would like to walk or use a mobility device to reach a destination, but you do not because of barriers?

251 Participants / 10,955 (2.3% of disabled population) Yes and I have a car and can drive to places I cannot walk

451 Comments

5%

80% White / 83% White in City

Yes and I have a reliable transportation option

5%

17.8% 49.5%

No 55% Female / 52.2% Female in City Yes and I use Mountain Mobility 92% Not Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish / 77.9% in City

22.8%

Yes and I use ART

Type of Disability Walking Moving Vision Breathing Cognitive Abilities Other Least Prevalent

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Most Prevalent


Intercept Surveys

“Most streets in Asheville only have sidewalks on one side making it necessary for folks in wheelchairs.... to have to cross where there are often no crosswalks.” - Asheville Resident

To meet people where they are walking and wheeling, the Close the GAP team interviewed people as they were using the Reed Creek and Wilma Dykeman Greenways. These surveys, known as ‘intercept’ surveys since they are intended to intercept a user in the midst of their activity, were conducted on August 10 and 14, 2021. The intercept survey asked people about their particular trip and information about what they would be spending in order to arrive at an understanding of the economic impact of greenways. While the full summary of findings is available in Appendix 5, some highlights of the intercept survey include: • 540 surveys; 60% from the River Arts District/ Wilma Dykeman Greenway and 40% from the Reed Creek Greenway • 43% of users walked or bicycled to the greenway; 57% drove to their starting location. • The primary activity of trail users was walking (54%), followed by running (26%), and bicycling (18%), and 2% other. • The median time spent on the trail was 65 minutes.

13

14

Image 13 / Chalk Art Advertising the Greenway Intercept Survey in the River Arts District. Image 14 / Linda Glitz with Connect Buncombe Interviewing a Woman in the River Arts District.

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Project Network Survey An online survey was hosted from August 25 - October 31, 2021 to collect community input on a draft network of recommendations for walking and greenway needs. A series of maps proposed a citywide network of sidewalk repairs, ADA upgrades, completion of missing sidewalk sections and greenway links. The survey asked users to share what streets they felt were overlooked, to rank key greenway segments, and to share any remaining feedback. This survey was promoted through the City’s Communications and Public Engagement Department through the neighborhood newsletter, Nextdoor, and social media. Staff and the project team presented the survey to the following committees of the City: Neighborhood Advisory Committee, Multimodal Transportation committee and the Legacy Neighbors Meeting. Additionally, City staff led targeted outreach to the following neighborhoods at this intermediate stage of the project: Shiloh, Burton St, Southside, East End and Emma. Posters were put on display at the following Community Centers: Linwood Crump Shiloh Community Center, Stephens-Lee Recreation Center, Burton Street Community Center, Arthur R. Edington Education & Career Center, Dr. Wesley Grant Sr. Southside Community Center, West Asheville Public Library, Oakley/South Asheville Library, East Asheville Public Library, and North Asheville Public Library. A total of 1,164 responses were made to the project network survey site in the time that the survey was open for feedback. Figure 11 describes a demographic summary of the respondents to the survey. There were 170 responses to the pedestrian network map, which resulted in 25 changes or additions to the map. A total of 412 rankings were provided for the greenway network map, which helped prioritize projects. The complete summary Figure 11. Project Network Survey Demographics Summary.

Who Took the Survey? 1,164 Responses

89% White / 83% White in City

59% Female / 52.2% Female in City

79% Not Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish / 77.9% in City

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LEGACY NEIGHBORHOODS The Legacy Neighborhoods Coalition’s membership is comprised of neighborhoods that have historically faced racially discriminatory practices, including Urban Renewal and Redlining. These neighborhoods also face current displacement due to nationally ranked levels of gentrification and an absence of local government employing community-led antidisplacement strategies in policies and practice. Asheville Buncombe Community Land Trust, Burton Street Community Association, East End/ Valley Street Neighborhood Association, PODER Emma Community Ownership, Shiloh Community Association, and Southside Rising are working together to ensure community-led development in their neighborhoods, prevent harmful development, and find solutions that support legacy residents to remain in their neighborhoods. (Source: Buncombe County)

of findings on this survey are in the Accompanying Documents: ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan.

Final Community Opinion Survey On February 21, 2022, the final set of project recommendations was shared with the community to collect feedback. This survey closed on March 21, 2022 and in that time, 4,216 responses and 471 comments were collected..


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Map 8. Legacy Neighborhoods

Mile

Beaver Lake

Source: City of Asheville & Buncombe County

NORTH

26

Emma

240

Burton Street

East End/Valley Street Southside Area

240

40

40

40

Shiloh

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE LEGACY NEIGHBORHOODS Burton Street Emma Lake Julian

South French Broad

Shiloh Southside Area

LeeWalker Heights

East End/Valley Street Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

Southside Erskine-Walton

Livingston Heights

AVL Regional Airport

0.5

Fletcher

Mills River

Miles

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Figure 12. Additional Engagement Strategies Including StoryMaps, Online Surveys, and Social Media Promotional Materials.

P U B L IC M E E T I NG S The Close the GAP team hosted two virtual public meetings. The purpose of the first set of meetings was to describe the priority pedestrian and greenway network and gather feedback; these were hosted on August 25, 2021 (6-7:30 p.m.) and August 27, 2021 (10-11:30 a.m.). Following this series of meetings, City staff hosted a roadshow where they visited neighborhood organizations and further facilitated feedback. Included in this first Public Meeting was an explanation of the Project Network Survey.

P H OTO & V I DEO C A MPA IG N Thanks to a grant from Connect Buncombe, City staff was able to hire a photographer and videographer to tell the story of Close the GAP. The photos and videos, representing diverse faces and voices of Asheville, share the many ways that it is both easy and challenging to move around the City. These tools were used to engage people across Asheville in Close the

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GAP. The photos were used to develop social media imagery (Facebook and Instagram), posters, website imagery and targeted advertising (Urban News).

AD DI T IONAL ENG AG EMEN T ST R AT EG I ES To reach further into the community, the TPD team developed several resources that are illustrated in Figure 12. These video and digital media include StoryMaps for Close the GAP and Asheville Unpaved and a Community Overview on YouTube in English and Spanish. These tools were promoted online but also used when in-person events were allowed. In these in-person meetings, the tools were provided as a presentation and follow up item. Additionally, the team expanded outreach through community e-newsletter posts and targeted outreach to specific organizations in the City.


4

HOW WE GOT HERE


I don't really love walking streets here because sidewalks are narrow, if we have them at all.” - West Asheville Resident


4

H OW W E G OT HERE

Destination + Equity

+

In this chapter, we review the steps the team took to arrive at project recommendations. This process began with a technical analysis that included several community engagement touchpoints before arriving at the final recommendations as described in Chapters 5, 6 and 7 for the Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian Plans, respectively.

Figure 13. The Following Three Factors Guided the Creation of Projects for Close the Gap.

TH E B IRT H O F A PRO J EC T

As such, it is important to rank projects so that the City can focus limited resources on key projects in order to achieve the goals and vision set out at the beginning of this plan. To rank projects, Close the GAP focuses on three key factors as illustrated in Figure 13: destination + equity, connectivity and safety. These three factors were used to rank projects based on the corridor approach, as described in the following.

Safety

+

Much of the community’s feedback gathered during this project took the form of a project idea or recommendation, such as a desire for a sidewalk connection on a particular street. In a plan like Close the GAP, which covers pedestrian, ADA and greenway needs, at the scale of a City like Asheville - the result is a long list of possible project ideas. Although all projects identified in this plan are important, the City simply does not have the resources to complete the entire vision in the near term.

Connectivity

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CORRID O R A PPROAC H The “corridor approach” is an effort to upgrade all pedestrian facilities in the public right-of-way by developing projects to address sections of public corridors, such as greenways or streets with sidewalks, in an organized fashion. Project development for all three plans was based on the prioritization methodology described in this chapter. Chapters 5, 6 and 7 explain how these corridor scores were utilized to develop project lists for Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian projects. For more information on how this process fits together, see the flowchart on page 70 at the end of this chapter. A corridor, which can be a sidewalk or greenway section, is defined by the roadway or greenway beginning and end points as shown in the project lists and maps. Not all existing roadway corridors (or segments) in the City are on the priority list; however all existing pedestrian facilities are in the ADA Transition plan. Additional details on the ADA Transition Plan are included in Chapter 6 and the Accompanying Document: ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan.

Destination + Equity Score The goal of the destination + equity score was to identify the essential places that people need to access and the areas of the City with the greatest equity need. To understand the combined destination + equity score, we first had to score them individually. For the equity component, we wanted to know: Does the corridor provide greater access to a high equity need area? To arrive at that answer, we used data from the U.S. Census (2019 American Community Survey) to score areas of the City known as Block Groups. This is a geographic area designated by the U.S. Census that typically represents between 600 and 3,000 people. Each Block Group received an equity score based on the following values: • Median household income, because people with lower incomes have fewer means to pay for the high costs of transportation such as car ownership (and are therefore more likely to walk or use public transportation). • Percent of the population that is BIPOC,

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because people of color in our city have been disproportionately affected by housing and transportation policy. • Percent of the population that is considered living below the poverty, because those affected by poverty are more likely to walk and use public transportation as a primary form of transportation. • Percent of households with no vehicles available to them, because people without vehicles are more likely to rely on walking and public transit for transportation. • Percent of the population above the age of 65, because, as people age, they may be more likely to stop driving a car. • Percent of the population living with a disability, because many people with a disability cannot, or choose not to, drive. • Percent of the population with limited English proficiency, because using transportation systems, particularly driving, is challenging to those with limited English proficiency. These factors are commonly called equity indicators as they can be used to evaluate levels of inequity in the community and measure progress towards a more equitable future. The equity score for each Asheville Census Block Group is illustrated in Map 9. To determine the destination factor value, we wanted to know: Does the corridor provide access to essential services and resources? To arrive at that answer, we identified key destinations (such as grocery stores, schools, homeless shelters, parks - see the Appendix for all destinations considered), developed a score, and assigned that to each corridor in the City. We mapped this information for City-owned and NCDOT-owned roads, but not interstates (as interstates are not accessible to pedestrians). This analysis helped us to understand the places people need to reach and the corridors are illustrated in Map 10. The team then combined the destination and equity scores, as illustrated in Map 11, to identify hot spots for pedestrian needs and guide prioritization efforts.


Map 9. Equity Score Source: U.S. Census, American Community Survey, 2019 5-Year Estimates

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Map 10. Destination Score Sources: City of Asheville, NCDOT, Google Maps, Buncombe County, Various Sources to Identify Service Locations, Close the GAP Team Analysis

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Map 11. Destination and Equity Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

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Figure 14. The Five Categories of Pedestrian Connectivity: Primary Spine, Secondary Spine, Major Collector, Minor Collector and Local/Neighborhood Connections.

15

Connectivity Score The goal of the connectivity score was to identify key street links across the City that make walking a viable transportation option. Close the GAP grouped the City’s pedestrian transportation network into five primary categories as illustrated in Figure 11. The streets that received the highest scoring are the pedestrian spines, which immediately connect more people to more destinations. For example, a road like Hendersonville Road in Biltmore Village has a connectivity score of five (5) as it connects more people to destinations. On the other hand, a road like Joyner Avenue has a connectivity score of three (3) as it is a pedestrian collector that connects State Street to Riverview Drive and parallels Amboy Road, which is a primary spine corridor..

Image 15 / Based on Connectivity Scoring, Hendersonville Road Has a Higher Connectivity Score (5) than Joyner Street (3).

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Map 12. Connectivity Score

Mile

Beaver Lake

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

NORTH

26

240 240 40

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE CONNECTIVITY SCORING 5 - Highest Connectivity Score

240

4

Lake Julian

3 2 1 - Lowest Connectivity Score Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

AVL Regional Airport

0.5

Fletcher

Mills River

Miles

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Safety Score

16

The goal of the safety score was to identify areas in the City where the pedestrian experience is challenged due to safety factors. The safety score was a combination of reported crashes and the following factors that relate to safety: traffic speed, traffic volume and number of traffic lanes. Map 13 illustrates the full safety score results. A corridor would receive an initial score based on the posted speed limit, the amount of traffic on the road (AADT), and the number of traffic lanes. Next, the corridor received extra points based on its pedestrian crash history. The corridor received two additional points if the corridor crash history included a pedestrian crash fatality, or one extra point if there were other recorded pedestrian crashes. The pedestrian crash data was discussed in greater detail in Chapter 2 and is shown in Map 5. For example, a road like Murdock Avenue in North Asheville had the lowest safety score of one (1), as it is a low speed, low volume, and is a two-lane road with no recorded crashes. On the other hand, Patton Avenue in West Asheville received the maximum safety score of seven (7) as it is high speed, with high traffic volume, more than four (4) travel lanes and multiple recorded pedestrian crashes.

Image 16 / Based on Criteria and Rating Methodology, Murdock Ave in North Asheville Had the Lowest Safety Score (1) While Patton Ave Had the Highest Possible Safety Score (7).

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Map 13. Safety Score Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

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Results Each road segment received an individual destination + equity, safety and connectivity score. The roadway segments were organized into five scoring groups, or tiers, as shown in Map 14 and described in Figure 15. Tiers The tiers used to group projects are illustrated in Figure 14. Tier 1 represents the highest combination of the connectivity, safety and destination + equity score, while tier 5 is the lowest combined score. An example of a tier 1 corridor is Merrimon Avenue. Merrimon provides direct connection for people walking, it links to essential destinations, and it has a documented history of reported crashes. Edgemont Road is a tier 5 project example since it primarily serves local neighborhood, does not link key destinations and the relative safety concerns are lower.

Future Use of Corridor Scores and Tiers This scoring process was utilized primarily to develop priority corridors groups (tiers) that were advanced into project development for each plan (Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian). However, the scoring results and tiers will be available as a GIS tool for City staff and can be utilized as follows: • Evaluation of corridors that may need to be added to the list in the future. • The scoring categories and final tiers are referenced in Chapter 9 and are recommended to be referenced when updating the Asheville Standards Specification and Details Manual (ASSDM). For example, for roadways with higher safety scores, it is more important to provide sidewalks on both sides of the road with greater separation from traffic.

All projects take time, and some are very complicated while others are dependent on funding partners like NCDOT. These variables shift project timelines, and as such, it is possible that lower scoring projects will be constructed while we’re still assembling the pieces of a higher scoring corridor. The tiers do not necessarily imply order of implementation or importance, but were used to group the projects into similar categories (or road types), and to aid in overall project development and prioritization as is described further in Chapters 5, 6 and 7.

Figure 15. The Tiers of Projects as Defined by Combined Scores.

Combined Score: Connectivity, Safety, Destination & Equity Tier 1: 13-17 Points

Tier 3: 8-9 Points

Tier 2: 10-12 Points

Tier 4: 7 Points

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Tier 5: 0-6 Points


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Map 14. Total Score by Tier Groups

Mile

Beaver Lake

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

NORTH

26

240 240 40

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE DES, SAFETY & CONNECTIVITY TIER GROUPING

240

Tier 1 Lake Julian

Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4 5 Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

AVL Regional Airport

0.5

Fletcher

Mills River

Miles

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17

18

Image 17 / Recommendations for Brevard Road in West Asheville Include ADA Upgrades to the Existing Sidewalk and a New Sidewalk on the Other Side of the Street. Image 18 / Hendersonville Road Corridor Study Rendering Showing a Planned Multi-use Sidepath With the Existing Sidewalk on the Other Side of the Street.

P RO JEC T CAT EG O R I E S PL AN ID EN TIF IC AT IO N Once each corridor was scored and reviewed, corridors were further divided into categories as the following strategy describes:

Assign to a Primary Plan Each roadway segment was assigned to the Greenway Plan (Chapter 5), ADA Transition Plan (Chapter 6) or Pedestrian Plan (Chapter 7). Additional project development discussion and final project lists can be found in these chapters as follows: • Chapter 5 - Greenways Plan: Includes identified greenways, multi-use pathways, and neighborhood greenway corridors. Note that some greenways overlap with roadway corridors. For example, the City and Buncombe County recently sponsored three corridor studies that resulted in multi-use path recommendations which were placed on the greenway project list. For example, the multi-use paths proposed for Hendersonville Road, Tunnel Road, Biltmore Avenue and McDowell Street can be found on the greenway project list. • Chapter 6 - ADA Plan: Roadway corridors with existing sidewalks in need of replacement, repair or maintenance were placed on the ADA Transition Plan. • Chapter 7 - Pedestrian Plan: Roadway corridors with missing sidewalk sections, sidewalk widening

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needs and/or crossing enhancement needs were placed in the Pedestrian Plan (the pedestrian plan project list). Some corridors were placed on multiple lists. A few examples of this are projects that: • Have both existing sidewalk sections, which were placed on the ADA Transition Plan, and sidewalk gaps, which were placed on the Pedestrian Plan. An example of this is Brevard Road in West Asheville. As shown in Image 17, there is an existing sidewalk in need of ADA upgrades as well as sidewalk gaps. • Have sidewalk gaps on one side, which would result in a project for the Pedestrian Plan, and a planned multiuse sidepath on the other side of the road, which would result in a project on the Greenway Plan. An example of this is Hendersonville Road in South Asheville. As shown in Image 18, this rendering from the Hendersonville Road Corridor Study shows the planned multiuse sidepath on one side with an existing sidewalk on the other side.

H OW I T AL L COMES TOG ET HER Network Confirmation Once projects were assigned to a plan (Greenway, ADA, or Pedestrian) the next step was a public feedback point to confirm that critical connections


were all identified prior to moving to specific project recommendations. In order to confirm the priority pedestrian corridors (roadway segments) and get input on greenway connections, a second round of online public engagement was initiated in August of 2021. These results are integrated into the following Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian Plans.

Project Development & Recommendations After the network was confirmed through public feedback, detailed project specifics were developed and are discussed in each chapter. These details include: • Existing conditions review and connection needs • Recommendations • Current funding status (if applicable) • Next steps for implementation • Partnerships required, if applicable, e.g., NCDOT, Buncombe County etc. In addition, an overview of Recommendations for Project Development (Chapter 9) and Policy Review and Recommendations (Chapter 10) apply to all three plans. The flow chart on page 70 shows how this process all comes together.

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Destination and Equity Scores (Areas in Greatest Need for Connectivity)

Chapter 4

Greenway System Gap & Off Road Connection is Feasible

Sidewalk Network Priorities (Includes Safety & Connectivity Scores)

(Chapter 6)

(Chapter 6)

Existing Pedestrian Facility Needs ADA Upgrades

New Sidewalk & Crossings Needed

Greenway Plan

ADA Transition Plan for Public Right-of-Way

Pedestrian Plan

(Chapter 6)

(Chapter 7)

(Chapter 8)

Confirmation and Public Feedback August & September 2021

Recommendations & Project Lists* (Chapter 6, 7 & 8)

Project Development & Next Steps (Chapter 9)

Design Standards & Policy Recommendations (Chapter 10)

Take Action (Chapter 11)

*Before reviewing the recommendations in the following Chapters, it is helpful to understand some terminology, and understand how NCDOT and the City develop and maintain facilities. Since these items are referenced repeatedly throughout the following chapters, please find some basics on the following pages.

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Quick Sheets #4:

Things to Know About Prioritizing and Funding for Projects Before the Design What you need to know about roadway maintenance and funding requirements All publicly owned roads, with a few exceptions, are maintained by either NCDOT or the City of Asheville. NCDOT has maintenance responsibility for Interstates (I-240), US Highways (US 25 / Hendersonville Road), NC Highways (NC 81 / Swannanoa River Road), and Secondary Roads (SR-3556 / Amboy Road). High scoring corridors maintained by NCDOT were placed on the NCDOT Priority Corridor Lists for the ADA and Pedestrian recommendations. This will aid the City and NCDOT in their project development prioritization and to develop projects that meet their requirements and priorities. These corridors also have funding partnership opportunities that differ from City of Asheville streets. The City and NCDOT have a history of working in partnership to develop projects. For example, NCDOT and the City have a standing monthly meeting to discuss pedestrian safety issues.

Additionally, the City and NCDOT work with regional partners through the FBRMPO to determine other types of projects. The City of Asheville maintains some larger roads, such as Charlotte Street north of I-240 or WT Weaver Boulevard, smaller streets like Livingston Street, and most streets in downtown Asheville. High scoring corridors maintained by the City of Asheville were placed on the City of Asheville’s Priority Corridor Lists for the ADA and Pedestrian recommendations. When developing projects from these lists, the City of Asheville will lead project development. If any of these projects receive state and/or federal transportation funding, they must follow the state project development process. In addition, the figure below shows the transportation planning and prioritization process that these projects must follow before project development.

Figure 16. Transportation Planning Process: Pre-design Steps for State and Federally Funded Projects.

COMP PLAN

MTP1

SPOT2

TIP3

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

Identify local vision and needs

Identify region’s long range project plan

Identify region’s top projects

Identifty the region’s 10-year funding plan

Develop (construct) Projects

20 - 30 year planning horizon

20 year planning horizon, updated every 5 years

Criteria updated periodically

A 10 year plan that is updated every 2 years

Timing depends on size and scope of project

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1. What is an MTP? Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP, previously known as LRTP or Long Range Transportation Plan) The French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization (FBRMPO) maintains this fiscallyconstrained and required planning document that reflects planned transportation investments over the next 25 years. It forecasts changes in the region and seeks to identify transportation improvements needed to keep travelers and goods moving smoothly and how to fund those improvements. The plan is multi-modal and identifies investments in roadway, public transportation, bicycle and pedestrian, rail and aviation projects.

2. Spot Prioritization Process NCDOT uses a strategic, data-driven process to develop the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The process involves scoring all roadway, public transportation, bicycle, pedestrian, rail, and aviation projects on a number of criteria. Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), Rural Planning Organizations (RPOs), and the NCDOT Divisions also contribute to the final project score by assigning local priority points to projects.

3. Transportation Improvement Plan A statewide prioritized listing/program of transportation projects covering a period of four years that is consistent with the long-range statewide transportation plan (LRSTP), metropolitan transportation plans (MTPs), and transportation improvement plans (TIPs), and is required for projects to be eligible for funding under title 23 U.S.C. and title 49 U.S.C. Chapter 53.

of overlapping land use, safety and transportation needs that require a detailed study in order to better define a corridor wide improvement plan. A corridor study provides a detailed look at land use and transportation needs, goals and vision as well as a robust public and stakeholder involvement process. The result is a more vetted and customized range of solutions and recommendations that can move into the project development process. When a corridor study is needed, it is typically completed between the MTP and SPOT phase.

When are Feasibility Studies Done For more complex projects, it may be necessary to perform a high level investigation of physical and environmental constraints in order to better define a project scope and cost. This would be completed before a project moves into the final design process. During the feasibility study, key project risks and opportunities are identified and investigated. The evaluation should include items such as: • Environmental features (e.g. wetlands, threatened and endangered species, waterways) • Physical constraints (e.g. steep slopes, buildings and private property impacts) • Right-of-way availability (property ownership or the ability to acquire property for facilities) • Utilities and railroad lines More complex projects may require a detailed feasibility study with more robust data collection in order to clearly define the project scope and budget requirements.

4. When are Corridor Studies Completed? Some of Asheville’s busiest corridors are difficult for pedestrians to navigate; however, the ultimate recommendation is not as simple as adding sidewalks. Some of these roadways have a myriad

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5

GREENWAY (G) PLAN AND RESULTS


Greenways, more greenways please. More and more people are walking to destinations instead of driving. We need safe, green spaces to walk through.” - South Asheville Resident

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5

G R E E N WAY (G) PLAN AND R E S U LT S

2. Identify new greenway corridors 3. Define and assign new greenway typologies (types) to the network 4. Greenway Network Recommendations and Prioritization

Asheville’s update to the Greenway Plan and recommendations contained within this chapter define desired greenway corridors in Asheville, an approach to prioritizing these projects, and the highest ranked 10 projects that may be advanced in the near-term.

ST EP 1 : REF I NE PRE VIOUSLY PL ANNED G REENWAY AL IG NMENT S

OV ERV IE W

The first step in this effort was to review original greenway corridors as identified in the 2013 plan. These original corridors were either maintained as originally presented, revised, or eliminated if the greenway was identified as infeasible due to land use, right-of-way changes, topography, or other factors.

This plan is an update of the City of Asheville’s 2013 Greenway Master Plan, with a revision to the greenway network. New greenways have been added, refined, or removed. Greenways in the network were then assigned one of three typologies or “types” that better define the greenway’s character and purpose, much like roads have a hierarchical system or functional classification (see glossary). The public has weighed in on the priorities of greenways, which is one factor in final prioritization of the system. Other factors in prioritization include project status (how far along it is), potential for funding, equity, importance to the network, and partnerships that may help get a greenway built. The Destination and Equity scoring (explained in Chapter 4) guided this process to identify areas of need. In summary, this plan chapter is arranged in the following 4 steps:

Reviewing the 2013 Greenway Master Plan For Feasibility

This process included a constraints analysis as depicted in Appendix 8. Two specific corridors, the West Asheville RailTrail Greenway and the Beaverdam Greenway, were assessed in more detail to determine project feasibility. These detailed studies can be found in Appendix 9. Based on the constructability analysis, several greenways had been previously planned but have been determined infeasible and have been removed from the planned greenways list. The greenways that have been removed or altered from the greenway plan are as follows:

1. Refine previously planned greenway alignments, including the 2013 Greenway Master Plan

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• French Broad Greenway West (northernmost section): From Emma Road to Pearson Bridge Road this section was removed after further analysis indicates it is infeasible due to steep grades and exposed bedrock. • Beaverdam Greenway (travelling east of Merrimon Ave.): This greenway was removed as the corridor is very constrained as well as barriers related to small individually owned lots. This route may be considered as a natural surface trail candidate.

ST EP 2: I D ENT I F Y NE W G REENWAY CORRI D ORS Informed by the Destination and Equity Analysis and the constructability analysis, the Close the GAP project team worked with project partners to define the new, expanded planned greenway network. In searching for new greenway alignments to add to the system, a number of items were reviewed:

• Sandhill Road Greenway: A multi-use path proposed along this road was determined to be extremely difficult due to the potential impact to multiple small private lots, even if part of a road widening project.

• New Road Corridor Projects with Proposed Greenways: Through the State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP), developed with the French Broad River MPO, NCDOT identified roadway projects with complete street elements. See Map 21 for the NCDOT Greenway (Multi-use Paths) Projects City Prioritization Map.

• Hominy Creek Greenway-West: The greenway was realigned to the Pond Road area due to new development patterns which effected the previous alignments feasibility.

• I-26 Connector Greenways: The community identified a major need for connectivity associated with NCDOT’s Interstate 26 widening project. The I-26 area projects are highlighted on Map 21.

Image 19 / The French Broad Greenway Near New Belgium Brewing is an Example of a Spine Greenway (see Defining New Typologies, Image by Equinox).

19

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• Areas with Missing Links: The Close the GAP planning process identified areas that lack pedestrian and bicycle facilities, especially in those areas of the City identified as having higher priority based on destinations, equity, connectivity and safety analysis. • Opportunities to Utilize Larger Tracts of Land: Areas of the City with larger parcels or right-of-way were also identified, as it is typically easier to build greenways when fewer landowners are involved. • Opportunities for New On-Road Greenways: A new type of greenway type was identified—an “onstreet” Neighborhood Greenway that can connect the network in a new way. Read more about this in the section Step 3: Defining New Typologies (Types) where we describe a way to guide greenway planning and development in the City. The results of the redefined and expanded planned greenway network are detailed in Maps (15 - 18) and Tables (8-10).

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S TEP 3 : D E FI NE A ND A S S IGN N E W T Y P O LO G I E S ( T Y PE S ) Just like a road transportation network, a greenway system can have different levels of service and characteristics based on how many people it will serve, if it is a local or regional connection, or if it has corridor constraints that define how wide the greenway can be. This plan identifies a new set of typologies to guide greenway planning and development in the City. In this plan, each greenway has been assigned a typology that defines the experience, width, easement requirements, and other design characteristics. Each greenway is assigned one of the following typologies: Greenway Spines (See Map 16 and Table 8) are major thoroughfares of the City’s pedestrian/bicycle system. This greenway type carries the highest level of service (carrying capacity, or number of people) and design speed (how quickly a user can travel). It also has the greatest level of investment due to its prominence within the system. It has the greatest width (average 12-14’ or more narrow if a parallel bicycle facility can be established), amenity investment, and name recognition. Greenway Spines travel through entire districts of the City, serving as the “highway” of greenways. Arterial Greenways (See Map 17 and Table 9) serve a secondary means that feed all neighborhoods and sectors of the City into the Greenway Spines. This type of greenway has less amenity investment than spines. They would average 10-12’ and generally feed into more major multi-modal transportation routes (like bus routes or bike lanes) and Greenway Spines.

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Imagine an existing neighborhood street that is comfortable enough for a child to bike on as they might on a Greenway Spine: that is a Neighborhood Greenway (See Map 18 and Table 10). This is a new typology to Asheville, and it involves transforming a street to make it more bicycle and pedestrian friendly through enhancements such as intersection features that calm traffic and prioritize access for people walking and biking; wayfinding signage; and branding. Locations for on-street Neighborhood Greenways were selected if they met criteria of having low volume, low speeds, existing traffic calming measures or potential to incorporate traffic calming, and existing or potential for sidewalks. Constructing Neighborhood Greenways with low-cost temporary measures, such as flexible delineators, paint and temporary curbing could serve as an interim measure to determine neighborhood sentiment before a permanent investment is made. Further traffic studies and engineering may be needed for specific design elements. Further detail regarding definitions and standard design criteria for these greenway types can be found in Tables 5 - 7.


Figure 17. Asheville’s New Greenway Types, Including Spine Greenways, Arterial Greenways, Neighborhood Greenways and Natural Surface Trails.

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Table 5. Typology Details - Greenway

Greenways Spines are the major “interstates” of the city’s pedestrian/bicycle system.

Photo courtesy of Equinox

Greenway Spine Typology Definition Greenways Spines are the major “highways” of the city’s pedestrian/ bicycle system. This greenway type carries the highest level of service and has the highest design speed. It also has the highest level of investment due to its prominence within the system, width, amenity investment, and “name recognition.”

User Types All type of users. Major transportation routes to access all part of the city. While transportation is its primary service, it can serve as a destination for out of area users and/ or day-long recreation users.

Standard Width

Surface Tread

14’ wide. Min 10’ and up Asphalt greenway to 14’ in anticipated high surface use corridors where space allows. If this width can not be used, parallel active transportation facility should be considered (ie. sidewalks). Optional gravel/ crushed fines shoulder could be used where width can not be met.

Longitudinal Slope: Less than 5% slope for accessibility/ADA compliance

Shoulders*: 16”min./24” max. turf shoulders. *To increase existing greenway width, a 3-4’ rubberized shoulder can be added.

Temporary Construction Easement As needed by existing topography with all built elements located within the greenway easement.

Drainage/Cross Slope: Proper drainage of the trail should be provided and can include 2% crown or cross slope of the trail with a drainage ditch or swale on the inside portion of the trail. 2% in-slope or out-slope can also be used to provide positive drainage along the trail. Typical swale cross sections, 3:1 side slopes max, 1’ base min. Trees should be offset or cleared 6’ from the greenway swale.

Typical Greenway Easement Width 30’ typical. When along a stream or river, extend the easement to the edge of the water body to promote conservation If paralleling a road, a reduced easement may be used.

Level of Service/ Design Speed Major transportation routes, user travel speed and level of service is high, requiring design to accommodate via radii and other means.

Additional Notes Centerline striping of the greenway to address high user volumes may be appropriate. Striping should be used on tight or blind corners, near intersections and under bridges, and other areas where the trail may be confined.

Amenities: High Level of Amenities and Wayfinding Lighting: Lighting will be used on Spine Greenways. Lighting of high traffic areas, intersections with roads, and areas with low visibility are priority. Signage: Once a significant amount of miles are intact, install mile markers for wayfinding and to direct emergency response. Gateway/trailhead signage should be prominent with branded trail names. Trailheads or Nodes Along the Trail: Entrance sign, 5+ parking stalls, dog waste station, trash receptacles, wayfinding map, seating, etc.

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Figure 18. Greenway Spine Typology

Greenway Spine Typology

SEE NOTE*

SEE NOTE* *TO EXPAND WIDTH OF EXISTING GREENWAYS, A 3-4’ RUBBERZIED PATHWAY CAN BE ADDED THAT SHOULD BE FLUSH WITH EXISTING GREENWAY

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Table 6. Typology Details - Arterial Greenways

Arterial Greenways connect neighborhoods to the Greenway Spines.

Arterial Spine Typology Definition

Standard Width

Arterial Greenways serve as a secondary means that feed all neighborhoods and sectors of the City into the greenway spines. They can be used as transportation to access other parts of the City, but also serve as local neighborhood recreation amenities.

12’, where possible, 10’ in constrained areas, down to 8’ in highly constrained short stretches. The greenway could alternatively be a 1012’ sidewalk. Shoulders: 16”Min./24” Max. (Unless a sidepath).

Temporary Construction Easement

User Types Intended for all user types, but especially for shorter transportation routes to connect to greenway spines, or quick access to recreation.

As needed by existing topography with all built elements located within the Greenway Easement.

Surface Tread Asphalt Greenway Surface Alternative Surface Types: These trails can also serve as sidepaths and located where future sidewalks will be installed. Temporary surfaces prior to concrete sidewalks can be constructed as nonpaved crushed stone trails (with proper stormwater management) with a gravel top coated with 3” of smaller angular gravel or crushed fines. Arterial Greenways can also be widened sidewalks (10’) where necessary.

Typical Greenway Easement Width 30’ typical. When along a stream or river, extend the easement to the edge of the water body to promote conservation. If paralleling a road, a reduced easement may be used.

Longitudinal Slope: Less than 5% slope for accessibility/ADA compliance

Drainage/Cross Slope: Proper drainage of the trail should be provided and can include 2% crown or cross slope of the trail with a drainage ditch or swale on the inside portion of the trail. 2% in-slope or out-slope can also be used to provide positive drainage along the trail. Typical swale cross sections, 3:1 side slopes max, 1’ base min. Trees should be offset or cleared 6’ from the greenway swale.

Level of Service/Design Speed Secondary transportation routes, travel speed and level of service is moderate, with a somewhat lower design speed and level of service than the Greenway Spines

Additional Notes Centerline striping of the greenway to address high user volumes may be appropriate. Striping should be used on tight or blind corners, near intersections and under bridges, and other areas where the trail may be restricted or confined.

Amenities: Medium/Low (wayfinding, regulatory, and etiquette signage) Lighting: Lighting is preferred on Arterial Greenways and should be prioritized at intersections, trailheads, at underpasses or to light areas that are enclosed by dense vegetation or topography and not visible from a nearby road, homes or active use area. Signage: Mile marker wayfinding. Wayfinding signage where the greenway intersects with major roads or serve as neighborhood trailheads Trailheads or Nodes Along the Trail: Small trailhead with 2-5 parking stalls, including accessible parking.

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Figure 19. Arterial Spine Typology

Arterial Spine Typology

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Table 7. Typology Details - Neighborhood Greenways

Neighborhood Greenways transform an existing street to make it more bicycle and pedestrian friendly.

Neighborhood Greenway Definition Redesign of an existing neighborhood street to make it more pedestrian and bicycle friendly. A suite of design options contribute to these facilities and slow traffic for safer and more comfortable use.

User Types

Suite of Design Solutions to Develop Neighborhood Greenways

Users Prioritized

Ensure that these streets are prioritized for people walking and biking.

Traffic Calming

Traffic calming measures implemented to maintain low speeds or divert traffic

Intersection Improvements

Wayfinding

Improve crossings, especially of busy streets, to enable people of all abilities to more easily cross the street.

Consistent signage throughout each route, with branded neighborhood greenways signs.

People who desire to travel on enhanced neighborhood streets and other users who want to connect to Arterial, Spine Greenways, and other multi-modal routes.

Additional neighborhood greenway traffic speed and volume management elements are shown in the NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide under Bicycle Boulevards: https://nacto.org/publication/urban-bikeway-design-guide/bicycle-boulevards/

Amenities: Low (wayfinding, regulatory, and etiquette signage) Lighting: Lighting considered if new sidewalks are proposed. Consider signal treatments for crossing busier streets. Signage: Signage at intersections. Note that further traffic study and engineering is needed to assess the viability of specific Neighborhood Greenways.

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Intentionally blank to facilitate double-sided printing

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N ET WO RK RECO M M EN DAT IO NS A ND P RIO RITIZ AT IO N

Figure 20. Next Steps Project Development Definitions Referenced in Tables 8-11.

Planning (Pre-Design)

Network Recommendations The results of the refined and expanded planned greenway network are shown in Map 15.

This phase is required to better define the scope of corridor recommendations to address overlapping land use and transportation needs.

The maps and tables on the following pages show the results broken down in detail for each greenway type. Each typology has its own table with greenways assigned a short-, medium-, and long-term phasing. These tables will be used to assess over time what projects will go onto the City’s Capital Improvement Plan (CIP).

Transportation project development involves many steps from preliminary planning through construction. Chapter 8 of this report details the process as well as necessary public input, which is key to integrate at each stage of project development. Some of the greenway projects in this plan are already in development, and their needed “Next Step” to advance the project is noted in Tables 8 - 10. The stages of development referenced in the tables are described in Figure 20.

Ongoing Community Engagement

More on Project Development Next Steps:

Feasibility Study Due to observed corridor constraints, additional feasibility analysis is needed to refine the project limits and details. Preliminary Engineering These projects will require preliminary engineering (30% design) to further evaluate right-of-way needs, constraints and cost.

Design Full construction document to 100% design ROW (Right-of-Way) Securing easements or land

Construction Advertise for construction and build it!

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Map 15. Combined Greenway Network Map

1

Woodfin

Mile

Beaver Lake

NORTH

26

240 240 40

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

GREENWAY NETWORK Existing Spine Greenway Spine Lake Julian

Existing Arterial Coll Arterial Greenway Neighborhood Greenway Buncombe County Planned Greenway Potential Other Greenway Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

AVL Regional Airport

Fletcher

Mills River

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1

Woodfin

Map 16. Greenway Spines Map

S2

Mile

Beaver Lake

NORTH

26

S3

S11

240 240

S9 40

S13 S10 S12

S6

S4 40

S8

40

S5

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

S7

26

SPINE NETWORK Existing Spine Greenway Spine Lake Julian

Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

S1

AVL Regional Airport Mills River

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Fletcher


Table 8. City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Spine Greenways

City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Greenway Spines Project Phasing Notes (Project in Bold are the City’s Top 10 Projects) Map ID #

Greenway Name

Next Steps

S1

Airport Road Greenway

Planning

S2

Beaverdam Extension

Planning

S3

French Broad River North (NRADTIP)

Project Development Notes Work with county to consider integrating into their future plans Work on Extension as priority to connect lake to Woodfin’s Beaverdam Greenway which, sidepath is landowner contingent

Short Term

Medium Term

Extension: Complete all Preliminary

Long Term

Sidepath TBD

Preliminary This project is funded for design Engineering/ Engineering which should begin in 2022 ROW

Design, ROW and Construction

Preliminary Engineering/ ROW

Design, ROW and Construction

S4

Hominy Creek Greenway (East)

Preliminary Engineering

Contingent on some major landowners, middle section led by County

S5

Hominy Creek Greenway (West)

Landowner contingent

May come sooner, if part of a private development

Landowner contingent

S6

French Broad Greenway (Karen Cragnolin Park)

Preliminary Engineering

RiverLink leading implementation

TBD

Feasibility Study

Based on success with West Asheville Rail-with-Trail, this may follow, highly contingent on railroad company willingness to partner

Preliminary Engineering

TBD-based on NCDOT

TBD-based on NCDOT, currently slated for ROW in 2029

S9

Swannanoa River Greenway East (from Bleachery Blvd. Asheville/County Boundary)

Feasibility Study

Corridor mostly owned by the City. Sections not to be done in conjunction with NCDOT projects could become a higher priority if Fonta Flora State Trail funding for construction becomes available through the State

Feasibility Study, Preliminary Engineering/ ROW, Construction

S10

Swannanoa River East Greenway (From Glendale Ave. to Bleachery Blvd.)

Construction

S11

Tunnel Road Greenway

Planning

S12

West Asheville Railwith-Trail

Feasibility Study

S13

West Asheville Greenway

S7

South Asheville Rail-with-Trail

S8

Swannanoa River West Greenway (NCDOT Implemented sections)

Preliminary Engineering

Feasibility Study

Design, ROW

Construction

Full design soon to be complete Construction and soon to be constructed Done in conjunction with Tunnel Road Corridor and commercial redevelopment Highly contingent on railroad company willingness to partner. Engage Emma and Johnston Blvd neighborhoods Part of I-26 Connector project, constructed by NCDOT

TBD, see the Tunnel Road Corridor Study for more details Feasibility Study, Preliminary Engineering Preliminary Engineering, ROW, Design

Design, ROW, Construction

Construction

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Map 17. Arterial Greenways Map

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Table 9. City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Arterial Greenways

City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Arterial Greenways Project Phasing Notes (Project in Bold are the City’s Top 10 Projects)

Map ID #

Greenway Name

Next Steps

Project Development Notes

TBD

Greenway being analyzed for potential as a natural surface trail

Short Term Medium Term Long Term

A1

Bacoate Branch Greenway

A2

Bartlett Arms Greenway

Planning

A3

Beaucatcher Greenway

Construction

Full design completed with some adjustments, may need more funding

Re-Design, Construction

A4

Beaver Lake Greenway

Planning

Contingent on one major landowner

Feasibility Study

A5

Beverly Hills Greenway

Feasibility Study Complete after Swannanoa Gwy

A6

Biltmore and McDowell Greenway (Options)

Preliminary Eng.

A7

Biltmore Village Connector

Preliminary Eng. Pairs with Sweeten Creek Gwy

A8

Biltmore Village Sidepaths

Preliminary Eng.

A9

Canie Creek Greenway

Preliminary Eng.

A10 Center Street Greenway Ext.

Planning

Id’d by Shiloh neighborhood

A11

Planning

Connects Chunn’s Cove to city

A12

Chunn’s Cove Greenway Deaverview Greenway

Feasibility Study

TBD

TBD

Planning

Part of a transportation corridor study, two options proposed

Remaining Steps

Preliminary Engineering, Design, ROW, Construction ALL

TBD

TBD

ALL Likely to occur with development of property

Feasibility study paired with W. Asheville Rail-with-Trail

ALL TBD

TBD

Feasibility Study

Preliminary engineering, Design,

Preliminary Eng. Required to be unpaved

ALL

Feasibility Study Pair with Jake Rusher Greenway

ALL

A15 Jake Rusher Greenway

Feasibility Study

A16 Lake Julian Greenway

Feasibility Study Project implemented by county, with support from the City of Asheville

A18 Montford Greenway

Planning

Pair with Hendersonville Rd Multi-use path

Contingent on the Lakeview HOA and NCDOT on Merrimon Ave.

Preliminary Eng. Contingent on one landowner

TBD

ALL

A13 Falconhurst Greenway

Merrimon-Beaver Lake Sidepath

TBD

ALL

A14 Hendersonville Rd. Multi-use Path

A17

TBD

ROW, Construction

F

Planning

Feasibility Study, Preliminary Eng.

Design, ROW, Construction

TBD

TBD

TBD

Construction

Project construction will soon be underway

A20 Oakley East Greenway

Planning

Consider studying Oakley South

ALL

A21

Planning

Consider studying Oakley East

ALL

Planning

May be combo of sidewalk/gwy

ALL

A19 Nasty Branch Greenway

Oakley South Greenway

A22 Overlook Road Greenway A23 Ragsdale Creek Greenway A24

Reed Creek Greenway (North & Downtown Extension)

A25 Rhododendron Creek Greenway A26 Schenck Greenway A27 Smith Mill Creek Greenway

Feasibility Study Contingent on landowner outreach. Feasibility Study

Reed Creek North is a Top 10 Project, Downtown Ext. occurs medium-long term

Feasibility Study One section will be design/build Planning

Construction

TBD

TBD

Feasibility Study

All remaining

Design Construction

All Remaining for on Design/ Build Section

TBD

TBD

Feasibility Study Start after I-26 Connector starts

A28 Sweeten Creek Greenway

A30

Pair with S. Asheville Rail-with-Trail and Biltmore Village Connector

A29 Tunnel Road Connector Greenway

A31

Connects East Asheville to Tunnel Rd

TBD

TBD

ALL

TBD

/

Feasibility Study

All Remaining

TBD

TBD

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Map 18. Neighborhood Greenways Map

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Table 10. City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Neighborhood Greenways

City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Neighborhood Greenways Project Phasing Notes (Project in Bold are the proposed Pilot Projects)

Map ID #

Neighborhood Greenway Name

Project Notes

N01

Beachwood Neighborhood Greenway

Uses Beachwood Road, connects Tunnel Rd Grwy to Swannanoa River Grwy

N02

Beaucatcher Neighborhood Greenway

Connects Kenilworth to Beaucatcher Grwy via Samual Ashe Drive, Reservoir Road, and McCauley Drive

N03

Beaverdam Connector Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Glen Falls Road, Carjen Avenue, and Sareva Plaza, connecting to the lake

N04

Busbee Road Connector Arterial Greenway

Travels Busbee Road

N05

College Street Neighborhood Greenway

Travels College Street up to Beaucatcher Greenway

N06

Downtown Loop - East Neighborhood Grwy

Travels Woodfin Street and South Charlotte Street

N07

Downtown Loop - West Neighborhood Grwy

Travels Coxe Avenue, Clingman, Avenue, and Hill Street

N08

Eastwood Road Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Eastwood Road

N09

Emma East Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Emma Hills Drive and Wren Lane

N10

Emma North-South Neighborhood Greenway

Travels North Louisiana Avenue and Adams Hill Road

N11

Fairway Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Gladstone and Edgewood Roads through Asheville City Golf Course

N12

Haw Creek Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Avon Road and Beverly Road

N13

Hazel Mill Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Hazel Mill Road and North Louisiana Avenue

N14

Kenilworth Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Castle Street, Warwick Road, Kenilworth Road, Aurora Drive, and Beaucatcher Road

N15

Kensington Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Kensington and Fairway Drive along Asheville City Golf Course

N16

Kimberly Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Charlotte Street, Edwin Plaza, to Kimberly Ave north to Beaverdam Road

N17

Lakeshore - West Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Lakeshore Drive from Elkwood Road to Shorewood Drive

N18

Lakeshore - East Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Lakeshore Drive from Shorewood Drive to Graceyln Road, ending at Kimberly Avenue

N19

Lower Grassy Branch Neighborhood Grwy

Travels East Azalea Road, Lower Grassy Branch Road, Miller Branch Road, and Old Farm School Road

N20

Malvern Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Manila Street, Sulpher Springs Road, Mimosa Drive, and Bear Creek Road

N21

Oakley East Off Road Option B Arterial Grwy

Travels Liberty Street, Cedar Street, and Cherrio Lane

N22

Oakley East Neighborhood Greenway

Uses some of Future Drive

N23

Oakley West Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Glendale Avenue and Merchant Street

N24

Oteen Church Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Oteen Church Road, connecting into Azalea Park/Thomas Wolfe Cabin area

N25

Overlook Road Neighborhood Greenway

Connections to Overlook using Deerhaven Lane and Bent Oak Lane

N26

Falconhurst Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Tanglewood Drive, Craggy Avenue, Blue Ridge Avenue, Lanvale Avenue, Olney Road, and Vermont Avenue, connecting Falconhurst Nature Area to West Asheville Park

N27

Richmond Hill Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Richmond Hll Road, Thomas Street, Bingham Road, down Emma Road

N28

River Arts Connector Neighborhood Grwy

Travels Lyman Street, Clingman Avenue, and Depot Streets

N29

Rock Hill Road Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Rock Hill Road, connecting Sweeten Creek Road and Hendersonville Road

N30

Shiloh East-West Neighborhood Greenway

Travles Shiloh Road, Brooklyn Road, Hampton Street, and West Chapel Road

N31

Shiloh North-South Neighborhood Greenway

Travels entirety of Caribou Road from Sweeten Creek Road to Hendersonville Road

N32

South Slope Connector Neighborhood Grwy

Travels Southside Avenue, Short Coxe Avenue, Biltmore Avenue, and Buchanan Avenue

N33

Thompson Street Neighborhood Greenway

Travels entirety of Thompson Street from Biltmore Avenue to Glendale Avenue

N34

UNCA Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Mt Clare Avenue and connects into WT Weaver Boulevard

N35

Weaver Park Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Murdock Avenue, Hillside Street, Madison Avenue, East Chestnut Street, and Central Avenue

N36

West Asheville River Arts Neighborhood Grwy

Connects Patton Avenue down to Craven Street, and along West Haywood Street

N37

Yorkshire Neighborhood Greenway

Travels Yorkshire Street and connects to London Road

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N EX T S TEP S TO T H E N EIGH B O R H O O D G R E E NWAY P RO GR A M Given that Neighborhood Greenways direct people on bikes and people walking onto mixed traffic streets, further vetting and analysis of the routes and treatments are required for project development. As such, the next steps for implementation include development of a Neighborhood Greenway Plan and Signage Guide and Implementation of a Pilot Program:

Develop a Neighborhood Greenway Plan and Signage Guide A plan would develop more detailed design criteria, a toolbox of treatments with design details, and detailed recommendations for individual projects. It could also develop guidelines for signage and have signage templates ready for the pilot projects. Determine if a project is a good candidate using criteria defined in the Neighborhood Greenway Plan and suggested here. Further vetting and analysis of the feasibility of neighborhood greenway routes is necessary. Detailed traffic analysis is needed to understand feasibility and scope for each project. All projects should be reviewed based on standard criteria defined in the Neighborhood Greenway Plan. Some suggestion for this criteria could include: • Traffic Conditions are Appropriate: On low volume (<3,000 vehicles per day), low speed (<25 miles per hour) streets. • Connects Missing Gaps: Connects gaps in existing pedestrian/bicycle facilities that are unconnected to the larger corridor. Connects to major greenway, pedestrian, or bicycle infrastructure. • Challenging Gaps to Fill: Locations where bicycle/pedestrian facilities (like sidewalks and greenways) are lacking or challenging to build. • Population Connectivity: Connects to dense or more highly populated areas • Equitable: Connects to areas where there is a high equity/destination score. Continues to balance the distribution of investment in neighborhood greenways throughout the City.

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• Neighborhood & Community Support: Is supported by the local neighborhood and the larger public supports it as well. • Safety Improvements Needed: There is a need for traffic calming and/or to improve safety issues for pedestrians/bicyclists. • Opportunities Exist: The corridor can accommodate improvements that will greatly increase safety and functionality for pedestrians and bicyclists (traffic calming, separated pedestrian/bicycle facilities, etc.). • Supports Existing Plans & Goals: The improvements are aligned with one or more City or other organization sponsored plans and overall goals. Determine who will lead further design and implementation The design can be done in-house, by consultants, or by a partner; the project can be implemented through temporary materials (e.g., paint and flexible delineators) or by more permanent measures.

NEIG H BORH OOD G REENWAY PI LOT RECOMMENDAT ION S Pilot projects are identified based on the prioritization methodology explained earlier. Pilot projects were also chosen for the size of population and neighborhoods they would serve, for their connectivity to Arterial or Spine Greenways, and are based on balanced distribution across the City. Recommended Pilot Neighborhood Greenway Projects (listed by order of importance): 1. Thompson Street Neighborhood Greenway: This project is the top project as it will serve as an interim connection for the Swannanoa River Greenway before the NCDOT improvements are developed (as part of the project #U-5832). Thompson Street from Biltmore Avenue to Glendale Avenue could ensure that Biltmore Village is connected to East Asheville. 2. Lakeshore Neighborhood Greenway: This project was voted as one of the top priorities by the public. Note that this project can, in sections, serve as a multi-use path with an Arterial Greenway typology but will most likely be designed to be a Neighborhood Greenway where constraints don’t allow for a full multi-use path. Further study is needed to determine the final mix of design and typologies.


20

Image 20 / Street Redesign is a Component of Implementing Neighborhood Greenways. (image by Alyson West)

3. Malvern Neighborhood Greenway: This project would connect the existing Hominy Creek Greenway on-street to the Hawthorne at Bear Creek Apartments, where it can be off-street and connect into existing pathways at Malvern Hills Park. A final connection would be from the park to Patton Avenue. 4. Downtown Neighborhood Greenway Loop: This loop would take users around the outer edge of downtown and make important connections to Spine Greenways and other neighborhood greenways. Some of this loop already has existing bike lanes, sidewalks, and traffic calming measures. The Coxe Avenue and South Lexington Avenue Complete Streets Design project segment of this loop can serve as a first phase of implementation.

the Oakley neighborhood to the Swannanoa River Greenway using Merchant Street and Glendale Avenue. 6. Beaverdam Connector Neighborhood Greenway: This would connect Beaverdam Lake to Elkwood Avenue. This short stretch makes a critical connection from the Beaver Lake to the Woodfin boundary, where Woodfin’s future Beaverdam Creek Greenway will connect. 7. Haw Creek/Kensington Neighborhood Greenway: This project would connect the Haw Creek and Beverly Hills neighborhoods to the Swannanoa River Greenway.

5. Oakley West Neighborhood Greenway: This project would serve as the primary connection of

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1

Map 19. Neighborhood Greenways Pilot Project Map

Woodfin

N3 N17

Mile

Beaver Lake

26

NORTH

N18

N6 N7 N28

240

N12

240

N32 N15 40

N20

N33 N23

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD GREENWAY PILOT PROJECTS

240

Pilot Projects

N6

Downtown Asheville

Lake Julian

City of Asheville Area Cities N7

AVL Regional Airport

Fletcher N28

N32

0.5 Miles

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Mills River


Table 11. City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Neighborhood Greenway Pilot Projects

City of Asheville Greenway Network Phasing Plan: Neighborhood Greenway Pilot Projects Project Phasing Notes (Project in Bold are the City’s Top 10 Projects) Map ID #

Greenway Name

Next Steps

Project Development Notes

Short Term

Medium Term

Long Term

Planning

TBD

TBD

N3

Beaverdam Connector Neighborhood Greenway

Planning

N6, N7, & N32

Downtown Neighborhood Greenway Loop

Planning, some sections completed or being studied

Likely will be broken into implementation sections with Coxe/Lexington Ave. being the first to implement

Planning

TBD

TBD

N12 & N15

Haw Creek/Kennsington Neighborhood Greenway

Planning

Phase in when the Swannanoa River Greenway will be built

Planning

TBD

TBD

N17 & N18

Lakeshore Neighborhood Greenway

Planning

May be partially an Arterial Greenway and partially this typology. TBD based on a more detailed study

Planning

TBD

TBD

N20

Malvern Neighborhood Greenway

Planning

Connects much of Malvern Hills to Patton Ave., two parks and commercial

Planning

TBD

TBD

N23

Oakley West Neighborhood Greenway

Planning

Connects much of the Oakley Neighborhood to the Swannanoa River Greenway

Planning

TBD

TBD

Construction

Soon to go into construction

Construction

Preliminary Engineering

Interim improvements to make a safe connection for the Swannanoa River Greenway

ALL

South Slope and River N28 & Arts Neighborhood N32 Greenway Connector

N33

Thompson Street Neighborhood Greenway

See the following page for a more detailed description of each of the pilot projects

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S TEP 4 : THE P RIO RITIZ AT IO N PRO C E S S A N D RES U LT S Factors Determining Project Priorities Several factors were weighed to develop the top implementation projects. This includes projects at all stages of development, from those that are just referenced in this plan, to those that are “shovel ready” (ready for construction). The determining factors that elevate greenways to the highest ranking are: Project Development Stage Status, Including Funding Status Stages of project development sequentially include: (1) documented in a plan; (2) a full feasibility study has been developed; (3) construction documents and permitting are completed; (4) recent cost estimates are available and complete, making it a “shovel ready” project; and (5) full or partial funding is secured and the project is awaiting the bidding process. Importance to the Entire Greenway Network’s Connectivity Greenways that are important to regional connectivity, like the Greenway Spines, are priorities, as are greenways that connect whole areas of the City to these Greenway Spines. Additionally,the Greenway Spines that serve as the backbone to the Hellbender Regional Trail System (see Map 16) were given a high priority. Equity Greenways that connect areas of the City with high Equity and Destination scores were prioritized. Additionally, greenways are prioritized so that they are equitably distributed across the City. Legacy neighborhoods may require stabilization plans prior to project implementation. This evaluation may result in revised projects, as well as delays to address stabilization efforts. For more information see Chapter 8, the Pre-Design Project Development Checklist. Potential for Funding Greenways that align with transportation funding criteria, or other funding opportunities, are most likely to be funded, regardless of where they fall on the priority list. Typical criteria include opportunity to spur economic development and tourism, improve access, and alignment with community plans.

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Partnerships that Advance Development Partnerships with the MPO or NCDOT, as well as other regional partners (e.g., the Fonta Flora State Trail) or willing private landowners, can elevate the likelihood of greenway implementation. Project Development Status When looking at the top priorities for funding greenways, it is important to consider projects that have momentum and support and have already been partially funded and are in development. Community Input Once the full list of greenway corridors was identified and assigned a typology, the community was asked to weigh in on their priority Arterial and Neighborhood Greenways in an online survey. Since the Greenway Spines are the highest priority, often associated with larger roadway or redevelopment projects, and critical to the network, the Project Team decided to have the public only weigh in on the Arterial Greenways and Neighborhood Greenways.

Public Input Summary Table 12 shows the top ranking greenways based on public input and includes selected public comments that are representative of each greenway that ranked higher. Secondary Priority The following projects received a fewer amount of public votes than the high-medium priority projects, but did receive a minimum of three votes each. • Rhododendron-Falconhurst Neighborhood Greenway • Richmond Hill Neighborhood Greenway • Weaver Park Neighborhood Greenway • Montford Arterial Greenway • Chunn’s Cove Arterial Greenway • Beaucatcher Neighborhood Greenway • Shiloh Neighborhood Connections (multiple) • Fairway Neighborhood Greenway • Haw Creek Arterial Greenway


Table 12. Public Input Results and Comments (Arterial Neighborhood Greenways Below are Listed in Order of Public Rankings)

Arterial Greenways

Neighborhood Greenways

Lakeshore Greenway/Lakeshore Neighborhood Greenway: “Important route for pedestrians and bikers but there isn't enough safe space. Lots of commuter traffic.”

Downtown Loop Neighborhood Greenway: “It will open up safe connections between the Mountainside Park/ Southside area and North Asheville.”

Beaverdam Extension Greenway: “This will be essential in completing a safe way to navigate from Lakeshore to Merrimon.” “Very important to improve walkability of this segment.”

Kimberly Neighborhood Greenway: “This is a really valuable relief street for anyone walking or riding bikes going north/south and not wanting to deal with Merrimon. I use it all the time!”

Reed Creek Greenway: “So so important. Connecting the existing greenway network with the river is a must. Plenty of people are already walking/biking out this way and it is not safe.”

UNCA Neighborhood Greenway: “Great start, needs to connect more thoroughly to UNCA campus and Botanical Gardens and Broadway beyond.”

Amboy Sidepath Greenway: “Creating a separate (high speed) path would significantly improve the utility of Amboy Road as a 'commuting' route into the city.” Note, there were many comments about the need to improve the Amboy Bridge over the French Broad River.

River Arts Neighborhood Greenway: “This is an important connection between West Asheville/RAD and the South Slope and into downtown. It is nice because it is along a street that by design slows drivers down and makes it more comfortable to ride on.”

Sweeten Creek Greenway: “This would be an extremely beneficial connection between parts of south Asheville and downtown (and beyond). As of now, I would not ride my bike with my daughter or by myself from South Asheville to downtown. There is no safe route that prioritizes bikes let alone pedestrians of any kind.”

Malvern Neighborhood Greenway: “This is a major connection for West Asheville; it would enable a lot of residents in West Asheville to access the park in that area and not have to drive. Parking is limited and it would make it much safer for everyone wishing to use the park.”

Biltmore/McDowell Greenway: “The best option for safely expanding multimodal travel between downtown and Biltmore Village.”

Thompson Street Neighborhood Greenway: “This is super important to connecting Oakley to the outside world. Oakley is one of the most boxed in areas in the city tracks on both sides, I-240, and sidewalks roads on both sides of the Swannanoa.”

Canie Creek Greenway: “The Canie Creek space is an important greenspace for the Malvern Hills neighborhood already, making it formal and connecting it to other greenways would give our neighborhood more walking access and possibly better walking commutes.”

Oakley West Neighborhood Greenway:“This will represent one of the safest ways for Oakley residents to make their way to the Swannanoa River Greenway... We would also like slow street connections via East Street and via Stoner Road.”

Rhododendron Creek Greenway: ”Good connection point for W. Asheville residents to hop on at the park or Sand Hill Road.” Smith Mill Creek Greenway: “This is an important connection that is currently very challenging to make on a bicycle.” Reed Creek Extension Greenway: “Would improve access between Reed Creek greenway and points south.” Ragsdale Greenway: “This would see high use since it would connect/extend the popular Hominy Creek greenway.”

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TO P 10 P RIO R I T Y G R E E NWAY P RO JEC TS F O R T H E C I T Y OF A S H E V IL L E The following are the top priority greenway projects that the City of Asheville should advance. They are listed in order of importance. Note that some of these may contain portions of NCDOT projects which are detailed in their own section on page 105. Greenways that will be built solely as NCDOT projects are described there as well. Neighborhood Greenways are not included in this list but pilot projects have been suggested further on page 96. The following list briefly describes each project, its status, and factors for ranking this project as a “top” project.

1 / Swannanoa Greenway (Greenway Spine) The Swannanoa Greenway is a top priority for the City and is a major east-west connection of the regional Hellbender Trail Network. This includes multiple implementation stages with two NCDOT projects, the Thompson Street Neighborhood Greenway as an interim measure, and City-led sections. This is also part of the Fonta Flora State Trail.

2 / Beaucatcher Greenway (Arterial Greenway) This project would complete the envisioned “River to Ridge” initiative of connecting greenways from the French Broad River, through downtown, and up to Beaucatcher. Construction documents have been completed for the greenway and it has partial funding. Some redesign is being considered to lessen the cost and preserve trees. This project ranks high due to its near completion status.

3 / Reed Creek Greenway (Arterial Greenway) The City has received funding to initiate a feasibility study for this greenway. The City will need to secure funding for full construction documents and construction. This would include the uncompleted sections north to Broadway and south to downtown.

4 / French Broad River Greenway North (NRADTIP) (Greenway Spine) This greenway would connect the existing French Broad River and Wilma Dykeman Greenway north to the planned Woodfin Greenway. It is a critical regional greenway and part of the Hellbender Trail Network.

Figure 21. A Portion of the Soon to be Constructed Swannanoa River Greenway (from Glendale Avenue to Bleachery Boulevard).

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5 / Hominy Creek Greenway East (Greenway Spine) This segment connects West Asheville, Shelburne Road, and the existing Hominy Creek Greenway to the Farmers Market and Hominy Creek Park. Buncombe County has received funding from the French Broad MPO through the NCDOT’s Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) process to do preliminary engineering for the greenway section that connects the French Broad Greenway to the WNC Farmers Market. The unfunded portion is the section from the Farmers Market to Shelburne Road.

6 / West Asheville Rail-with-Trail Greenway and Deaverview Connector (Greenway Spine) This packages a regional Greenway Spine (the railwith-trail) with a greenway that connects to Roger Farmer Memorial Park and affordable housing in the Deaverview neighborhood. Other than a constructability analysis done for this plan (which is detailed in Step 1 and Step 2 of this Chapter) no further study has been done. A greenway feasibility study is the first step for this project. This project ranks high due to its regional connectivity, access to many neighborhoods and commercial areas, and broad service to an area of the City that has one of the higher destination and equity scores. Working with the legacy neighborhoods (like the Emma community) surrounding this corridor will be a critical initial step.

9 / South Asheville Rail-with-Trail/ Sweeten Creek Road Greenway (Spine and Arterial Greenways) A greenway/multi-use path on Sweeten Creek Road is needed to connect the South Asheville Rail-withTrail into Biltmore Village and to the Swannanoa River Greenway. Further discussions with Watco-Blue Ridge Southern Railroad are needed prior to initiating a feasibility study.

10 / Smith Mill Creek Greenway (Arterial Greenway) This greenway starts near the Falconhurst Preserve and parallels Patton Avenue, ultimately connecting into the greenway that will be traveling over Bowen Bridge. The City’s Parks Department analyzed the feasibility of the greenway through a report.

7 / Hendersonville Road Multi-use Path and Jake Rusher Greenway (Arterial Greenways) Two different greenways link together to create a connection to Lake Julian and Jake Rusher Parks. It is critical that the Lake Julian Greenway is advanced simultaneously (led by the County) to make a complete connection. This project is important because it provides connection to commercial development, two parks, and benefits an area that is under-served by pedestrian/bicycle infrastructure.

8 / Rhododendron Creek Greenway (Arterial Greenway) Rhododendron Creek connects West Asheville Park and the surrounding neighborhoods to the Hominy Creek Greenway. The City has acquired some of the easements needed to complete this greenway. Due to this being a short segment, bypassing feasibility into preliminary engineering is recommended.

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2

Map 20. Top Greenway Projects Map

Miles

Woodfin

NORTH

Beaver Lake 26

3

4 240

6 10

2 240

2

40

1 8 40

1

9

40

5

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

9

TOP TEN GREENWAY PROJECTS

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

Lake Julian

240

Greenway Spine Arterial Greenway

7

Greenway Network Components Downtown Asheville

26

City of Asheville Area Cities

AVL Regional Airport

2 Fletcher

2 2

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Mills River


N C D OT GR E E NWAY ( M U LTI-U SE PAT H S ) P RO JEC TS PR IO R I T I Z AT ION

• Bleachery Boulevard/Swannanoa Road to Azalea Park (NCDOT project #U-6046): construction anticipated beyond 2030. • Thompson Street Neighborhood Greenway: Interim improvements will make it a much improved connection to the existing greenway project. See more about this in the Neighborhood Greenway section of this plan.

The following are projects that NCDOT would be involved with or lead as the manager of state roads. The projects are typically a part of road corridor improvement studies that include complete street measures. Much of NCDOT’s prioritization of projects may change due to a funding shortfall, so the timelines indicated below will likely change. Note that NCDOT and other transportation organizations typically refer to greenways as multi-use paths.

2. North RADTIP (French Broad River Greenway): Right-of-way acquisition is anticipated for 2025 and construction for 2029. This is packaged as part of the I-26 connector projects below. NCDOT will lead the design and construction of the greenway from Pearson Bridge Road to the planned Woodfin Greenway (Riverside Road/ Broadway interchange).

NCDOT Projects and Corridor Studies that Include Greenway Elements

3. I-26 Connector Project Greenway Improvements: Construction is anticipated in stages, beginning in 2024 for the downtown sections. The City’s Transportation and Planning & Urban Design Departments will study plans to ensure that there are neighborhood connections to the pedestrian/bicycle facilities built with this project . Also of note, significant NCDOT rightof-way will be purchased in the area of the Smith Mill Creek. The City should explore future options to build the Smith Mill Greenway and also explore ways to incorporate natural surface trails in this area as part of Asheville Unpaved.

Map 21 illustrates the locations of the numbered projects listed below. 1. Swannanoa River Greenway: • Meadow Road (NCDOT project #U-4739): construction is anticipated in 2029. • Biltmore Avenue to Glendale Avenue (NCDOT project #U-5832) construction anticipated beyond 2030. This is deemed by the City as the highest priority of all projects. The City is looking at the entire Swannanoa River Road corridor as an opportunity for urban revitalization and a chance to move the road away from the river which floods and is eroding. The greenway will be part of a broader project that is envisioned for the entire corridor.

21

Image 21 / Proposed West Asheville Greenway as part of I-26 Connector Project. (Source: French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization Governing Board Presentation, 015)

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\7 22

Image 22 / Hendersonville Road Proposed Multi-use Path (After) south of Long Shoals Road Entering the City of Asheville. (Source: Hendersonville Road Corridor Study, 2021)

4. Sweeten Creek Road Greenway: (NCDOT project #U-2801A) A 10-foot multi-use path is proposed along the entire five-mile length of the Sweeten Creek Road corridor. NCDOT is considering removing this project from the State Transportation Improvement Plan list due to funding shortfalls. 5. Hendersonville Road: The majority of Hendersonville Road was evaluated in a corridor study led by the French Broad River MPO. A fivemile greenway/multi-use path was incorporated into recommendations. The plan recommends building the first segment from Rock Hill Road to the Walmart Super Center. Note that another segment of this corridor is prioritized in this plan’s Top 10 Greenway Priority Projects. 6. Tunnel Road: This corridor was also studied by the French Broad River MPO where the City identified the need for improved pedestrian and bicycle access. Results from the Tunnel Road Corridor Study indicate that sections of the studied corridor (Beaucatcher Tunnel to the South Tunnel/ Swannanoa River Road intersection) have excess capacity, meaning there is potential space to reallocate roadway use for bicycle and pedestrian facilities. Each segment of the roadway addressed in the study includes a “Road Space Reassignment within Existing Right-of-Way” and a “Road Space

106 /// GAP Plan /

Reassignment (with Development)” scenario with cross sections that illustrate recommended multimodal facilities. In most cases, the recommendation is for a multi-use path or some type of separated facilities that dedicate more space to bicyclists and pedestrians. 7. Craven Street Bridge: Craven Street Bridge connects the French Broad River West Greenway with the Wilma Dykeman Greenway. A small sidewalk on the bridge is heavily trafficked by greenway users, often forcing them onto the road when there are multiple users. Improvements to this bridge are needed to better accommodate greenway users. 8. Biltmore Avenue/McDowell Corridor Study: The Biltmore Avenue and McDowell Street Corridor Study evaluated Biltmore Avenue, McDowell Street/Asheland Avenue, and Southside Avenue for changes that may better service all modes of transportation. The plan recommends 19 project segments that include an advisory shoulder, neighborhood greenways (termed bicycle boulevards in the study), one-way separated bike lanes, segments with sharrows, a sidepath and a two-way separated bike lane.


1 Map 21. NC Department of Transportation (NCDOT) Projects

Mile

Woodfin

NORTH

Beaver Lake 26

2

6 3 240

240

7 40

8 1 40

4

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

5 OTHER PLANNED PROJECTS Adopted Study with a MUP

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

Discuss with City 240

Lake Julian

6

I-26 Improvements STIP Funded Downtown Asheville City of Asheville

26

Area Cities

3

AVL Regional Airport Fletcher

8 Mills River

/ GAP Plan /// 107


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$$$$$ (Multi-million dollar project) Costs will include design, ROW, an construction with 1-2 major bridge spans of the Swannanoa River. Next steps include pre-design activities like traffic analysis, public engagement, and other steps to inform more detailed design.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

RR OAD

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IVE ANO AR SWA NN

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• Description: This 10-14’ greenway is the city’s major east-west connection running along the Swannanoa River. It connects commercial, Biltmore Village, West Asheville, Oakley, and East Asheville, and Biltmore Village.

ST R

• Length: 8.77 miles

108 /// GAP Plan /

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

Note that the City wants to look at a larger project area that may mean the greenway and road are not constrained to the road’s current footprint. Actual greenway alignment is to be determined.


CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

3-lane road section at intersections, middle lane tappers away as road leaves intersections.

SWANNANOA RIVER ROAD (WEST SECTOIN

A

COMMERCIAL/ PRIVATE PROPERTY

12-foot Greenway

(RE-DESIGN)

Maintained riparian edge

Existing Utilities

Swannanoa River

Buffer varies Min. 5’ Average 10’

SWANNANOA RIVER ROAD

Existing Guardrail

GREENWAY

5’Buffer

EXISTING SWANNANOA RIVER ROAD

KEY ELEMENTS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

A. Greenway designed and built as part of NCDOT road redesign project as part of a larger city-driven Swannanoa River Road (Road revitalization and flood control project. Greenway is Associated Segments: proposed to be on the north side of Swannanoa River 1-A Road.

Re-design)

B. Thompson Street Advisory Bike Lanes (or yield condition Notes of Interest: roadway) can serve as an interim connection until there-design where significant takeings occur. Only feasible in case of road NCDOT sections along Swannanoa River Road can be B built. C. Greenway section near the Municipal Course would be designed and built as part of a NCDOT road redesign project. The greenway would be on the south side of the road.

Advisory Bike Lanes on Thompson Street can serve as an interim connection for the greenway.

Simpson Street- On-Street Greenway Connector (Examp

4 Existing utility

C

Existing Swannanoa River road

Existing utility

Associated Segments:

8-12-foot Greenway

Reduced river buffer

5-C

Potential floodplain impacts

Notes of Interest:

SWANNANOA RIVER ROAD (EAST SECTOIN

On-street paint can act as traffic calming • Road has minimal local traffic

5’Buffer

Existing fence

EXISTING RIGHT-OF-WAY EXISTING CITY OWNED GOLF COURSE

SWANNANOA RIVER ROAD

GREENWAY Swannanoa River Retaining wall height varies in size and Greenway may need railing in some locations Represents slope in areas of most constricted space

Swannanoa River Road (No Road Re-design) GAP Plan Associated Segments:

D-2

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B EAUCATCHER GREEN WAY

0

Greenway Type

500

1,000 Ft

Kimberly

Existing Spine

Weaver Pa rk

INVESTMENT LEVEL

Soon To Be Constructed Spine Greenway Spine

Existing Arterial Greenway Arterial Greenway Neighborhood Greenway

Beucatcher is mostly funded. Even if the design is revised, it may be close to being shovel ready.

Potential Other Greenway

Tun

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$$$$$

County-Planned Greenway

Beaucatcher Greenway Status

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

City-led project

• Greenway Type: Arterial Greenway

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• Description: Connects Memorial Stadium to the historic Helen’s Bridge and a spur trail to connect to the future White Fawn Overlook Park. The City plans to modify full construction documents to be able to build access sections at both ends that enhance public access and safety and can be built with existing funds.

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240

DOWNTOWN

• Length: 1.25 miles

THER

2

CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS


CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

KEY ELEMENTS

SOUTHERN SECTION

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

MCCORMICK FIELD

HI

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MEMORIAL STADIUM

MEMORIAL STADIUM CONNECTOR

Natural surface trails proposed in this area

DR

C. The Greenway connects to Beaumont Street. Beaumont Street will be improved to allow for separated pedestrian/ bicycle facilities. The greenway terminates at Helen’s Bridge.

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B. The northern section travels along Ardmion Park with some minor safety improvements as it travels on-road,

N

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A. The southern section will be improved, unpaved roadbed to allow for drainage and improved surface, but will remain unpaved. A connection to Memorial Stadium will be made and it is yet to be determined whether it is paved or unpaved.

WHITE FAWN RESEVOIR RES

BEUACATCHER GREENWAY

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D. A natural surface trail system of 3-4 miles of trail is proposed in Mountainside Park surrounding the greenway.

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E. The greenway would ultimately connect to the future proposed White Fawn Park, which could also serve as a small trailhead.

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION • Greenway Type: Arterial • Length: 1.13 miles • Description: Includes Reed Creek North from the existing greenway to Riverside Drive/Woodfin municipal boundary and the downtown connection south from the existing greenway.

Placemaking on the existing greenway section

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

D

E

LEFT: The newest section of the greenway to be built RIGHT: This pedestrian overpass crossing of I-240 will be improved with the I-26 Connector project and will be a critical link to downtown and the Downtown Neighborhood Greenway Loop

KEY ELEMENTS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

F

A. Reed Creek will connect to French Broad North (NRADTIP) Greenway at the intersection of Riverside Road and Broadway. The Future NCDOT I-26 Project will redesign this intersection at which point a much safer crossing should be integrated into design. B. This section may go on the north side of Broadway (on University of North Carolina property) or on the south side of Broadway. The feasibility study will determine this.

Location to be determined

C. Existing placemaking and branding of the greenway can be integrated into future segments. D. The southern section is the newest to be built. E. The pedestrian overpass to be improved as part of I-26 Connector project. F. A feasibility study will determine how the greenway will travel on Hill Street.

Pedestrian Overpass Crossing

E

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4

CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

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• Description: The City is leading a the 1.27-mile section along the French Broad River. At Pearson Bridge Road, the greenway would cross at-grade and then parallel Riverside Drive as a multi-use path for another 0.56 miles. This section would be led by NCDOT.

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

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A feasibility study already completed and led by Buncombe County. Design, ROW acquisition and construction are next steps. The City anticipates engaging consultants to assist with the design process in 2022.

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INVESTMENT LEVEL

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F R E NCH BROA D GREEN WAY ( NOR TH R ADT IP)

500

Existing Arterial Greenway Arterial Greenway Neighborhood Greenway Potential Other Greenway

26

County-Planned Greenway

French Broad Greenway (North RADTIP) Status NCDOT to make improvements as part of Riverside Drive Project

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114 /// GAP Plan /

Tra il

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D. The greenway is proposed as a multi-use path along Riverside Drive from Pearson Bridge to Broadway due to railroad constraints along the river. E. The Broadway/Riverside Drive intersection will be redesigned as part of the Future I-26 project. The Woodfin Blueway Greenway design (led by the County) is underway and travels north for several more miles.

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C. The greenway is proposed to travel alongside the river which is still largely industrialized in this area. It is proposed to cross on-grade at Pearson Bridge Road.

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B. The I-26 Connector project will have new elevated freeway connection that travels over this area and ties into the existing I-26.

C French B road

A. The proposed greenway connects into the existing Wilma Dykeman and French Broad Greenways just north of the Norfolk Southern railroad bridge over the French Broad River.

City-led; soon to be developed construction documents

1.27 Miles

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KEY ELEMENTS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

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TYPICAL GREENWAY PROPOSED ALONG THE RIVER

Example Intersection Modifications: Shorten pedestrian crossing, image from the NC 251/ Riverside Drive Greenway Feasibility Study

Top of Bank Varies

French Broad River

Example Intersection Modifications: Shorten pedestrian crossing, image from the NC 251/Riverside Drive Greenway Feasibility Study

D

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GAP Plan

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5

CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

Hominy Creek Greenway

Neighborhood Greenway Potential Other Greenway

way

County-Planned Greenway

240

B

Hominy Creek Greenway Status Buncombe County-led STIP project City-led connections

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KEY ELEMENTS

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B. Decommissioned bridge, proposed as a greenway focal point overlooking Hominy Creek.

iver

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

A. Connect to greenways via high visibility crosswalk at Shelburne Road to connect to future Rhododendron Creek Greenway, and connection to existing Hominy Creek Greenway.

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• Description: Connects the existing Hominy Creek Greenway and West Asheville to the WNC Farmers Market. From there, it connects to the French Broad River Greenway and Hominy Creek River Park.

Arterial Greenway

French Broa d Riv er

• Length: 1.08 miles (0.56 for City-led sections)

Existing Arterial Greenway

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• Greenway Type: Spine

Greenway Spine

Bent Cre

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Soon To Be Constructed Spine

A

$$$$$ County leading middle portion to connect further south along Highway 191. The City would need to lead sections to ensure connectivity to city greenway and parks.

Existing Spine

Rhododendron Creek

HO MIN Y CR E E K GREEN WAY INVESTMENT LEVEL

Greenway Type

WEST ASHEVILLE

ek

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C. Connect to the WNC Farmers Market led by Buncombe County. D. Bridge would be required to cross Hominy Creek to get to French Broad River Greenway and Hominy Creek Park. E. Exact alignment to be determined and should minimize disturbance to parking, and is in high demand during the summer.

116 /// GAP Plan /

0

500

1,000 Ft


CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

A closeup of the Shelburne Road area

BEFORE AND AFTER OF DECOMISSIONED BRIDGE

B

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GAP Plan

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rk

a te

co

INVESTMENT LEVEL

$$$$$ Feasibility study, design, ROW acquisition, and construction are next steps.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION • Greenway Type: Spine • Length: 6.6 miles (rail-with-trail) and 0.88 for the Deaverview Greenway • Description: Greenway proposed within Blue Ridge Southern Railroad right-of-way. This greenway scores high for addressing equity and connectivity needs. Also has a proposed connection to the Deaverview area. Public engagement with the Emma Community is essential to meeting equity issues in this area.

118 /// GAP Plan /

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WE S T A SHE V I L L E R A IL -W ITH-TR AIL & DE AV E R V I E W CO NNEC TOR

An example of a rail-with-trail in Blackstone River Bike Path in Rhode Island

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WEST ASHEVILLE

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West Asheville Greenway Rail-with-Trail Greenway & Deaverview Connector Status

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County-Planned Greenway

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Potential Other Greenway

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

1 Mile

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

ntown nector - East

KEY ELEMENTS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

A. Murphy Junction will be a challenging area where greenway, railroad, and Emma Road intersects. Crossing underneath the railroad needs to be studied further. B. Further analysis of all road and creek crossings are needed to ensure that the greenway can stay within railroad right-of-way. W KH

C. Deaverview Greenway connects into rail-with-trail at Roger D Farmer Park and Deaverview Road. Its western terminus is Deaverview Apartments. D. From Leicester Highway to Old Haywood Road the railroad right-of-way widens from 75-100 feet, allowing for significant buffering from the rail line. E. There is a challenging crossing area near the Lowe’s entrance off of Smokey Park Highway. See image to right.

EXISTING CONDITIONS ALONG THE RAIL LINE

See Appendix 9 for a more detailed analysis of the railwith-trail.

E

IN

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Challenging crossing area near entrance of Lowes off of Smokey Park Highway, yellow dashed line indicated potential greenway alignment options

INTERSECTION WITH PINEY PARK RD

INTERSECTION WITH BEAR CREEK RD

INTERSECTION WITH JOHNSON BLVD

MURPHY JUNCTION (TWO RAILROAD LINES AND SMITH MILL CREEK INTERSECT)

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GAP Plan

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look Rd Gree nwa y

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Neighborhood Greenway

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County-Planned Greenway

Hendersonville Road Multi-use Path & Jake Rusher Greenway Status

B

Buncombe County-led as part of County’s Lake Julian Park

0

City-led project

H E N DE RS O NV I L L E ROAD M U LTI-U SE PATH & JAK E R U S HER GR E E NWAY INVESTMENT LEVEL

$$$$$

Proposed Greenway

Feasibility study, design, ROW acquisition, and construction are next steps.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION • Greenway Type: Arterial

Jake Rusher Park and Walking Path

• Length: 1 mile (City-led section) • Description: Greenways travels from Sweeten Creek, through Jake Rusher Park, and as a multi-use path along Hendersonville Road until it connects into the Lake Julian Greenway (County-led greenway).

120 /// GAP Plan /

A

se

Potential Other Greenway

The Jake Rusher Park existing walking path and proposed greenway

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

KEY ELEMENTS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

A. Starting at Sweeten Creek Road, the greenway runs through Jake Rusher Park, which already has a walking loop around the park that could be partially expanded to accommodate a full-sized greenway. B. The crossing of Hendersonville Road will be a design challenge since there are no nearby signalized crossings. Options for improved crossing should be analyzed. C. A multi-use path can travel along Hendersonville Road as proposed in the Hendersonville Road Corridor Study, or a greenway can go behind businesses along the shore of Lake Julian. D. If paralleling the road, a greenway connection into the South Asheville Rail-with-Trail would require further study since there is opportunity to use the elevated bridge that is inactive (no longer being used by Duke’s Power Plant) in this spot to cross over Hendersonville Road. E. Connect into the proposed Lake Julian Greenway using the decommissioned rail line segment than runs from points D to E.

BEFORE AND AFTER AT JAKE RUSHER PARK

A

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GAP Plan

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8

CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

0

RH O D O D END RO N CR EEK G R EENWAY

500

1,000 Ft

INVESTMENT LEVEL

E

E

PROJECT DESCRIPTION • Greenway Type: Arterial

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Feasibility study for northern section (see map), design, ROW acquisition, and construction are next steps.

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• Length: 1 mile • Description: Rhododendron Creek is an important greenway connection for West Asheville, as it would connect much of the neighborhood to the river, French Broad River Greenway, the River Arts District, and west to the existing and proposed Hominy Creek.

D

Greenway Type

Greenway Spine

1

Existing Arterial Greenway

KEY ELEMENTS

Arterial Greenway Neighborhood Greenway

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122 /// GAP Plan /

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City-led design/build project

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E. The Second Phase of the greenway needs further refinement and easements.

Rhododendron Creek Greenway Status

ek Cre

D. The greenway would connect through West Asheville Park where it would also connect a proposed Neighborhood Greenway.

County-Planned Greenway

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C. The First Phase of the greenway is currently being assessed by the City. A design-build option is being explored. The City is working on finalizing easements.

Potential Other Greenway

T PH

A. Improved pedestrian/bicycle crossing needed to connect major greenway intersection.

FIRS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

on Creek Gr e dendr R h odo

Existing Spine Soon To Be Constructed Spine

B. The City has assessed how existing City-owned property can accommodate the greenway.

WEST ASHEVILLE

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

N CO SE D E AS PH

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DAVENPORT RD

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West Asheville Park

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Hominy Creek Greenway

Study area for Rhododendron Creek Park, representing the area where a greenway route is being studied.

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GAP Plan

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A.

CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY

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INVESTMENT LEVEL

$$$$$ Feasibility study, design, ROW acquisition, and construction are next steps.

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

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• Greenway Type: Spine • Length: 5.8 miles

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• Description: This greenway is proposed to travel in Blue Ridge Southern Railroad’s existing right-of-way, which is wide in some areas. This line is also less active, making it a prime opportunity for a greenway.

40

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Ke n South Tunnel Road Greenway Rvrb n a Park no PROJECTS nna Swan a n a n oa Sw r Oa kle a Riv e r t ano e n e r an pson S t Sw om 0 0.5 1 Mile Th

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Greenway Type Existing Spine Soon To Be Constructed Spine

E. Railroad right-of-way becomes a challenge in this area, requiring the greenway to transition to a multi-use path on Sweeten Creek Road.

Mountains-to-Sea Trail

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Arterial Greenway Neighborhood Greenway

S. Ashevi

Road

Potential Other Greenway

Overlook

County-Planned Greenway

Sweeten Creek multi-use Path; work with NCDOT

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South Asheville Rail-with-Trail; City-led project

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F. The Swannanoa River Greenway Feasibility t pur Study proposed a new connection across Norfolk Southern’s rail line to Thompson Street in this area.

B

th Pa

Existing Arterial Greenway

D. The Shiloh community has identified several bicycle/pedestrian improvements that could connect well into this greenway.

124 /// GAP Plan /

se

Greenway Spine

C. A connection up to the Blue Parkway and the Mountains-to-Sea Trail should be coordinated with the National Park Service.

i-u Mult

B. Key roadway crossings can be enhanced to provide connections into the surrounding community.

rai l

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KEY ELEMENTS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

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Blue R

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Artist’s rendering of South Asheville Rail-with-Trail at Mills Gap Road

C

Connection to the Blue Ridge Parkway and Mountains-to-Sea Trail

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rwy

Emma G

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Greenway Type Soon To Be Constructed Spine

F

Existing Arterial Greenway Arterial Greenway Neighborhood Greenway

ay

W

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

d oa Br

Smith Mill Creek Greenway Status Ri

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0.5 Mile

S MI T H M ILL CREEK G R EEN WAY

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Smith Mill Creek Greenway

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Smith Mill Greenway Connection (Unpaved Trail)

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CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS a

El. Br. C.

INVESTMENT LEVEL

$$$$$

KEY ELEMENTS

*See Location on Map by Corresponding Letters

Feasibility study, design, ROW acquisition, and construction are next steps.

A. The greenway ties into Falconhurst Natural Area, and a trail that will need to be unpaved per easement restrictions.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

B. The greenway passes alongside the Armory and crosses near or at Patton Avenue.

• Greenway Type: Arterial • Length: 1.6 miles • Description: Smith Mill Creek Greenway is proposed to travel parallel to Patton Avenue behind commercial strips and along Smith Mill Creek. It then is proposed to cross Patton Avenue where it intersects with at the proposed I-26 Connector. It then travels along Smith Mill Creek down to the river, along land that is proposed NCDOT right-of-way.

126 /// GAP Plan /

C. The greenway travels behind commercial development on the south side of Patton Avenue. D. The greenway would cross at the proposed I-26 junction with Patton Avenue. E. The trail would travel along Smith Mill Creek and what will eventually be NCDOT right-of-way. F. The trail travels down to the French Broad River. A design challenge at Murphy Junction will need to be worked out in order to navigate Norfolk Southern’s elevated crossing, as well as the junction with Emma Road and the proposed West Asheville Rail-with-Trail.


CITY OF ASHEVILLE TOP 10 GREENWAY PROJECTS

p oo

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PL AC EHO LD E R I MAG E Smith Mill Creek

Potential location Potential for Smith Smith Mill Creek for Greenway (shown in Greenway blue) blue) Smith Mill Creek

Smith Mill Creek Greenway Connector to Patton Bridge & Downtown Asheville

Smith Mill Creek Greenway

The Visualization of the Proposed I-26 Connector and how the Smith Mill Creek Greenway interrelates (visualization provided by NCDOT)

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Intentionally blank to facilitate double-sided printing


6

THE ADA TRANSITION PLAN (A) SUMMARY


Lack of sidewalks or sidewalk curb ramps means people in wheelchairs have to go in roads, where people driving have trouble seeing something they don’t expect.” - East Asheville Resident

130 /// GAP Plan /


6

T H E A DA TR ANSITION PLAN (A) SUMMARY The overall goal of the Transition Plan is to remove barriers in Asheville’s public rights-ofway so that pedestrians with disabilities can fully participate in programs, services and activities that the City has to offer. The Transition Plan will result in a plan to remove barriers in the City’s existing public rights-of-way network. Given the length and technical nature of the evaluation and transition plan document, this chapter contains only a summary that highlights the purpose and next steps. For the full report, please refer to the accompanying ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan document.

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on someone’s disability. Title II of the Act requires cities and towns to have a plan to make accommodations for everyone. The ADA Transition Plan component of Close the GAP will result in a new Transition Plan for the City’s Public Rights-of-Way. Examples of public rights-of-way include public streets, sidewalks, road crossings and pedestrian signals, greenways, bus stops, and on-street parking. The requirements for the Plan are as follows: • Identify physical obstacles (or barriers) that make it hard for people to travel and prioritize the areas that have the biggest impact. • Consider the methods to be used to make the facilities accessible. • Develop a schedule with benchmarks to remove barriers.

23

W H AT IS T H E A DA TR A N S ITIO N PL A N F O R T H E P U B L IC R IG H T S - O F - WAY ? Many people with disabilities in our City rely on our pedestrian network as their primary, or only, way to get from place to place. According to the 2019 American Community Survey, 12.2% of Asheville's population has some type of disability. Other sources report a greater disability presence. It is the City's responsibility to ensure that people with disabilities can move about City streets and buildings and participate in programs, services and activities without barriers.

Image 23 / A Person with a Vision Impairment Trying to Navigate the Public Right-of-Way. (Source: Janet Barlow)

/ GAP Plan /// 131


Quick Sheets #5:

What is the Difference Between the ADA Transition Plan and Pedestrian Plan?

SIMPLY: The ADA Plan is about UPGRADES to EXISTING pedestrian facilities and the Pedestrian Plan addresses where to construct NEW facilities. Both must be ADA compliant to provide access for all. What is included in the public rights-of-way? The public rights-of-way include all public streets, sidewalks, road crossings and pedestrian signals, greenways, bus stops, and on-street parking.

What is the difference between a standard ADA Transition Plan and this ADA Transition Plan for the Public Rightsof-Way? This Transition Plan addresses accessibility within the public rights-of-way and does not include information on the City of Asheville’s programs, practices, or building facilities not related to public rights-of-way.

What does ADA compliant mean? All new or altered pedestrian facilities within the City’s public rights-of-way (such as sidewalks, greenways, crossings, curb ramps, traffic signals, parking and bus stops) must meet (to the maximum extent that is feasible) certain requirements that allow access for individuals with disabilities. The route that must be kept compliant is called the Pedestrian Access Route (PAR). ADA compliance means that minimum standards must be met for each dimension or element along the pedestrian access route (PAR) . The following are some examples of elements that must be compliant along a pedestrian route: • Clear width and height (which is sometimes blocked by encroachments - or physical intrusions can include items such as utility poles, traffic signs, street furniture)

132 /// GAP Plan /

• Running grades (the slope in the same direction of travel) • Cross slopes (the slopes across the travel path) • Turning and maneuvering space (the space where a pedestrian turns directions of travel) • Horizontal openings (gaps in the surface of travel, such as a gap or hole in the sidewalk) • Vertical rises (obstructions that are typically bumps or lips, such as the displacement of a sidewalk panel) • Detectable Warning Surfaces (DWS) and locations (also known as truncated domes, DWS is a distinctive surface pattern of domes that are detectable by a cane or underfoot to alert people of their approach to street crossings or other intersections) • Traffic signal features (e.g., pedestrian signals and pushbuttons, audible messages and vibro-tactile features) • Parking and accessible route to parking spaces • Width and length of boarding and alighting areas at transit stops


24

Image 24 / Examples of Public Right-of-Way Include Streets, Sidewalks, Crossings, Pedestrian Signals and Bus Stops, Among Others.

TH E A DA S E L F- E VA L UAT ION Before developing a plan to remove accessibility obstacles, it is necessary to document those obstacles. This is done in an ADA Self-Evaluation and is required under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act and 28 CFR 35.105, to perform a selfevaluation of its current transportation infrastructure policies, practices, and programs. Self-evaluation items include:

Review of Policies and Practices This self-evaluation includes what City policies and practices impact accessibility and examine how the City of Asheville implements these policies. Policies and practices are the standards, guidance and steps that the City follows to guide decisions and projects; while often invisible to the public, they are critical to how the public experiences the right-of-way. This step

will identify obstacles or barriers in City of Asheville's policies and practices. The goal is to develop a plan to provide accessibility and allow for full participation of individuals with disabilities. The results of this review are detailed in Chapter 9 and the accompanying ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan document.

Review Infrastructure Needs This self-evaluation examines the condition of the City of Asheville’s Pedestrian Access Route (PAR) and identifies the need for infrastructure improvements. This includes the sidewalks, curb ramps, pedestrian/ bicycle trails, street crossings, traffic control signals, on-street parking and transit facilities that are located within the City of Asheville rights-of-way. Any barriers to accessibility identified in the selfevaluation and the remedy to the identified barrier are set out in this transition plan.

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Methodology and Approach In the past, the most common practice for reviewing infrastructure for ADA Transition Plans and SelfEvaluations across the United States has involved a detailed identification of pedestrian obstacles by creating a full inventory of every foot of sidewalk, every curb ramp, pedestrian signal, parking space and bus stop. This includes measuring every slope and dimension. This endeavor can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and can take multiple years to complete. It creates massive amounts of data that cities struggle to manage and many never use. On top of this, it is common for cities to determine through this process that nearly every corridor will need some sort of compliance upgrade; and, frequently, up to 90% of facilities have at least one element of noncompliance.

5 25

The City of Asheville, like most communities, has limited resources and competing demands for them. Because of this, the City worked with industry leaders, with input from FHWA staff, that have been conducting ADA Transition Plans for the Public Right-of-Way based on a “corridor approach”.

The Corridor Approach The City of Asheville used a corridor evaluation methodology under the assumption that nearly all of the facilities in the public right-of-way contain at least one non-compliant element with respect to standards for accessibility in the public right-ofway. It is the City’s intent to make all of its pedestrian infrastructure accessible by identifying the areas with the highest needs, the greatest use, and making those improvements in order of priority. The “corridor approach” is an effort to upgrade all pedestrian facilities in the public right-of-way by developing projects to address sections of public corridors such as greenways or streets with sidewalks in an organized fashion, based on the prioritization methodology described in Chapter 4. The corridors (sidewalks and greenway sections) are defined by roadway or greenway beginning and end points as shown in the project lists.

Image 25 / A Common Practice for Reviewing Infrastructure for ADA Compliance is a Detailed Inventory of Slope and Dimension of the Right-of-Way.

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26

Image 26 / People with Disabilities Navigating Asheville’s Public Right-of-Way (Source: Janet Barlow).

Not all corridors are on the priority list; however all existing pedestrian facilities are in the ADA Transition plan. Additional details can be found in the accompanying ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan document. . The corridor approach plan and schedule to remove obstacles was developed methodically as follows: 1. Determine what corridors are most important to upgrade based on destination + equity, safety, connectivity, and public feedback. 2. Develop a schedule and plan with cost estimates to remove obstacles. 3. Upgrade corridors through a systematic process, described in more detail in the accompanying ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan document. The process includes: (i) Complete detailed ADA assessments and inventories for prioritized corridors in accordance with ADA Standards and PROWAG Guidance. (ii) Create and inventory and database updates of individual barriers and fully ADA compliant elements identified on each corridor. (iii) Develop a budget and scope of work for updating all non-compliant elements for each corridor to remove barriers. (iv) Complete project planning, design and construction to upgrade non-compliant elements to the maximum extent feasible.

(v) Remove compliant elements from the inventory of barriers. The benefits of this process are as follows: 1. Provides a methodical approach to upgrading key pedestrian corridors throughout the City based on a thorough prioritization process (including destination + equity, safety, connectivity and public input factor). 2. Includes input from community members with disabilities and considers needed corridor upgrades to remove barriers based on local needs. 3. Allows for methodical advanced planning for crossdepartment and interagency corridor projects in order to maximize implementation and ADA Transition Plan database updates. 4. Moves toward implementation faster (money and time for up front measurements can be spent on implementation). 5. Improves efficiency, as conditions along roadways deteriorate and may be in a different condition by the time any work is done. As such, detailed assessments will be current and not need to be repeated for a project that is programmed for a future year when conditions have changed. 6. Allows for cross-department and interagency coordination for advanced planning of ADA corridor projects that align with other infrastructure projects. This assists with maximizes the efficiency of implementation and ADA Transition Plan.

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M O RE A B OUT T H E A DA The Americans with Disabilities Act, enacted on July 26, 1990, is a civil rights law prohibiting discrimination against individuals on the basis of disability. Title II of the ADA pertains to the programs, activities and services that public entities provide. As a provider of public transportation services and program, the City of Asheville must comply with this section of the Act as it specifically applies to public service agencies. Title II of the ADA provides that, “… no qualified individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any such entity.” (42 USC. Sec. 12132; )

TH E A DA A ND I T S REL ATIO N SH I P TO OT H E R L AW S Title II of the ADA is a companion legislation to two previous federal statutes and regulations: • The Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 is a Federal law that requires Federal facilities that are designed, built, altered or leased with Federal funds be accessible. The Architectural Barriers Act marks one of the first efforts to ensure access to the built environment.

• Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is a Federal law that protects qualified individuals from discrimination based on their disability. The nondiscrimination requirements of the law apply to employers and organizations that receive financial assistance from any Federal department or agency. Title II of the ADA extended this coverage to all state and local government entities, regardless of whether they receive federal funding or not.

What are the Proposed Public Right-ofWay Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG)? Even in 2022, the country is without established standards for accessibility in the public right-of-way. The United States Access Board is developing new guidelines under the Americans with Disabilities Act, called the PROWAG, that will address access to sidewalks and streets, crosswalks, curb ramps, pedestrian signals, on-street parking, and other components of public rights-of-way. These guidelines also review shared use paths, which are designed primarily for use by bicyclists and pedestrians for transportation and recreation purposes. The Access Board issued proposed guidelines for public comment. The Board is in the process of finalizing these guidelines. These guidelines are considered “best practice” until they are finalized and adopted by the Department of Justice and the Department of Transportation, when they become the new standard.

27

Image 27 / Art Installation Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the ADA Law (Source: Tinkering Monkey)

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EP T S

A DA TR A N S I T IO N PL A N P RO JEC T DE V E LO PME NT P RO C ES S ADA Priority Corridors were developed as follows:

Corridor Prioritization: Round 1

Step 1: Corridor Prioritization - Round 1 As described in Chapter 4, this corridor prioritization methodology scored streets in the City to determine the areas of greatest need based on the combination of three scores: destination + equity, safety and connectivity

Step 2: Corridor Prioritization - Round 2 (Public Feedback) In order to account for public concerns and reported issues with the pedestrian network, corridors received points based on public input received during the initial Broad Community Feedback Surveys in January 2021 and the Project Network Survey in the Fall of 2021, as described in Chapter 3 and Appendix 4. Map 22 outlines how the team assigned points after a detailed review of both public surveys.

EP T S Corridor Prioritization: Round 2 (Public Feedback)

EP T S

Step 3: Final Project Lists by Category After the corridor scoring was completed, roadways that scored more than 10 points (maximum score of 20 points) were further divided into two priority project lists based on roadway maintenance and ownership. These categories were developed to assist with identifying project development, funding partnerships and coordination needs.

Final Project Lists by Category

EP T S

North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) Roadways • Priority ADA Project Groups 1- 9 (See Map 23 and Table 13 for project list details).

Corridor Recommendations

City of Asheville (COA) Roadways • Priority ADA Project Groups 1-5 (See Map 24 and Table 14 for project list details) Note that all existing pedestrian facilities are included in the ADA Transition plan database as future corridors for barrier removal. Corridors not included in these lists will be prioritized during year 10 of the ADA Transition Plan, as an update to the schedule for barrier removal as detailed in the accompanying ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan document.

EP T S Round 3 Public Feedback

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Step 4. Project Development & Recommendations

The dates of these focus groups were as follows:

After the public vetted the priority network, the team compiled project lists and evaluated each corridor to determine needed ADA and pedestrian improvements. From that review, each corridor received a project description and recommendations. The corridor evaluation and project development details are available in table format in Appendix 10.

• September 16th, 2021

For projects that have a combination of ADA Transition Plan elements (e.g., existing sidewalks and ramps) and Pedestrian Plan elements (e.g., sidewalk gaps and new crossings), the project descriptions were combined. This will allow for development of a complete project as each corridor is advanced into implementation. Even if these improvements are phased (not completed at the same time or under one project), a completed corridor requires implementation of both missing connections as well as upgrading existing facilities in order to ensure accessibility for all users. The project information included in the tables in Appendix 10 includes the following details on each corridor: • Funding and project development status • Recommended next steps for implementation • Prioritization next steps, where applicable • An ADA conditions scan • Order of magnitude cost estimates

Step 5. Public Input Round 3 The City collected a final round of public input in March 2022 which included an online survey and ADA Focus Group meetings. Additionally, the Think Tank Team, FBRMPO and the Citizens Advisory Committee met one final time which involved various City departments, NCDOT and Buncombe County representatives. More on ADA Focus Group Feedback and Priorities During Round 2 and Round 3 of public input for the Close the GAP Plan, the City hosted a series of virtual ADA Focus Group meetings. These small groups allowed for feedback on projects, priority corridors, as well as City policies that impact mobility for differently abled individuals moving about the City of Asheville.

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• September 14th, 2021 • March 31, 2022 Several one-on-one meetings took place as well. Attendees included individuals with ambulatory impairments, wheelchair users, those with vision impairments (full and partial) as well as support organizations that provide services for individuals with disabilities. Although a few specific corridors were cited during Focus Group meetings, much of the discussion centered around key maintenance and policy issues that result in obstacles along the Pedestrian Access Routes (PARs) in the City. Focus Group and survey participants mentioned several key corridors in need of ADA upgrades. The top mentioned corridors are as follows (in order of most mentioned): 1. Merrimon Avenue 2. Haywood Road 3. Broadway Street (north of I-240) 4. Tunnel Road 5. Amboy Road 6. Fairview Road 7. Kenilworth Road Several corridors were mentioned frequently on the ADA survey that do not yet have full connections and therefore are part of the Pedestrian and Greenway plans, These corridors are as follows: 1. Leicester Highway – Pedestrian Plan 2. Swannanoa River Road – Pedestrian Plan 3. Johnston Boulevard 4. Sweeten Creek Road 5. Riverside Drive 6. Hominy Creek Road The ADA Focus Group feedback related to types of facilities that are desired as well as key maintenance and policy issues are summarized on the following two pages. More details and recommendations on these items are included in Chapter 9: Standards and Policy Recommendations.


1

Woodfin

Map 22. Public Input Score

Mile

Beaver Lake

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

NORTH

26

240 240 40

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE PUBLIC INPUT POINT ASSIGNMENT

240

3 Points 2 Points

Lake Julian

1 Point Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

AVL Regional Airport

0.5

Fletcher

Mills River

Miles

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Quick Sheets #6:

Top ADA Focus Group Priorities: Facilities and Design Items

1

Provide pedestrian push buttons & audible pedestrian signals (most important in loud crowded areas)

2

Improve design, where feasible, for directional ramps (2 per corner vs. single corner ramp)

3

Correct steep sidewalk cross slopes at driveway aprons and minimize driveway curb cuts

4

Provide adequate audible and directional queues for roundabout crossings

28

29

Image 28 / Audible Push Buttons that are Properly Positioned are Essential for Individuals with Disabilities to be able to Cross Busy Streets. (Source: https://twitter.com/ nyc_dot/status/1286339567067463684?lang=gu) Image 29 / Example of Preferred Curb Ramp Configuration for Individuals in Wheelchairs and with Vision Impairments. (Source: Colorado DOT “Curb Ramp Designers Resource” Version 1.3) Image 30 / Example of Steep Driveway Cross Slope on Tunnel Road. Anything Over 2% is Non-compliant and can be a Barrier for Travel. Image 31 / Roundabout Crossings are Challenging for Those with Vision Impairments; Treatments such as Signals and Flashing Beacons with Audible Messages can Help. (Source: https://carmanah.com)

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30

31


Quick Sheets #7:

Top ADA Focus Group Priorities: Maintenance and Policy Items

1

Maintain accessible routes through temporary work zones

2

Remove permanent obstacles in sidewalks such as utility poles

3

Fix sidewalks in poor repair

4

Improve drainage at curb ramps to prevent water ponding and gravel build up

5 6

34

32

33

40

35

Enforce policies that keep temporary obstacles off the Pedestrian Access Route (PAR) such as trash can, signs, snow removal and vegetation overgrowth

Maintain vertical requirements for PAR for cane usage and to prevent injury

37 Image 32 / Example of Temporary Ramp used to Maintain Access through a Temporary Work Zone. (Source Oregon DOT) Image 33 / Example of Utility Poles and Other Obstacles in PAR Merrimon Avenue. Image 34 / Example of a Sidewalk in Poor Repair that Creates and Obstacle. Image 35 / Example of Curb Ramp on Charlotte Street in Need of Better Drainage. Image 36 / Signs in the Sidewalk Create an Obstacle on Merrimon Avenue. Image 37 / Vertical Clearance Requirements Ensure Visually Impaired Pedestrians can Navigate without Injury. (Source: https://www.access-board.gov/ada/ guides/chapter-3-protruding-objects/)

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More on the ADA Conditions Scan For each corridor, the team completed a desktop scan to identify existing condition information available through published maps, photos, local knowledge and geographic information system (GIS) databases. These reviews included an initial “high level” assessment that indicates the prevalence and severity of accessibility barriers within the Pedestrian Access Route (PAR) including transit stops, parking and signals.. This rating database should be updated as corridors are fully assessed during the planning and scoping phase and then updated again as projects are completed and documented as ADA compliant, thus allowing the barriers to be removed from the ADA Transition Plan. The ratings are as follows:

determine cost estimates for the ADA Transition Plan (see Accompanying Document: ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan). The City can use these ratings as a tool when deciding which corridors to program during regular cycles of capital project programming. For example, when a list of ADA projects is considered for an upcoming capital improvement cycle and one is a high priority corridor with a conditions rating of 2 (Good Condition), it may be shifted down on the project list to accommodate a slightly lower priority project with a conditions rating of 5 (Poor Condition).

Detailed Assessments During Corridor Implementation

1. Fully compliant.

During implementation, the City’s first task will be to perform a detailed ADA assessment and develop a project scope of work for each corridor.

2. Good condition: needs compliance review to verify. 3. Fair condition: needs ADA upgrades in spots (specific locations).

The detailed ADA assessment for scoping will include identifying barriers and obstacles for repair. ADA elements should be inventoried using a detailed ADA checklist that should be developed in accordance with ADA Standards and PROWAG Guidance. These elements should include the following*:

4. Moderate condition: needs many ADA upgrades. 5. Poor condition: needs significant ADA upgrades (full sidewalk reconstruction for much of the corridor).

• Curb ramps and crossings

Note that no corridors were assigned a rating of 1 (fully compliant) since corridor assessments have not been completed and all corridors remain on the Transition Plan. The rating system was used to

38

• Sidewalk cracks and gaps • Sidewalk cross slopes • Vertical and horizontal encroachments in the

39

Image 38 / Curb Ramp Elements (Source: Virginia Transportation Research Council) Image 39 / Watauga Street in Montford is an Example of a Sidewalk with an ADA Condition Rating of 5 - In Poor Condition.

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Pedestrian Access Route (PAR must be kept clear per height and width requirements) • Accessible signals and push button placement • Excessive cross slopes at driveway openings openings • Audible crossing features at roundabouts & free flowing right turns • Accessible on-street parking needs • Transit stop accessibility • Location-specific maintenance and policy needs (what is needed to keep pedestrian access route clear (e.g., future utility work, inadequate repairs, trash cans, vegetation)

• •After 20 years, 50% of accessibility features will be ADA compliant to the maximum extent feasible. • After 30 years, 75% of accessibility features will be ADA compliant to the maximum extent feasible. • After 40 years, 100% of accessibility features will be ADA compliant to the maximum extent feasible. Section 5.0 of the Accompanying Document: ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan includes a more detailed implementation plan and schedule for removing physical infrastructure barriers and deficiencies in policies and procedures.

*This is not and exhaustive list. All construction must meet the current federal regulations to ensure that corridors are fully accessible. Post assessment, all elements that are fully ADA compliant may be removed from the ADA Transition Plan. These elements should be documented and maintained on a City database with corridor assessment results and transition plan progress. More on Implementation and Barrier Removal The City of Asheville is committed to eliminating accessibility barriers for individuals with disabilities within its public rights-of-way. As required under 28 CFR 35.150(d)(3), the City must specify a schedule for taking necessary steps to achieve ADA compliance. In addition to ADA Corridor projects, barrier removal will be accomplished over the next 40 years through the following methods. • Capital Improvement Projects (to include Corridor Projects in future years) • Street resurfacing • NCDOT projects • Developer activity • Utilities and other work done under a permit • Grants and Partnerships Below is a summary of the schedule for barrier removal for pedestrian facilities within the City of Asheville’s public rights-of-way: • After 10 years, 25% of accessibility features will be ADA compliant to the maximum extent feasible.

ADA STANDARDS: Please visit to learn more: https://www.ada. gov/2010ADAstandards_index.htm

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1

Woodfin

Map 23. NCDOT: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 9

Beaver Lake

Mile

NORTH

6.D 9.I

26

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

4.F 5.H

9.B 2.E 4.H

8.D

3.G

4.I

240

6.F

2.D 6.E 3.E 2.C 4.G 7.B 4.A 8.C 4.C 7.A 5.A 6.B 9.L

5.I

8.E 8.A

9.A

9.J 3.F

40

9.K

40

3.B 3.A240 5.B

Biltmore Estate

40

9.C

9.M 9.D 9.E 9.F 5.C 4.E

2.B

4.J

4.D

8.B

1.A

3.C

2.A 4.B 8.G

6.A

6.C

Biltmore Forest

2.A 9.M 8.G 4.B 9.E 9.F 9.D

26

3.D

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

6.E

NCDOT: ADA PROJECTS

240

3.E

2.C 8.C

5.C

8.F

2.D

4.G

Biltmore Forest

9.G

7.B

5.E

5.A

Groups 1 and 2

5.D 9.H

Groups 3 and 4

Lake Julian

Groups 5 and 6 Groups 7 and 8 Group 9

4.A

Downtown Asheville

5.F

City of Asheville Area Cities

5.G

7.A

6.B

9.L 4.B

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4.C

AVL Regional Airport

2.A

0.5

Mills River

Miles

Fletcher


Table 13. NCDOT: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 9 Map ID # 1.A 2.A 2.B 2.C 2.D 2.E 3.A 3.B 3.C 3.D 3.E 3.F 3.G 4.A 4.B 4.C 4.D 4.E 4.F 4.G 4.H 4.I 4.J 5.A 5.B 5.C 5.D 5.E 5.F

Segment

Total Score

Tunnel Rd. Biltmore Ave. Fairview Rd. (Alt US 74) Merrimon Ave. (US 25) Merrimon Ave. (US 25) Patton Ave. (US 19/23; Alt US 74) Tunnel Rd. Tunnel Rd. Tunnel Rd. Hendersonville Rd. (US 25)

New Haw Creek Rd. to Porters Cove Rd. Southside Ave. to Thompson St.

19 18

Swannanoa River Rd. to School Rd.

18

I-240 Interchange

18

Planned (MTP)

I-240 to WT Weaver Blvd.

18

Planned (MTP)

Rock Hill Rd to NC 280

17

Study Complete

Charlotte St.

I-240 Interchange

17

Planned (MTP) Fund Short Term ADA Upgrades

Sand Hill Rd. to Old Haywood Rd.

17

Road Name

Smokey Park Hwy. (US 19/23; Alt US 74) Patton Ave. (US 19/23; Alt US 74) Biltmore Ave. (US 25) McDowell St. (US 25) S. Charlotte St. Hendersonville Rd. (US 25) Hendersonville Rd. (US 25) Merrimon Ave. (US 25) Broadway St. Haywood Rd. Haywood Rd. Sweeten Creek Rd. (Alt US 25) Broadway St. S. Tunnel Rd. Hendersonville Rd. (US 25) Long Shoals Rd. (NC 146) Long Shoals Rd. (NC 146) Airport Rd. (NC 280)

Johnston Blvd./Haywood Rd. to I-240 Interchange Chunns Cove to S. Tunnel Rd. Tunnel Rd. to Chunns Cove Rd. I-240 Interchange

18 17 Grouped 17

Funding Status Planned (MTP) Study Complete

Bond Funded (Partial for Sidewalk Gaps) Study Complete Study Complete Study Complete

Old Haywood Rd. to Johnston Blvd./ Haywood Rd. Patton Ave. to Hilliard Ave. Entire St. I-240 to Biltmore Ave.

17

Planned (MTP)

16 16 16

Study Complete

I-40 to Rock Hill Rd.

16

Planned (MTP)

I-40 Interchange

16

WT Weaver Blvd to Beaverdam Rd.

16

Planned (MTP)

I-240 Interchange Sand Hill Rd. to Patton Ave. I-240 to Sand Hill Rd.

16 16 16

Planned (MTP) Funded (NCDOT# HL-0003) Funded (NCDOT# HL-0003)

Crayton Rd. to Rock Hill Rd.

16

Planned (MTP)

Patton Ave. to I-240 Entire St.

15 15

Study Complete

Biltmore Ave. to I-40

15

Hendersonville Rd. to Overlook Dr

15

Schenck Parkway to Overlook Dr

15

Watson Rd. to Hendersonville Rd.

15

Bond Funded for North Side; Planned (MTP) for Remaining

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1

Woodfin

Map 23. NCDOT: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 9 (continued)

Beaver Lake

6.D 9.I 4.F

5.H

9.B 2.E 4.H

8.D

3.G

4.I

240

6.F

2.D 6.E 3.E 2.C 4.G 7.B 4.A 8.C 4.C 7.A 5.A 6.B 9.L

5.I

8.E 8.A

9.A

9.J 3.F

40

3.B 3.A240

Biltmore Estate

1.A

5.B

40

9.C

9.M 9.D 9.E 9.F 5.C 4.E

2.B

4.J

4.D

8.B

6.C 3.C

2.A 4.B 8.G

6.A

9.K

NORTH

26

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

40

Mile

Biltmore Forest

2.A 9.M 8.G 4.B 9.E 9.F 9.D

26

3.D

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

6.E

NCDOT: ADA PROJECTS

240

3.E

2.C 8.C

5.C

8.F

2.D

4.G

Biltmore Forest

9.G

7.B

5.E

5.A

Groups 1 and 2

5.D 9.H

Groups 3 and 4

Lake Julian

Groups 5 and 6 Groups 7 and 8 Group 9

4.A

4.C

Downtown Asheville

5.F

City of Asheville Area Cities

5.G

7.A

6.B

9.L 4.B

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AVL Regional Airport

2.A

0.5

Mills River

Miles

Fletcher


Table 13. NCDOT: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 9 (continued) Map ID #

Road Name

5.G

Airport Rd. (NC 280)

5.H 5.I 6.A 6.B 6.C 6.D 6.E 6.F 7.A 7.B 8.A 8.B 8.C 8.D 8.E 8.F 8.G 9.A 9.B 9.C 9.D 9.E 9.F 9.G 9.H 9.I 9.J 9.K 9.L 9.M

Segment

Town of Fletcher Boundary WT Weaver Blvd. to I-26 Broadway St. Interchange Haywood Rd. Beverly Rd. west to I-240 I-240 to Stradley Mountain Rd./ Brevard Rd. (NC 191) Ridgefield Blvd. Biltmore Ave. (US 25) Southside Ave. to Hilliard Ave. New Haw Creek Rd. Arco Rd. to Beverly Rd. Merrimon Ave. (US Beaverdam Rd. to Wembley Rd. 25) Broadway St. I-240 to WT Weaver Blvd. Beverly Rd. west to Roberts St./ Haywood Rd. Clingman Ave. traffic circle Clingman Ave. Entire St. College St. & Tunnel Charlotte St. to Beaucatcher Tunnel Rd. Brevard Rd. (NC 191) I-240 to Haywood Rd. Sardis Rd. (NC 112) Country Meadows Dr. to Sand Hill Rd. Montford Ave. I-240 Interchange Louisiana Ave. Haywood Rd. to Patton Ave. Sand Hill Rd. Wendover Rd. to Haywood Rd. Hendersonville Rd. to Alpine Ridge Mills Gap Rd. Dr. Swannanoa River Rd. One Way to Bryson St. Amboy Rd. Bridge French Broad River Bridge Patton Ave. to north of Hazel Mill N. Louisiana Ave. Rd. Wood Ave. Swannanoa River Rd. to Future St. All Souls Crescent McDowell St. to Hendersonville Rd. (US 25) Brooke & Lodge St. Entire St. Thompson St. to Hendersonville Rd. Biltmore Ave. US 25 Overlook Dr NC 146 to Springside Rd. Rosscraggon Rd. & Entire St. Rathfarnham Rd. Beaverdam Rd. Merrimon Ave. to Kimberly Ave. Amboy Rd. Entire St. Sand Hill Rd. (NC 112) Lake Dr. to Sardis Rd. Southside Ave. (US Entire St. 25) Biltmore Ave. to Swannanoa River Bryson St. (US 81) Rd.

Total Score

Funding Status

15

Planned (MTP)

15

Partially Funded (NCDOT# BL-0005)

15

Funded (NCDOT# HL-0003)

14 14 14 14

Planned (MTP)

14

Planned (MTP)

14 13 13 12 12 12 12 12

Funded (NCDOT# U-6047)

12

Funded (NCDOT# U-5834)

12 11

Funded (NCDOT# U-4739)

11

Funded (NCDOT# U-6162)

11 11

Study Complete

11

Study Complete

11

Study Complete

11 11 11 11 11

Funded (NCDOT# U-4739)

11 11

Funded (NCDOT# U-6046/5832)

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1

Woodfin

Map 24. COA: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 5

Mile

Beaver Lake

4.G

26

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

NORTH

5.Q 5.R

4.H

4.I 3.D

5.O 3.A 240

5.N

5.J 5.K

5.P

240

4.J 40

5.L

4.E 5.M

40

4.F

5.T

4.K

5.S

40

5.A Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE COA: ADA PROJECTS Group 1

4.H 4.C 2.B 5.R

5.B

5.C

5.F

5.H 5.G 4.B 1.A

5.E

Group 2 Lake Julian

4.L

Group 3 Group 4

4.D

3.D

Group 5

2.A

Downtown Asheville

3.C

5.I

City of Asheville

4.A

3.A

Area Cities

5.D

5.N

3.B

AVL Regional Airport

0.5 5.K

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Mills River

Miles

Fletcher


Table 14. COA: Priority ADA Project Groups 1 - 5 Map ID #

Road Name

1.A

Patton Ave.

2.A 2.B 3.A

Lexington Ave. Haywood St. Hilliard Ave.

3.B

Asheland Ave.

3.C 3.D 4.A 4.B

Asheland Ave. Valley St. Church St. Battery Park Ave. Woodfin & Oak Streets College St. Livingston St. Hospital Dr. Lakeshore Dr. Montford Ave. Chestnut St. Kenilworth Rd. Fairview Rd. College St. Shiloh Rd. Battle Square Walnut St. Coxe Ave. Wall St. O'Henry Ave. Otis St. N French Broad Ave. S French Broad Ave.

4.C 4.D 4.E 4.F 4.G 4.H 4.I 4.J 4.K 4.L 5.A 5.B 5.C 5.D 5.E 5.F 5.G 5.H 5.I 5.J 5.K 5.L 5.M 5.N 5.O 5.P 5.Q 5.R 5.S 5.T

Segment Clingman Ave./Haywood St. to Biltmore Ave.

Total Score 18

Entire St. Entire St. Entire St. Hilliard Ave. to Phifer St./Southside Ave. Patton Ave. to Hilliard Ave. College St. to Hazzard St. Entire St. Entire St.

15 15 14

Entire St.

13

Patton Ave. to Spruce St. Entire St. Entire St. Shorewood Dr. to Merrimon Ave. Entire St. Merrimon Ave. to Broadway St. Tunnel Rd. to Pickwick Rd. Sweeten Creek Rd. to School Rd. Charlotte St. to Spruce St. Entire St. Entire St. Entire St. Entire St. Entire St. Entire St. Entire St. Entire St. Patton Ave. to Hilliard Ave. Lyman St./Clingman Ave. Ext north to Roberts St. traffic circle Livingston St. to Lyman St./ Depot St. Clingman Ave. Ext Victoria Rd. Hospital Dr. to Fernihurst Dr. Victoria Rd. Fernihurst Dr. to Meadow Rd. S French Broad Ave. Hilliard Ave. to Livingston St. Riverside Dr. I-240 to I-26 Ramp State St. Entire St. Murdock Ave. Entire St. Hill St. Montford Ave. to Atkinson St. Wood Ave. & Cedar St. Wood Ave. and Cedar St. Short McDowell St. Meadow Rd. to McDowell St.

Funding Status Planned Repaving Project (Includes ADA) Planned Protected Bike Lane Project (College St. to Biltmore Ave.) Partially Funded (NCDOT# EB-5830)

14 14 14 12 12

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

Partially Funded (NCDOT# EB-5831)

11 11

Partially Funded (Neighborhood Greenway)

11 11 11 12 11 11 11 11 11

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7

THE PEDESTRIAN PLAN (P) RESULTS


It’s the neighborhood and the people that make the walk enjoyable.” - Downtown Resident


7

THE PEDESTRIAN PLAN (P) R E S U LT S

Step 2: Corridor Prioritization - Round 2 (Public Feedback) In order to account for public concerns and reported issues with the pedestrian network, corridors received points based on public input received during the initial Broad Community Feedback Surveys in January 2021 and the Project Network Survey in the Fall of 2021, as described in Chapter 3 and Appendix 4. Map 25 outlines how the team assigned points after a detailed review of both public surveys.

The Pedestrian Plan is a guiding document that provides a clear and transparent path to extending new pedestrian facilities that will create a safe, cohesive and connected system for users of abilities.

P RO JEC T I DE NT I FIC AT ION The Close the GAP Pedestrian Plan goal is to identify top priorities for the following: 1. New sidewalks and sidewalk improvements, such as widening or better separation from traffic. 2. Intersection and mid-block pedestrian crossing improvements.

Image 40 / The City Maintains Most Streets in Downtown Asheville like Haywood Street and Battery Park Avenue.

40

One of the most important purposes of this effort is to provide guidance for City officials and local stakeholders as they make decisions on where to fund construction of new facilities. This plan developed this guidance through the following steps:

Step 1: Corridor Prioritization - Round 1 As described in Chapter 4, this corridor prioritization methodology scored streets in the City to determine the areas of greatest need based on the combination of three scores: destination + equity, connectivity and safety.

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EP T S

Step 3: Final Project Lists by Category

Corridor Prioritization: Round 1

After the corridor scoring was completed, roadways that scored greater than 10 points out of 20 maximum points were further divided into two priority project lists based on roadway maintenance and ownership. These categories were developed to assist with identifying project development and funding partnerships and coordination needs. North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT)

S

TEP

• Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1- 9 (See Map 26 and Table 15 for project list details). City of Asheville (COA) Roadways

Corridor Prioritization: Round 2 (Public Feedback)

• Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1-5 (See Map 27 and Table 16 for project list details)

Step 4: Project Development & Recommendations

S

TEP Final Project Lists by Category

S

TEP

After the public vetted the priority network, the team compiled project lists and evaluated each corridor to determine needed ADA and pedestrian improvements. From that review, each corridor received a project description and recommendations. Examples of the pedestrian plan recommendations that were considered are as follows: • Complete missing sidewalk sections • Provide connections to transit stops • Improve safety at pedestrian crossings • Increase frequency of pedestrian crossings • Widen sidewalks and/or provide separation from traffic

Corridor Recommendations

EP T S Round 3 Public Feedback

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• Multi-use sidepaths were included in some instances where the corridor is part of a planned bicycle route or has previously identified bicycle needs. This is not an exhaustive list of pedestrian facility design needs. For more information, see More on Pedestrian Facility Section at the end of this chapter. Projects with ADA Transition Plan elements (e.g., existing sidewalks and ramps) and Pedestrian Plan elements (e.g., sidewalk gaps and new crossings) have combined project descriptions, which allows City staff to design a complete project as each corridor is advanced into implementation. Completing a pedestrian corridor requires the City to develop


41

42

Image 41 / A Pedestrian Crossing at a Location with a Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon (RRFB) (Source: Texas Transportation Institute) Image 42 / Some of Asheville’s Busiest Corridors, like Tunnel Road, have a Myriad of Overlapping Land Use, Safety and Transportation Needs that Require a Detailed Study.

missing connections identified in the Pedestrian Plan, as well as upgrading existing facilities identified in the ADA Transition Plan. The City has the option to complete corridors under one project or using a phased approach. In addition to the corridor assessment and recommended improvements, a project database was developed for tracking progress, funding and next steps. Some projects are already in process. As such, the database contains the following information.: • Funding and project development status • Recommended next step for implementation • Prioritization of next steps, where applicable The final recommendations were vetted through NCDOT and various City departments to evaluate overlapping capital needs that could impact the timeline and prioritization for the project.

Step 5: Public Input Round 3 A final round of public input was conducted in March of 2022 which included an online survey, ADA focus group meetings, a Citizens Advisory Committee meeting as well as a project Think Tank Team meeting involving various City departments, FBRMPO, NCDOT and Buncombe County representatives.

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Intentionally blank to facilitate double-sided printing

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1

Woodfin

Map 25. 2. Example Public Input Score

Mile

Beaver Lake

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

NORTH

26

240 240 40

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE PUBLIC INPUT POINT ASSIGNMENT

240

3 Points 2 Points

Lake Julian

1 Point Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

AVL Regional Airport

0.5

Fletcher

Mills River

Miles

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1

Woodfin

Map 26. NCDOT: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 9

Beaver Lake

Mile 6.D

26

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

2.C 8.D

5.C 6.C

7.B 8.C

2.B 7.A

2.A

4.E 9.E

9.L

9.C

40

9.B 6.B

8.H 8.G 7.C

5.G

8.F

9.D

240

9.A

240

3.C

40

7.D

4.D 3.F

1.A 7.E

3.D

NORTH

6.A

5.A

40

8.A 2.D

9.K 9.J

5.B

5.F 4.B

4.A

4.C

6.E

1.B

5.A

6.A 8.A

8.E

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

9.I 3.B

4.E 9.J 9.K

26

3.E

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

6.C

9.H

2.B

Biltmore Forest

8.B 3.A

NCDOT: PEDESTRIAN PROJECTS Groups 1 and 2

9.G

7.A

5.F

Groups 3 and 4

Lake Julian

Groups 5 and 6 Groups 7 and 8 Group 9

5.E

Downtown Asheville City of Asheville

5.D

AVL Regional Airport

9.A

0.5 4.E

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Mills River

Miles

9.F

Area Cities

Fletcher


Table 15. NCDOT: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 9 Map ID #

Road Name

Segment

Total Score

Funding Status

1.A

Leicester Hwy.

Patton Ave. to Old County Home Rd.

19

Funded (NCDOT# U-5190) Note: Overlapping Access Management Project (NCDOT# U-5972)

1.B

Tunnel Rd.

New Haw Creek Rd. to Porters Cove Rd.

19

Planned (MTP)

2.A

Patton Ave.

Johnston Blvd./Haywood Rd. to I-240 Interchange

18

Bond Funded (Partial for Sidewalk Gaps)

2.B

Merrimon Ave.

I-240 to WT. Weaver Blvd.

18

Planned (MTP)

2.C

Merrimon Ave.

WT Weaver Blvd. to Beaverdam Rd.

Grouped

Planned (MTP)

2.D

Fairview Rd.

Swannanoa River Rd. to School Rd.

18

3.A

Sweeten Creek Rd.

NC 280 to City Limit

17

Funded (NCDOT# U-2801A)

3.B

Sweeten Creek Rd.

Just south of Edgewood Rd. Ext to Blue Ridge Parkway

17

Funded (NCDOT# U-2801A)

3.C

Patton Ave.

Old Haywood Rd. to Johnston Blvd./Haywood Rd.

17

Planned (MTP)

3.D

Smokey Park Hwy.

Sand Hill Rd. to Old Haywood Rd.

17

3.E

Hendersonville Rd.

Rock Hill Rd. to NC 280

17

Study Complete

3.F

Tunnel Rd.

Chunns Cove to S. Tunnel Rd.

17

Study Complete

4.A

Sweeten Creek Rd.

Crayton Rd. to Rock Hill Rd.

16

Planned (MTP)

4.B

Hendersonville Rd.

I-40 Interchange

16

4.C

Hendersonville Rd.

I-40 to Rock Hill Rd.

16

Planned (MTP)

4.D

Tunnel Rd.

Tunnel Rd. to Chunns Cove Rd.

16

Study Complete

4.E

McDowell St.

Entire St.

16

Study Complete

5.A

Swannanoa River Rd. Bryson St. to Highway 70

15

Funded (NCDOT# U-6046/5832)

5.B

Sweeten Creek Rd.

Brook St. to Crayton Rd.

15

Planned (MTP)

5.C

Broadway St.

WT Weaver Blvd. to I-26 Interchange

15

Partially Funded (NCDOT# BL0005)

5.D

Airport Rd.

Watson Rd. to I-26 Ramps

15

Planned (MTP)

5.E

Airport Rd.

Watson Rd. to Hendersonville Rd.

15

Bond Funded for North Side; Planned (MTP) for Remaining

5.F

Hendersonville Rd.

Biltmore Ave. to I-40

15

5.G

S. Tunnel Rd.

Entire St.

15

Study Complete

6.A

Meadow Rd.

Entire St.

14

Funded (NCDOT# U-4739)

6.B

Sand Hill Rd.

Smoky Park Hwy. to Lake Dr.

14

Funded (NCDOT# U-6037)

6.C

Broadway St.

I-240 to WT Weaver Blvd.

14

Planned (MTP)

6.D

Merrimon Ave.

Beaverdam Rd to Wembley Rd

14

Planned (MTP)

6.E

Brevard Rd.

I-240 to Stradley Mountain Rd./ Ridgefield Blvd.

14

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Map 26. NCDOT: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 9 (continued) Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

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Table 15. NCDOT: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 -9 (continued) Map ID #

Road Name

7.A

College St. & Tunnel Rd.

Charlotte St. to Beaucatcher Tunnel

13

7.B

Riverside Dr.

I-26 Ramp to Broadway St.

13

7.C

New Haw Creek Rd.

Tunnel Rd. to Arco Rd.

13

7.D

Chunns Cove Rd. & Piney Mountain Rd.

Tunnel Rd. to Bella Vista Retirement

13

7.E

Johnston Blvd.

Patton Ave. to Cedar Hill Rd.

13

8.A

Swannanoa River Rd. One Way to Bryson St.

8.B

Mills Gap Rd.

8.C

Old County Home Rd. Entire St.

12

8.D

Broadway St.

I-26 Interchange

12

Funded (NCDOT# BL-0005)

8.E

Sardis Rd.

Country Meadows Dr. to Sand Hill Rd.

12

Funded (NCDOT# U-6047)

8.F

Brevard Rd.

I-240 to Haywood Rd.

12

8.G

New Haw Creek Rd. & Middlebrook Rd.

Old Haw Creek Rd. to Tunnel Rd.

12

8.H

New Haw Creek Rd

Beverly Rd. to Bell Rd.

12

9.A

Southside Ave.

Entire St.

11

9.B

Sand Hill Rd.

Sardis Rd. to Sand Hill School Rd./ W. Oakview Rd.

11

9.C

Sand Hill Rd.

Sand Hill School Rd./W. Oakview Rd. to Wendover Rd.

11

9.D

Sand Hill School Rd.

Entire St.

11

9.E

Amboy Rd.

Entire St.

11

Funded (NCDOT# U-4739)

9.F

Airport Rd .

Ferncliff Park Dr. to Airport Park Rd.

11

Planned (MTP)

9.G

Rosscraggon Rd. & Rathfarnham Rd.

Entire St.

11

9.H

Overlook Dr.

Springside Rd. to Hendersonville Rd.

11

9.I

Rock Hill Rd.

Entire St.

11

Planned (MTP)

9.J

Biltmore Ave.

Thompson St. to Hendersonville Rd. US 25

11

Study Complete

9.K

All Souls Crescent

McDowell St. to Hendersonville Rd.

11

Study Complete

9.L

Amboy Rd. Bridge

French Broad River Bridge

11

Funded (NCDOT# U-4739)

Segment

Hendersonville Rd. to Alpine Ridge Dr.

Total Score

Funding Status

Funded (NCDOT# I-2513D)

Funded (NCDOT# EB-5944)

12 12

Funded (NCDOT# U-5834)

Bond Funded

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1

Woodfin

Map 27. COA: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 4

Mile

Beaver Lake

NORTH

4.G 26

Source: Close the GAP Team Analysis

4.H 3.D 4.I 1.A

3.J

2.A 2.B

4.C

3.C

240

4.D 4.M

40

40

4.B 3.A

240

3.H 3.B

40

4.E

4.F 4.L

3.I 3.E

4.K

3.F

4.A 3.G Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

4.J

240

3.D

COA: PEDESTRIAN PROJECTS Group 1 Group 2

Lake Julian

Group 3 Group 4

4.I

Downtown Asheville

1.A 2.A

City of Asheville Area Cities

3.A 4.B

AVL Regional Airport

0.5 4.D

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Mills River

Miles

Fletcher


Table 16. COA: Priority Pedestrian Project Groups 1 - 4 Map ID #

Road Name

Segment

Total Score

Funding Status Partially Funded (NCDOT# EB-5830)

1.A

Lexington Ave.

Entire St.

15

2.A

Hilliard Ave.

Entire St.

14

2.B

Deaverview Rd.

Pisgah View Rd. to Patton Ave.

14

3.A

Church St.

Entire St.

12

3.B

Livingston St.

Entire St.

12

3.C

N. Bear Creek Rd.

Entire St.

12

3.D

Montford Ave.

Entire St.

12

3.E

London Rd.

Entire St.

12

3.F

Caribou Rd.

Entire St.

12

3.G

West Chapel Rd.

Entire St.

12

3.H

Kenilworth Rd.

Tunnel Rd. to Pickwick Rd.

12

3.I

Fairview Rd.

Sweeten Creek Rd. to School Rd.

12

3.J

Emma Rd.

Craven St./Hazel Mill Rd. to Bingham Rd.

12

4.A

Shiloh Rd.

Entire St.

11

4.B

Coxe Ave.

Entire St.

11

4.C

Roberts St.

Lyman St./Clingman Ave Ext to W. Haywood Street (Grouped Project)

11

4.D

Depot St.

Livingston St. to Lyman St/ Clingman Ave. Ext

11

4.E

Victoria Rd.

Hospital Dr. to Fernihurst Dr.

11

4.F

Victoria Rd.

Fernihurst Dr. to Meadow Rd.

11

4.G

Lakeshore Dr.

Elkwood Ave. to Shorewood Dr.

11

4.H

Murdock Ave.

Entire St.

11

4.I

Hill St.

Montford Ave. to Atkinson St.

11

4.J

Springside Rd.

Entire St.

11

4.K

Wood Ave. and Cedar St.

Wood Ave. and Cedar St.

11

4.L

Short McDowell St.

Meadow Rd. to McDowell St.

11

4.M

Oakland Rd.

Entire St.

11

Funded (NCDOT# EB-5965)

Partially Funded (NCDOT# EB-5831)

Partially Funded (Neighborhood Greenway)

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M O RE O N PE DE S T R I A N FAC IL IT Y SE L EC T IO N The focus of this section is to provide resources and guidance to consider during the planning and design phase of the Close the GAP pedestrian projects. The pedestrian component of a street design is one of many components that should be balanced when developing a complete street, where all users can move safety and efficiently.

Competing Needs and Complete Streets Resources The following graphic indicates the many components a community must balance when evaluating a complete street cross section for an urban street similar to many streets in Asheville.

This balancing act can be most challenging when project managers are considering design modifications along existing corridors in urban contexts with limited rights-of-way, like Tunnel or Hendersonville Roads. Given the many competing elements along each street, within the public rightof-way, the process for selection of the final cross section of a street is nuanced and should be based on planning and engineering studies that consider land use, traffic context and user demands, as well as safety and comfort needs. A concept that emphasizes this point is that of 8-80 cities1: building cities that are great for an 8-yearold and an 80-year-old. If streets are comfortable for these baseline age groups, then they should be accessible, low stress and comfortable for all user types.

Figure 22. Components of Complete Streets (Source: Philadelphia Complete Streets Design Handbook).

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Resources for Complete Streets

USDOT ON COMPLETE STREETS Complete Streets are streets designed and operated to enable safe use and support mobility for all users. Those include people of all ages and abilities, regardless of whether they are traveling as drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists, or public transportation riders. The concept of Complete Streets encompasses many approaches to planning, designing, and operating roadways and rights of way with all users in mind to make the transportation network safer and more efficient. Complete Streets policies are set at the state, regional, and local levels and are frequently supported by roadway design guidelines. Complete Streets approaches vary based on community context. They may address a wide range of elements, such as sidewalks, bicycle lanes, bus lanes, public transportation stops, crossing opportunities, median islands, accessible pedestrian signals, curb extensions, modified vehicle travel lanes, streetscape, and landscape treatments. Complete Streets reduce motor vehicle-related crashes and pedestrian risk, as well as bicyclist risk when well-designed bicycle-specific infrastructure is included (Reynolds, 2009). They can promote walking and bicycling by providing safer places to achieve physical activity through transportation. One study found that 43% of people reporting a place to walk were significantly more likely to meet current recommendations for regular physical activity than were those reporting no place to walk (Powell, Martin, Chowdhury, 2003).

There are many resources existing for planners and designers to reference when selecting pedestrian facilities. . Three comprehensive complete street resources include: • Complete Streets - Institute of Transportation Engineers (https://www.ite.org/technical-resources/ topics/complete-streets/) • National Complete Streets Coalition (https:// smartgrowthamerica.org/program/nationalcomplete-streets-coalition/) • Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center (PBIC) (https://www.pedbikeinfo.org/topics/ completestreets.cfm) In early 2022, NCDOT’s Integrated Mobility Division (IMD) introduced its new Complete Streets Project Evaluation Methodology (PEM). which provides planners and designers with additional guidance on facility selection and balancing needs within the public right-of-way. IMD’s new PEM is directed toward facility selection during NCDOT project development. Ideally, it will help the City define project feasibility and cost trade-offs for various complete streets needs developed in partnership with NCDOT. However, PEM is not only useful when NCDOT is upgrading roadways within the City. It will also provide useful tools for the City to consider when updating the Unified Development Ordinance and Standard Specifications and Details Manual, as is discussed in Chapter 9.

Source: https://www.transportation.gov/mission/ health/complete-streets#:~:text=Complete%20 Streets%20are%20streets%20 designed,bicyclists%2C%20or%20public%20 transportation%20riders.

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Quick Sheets #8:

Key Elements of NCDOT Complete Streets Project Evaluation Methodology

NCDOT’s new Project Evaluation Methodology (PEM) aids in the evaluation of complete street projects using a five stage process: 1. Initial Screening and Data Input 2. Transportation Need Determination 3. Facility Type Selection 4. Impact Assessment 5. Final Analysis. Figure 23 was developed by NCDOT and displays the five-stage planning process.

TO LEARN MORE: Please visit: https://connect.ncdot.gov/ projects/BikePed/Documents/Complete%20 Streets%20Evaluation%20Methodology.pdf

Figure 24 was developed by NCDOT to provide facility selection guidance to planners and designers to use based on the amount of traffic along and the configuration of a street.

Figure 23. Complete Streets Project Evaluation Methodology Process (Source: NCDOT Complete Streets Evaluation Methodology).

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Figure 24. Facility Selection Matrix (Source: NCDOT)

Facility Selection Legend and Notes

AADT and Roadway Configuration Operating Speed

Operating speed of 35 mph or less <6,000 AADT (2 or 3 Lanes) P: Wide Sidewalk (2) O: Sidewalk (2)

Pedestrian and Bicycle Demand

High

B: Buffered Bicycle Lane O: Bicycle Lane, Shared Lane

Any cross section with designs supporting speeds above 35 mph ≥6,000 AADT (2 or 3 Lanes)

4 Lane Divided

>4 Lanes

P: Wide Sidewalk (2) O: Sidewalk (2) B: SBL/SUP O: Buffered Bicycle Lane, Bicycle Lane

P: Sidewalk (1-2)

Medium

Low

B: Buffered Bicycle Lane O: Bicycle Lane, Shared Lane

B: SBL/SUP O: Buffered Bicycle Lane, Bicycle Lane

B - Denotes priority bicycle facility or space to accommodate bicyclists. The priority bicycle selection must be analyzed first before consideration of additional facility type options. O - Denotes alternative facility options for consideration in order of recommended evaluation after the priority facility. Options that provide the greatest separation from motor vehicles must be evaluated before other options. Terms: SBL = Separated Bicycle Lane, SUP = Shared-Use Path, “Shared Lane” may consist of Shared Lane Markings, additional markings, and traffic control devices for bicycle awareness, “Sidewalk+” indicates that presence of sidewalk and expanded buffer/furnishing strips, “Paved Shoulder” may accommodate bicyclists with widths that are to be determined, and “Shared Roadways” may include signage and shoulders per 3R guidance. (#) - Indicates number of sidewalks along a roadway. * - Sidewalk placement dependent on distribution of development along the roadway. For balanced development, consider sidewalks on both sides. Where land development is not consistent along both sides of the roadway and there is potential for pedestrian and /or bicycle crossing, consider including sidewalks on both sides of the roadway. Dual Priority Facility Types: When two priority facility types are shown for a mode, such as separated bicycle lanes and shared-use path (SBL/SUP), the Project Lead and Manager should review local plans, the roadway and bicycle and pedestrian network, and on-site conditions to select the more appropriate facility. Demand for Both Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities: In situations where demand is present of anticipated for both pedestrian and bicyclists, follow the facility selection table to accommodate both user types.

P: Sidewalk (1) O: Paved Shoulder (width TBD), No Facility/Shared Roadway B: Paved Shoulder (width TBD) O: Shared Roadway/ No Facility

Intermittent / None

P: Sidewalk + Expanded Buffer (1-2)* O: Sidewalk (1-2)*

P - Denotes priority pedestrian facility. The priority pedestrian facility must be analyzed first before consideration of additional facility type options.

P: Sidewalk (1) O: Paved Shoulder (width TBD)

P: Sidewalk (1) O: Paved Shoulder (width TBD)

B: Paved Shoulder (width TBD) O: Shared Roadway/ No Facility

B: SUP O: Paved Shoulder (width TBD), Shared Roadway/No Facility

B: Shared Roadway / No Facility

Cross Sections: Select the roadway configuration column with the same or higher number of lanes and median presence. Atypical cross sections (i.e. four-lane undivided, imbalanced lane configurations) are not shown above. Speed: Vehicle operating speed is an overall consideration for selecting facility types for pedestrians and bicyclists. High vehicle speeds increase the likelihood of a fatal or severe injury in the event of a pedestrian crash. If the operating speed is expected to be above 35 mph, then separated pedestrian and bicycle facilities are a priority of reducing the risk of severe injury and fatal bicycle an pedestrian crashes. The roadway project should include a network that supports the needs of the design user (considering the most likely type of bicyclist and abilities of the pedestrian population). The roadway should also include design features and measures to help achieve the desired operating speed, based on the surrounding context. If the operation speed exceeds the listed AADT and cross section, select the higher AADT lane configuration. Shoulders: Paved shoulders are neither a pedestrian nor bicycle facility, and the Project Lead and Manager should consult with the LGA and review for safety needs when considering this option. Paved shoulders are typical improvements on NCDOT projects, and Project Leads and Managers should consult the NCDOT Roadway Design Manual for standard widths.

Another tool developed with NCDOT’s PEM is the interactive user demand estimation tool. The image on the left shows the Balance Demand Scenario Scores for the Asheville area.

TO VIEW THE TOOL: Please visit: https://www.arcgis. com/apps/webappviewer/index. html?id=4d99643ea1354c0e9e8ad27243983bc4

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ROA DWAY C RO S S I NG TREATM ENT S E L EC T IO N To create a truly accessible community for all transportation modes, facilities must be designed to maximize comfort, convenience and safety – not only along corridors but at locations where people walking interact with streets crossings, trails and driveways (access points). As discussed in the introduction of this Plan, people walking are disproportionally impacted by traffic crashes2. Potential exposure to people walking is introduced at intersections and crossings where these movements cross the path of motor vehicles. This is evident across the state of North Carolina where over the last 10 years, crossing related crashes accounted for 41% of on-roadway crashes involving people walking.3

More information can be found here: https://connect. ncdot.gov/resources/safety/Teppl/TEPPL%20 All%20Documents%20Library/Pedestrian_Crossing_ Guidance.pdf FHWA’s Proven Safety Countermeasures Initiative (PSCi) The USDOT Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has a Proven Safety Countermeasures Initiative (PSCi), which is the culmination of almost 15 years of safety work and now includes a comprehensive tool that can be used by transportation practitioners. This online tool can be used to address a variety of areas that impact pedestrian crossing safety including: • Speed management and speed limit setting guidance. • Crosswalk visibility enhancements and lighting

At the state and national level, many advances have been made in developing guidance and standards for pedestrian safety. The following resources represent best practices and should be carefully followed in the planning and design of pedestrian facilities for the Close the GAP pedestrian corridors.

• Leading pedestrian intervals

Guides for Improvement Pedestrian Safety at Uncontrolled Crossing Locations

• Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHBs)

North Carolina Pedestrian Crossing Guidelines (2018) The North Carolina Pedestrian Crossing Guidelines (2018) provides guidance on when to consider marking crosswalks at uncontrolled approaches for pedestrians, when to install pedestrian signal heads at existing signalized intersections and when to providing supplemental treatments at a crossing location. The report includes a crosswalk assessment flowchart and is provided in a poster format that fully describes most aspects of the evaluation and decision-making process. The guidelines principally consist of four parts: Step 1) Document Existing Characteristics / Signalized Crossing Assessment Step 2) Unsignalized Crossing or Midblock Crossing Assessment Step 3) Additional / Alternative Treatments Assessment Step 4) Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon (PHB) Assessment

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• Road diets • Medians and pedestrian refuge islands • Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFBs)

More information can be found here: https://safety. fhwa.dot.gov/provencountermeasures/ FHWA Toolbox of Pedestrian Countermeasures and Their Potential Effectiveness FHWA also issued a brief 8-page document in September 2018 that provides an extensive list of proven pedestrian countermeasures and reports on the anticipated “crash reduction that might be expected if a specific countermeasure or group of countermeasures is implemented with respect to pedestrian crashes”. More information can be found here: https://safety. fhwa.dot.gov/ped_bike/tools_solve/fhwasa18041/ fhwasa18041.pdf


FHWA’s Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) Guide Nationally, locations where there is no traffic control (i.e., no traffic signal or stop sign to stop traffic) correspond to higher crash rates. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) released the “Guide for Improving Pedestrian Safety at Uncontrolled Crossing Locations” that provides crossing guidance for uncontrolled crossings to help local and state agencies “address significant national safety problems and improve quality of life for pedestrians of all ages and abilities”.4

Figure 25. Steps Involved for Selecting Counter-measures at Uncontrolled Pedestrian Crossing Locations (Sources: STEP Guide)

The FHWA guide includes a process for evaluating crossings and determining appropriate countermeasures for specific crossing conditions based on engineering which includes data collection, site condition analysis and crash history review. These countermeasures range in cost and applicability based on roadway type and conditions. The guide process includes the analysis and countermeasure selection steps, illustrated in Figure 25. The STEP Guide includes a process for evaluating crossings and determining appropriate countermeasures for specific crossing conditions based on engineering which includes data collection, site condition analysis and crash history review. These countermeasures range in cost and applicability based on roadway type and conditions. Within the STEP Guide, seven lower-cost countermeasures (called “The Spectacular Seven”) are recommended to address significant national safety issues. These seven countermeasures are depicted in renderings and descriptions in Table 17, along with the corresponding reduction in crashes involving a person walking that is associated with each treatment.

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Table 17. Seven Key Solutions to Improve Pedestrian Safety at Intersections (Source: STEP Guide). COUNTERMEASURE NAME

Crosswalk Visibility Enhancements

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Key Elements: o High-visibility crosswalks o Pedestrian crossing warning sign (MUTCD W11-2) o Parking restrictions o Lighting o Other treatments may be considered (e.g., curb extension)

REDUCTION IN CRASHES INVOLVING A PERSON WALKING

23-48%

COUNTERMEASURE NAME

Raised Crosswalks

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Function as an extension of the sidewalk and allow a person walking to cross the street at a constant grade.

REDUCTION IN CRASHES INVOLVING A PERSON WALKING

45%

COUNTERMEASURE NAME

Pedestrian Refuge Islands

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Typically constructed in the middle of a 2-way street to provide a place for people on foot to wait for people driving to stop or yield.

REDUCTION IN CRASHES INVOLVING A PERSON WALKING

32%

COUNTERMEASURE NAME

Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHB)

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Unlike a traffic signal, the PHB rests in dark until a person walking activates it at which time the beacon displays a sequence of flashing and solid lights that control vehicular traffic while the pedestrian signal heads indicate when the pedestrian can walk.

REDUCTION IN CRASHES INVOLVING A PERSON WALKING

55%

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COUNTERMEASURE NAME

Road Diet

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

A reconfiguration of the roadway that is appropriate for an undivided road with wide travel lanes or multiple lanes that can be narrowed or repurposed to improve crossing safety for people walking.

REDUCTION IN CRASHES INVOLVING A PERSON WALKING

19-47%

COUNTERMEASURE NAME

Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon (RRFB)

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

A pedestrian actuated conspicuity enhancement used in combination with a pedestrian crossing warning sign to improve safety at uncontrolled, marked crosswalks.

REDUCTION IN CRASHES INVOLVING A PERSON WALKING

47%

COUNTERMEASURE NAME

Leading Pedestrian Interval

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Typically, a 3-7 second head start before vehicles are given a green signal.

REDUCTION IN CRASHES INVOLVING A PERSON WALKING

59%

To assist practitioners, the FHWA guide offers a matrix tool to determine appropriate crossing treatments that should be considered at an uncontrolled crossing based on posted speeds, annual average daily traffic (AADT) and the number of lanes a person walking must cross with or without a median or refuge island. These treatments should be based on an engineering judgement. In addition, it is important to note that the matrix provides a toolbox for treatments rather than mandated or required treatments. For midblock and uncontrolled crosswalks, the STEP Guide advises the following best practices and planning considerations:

• Consider how far the person walking needs to travel in distance and time (shorter distance and time is most successful) • Follow currently used travel routes • Connect key destinations • Maximize low-risk crossing locations • Avoid busy intersections and higher conflict areas if feasible In addition to the STEP Guide, there are also several design related guides and standards that address

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crossing design for pedestrian facilities at traffic signals, unsignalized intersections and mid-block (non-intersection) locations. One such resource is the NCDOT Pedestrian Crossing Guidelines (2018). These resources are detailed in the Implementation Plan section of this document.

P RO JEC T E L E ME NT S F O R P EO P L E WA L K I NG The work of pedestrian system planning also includes the finer details such as traffic calming, access to transit and ADA accessibility. This section focuses on the finer, yet necessary, details that ensure that the pedestrian network is functional for all.

Traffic Calming As traffic congestion and travel speeds increase on a street, there can be negative impacts to people walking. Traffic calming is a tool to manage the negative impacts of traffic on the street through physical design and other measures. In addition, as reviewed, speed is a major predictor of injury severity, thus calming traffic will help reduce severe and fatal crashes involving people walking. The Federal Highways Administration (FHWA) and Institute of Transportation Engineers have developed the Traffic Calming ePrimer5 in which they provide the following broad categories of traffic calming: • Horizontal deflection requires a person driving a car to navigate around a feature, including: • Curb extensions • Median crossing islands • Lateral shift/chicane (modification to roadway design to eliminate straight, unimpeded section of roadway) • Vertical deflection requires a person driving a car to travel over a feature, such as: • Speed humps/bumps • Raised crosswalks • Raised intersections • Roundabouts utilize both horizontal and vertical deflection • Street width reduction by using tools such as a road diet or lane narrowing • Routing restrictions, closures and turn restrictions such as: • Diverters

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WHAT IS TRAFFIC CALMING? The primary purpose of traffic calming is to support the livability and vitality of residential and commercial areas through improvements in non-motorist safety, mobility, and comfort. These objectives are typically achieved by reducing vehicle speeds or volumes on a single street or a street network. Traffic calming measures consist of horizontal, vertical, lane narrowing, roadside, and other features that use self-enforcing physical or psychoperception means to produce desired effects. (Source: FHWA Traffic Calming ePrimer)

• Half or full closures • Median barrier • Turn restriction Traffic calming measures can be applied to projects in this Plan as ways to improve the walkability and safety on Asheville’s streets.

Decorative Crosswalks Increasingly, municipalities are interested in making their downtowns both aesthetically pleasing and friendly for people walking, and one commonly sought-after way to do this is through streetscape elements like colored or decorative crosswalks. Various decorative crosswalk options are available that can be customized to increase crosswalk visibility while not distracting people driving from the road. FHWA issued a memorandum on August 15, 20136 related to decorative crosswalk patterns. Based on the FHWA memorandum, it is possible to develop an aesthetic crosswalk pattern if it meets the following criteria: • No retro-reflective, traffic control or distracting elements within the vehicular traveled way


• Acceptable pattern examples are repetitive such as brick, lattice, cobbles or paving stones

• Enhanced crossings and signal timings for people walking near transit stops;

• Acceptable colors are neutral such as red, rust, brown etc.

• Bus shelters, benches and trash receptacles; and

Any such treatment placed on an NCDOT-maintained roadway needs to be closely coordinated with the Division 13 office to ensure it meets both the FHWA memorandum as well as NCDOT standards.

• Accessible bus stop landings.

Access to Transit Understanding transit in relation to a pedestrian network is important as both modal opportunities offer enhancements to each other and are most effective when seen as a unit. Every person taking transit is also a person walking, and for transit systems to be effective, the “first and last mile” of a person’s transit trip is often taken by foot. The phrase “first and last mile” is frequently used when understanding transportation systems and is not intended to be literal but rather a reference to the first and last leg of a transit trip that is taken on foot. For both systems to work together well, transit and pedestrian networks need to be safe, efficient and connected. This means solutions such as sidewalks connecting to bus stops and bus stops with shelters. The following high-level items are recommended to ensure that transit and pedestrian systems are better integrated: • Include high quality (direct and safe) access to bus stops during project development;

Accessibility for All The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on someone’s disability. Title II of the Act requires cities and towns to have a plan to make accommodations for everyone. Sidewalks, street crossings, and other elements in the public right-of-way can pose challenges to accessibility and many people with disabilities rely on the multimodal network as their primary, or only, way to get from place to place. Creating an equitable transportation system requires that people with disabilities can move about without barriers. To address these challenges, the US Access Board has developed a set of design standards for transportation: the “Proposed Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way”, or PROWAG. The PROWAG addresses people’s access to sidewalks and streets, including crosswalks, curb ramps, street furnishings, pedestrian signals, parking, and other components of public rights-ofway. The goal of the access board in developing these guidelines “is to ensure that access for persons with disabilities is provided wherever a pedestrian way

43

44

Image 43 / Recently Upgraded Transit Stop on Tunnel Road That Needs Additional Crossing Treatments. Image 44 / Unimproved Bus Stop on Tunnel Road Which is One of the Most Heavily Used Transit Corridors in the City.

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is newly built or altered, and that the same degree of convenience, connection, and safety afforded the public generally is available to pedestrians with disabilities”. Once these guidelines are adopted by the Department of Justice, they will become enforceable standards under Title II of the ADA. Although these guidelines are currently in development, many jurisdictions have adopted them as their local standard. These standards represent industry best practices and should be followed for all future transportation infrastructure projects in Asheville. See the Chapter 6 for more details on the ADA Transition Plan for the Public Right-of-Way.

45

Image 45 / These Guidelines Propose Accessibility Guidance for the Design, Construction and Alteration of Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way

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Chapter 7 Endnotes 1 8 80 Cities. (2020). https://www.880cities.org/ 2 The League of American Bicyclists. (2018). Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2018 Benchmarking Report. https://bikeleague.org/ benchmarking-report. 3 NCDOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Crash Database: 2007-2018 4 EDC-5: Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian. (2020, May 26). Accessed April 2021 https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/innovation/everydaycounts/edc_5/ step2.cfm 5 FHWA. (2017). Traffic Calming ePrimer. https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/speedmgt/traffic_calm.cfm 6 MUTCD Official Ruling 3(09)-24(I) – Application of Colored Pavement

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8

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT & NEXT STEPS


I prefer walks around neighborhoods to admire architecture and landscapes.” - South Asheville Resident

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8

PROJECT D E V E LO P M E N T & NEXT STEPS The Greenway, ADA Transition and Pedestrian Plans identify the network and corridor ideas for the City to pursue. That is because Close the GAP is the guiding plan phase of this process. The following chapter describes the steps that the City will pursue to develop these projects further.

projects vary greatly in complexity and, therefore, vary greatly in the time it takes for implementation. Given this variation in complexity, the priority rankings in this Close the GAP Plan do not reflect the order that projects will be constructed. The rankings reflect the recommended order that funding should be secured to initiate project scoping and preliminary engineering studies to get projects moving toward implementation. One of the key goals of Close the GAP is to improve the consistency in how projects are prioritized for funding in order to move key projects into the project development pipeline.

B EYO N D PR E L I MI NA RY P L A N N IN G The Close the GAP effort comprises what is often referred to as preliminary project planning for the pedestrian projects. It is important to understand that this Close the GAP plan is the first in many steps that are required to deliver a constructed pedestrian facility. From there, a project identified in this Plan will move into the next stages of project development. The projects included in the Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian Plans include some that are new and some that are in a different stage of project development.

Image 46 / Staff at Work on Sidewalk Upgrades in Asheville.

46

The Recommended Project Implementation Process on the following page describes the key steps to take a corridor project from this plan to construction. Although typical time frames are listed for each step,

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Quick Sheets #9:

Recommended Project Implementation Process 1

Project Development (Duration varies)

Project development doesn’t have a time frame, as this is where the concept becomes a project. • Identify project goals • Corridor needs assessment • Feasibility assessment (or feasibility study for more complex projects) • Create a public communications and engagement plan • Identify funding, project delivery approach and permitting needs • Determine stakeholders and a design team • Define scope, goals, budget and schedule • High-level cost estimates and key cost factors (risks)

2

Preliminary Engineering Investigations* (6 to 12 months)

Preliminary engineering will involve proceeding through 30% design prior to finalizing the project scope and budget. • • • • • • •

Collect data and analyze alternatives Develop preliminary improvement concepts Begin public communication / engagement Develop bike and pedestrian facility options Identify environmental / stormwater approach Refine scope, goals, budget and schedule Completion of preliminary engineering is the ideal stage for a capital budget or other funding request.

*The level of detail for preliminary engineering investigations may vary based on project complexity. Simple projects can often move straight into Step 3. More complex projects require a feasibility study which may be initiated early in Step 1, prior to project funding.

3

Final Design (12 to 24 months)

Final design generally has three additional review points at 60%, 90% and 100% design. • • • • • •

Determine type, size and location of bridges or culverts (if needed), usually at 30% Continue public communication / engagement Acquire right-or-way as needed Obtain permits Develop bid package Refine scope, budget and schedule at each review point

4

Construction (12 to 36 months)

Construction is when the road work occurs. • Conduct management / oversight • Maintain quality assurance / quality control • Provide periodic construction status updates to public


FI N E T U NI NG T H E PRO C E SS During the Close the GAP process, several areas were identified in the project development process that may help improve project implementation, if consistently applied. • A goal setting and needs assessment process that includes early public input and an early data collection and constructability review. • Consistency in project planning to make sure that projects are vetted with the public and engineering investigations prior to setting budgets and scope limits. • Flexibility to adjust project scope and budgets as additional engineering is completed and unforeseen project constraints arise. • Develop consistent project pipeline of vetted projects to prepare for future funding. To address these areas for improvement, the team developed the Recommended Project Implementation Process and a Pre-Design Project Development Checklist. This Pre-Design Project Development Checklist should be a key element in the implementation of the City’s Greenway, ADA Transition and Pedestrian Plans as well as all other transportation projects. A few key highlights of these recommendations are as follows: • The Recommended Project Implementation Process on the previous page includes additional guidance on public engagement and the need for integration at all stages of project development, and importantly, before project scope and budget are finalized.

Project Implementation Process. At this point, if the project is recommended to proceed, it would become a standalone project with a line item in the following years’ fiscal budget request. • In order to ensure completion of the ADA Transition Plan, the Pre-Design Project Development Checklist includes an ADA compliance review that, ideally, would be completed consistently with each City transportation project. This will help ensure that accessibility is integrated early in project scoping and will help maximize outcomes for the Plan’s standalone projects, which are expensive and challenging to fund. As such, integration with projects early will help ensure that each project maximizes removal of ADA obstacles, including utility conflicts and right-of-way limitations. This will also help to prevent new projects going to construction that have non-compliant ADA elements from the start. A phased approach may be needed to complete all upgrades; however, this Pre-Design Project Checklist should be a key element in the implementation of the City’s Greenway, ADA Transition and Pedestrian Plans as well as other transportation projects. • Refinements to project scope, goals, budget, and schedule are included at each project development stage as additional engineering reveals project unknowns. This is often complemented by a project Figure 26. Standard Contingency Methodology Order of Magnitude Planning Cost Estimate

40%

Conceptual Level Cost Estimate

• Inclusion of Feasibility Assessments/Studies and Corridor Studies for more complex projects. • The Pre-Design Project Development Checklist (as shown on the following page) can be used for consistent pre-design project vetting to minimize significant scope changes later in the design process that can create public frustration and can limit project outcomes. • Solidify the project scope and the final design and construction budget after preliminary engineering has reached the appropriate level of completion, generally the 30% of final design milestone. The 30% milestone is Step 2: Preliminary Engineering in the Recommended

Based on best available information and historical linear foot (or square foot) costs

35%

Based on additional investigations, conceptual plans with alignments, type of structures, topographic maps etc

Preliminary Eng. Cost (30% Design)

20%

• After preliminary engineering 30% level plans • Based on actual field survey with most features identified including right-of-way • Based on actual quantities and most closely related unit prices

100% Design Cost

10%

• Based on 100% final plans and plats • After design and permitting is complete • Post utility coordination, property acquitisions and detour planning • Based on final quantities

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Quick Sheets #10:

Pre-Design Project Development Checklist Duration and complexity of this evaluation varies e.g. Simple sidewalk projects may require minimal research as compared to a corridor study that involves roadway and intersection modifications.

1 Identify Project Goals 2 Corridor Needs Assessment

This evaluation should include items such as: • • • • •

Review of missing sections of sidewalk ADA compliance review Existing traffic data/conditions Pedestrian patterns and crossing needs Development patterns (existing and future)

• Bicycle needs, overlapping neighborhood greenway routes • Overlapping infrastructure needs such as drainage for storm water or repaving • Community feedback and community context (appropriateness of facilities based on community conditions)

Community Feedback Note: This evaluation may require early public surveys or engagement in order to identify local needs. Legacy neighborhoods may require stabilization plans prior to project implementation. As such, extensive neighborhood communication should begin during Step 2: Corridor Needs Assessment. This evaluation may result in revised projects, as well as delays to address stabilization efforts.

3 Feasibility Assessment (or Feasibility Study* for More Complex Projects)

This effort is a high level investigation of physical and environmental constraints that may impact the ability and/or cost to construct a new pedestrian facility or upgrade existing facilities. It is also helpful for identifying key project risks that may need additional investigation before the scope and cost can be defined. This evaluation should include items such as: • Environmental features (e.g. wetlands, threatened and endangered species, waterways) • Physical constraints (e.g. steep slopes, buildings and private property impacts) • Right-of-way availability (property ownership or the ability to acquire property for facilities) • Utilities and railroad lines *More complex projects may require a detailed feasibility study with more robust data collection in order to clearly define the project scope and budget requirements.

4 High-Level Cost Estimates and Key Cost Factors

Planning level costs estimates serve as a placeholder, or preliminary cost estimate for funding agencies. Since these costs are completed before engineering, some costs will be unknown and should be flagged as key cost variations for further investigation. Examples include possible hazardous waste sites, soil testing and flood studies.

5 Create a Public Communications and Engagement Plan

Legacy neighborhoods may require stabilization plans prior to project implementation. As such, this neighborhood communication should begin during Step 2: Corridor Needs Assessment. This evaluation may result in revised projects, as well as delays to address stabilization efforts.

6 Identify Funding and Determine Project Delivery Approach and Permitting Needs Examples of funding sources include federal, state, MPO, local, and private partnerships. See Appendix 11 for a detailed funding guide.

7 Determine Stakeholders and Design Team & Advance to Preliminary Engineering


Quick Sheets #11:

FAQ’s on Project Development & Next Steps

What to Expect How long will it take? Each project varies in complexity and the order of priority should not be interpreted as order of construction. It is important to acknowledge that the timeline for planning, designing and constructing new sidewalks can vary greatly. A simple short sidewalk section on City roads that does not require purchasing private land could potentially be designed and built in 6 months if there are no complicating factors such as retaining walls, bridges or need for curbing and drainage infrastructure. However, a corridor project such as Swannanoa River Road could be 10 years in the future. This project must follow NCDOT and Federal funding requirements and permitting and includes the purchase of substantial land (right-of-way), design of bridges and evaluation of environmental and flood impacts.

What if our community has been traditionally under-served and we are concerned about improvements impacting our housing affordability? During the Close the GAP equity evaluation and public engagement outreach, several communities expressed this concern. As such, all projects in those communities have been listed as tentative. A detailed community planning effort is recommended to refine the needs and desires of the community before the projects listed move into funding and development.

Will I have a chance to comment and be involved in the projects? The opportunity for public involvement will continue as projects move through this process. Similar to the timeline for construction discussion above, the higher the level of complexity of a project and the greater the impacts, the more opportunity there should be in the process for public input. Public comment begins in this planning and funding stage of projects and continues each time a project moves through Council’s agenda. In addition, the project design process includes input throughout, in order to ensure that the design meets the needs of the community.

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cost estimating methodology that includes a contingency that is highest at early planning stages and decreases as design is finalized and the number of unknowns decreases. An example of this best practice is shown in Figure 26.

Project Development When NCDOT or Federal Funds are Involved Once this plan is complete, projects will be selected to move forward into the NCDOT prioritization process, known as SPOT. Projects selected to be funded will then move into the NCDOT project development process for design, approvals and clearances, right-of-way acquisition and construction.

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) The NEPA was one of the first laws (42 U.S.C. §4321 et seq. 1969) written that established a broad national framework for protecting our environment. NEPA’s basic policy is to assure that all branches of government give proper consideration to the environment prior to undertaking any major federal action that significantly affects the environment.

When projects are funded with State and Federal transportation dollars, project managers must follow a specific State and Federal project development process. This process includes environmental permitting to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The “pre-design” process for State and Federally funded projects has specific steps and processes as show in Figures 27 and 28.

Figure 27. How to Get Roads Built (Source: https://www.ncdot.gov/initiatives-policies/Transportation/how-road-gets-built/ Pages/default.aspx)

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Figure 28. NCDOT Transportation Planning Process

COMP PLAN

MTP1

SPOT2

TIP3

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

Identify local vision and needs

Identify region’s long range project plan

Identify region’s top projects

Identify the region’s 10-year funding plan

Develop (construct) Projects

20 - 30 year planning horizon

20 year planning horizon, updated every 5 years

Criteria updated periodically

A 10 year plan that is updated every 2 years

Timing depends on size and scope of project

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9

DESIGN & POLICY


Need more sidewalks!! Sidewalks connect communities and promotes health” - East Asheville Resident


9

DESIGN & POLICY The purpose of this chapter is to provide design standards, policy review findings and recommendations that are needed to update implementation and maintenance of Greenways, ADA and Pedestrian facilities so the City may reflect evolving national standards and best practices.

I N TRO D U C T IO N When we think about the ingredients that make up a livable community, a safe and convenient place for people to walk and bike or access the bus for daily activities is at the top of the list. Planners, engineers and project designers rely on standards and policy guidance during implementation and maintenance of pedestrian and bicycle facilities to ensure safety, consistency and predictability. Historically, the resources to design these multimodal facilities have been limited. Over the last 15 years, design guidance has improved, equipping practitioners with the resources to develop ideas and try out innovations seen in other communities and internationally. These advancements in design and policy practice are essential to integrate into local codes, policies and practices, enabling communities to achieve a multimodal transportation network that is more inclusive to people of all ages and abilities and that can be well-customized to the local context.

D ESIG N STANDARD S & POL ICY RE VI E W TASKS As part of the Close the GAP process, the consultant team was tasked with the following policy and standard review in order to develop recommendations to improve implementation and maintenance of Greenways, ADA and Pedestrian facilities for the City. 1. Review of the City of Asheville’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) sections related to Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian facilities. 2. Review of the City of Asheville’s Standards Specifications and Details Manual (ASSDM) sections related to Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian facilities. 3. Conduct a series of Targeted Focus Groups with NCDOT and various City departments that are responsible for overseeing implementation and maintenance of Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian projects in the City of Asheville. These meetings focused on policies and procedural challenges to delivering fully ADA compliant pedestrian facilities in the public rights-of-way. These tasks resulted in a detailed set of policy and design standard recommendations and best practice references that will be useful references for updating City policies and standards. The following sections summarize the findings and key recommendations for each Design Standard and Policy Review task listed above. The full detailed review tables are include in Appendix 12.

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Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) Findings and Recommendations The City of Asheville’s UDO is a document that contains regulations that apply to different types of land uses, development, and other regulations. For example, the UDO includes chapters such as Development, Historic Preservation, and Nuisances. In general, the UDO communicates the expectations of the City as it relates to development projects and activities. For example, the UDO requires new sidewalk when someone develops a new multi-family residential development with 10 or more units. The planning team conducted an in-depth review of Asheville’s UDO to identify standards that promote, could be changed to improve, or hinder walkability. The review noted recommended changes to and identified gaps in UDO language. The detailed UDO review and recommendations results are included in Appendix 12.A. Key UDO recommendations that have the greatest impact on pedestrian mobility in the City have been included in a set of comprehensive Action Items that are listed in Chapter 10.

Asheville Standards Specifications and Details Manual (ASSDM) Findings and Recommendations Where the UDO communicates when a sidewalk is to be installed (new multi-family units with 10 or more units), the ASSDM outlines how to construct the sidewalk. For example, the ASSDM requires new sidewalks on local streets to include three elements: a 1.5-foot setback from the right-of-way, a 5-foot sidewalk, and a 5-foot utility strip/setback from street or curb edge. These policy and design standards are used to determine such factors as: • Facility selection: shared or separated facilities (sidewalk, greenway, bike lanes etc.) • Facility width • Separation (or buffer) from traffic or features such as streams and steep slopes • Need for facilities on one or both sides of the street • Pedestrian crossing spacing and treatments • Accessibility standards - ADA compliance for ramps, sidewalks, crossings, greenways

Image 47 / A Sample Image and Table from Asheville’s Standards and Design Manual.

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• Accessibility standards for transit stops and onstreet parking

• Lighting requirements and standards

TARGETED FOCUS GROUP SESSION STRUCTURE

• Temporary traffic control (work zone accommodations for bicycle and pedestrians)

Questions for Each Category

• Trail crossing design (e.g., sight distance, markings and signage)

Existing: How are things done now? Existing Issues / Challenges / Shortfalls.

• Transit stop amenities

• Pedestrian signal standards (including audible pedestrian signal (APS) needs) The detailed ASSDM review and recommendations results are included in Appendix 12.B. Key ASSDM recommendations that have the greatest impact on pedestrian mobility in the City have been included in a set of comprehensive Action Items that are listed in Chapter 10.

Targeted Focus Group Meeting Findings and Recommendations The following Targeted Focus Group meetings were held with various City departments that are responsible for overseeing implementation and maintenance of Greenway, ADA and Pedestrian projects in the City of Asheville. The following 4 focus group meetings were held: 1. Transportation Department 2. Public Works and Streets Departments 3. Planning and Development Services Departments 4. Capital Projects During the Targeted Focus Group meetings, the planning team covered a series of questions and discussion topics, which are shown to the right. The findings and recommendations are summarized in Table 18.

Special Focus Areas The Close the GAP team was tasked with delving into several policy topics in greater detail: best practices for temporary traffic control, and a review of alternative surfaces for sidewalks (vs. standard concrete). Temporary traffic control and sidewalk maintenance are addressed in Appendices as follows:

Future Goal: If you could change how things are done, what would you change? How should it be done, if differently than today? Target for Future Gap Identification: Needed Resources + Desired Methods/Ideas to Bridge the Gap

CATEGORIES Resources & Planning: Funding: Planning, feasibility studies, cost estimating procedures, design and construction, maintenance, emerging needs and requests Staff: Training (new standards), capacity (e.g. review specificity requires staffing and coordination), inspection forms, internal design Project Implementation (Design Construction): Private development, public works, major projects (local funding - Bond, etc.), major projects (non-City funded, e.g. STBG), NCDOT project coordination Policy Specific: UDO related, ASSDM related, organizations working in the public right-of-way (e.g., utilities), inspection forms, right-of-way and easement acquisition, legal options, complaints and requests, public meetings (accommodations / locations)

Accompanying Documents: Alternatives to Sidewalks Guidebook Accompanying Documents: Pedestrian Accommodations in Work Zones Design Guidance and Checklist

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Table 19. Focus Group Meeting Findings and Recommendations Targeted Focus Groups: Identified Needs by Category

Recommendation

Investment Considerations

Project Selection & Prioritization Needs Clear equity definition and application guidance.

Clarify policy on transportation equity and process for prioritization.

Policy/Program Development

Funding flexibility for emergency projects and partner matching (grants).

Consider funding set aside for emergency and grant/ partnership opportunities.

Funding Investment

Public facing database with City responses to community sidewalk and ADA related requests (Asheville App and other community requests).

Update Asheville App (or similar) where records, City responses, and actions taken are visible to the public.

Policy/Program Development

Need for more funding to support project implementation

See Chapters 5, 6, 7 and 8 for detailed recommendations.

Funding Investment

Project Scoping and ROW Needs Project scope and final budget set with insufficient preliminary engineering and there is a need for contingency or flexibility in scope to address unknown budget issues.

See recommended project implementation process in Chapter 8.

Capital Project Planning Policy

Issues with public expectation on projects that lead to scope creep or public frustration.

See recommended project implementation process in Chapter 8. Consider standard website format for project decision history and graphical documentation of design decisions for public consumption.

Capital Project Planning Policy

Challenges with right-of-way acquisition that delay sidewalk and greenway projects, and limit ADA compliance. For example, more ADA ramps will be technically infeasible or result in undesireable corner ramps if right-of-way is not secured earlier in the process.

See recommended project implementation process in Chapter 8.

Capital Project Planning Policy

Limited resurfacing budgets and scoping result in missed opportunities include funding for ADA work, complete streets components such as parking spaces, bike lanes.

In order to better address ADA compliance during resurfacing (to include full ADA upgrades that may require right-of-way), look to plan ahead to integrate and coordinate overlapping ADA transition plan and Capital Projects along planned resurfacing routes.

Capital Project Planning Policy and Funding Investment

Design Standards, UDO and Policy Update City ADA ramp details and relevant design standards to reflect Proposed Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG). See detailed recommendations included in the review of Asheville’s Standard Specifications and Details Manual (ASSDM) in Appendix 12.B. Need updated ADA design standards and review requirements, including driveways.

Modify development and transportation design and review process to require an ADA checklist and approval by designated ADA specialist. Designs should include detailed elevations with ADA measurements. Develop and require technical infeasibility forms (TIFs) for instances where full ADA compliance is not feasible within the scope of work. These forms should be kept on file or uploaded into a GIS database.

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Policy/Program Development


Table 18. Focus Group Meeting Findings and Recommendations (Continued) Targeted Focus Groups: Identified Needs by Category

Investment Considerations

Recommendation

Designing for a 2% cross slope often results in non-compliant ramps because designing for the maximum does not allow for construction tolerances (variations).

Modify design standards to less than maximum, for example, 1.5% cross slope vs max 2% to allow for construction tolerances (variations).

Policy/Program Development

Need improved crossing guidance for use of raised crosswalks, lighting, RRFB's, signal features, APS/LPI, etc.

See Chapter 7 for more on crossing recommendations.

Policy/Program Development

The ASSDM contains sidewalk standards based on context, some of which have both a recommended and minimum width standard. Consider adding a recommended and minimum width for all types of sidewalk contexts based in the tiers described in Chapter 4 and other land uses, City plans, etc.

Policy/Program Development

Need a clear sidewalk policy for waivers.

When a sidewalk that is less than the maximum width is requested, require design documentation on constraints prior to accepting minimum widths. Need for ADA on-street parking standards.

Update parking space design and requirements in the ASSDM to reflect PROWAG details.

Policy/Program Development

Updates needed on details for transit stop accessibility.

Update standard ADA details for bus stops. See ASSDM recommendations table.

Policy/Program Development

Update temporary street closure (construction and events) process (see Appendix for more details).

Frequent issues with inadequate access through work zone and temporary sidewalk closures.

Require a detour design and approval submission for any sidewalk or ramp closure and review to ensure detour is in compliance with the MUTCD requirements and proposed PROWAG standards. • consider certification process for selected contractors.

Policy/Program Development

• provide contractor resources on City website with • typical applications and best practices. • consider implementing/revising enforcement / violation fee structure

Need for lighting requirements / standards for sidewalks, crossings and greenways.

Develop a sustainable street light policy and program to address lighting best practices in locations of high pedestrian usage and at pedestrian crossing locations. See example programs in the UDO (Appendix 12.A) and ASSDM (Appendix 12.B) recommendations tables.

Policy/Program Development

Enforcement for full ADA compliance for impacted facilities during utility repair work.

Addressed in UDO and ASSDM recommendations.

Enforcement

Lack of greenway details and specifications.

Addressed in Chapter 5 and UDO and ASSDM recommendations.

Policy/Program Development

DEVELOPMENT COORDINATION

Develop review capacity and training.

Evaluate development review staff capacity with respect to ADA Transition Plan recommendations.. Develop staff ADA review training program.

Policy/Program Development

Consider hiring an ADA review specialist, either internal or contracted.

Staff Development

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Table 18. Focus Group Meeting Findings and Recommendations (Continued) Targeted Focus Groups: Identified Needs by Category

With project partners, there is a need for additional ADA knowledge design and construction.

Recommendation Consider ADA certification for contractors selected on City projects. Certification possibilities include design, construction, inspectors, and work zone traffic control. Provide regular training.

Investment Considerations

Policy/Program Development

Provide best practices resources on website. Include flexibility and advanced planning time for greenway alignments through large parcels. Challenges planning for greenway alignments through undeveloped parcels.

Continue to work with developments through existing density and parking bonus process for voluntary completion of greenway connections.

Policy/Program Development

Consider arrangements to match funds from development greenway easement donations to complete longer stretches of greenway with other grant funding sources.

OTHER ADA COMPLIANCE CHALLENGES Create rapid response program to enforce clearing of encroachments (trash cans, vegetation, signs, snow removal etc). Permanent obstructions such as utility poles/parking meters are covered in the UDO/ASSDM review in Appendix 12.

Policy/Program Development

Infeasible ramps require consistent database to track ADA Transition Plan and document infeasibility.

Develop a technical infeasibility form (TIF) and related submission and approval process. Develop a process for Citywide tracking / database to maintain an updated list of ramps on transition plan. Apply consistently for City, NCDOT and private projects.

Policy/Program Development

Accessible parking requests process/policy.

Develop a public accessible parking space request policy, program and website.

Policy/Program Development

Maintenance of sufficient pedestrian access route (PAR) width Competing public space elements, such as trash cans, snow, utilities, trees, parking meters, etc.

1. Update ramp inspection form to include all accessibility requirements (see best practice examples in the ASSDM review in Appendix 12.B). Inconsistent inspection and enforcement of noncompliant ramps.

2. Coordinate with NCDOT inspection forms for NCDOT streets. Establish a consistent form if possible. 3. Consider ADA certification process and training for contractors selected on City projects.

Policy/Program Development

4. Provide best practices resources on website, such as calibration of levels, pre-pour elevation checks, concrete finishing.

Complaint process and tracking that is clear and consistent.

Ensure all departments are contacting the official ADA coordinator for any ADA complaint or grievance tracking and outcome documentation. See accompanying ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan document for official grievance procedure.

Policy/Program Development

Accessible meetings and special accommodations for public meetings (need policy and process).

Develop/update meeting location checklists for ADA compliance.

Policy/Program Development

Need for official sidewalk maintenance plan document and associated policy.

See Chapter 6, Chapter 8 and Accompanying Documents: ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan Consider adopting a maintenance scan and repair process at regular intervals.

Policy/Program Development

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External Policy and NCDOT Coordination Findings NCDOT is an important partner in the City’s efforts to improve walkability. There are many NCDOT policies that apply to sidewalk, bikeway, and greenway development. Similar to the City department Focus Group meetings, the team met with NCDOT representatives to discuss design standards and policies that impact the implementation and maintenance of Greenways, ADA and Pedestrian facilities within the City. Some NCDOT policies provide guidance on these issues are as follows: • Complete Streets Policy (2022) More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/projects/BikePed/Pages/ Complete-Streets.aspx • Greenway accommodation guidelines (2015) More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/resources/safety/Teppl/ TEPPL%20All%20Documents%20Library/B06_ GWY_GDLNS.pdf • Department of Justice/Department of Transportation Joint Technical Assistance on the Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act Requirements to Provide Curb Ramps when Streets, Roads, or Highways are Altered through Resurfacing (2013) More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/resources/safety/Teppl/ TEPPL%20All%20Documents%20Library/DOJDOT%20Curb%20Ramps%20and%20Resurfacing. aspx • Mid-Block Crossing Guidance (Various) More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/resources/safety/Teppl/Pages/ Teppl-Topic-Original.aspx?Topic_List=C36 • Standard Practice for Pedestrian Reasonable Access Requests from Pedestrians with Qualifying Disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (2003) More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/resources/safety/Teppl/ TEPPL%20All%20Documents%20Library/ Disabled_Ped_Practice.pdf • Pedestrian Crossing Guidance (Various) More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/resources/safety/Teppl/

TEPPL%20All%20Documents%20Library/ Disabled_Ped_Practice.pdf Other policies are specific to design, such as the newly updated Roadway Design Manual (2021) and the Standard Specifications for Roads and Structures document (2018). • More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/projects/Roadway/Pages/RDM. aspx (Roadway Design Standard Link) • More information can be found here: https:// connect.ncdot.gov/resources/Specifications/ StandSpecLibrary/2018%20Standard%20 Specifications%20for%20Roads%20and%20 Structures.pdf (Standard Specifications....) The following NCDOT policy and procedural items were identified during the Close the GAP process as having the greatest impact on the City’s ability to achieve a multimodal transportation network that is more inclusive to people of all ages and abilities. The following priority items and recommendations will require ongoing coordination between the City and NCDOT: 1. Current NCDOT policy dictates that street repaving projects should also include upgrades to curb ramps where the pedestrian access route is modified during repaving. However, this does not address non-compliant PARs at driveway aprons and mid-block sidewalk sections. Although this is standard resurfacing practice in most jurisdictions, the result is a missed opportunity for fully accessible corridors along the most high priority routes in the City (see Chapter 4 for more info on prioritization factors). During NCDOT coordination meetings, participants identified an opportunity to seek additional funding and initiate an early planning and coordination process between the City and NCDOT to combine funding with future resurfacing work to better achieve full corridor compliance. Combining this work is more cost and time efficient than completing this work as separate projects, and offers the best outcome for the traveling public. This process can help to maximize the results achieved with each transportation investment. 2. NCDOT resurfacing policy and budgets include intersection curb ramp upgrades but do not include signal equipment modifications. Ideally, curb ramps and signal push buttons should be updated at the same time to maximize ADA compliance and to allow for better designs (2

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48

Image 48 / Temporary Traffic Control while RADTIP was Under Development

ramps per corner) and also allow for future audible pedestrian signals (APS) if ramps and push button equipment are spaced properly. As a result of this practice, when intersection curb ramps are upgraded during resurfacing projects, they may not be located in ADA compliant locations relative to signal equipment and the opportunity to provide much needed push buttons is missed. Another negative outcome may result where ramp configurations are not placed in line with signal equipment (e.g., maintaining corner ramps instead of providing one ramp per crossing with a push button). During joint meetings with City and NCDOT staff, the consensus was that additional funding will need to be pursued as a solution to this issue.

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3. The NCDOT policy for audible pedestrian signal requests and limited funding make it difficult to expand the APS system in the City of Asheville to assist pedestrians with visual impairments. During NCDOT coordination meetings, an opportunity was identified to create an ADA Advisory Committee that can advise NCDOT on priority locations for APS to maximize the mobility benefits for those with vision impairments. This idea will require additional funding and committee formation discussions to ensure success. 4. During Close the GAP-related ADA focus group meetings, public engagement surveys and field observations, it was noted that work zone traffic control on City and NCDOT roadways has not


consistently maintained accessible routes, per MUTCD standards, during construction. This is a key finding that is impacting mobility throughout the City and further coordination between NCDOT and the City is needed. See accompanying Pedestrian Accommodations in Work Zones Design Guidance and Checklist document for more information on temporary traffic control accessibility guidance.

Other Resources and Design Standards Good pedestrian and bicycle design is the function of many factors, including connectivity, comfort, continuity and convenience. The following are state and national design guidance resources that collectively work to achieve these multimodal design goals for Close the GAP as well as state and national resources related to designing for people traveling with a disability. It should be noted that, as pedestrian and bicycle design is constantly evolving and innovating, updates to these resources should be sought out following the publication of Close the GAP.

Table 18. Other Resources and Design Standards

Pedestrian Guidance North Carolina Department of Transportation Complete Streets Policy A.09.0106

2019 (2022 update to methodology)

Evaluating Temporary Accommodations for Pedestrians

2018

Pedestrian Crossing Guidelines

2018

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Guide for the Planning, Design and Operation of Pedestrian Facilities

2004

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Guide for Improving Pedestrian Safety at Uncontrolled Crossing Intersections

2018

Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) 2009 MUTCD Guidance and Supplemental Information (including NC Supplement)

2009

US Access Board Proposed Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG)

2011

Guide to the Standards

2010

USDOT/Department of Justice USDOT ADA Standards for Transportation Facilities

2006

DOT/DOJ Joint Technical Assistance Memos

Varies

ADA Standards

2010

Other Multimodal Design Guidance North Carolina Department of Transportation Roadway Design Manual

2021

Complete Streets Policy A.09.0106

2019 (2022 update to methodology)

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Other Multimodal Design Guidance Greenway Accommodations Guidelines

2015

WalkBike NC: The Statewide Pedestrian and Bicycle Plan

2013

Federal Highway Administration Strategies for Accelerating Multimodal Project Delivery

2019

Small Town and Rural Multimodal Networks Design Guide

2016

Achieving Multimodal Networks

2016

Achieving Multimodal Networks: Applying Design Flexibility and Reducing Conflicts

2016

Guidebook for Developing Pedestrian and Bicycle Performance Measures

2016

National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) Transit Street Design Guide

2016

Urban Street Design Guide

2013

Bicycle Guidance (When a Corridor Overlaps with Bicycle Network Needs) North Carolina Department of Transportation Complete Streets Policy A.09.0106

2019 (2022 update to methodology)

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities

2012

Federal Highway Administration Bikeway Selection Guide

2019

Incorporating On-Road Bicycle Networks into Resurfacing Projects

2016

Separated Bike Lane and Planning Design Guide

2015

Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices 2009 MUTCD Guidance and Supplemental Information (including NC Supplement)

2009

National Association of City Transportation Officials Urban Bikeway Design Guide

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2014


10

TAKE ACTION


Sidewalks, sidewalks, sidewalks! Pedestrian and bike infrastructure makes a city so livable.” “

- North Asheville Resident


10

TA K E A C T I O N Close the GAP is an action-oriented plan that is built off of community desires. For the Plan to be effective, it needs a clear approach to implementation that defines next steps, timeframe, responsible parties, key partners, and performance measures to evaluate success. This approach will allow the City to be strategic yet flexible in the lifetime of this Plan.

O RGA N IZAT IO NA L & PARTN ER FR A ME WO R K

Transportation Department staff will be responsible for overseeing the implementation of Close the GAP and progress towards performance measures. They will coordinate with the MPO and NCDOT on funding and project development as well as seek other project development opportunities.

French Broad River MPO The MPO will be responsible for coordinating funding opportunities between the City, County and NCDOT. This includes funding projects through the STIP as well as other opportunities such as through their Planning Work Program.

Buncombe County & Neighboring Jurisdictions

Close the GAP will not be implemented solely by the City of Asheville; regional and state agencies, county and neighboring communities, and the private and non-profit sectors will be critical to success. Many of these organizations have been referenced throughout this document, and key partners include the following:

Generally what matters most to people walking and rolling is a connected system that allows travel from one location to another. Most people are unaware of City or County boundaries. As such, it is prudent that the City, County and neighboring jurisdictions coordinate to ensure that their greenway and pedestrian networks connect.

Asheville City Council

Specific to Buncombe County, there is an opportunity with their Comprehensive Plan (for which an update is underway at the time of the drafting of this document) and their impending Multimodal Plan (which will be developed) to better align networks. Coordination with the County on sidewalk projects is particularly critical as areas just outside of the City limits are seeing significant growth; these are locations where sidewalks may be expanded through development. Since, in 2012, Asheville was stripped of its ability to annex property through an Extraterritorial Jurisdiction, coordination with the County will be imperative.

The City Council will adopt the Plan document and will oversee its implementation. It is also responsible for amending the UDO and other policy related decisions. City Council can make decisions related to the budget to facilitate the implementation of Close the GAP.

City Staff The responsibility for implementation of this plan at the staff level lives in the Transportation Department. However, other departments involved in implementation and policy include: Capital Projects, Public Works, Planning and Urban Design, Equity and Inclusion, Finance and Management Services, Development Services, and others.

Neighboring jurisdictions that require coordination include Woodfin, Biltmore Forest, Fletcher/Henderson

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County, and Mills River. See Map 28 for an illustration of Asheville’s neighbors that share a boundary, for which network connections will be critical.

NCDOT Division 13 As discussed in the previous chapter, there are ample opportunities to build upon coordination with Division 13 of NCDOT, which includes the City and Buncombe County. This includes projects in the STIP, resurfacing or roadway/bridge reconstruction projects, and monitoring the construction of the network.

NCDOT Integrated Mobility Division Based out of Raleigh, this division of NCDOT develops guidance on bicycle and pedestrian policy and complete streets, which is critical to project development. They may also fund future plan update funding opportunities through their grant programs, which in part funded Close the GAP.

Developers There are many details that the UDO prescribes related to development, and these offer the City a partner and opportunity to expand the pedestrian network.

Non-Profit Partners Asheville has a long and successful history of working with its non-profit partners to expand its reach and impact in the community. These relationships should be continued to enable Close the GAP to be successful. Certain non-profit partners offer funding opportunities, and others may be recipients of minigrants to better serve the community.

Community Members Similarly, Asheville has a strong history of empowering members of the community to advocate and serve. Through the many committees and commissions that guide decisions at the city, Asheville can continue to tap into the community through these volunteers. In addition, community members generate public support for walking, by talking to their neighbors, friends, colleagues, etc. They advocate to elected officials or others for better projects. Finally, members of the community volunteer at events and programs that make these projects a success.

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T H E ACT ION PL AN The Close the GAP Action Plan contains 10 goals related to equity, the Greenway, ADA Transition, and Pedestrian plans, project development, policy, funding, tools, safety, and multimodal integration. The actions will shift as partner and funding opportunities change; however, the following offers a basic structure for the City to initiate these tasks. Each task is numbered, which is not based on priority but for ease of City implementation. Tasks include a brief description of the action, lead department (or departments) that will guide the task, and partner agency or organization to support the task. Timeframe refers to the approximate horizon to indicate when the task should be completed, and how success will be measured is the benchmark to indicate whether a task is completed. The action plan links various actions to project goals. Many action items could apply to multiple goals; however, they are not repeated in each section. The sum result of these actions combined are the key to achieving the Close the GAP vision where “Asheville is a place where vibrant, safe, and comfortable streets and greenways give everyone the opportunity to walk to their destinations and to enjoy the convenience and health benefits of walking.”


Map 28. Regional Connections

1

Woodfin

Mile

Beaver Lake

NORTH

26

240 240 40

40

40

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Forest

26

CLOSE THE GAP NETWORK Greenway Network Components Pedestrian Network Components

Lake Julian

Bumcombe County Planned Greenway Regional Connection Downtown Asheville City of Asheville Area Cities

AVL Regional Airport

Fletcher

Mills River

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Table 20. Goal 1: Equity Close the GAP network implementation results in a walkable and accessible community for all, no matter where you live or who you are.

Action #

Action

1.1

Develop a City of Asheville definition for Transportation Equity and metrics to evaluate the equity impact of transportation projects.

Plan Impact

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Lead

Partner

Transportation, Office of Equity N/A and Inclusion

Immediate (0-3 years)

How Success Will Be Measured Adopted definition of transportation equity. Metrics to evaluate the equity impact of transportation projects. Number of sidewalk gaps closed in high equity need areas.

1.2

Using Close the GAP and neighborhood input as a guide, prioritize sidewalk gaps and other pedestrian facilities in high equity need areas.

Pedestrian Plan

Transportation, CAPE, Office of Equity and Inclusion, Public Works and Capital Projects

1.3

Work with various City departments and Buncombe County to develop neighborhood stabilization plans to address pedestrian needs and gentrification concerns.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Legacy CAPE, Planning Neighborhood Coalition, & Urban Buncombe Design County

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Timeframe

Legacy Neighborhood Coalition

Ongoing

Immediate (0-3 years)

Number of neighborhood engagement points to determine preferences in addressing pedestrian gaps.

Number of neighborhood stabilization plans developed.


Table 21. Goal 2: Greenway Network City of Asheville residents and stakeholders travel along the greenway network on existing and new types of greenways. Action #

Action

2.1

Secure funding for and develop a neighborhood greenway implementation guidebook that incorporates Close the GAP recommended plan elements (See Chapter 5).

2.2

Increase amount and quality of greenway / natural surface trail information available to users through signage and online data by installing accessible trail markers.

Plan Impact

Greenway

Greenway

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

Transportation, Public Works, Planning & FBRMPO Urban Design and CAPE

Immediate (0-3 years)

Transportation

Asheville on Bikes, Connect Buncombe, Pisgah Area SORBA

Immediate (0-3 years)

How Success Will Be Measured

Development of a City of Asheville Neighborhood Greenway Guidebook

Install accessible trail makers and include information in online greenway information. Trail Guidelines in PDF 2020.pdf (accessrecreation.org) There are a variety of methods to report and benchmark physical activity:

2.3

Use greenway intercept surveys to track and report on commuting trips and physical activity.

Average minutes of physical activity per day per capita. Greenway

Transportation

Connect Buncombe

Immediate (0-3 years)

Average minutes of physical activity attributable to active transportation per day. Portion of people regularly using the greenways for active transportation. Number of walking or biking trips.

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Table 21. Goal 2: Greenway Network (continued) Action #

Action

Plan Impact

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

Mid-Range (4-6 years)

Development and deployment of notice program. Advertisement on the greenway alerts webpage. Consider a banner on other greenway webpages users can click that navigates them to the alerts and closures webpage.

Enhance City’s communication efforts about trail closures, detours, and maintenance projects.

2.4

Integrate greenways closures with the City’s alert system.

Greenway

Transportation, N/A CAPE

Use newly improved Traffic Control guidance to identify on-street rerouting for greenway closures due to construction or weather events.

2.5

Develop an ongoing greenway maintenance scan schedule for greenway corridors to ensure that routes remain accessible.

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Greenway and ADA Transition

Transportation, N/A Parks, PW

Immediate (0-3 years)

Schedule/Plan development. Number of greenway accessibility repairs completed.


Table 22. Goal 3: Pedestrian Network Using Close the GAP’s ADA Transition Plan as a guide, the City of Asheville’s pedestrian network is ADA compliant to the maximum extent feasible. Action #

Action

3.1

Develop an ADA Design Checklist and Submission Requirements to include detailed elevations with ADA measurements. Set criteria less than maximum values to accommodate construction tolerances (variations).

3.2

Develop and begin using a technical infeasibility form for design and inspection to document how and why it is technically infeasible to meet ADA requirements during a development project.

Plan Impact

3.3

Partner

How Success Will Be Measured

Timeframe

ADA Transition

Transportation, Public Works, N/A Development Services

ADA Transition

Transportation, Public Works, Risk Management, N/A Development Services, Planning & Urban Design

Immediate (0-3 years)

ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works, N/A Development Services

Immediate (0-3 years)

Develop a publicly accessible portal to house technical infeasibility documents. Develop a set of ADA Training Programs aimed at designers, reviewers, and field inspectors for internal and external partners. Topics should include Technical Infeasibility Forms and Work Zone Traffic Control.

Lead

Completion of the ADA Design and Submission Requirements.

Immediate (0-3 years)

Number of trainings provided to City staff and outside developers.

Technical infeasible process and forms. Technical infeasible tracking process.

Developed training curriculum. Number of trainings provided.

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Table 22. Goal 3: Pedestrian Network (continued) Action #

3.4

Action Form an ADA Advisory Committee of individuals with disabilities and members of organizations that serve people with disabilities. This committee may provide ADA input on items such as Audible Pedestrian Signal locations, reviewing changes to project priorities.

3.5

Track and report on ADA Transition Plan progress to document the removal of barriers from the transportation network.

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Plan Impact

ADA Transition, Pedestrian

ADA Transition

Lead

Partner

NCDOT (Encourage NCDOT Transportation, membership Risk as an exManagement, officio Public Works member of the ADA Advisory Committee)

Transportation, Public Works, Capital NCDOT Projects, Risk Management

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

Formation of the ADA Advisory Committee. Immediate (0-3 years)

Number of meetings of the ADA Advisory Committee. Number of projects the ADA Advisory committee provided input on.

Immediate (0-3 years) & Ongoing

As the Transition Plan is implemented, corridors and individual elements will be removed from the Transition Plan. At the end of each year, complete a program review and an annual update report summarizing completed actions and describing any changes in conditions. The report enables tracking of progress in removing accessibility barriers and achieving ADA compliance.


Table 23. Goal 4: Pedestrian Network Using Close the GAP as a guide, the pedestrians in the City of Asheville can walk from home (however one defines home) to key destinations along a network of streets comfortable for people who walk. Action #

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

Action

Use Close the GAP as a guiding plan to create a complete pedestrian network.

Complete projects in the Close the GAP high priority network to increase the number of people walking for transportation and recreation in Asheville.

Use Close the GAP priority project lists to initiate new projects into the project development process yearly to keep a steady stream of projects in development.

Initiate a pilot program for the use of alternatives to sidewalks to expand the pedestrian network.

Plan Impact

Lead

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works, Development Services, Planning and Urban Design

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Parks and Recreation

Partner

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured Number of pedestrian gaps filled.

NCDOT, FBRMPO, Funding Partners

NCDOT, FBRMPO, Funding Partners

Ongoing

Number of crossing gaps filled or improved. Number of other pedestrian amenities added or improved (e.g., signals, signage). Percent of Asheville commuters walking and biking to work (using annual American Community Survey updates).

Ongoing

Number of people walking recorded in annual local counts. Number of people walking recorded in future greenway intercept surveys. Number of new projects identified for the project pipeline each year.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works, Capital, NCDOT, Finance and Budget Department

NCDOT, FBRMPO, Funding Partners

Reporting on projects implemented: Ongoing

• Number of Pedestrian Priority Network sidewalk gaps filled. • Number of Pedestrian Priority Network crossing gaps filled or improved. Adoption of alternative sidewalk standards.

Pedestrian, ADA Transition

Transportation, Public Works

N/A

Immediate (0-3 years)

Number of interim pedestrian improvements (e.g. painted curb extensions and refuge islands, alternative pedestrian walkways constructed).

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Table 23. Goal 4: Pedestrian Network (continued) Action #

Action

Plan Impact

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

Promote clear sidewalks through a “Keep it Clear” community education and enforcement campaign.

4.5

Create “Keep it Clear” rapid response program to enforce clearing of encroachments (e.g. trash cans, vegetation, signs, snow).

How Success Will Be Measured

Number of “Keep It Clear” points of education. Number of enforcement activities associated with the “Keep It Clear” campaign. ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works, CAPE

Neighborhood Associations, Business Associations

Immediate (0-3 years)

Number of communications educating public about sidewalk maintenance See Examples: https:// docs.google.com/ document/d/1RTmLdHLaGImtoOeCrpG_ jQU6BpwPyR2NGb TYUQ7XAk/edit U6BpwPyR2NGbTYUQ7XAk/ edit

Expand property owner education regarding responsibility for maintaining sidewalks.

Crossing opportunities can be evaluated in a number of ways — along a specific roadway, as an average measure for a particular area, or related to intersections.

4.6

Using guidance from Close the GAP, improve the number and quality of pedestrian roadway crossings across the City.

Examples of measures include: ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, NCDOT, Public Works, Capital Projects FBRMPO

Immediate (0-3 years)

Decrease linear distance along a corridor between legal crossing opportunities. Decrease linear distance along a corridor between marked crosswalks. Decrease linear distance along a corridor between signalized crossings. Increase the number of intersections with crossings of all intersection legs.

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Table 23. Goal 4: Pedestrian Network (continued) Action #

Action Develop a plan/ program and schedule for routine sidewalk maintenance scans along high priority corridors to ensure that routes remain accessible.

4.7

This program may include specifics on less costly sidewalk repair methods such as patching, crackfilling, wedging, flexible pavement applications, mud-jacking, and grinding/cutting (beveling).

Plan Impact

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

Develop schedule and plan. ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, N/A Public Works

Mid-Range (4-6 years)

Track scan and repair progress with ADA Transition Plan database. Expand repair methods to include lower cost solutions.

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Table 24. Goal 5: Project Development Using Close the GAP as a guide, the City of Asheville has increased capacity to deliver quality pedestrian projects. Action #

Action

Plan Impact

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

Leverage City of Asheville and NCDOT resurfacing projects to accelerate Close the GAP and complete street project implementation.

5.1

Work with departments and agencies to ensure that ADA upgrades and planned and budgeted for in resurfacing projects (e.g., right-of-way acquisition, curb ramp design, signal upgrades).

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works, NCDOT Capital Projects

Ongoing

Number of Close the GAP projects completed during resurfacing.

Since NCDOT resurfacing funds cannot be used for right-of-way purchase or utility relocations, identify sources of matching funds to partner with NCDOT on resurfacing projects to complete full corridor ADA upgrades.

5.2

5.3

Refine the City’s existing right-of-way policy and process to maximize ability ADA to achieve ADA compliance Transition and accomplish Close the GAP project implementation.

Include a schedule of City and NCDOT repaving projects in the City’s project planning and development process.

Transportation, NCDOT Public Works, (ex-officio Capital Projects involvement)

Immediate (0-3 years)

Number of ROWs identified / secured early in project planning steps.

Plan for and implement cross jurisdictional pedestrian projects.

Form working group.

Form a regular working group to coordinate Close the GAP pedestrian projects with Buncombe County and other adjoining municipal planning efforts, particularly in the City’s former extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ).

Working with Buncombe County and other municipalities, prioritize projects important to cross-jurisdictional connectivity.

As Buncombe County updates its plans and ordinances, work with the county to develop a coordinated pedestrian network in urbanized areas adjoining the City.

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Greenway, Pedestrian

Transportation, Planning and Urban Design, Development Services

Buncombe County, Woodfin, Biltmore Forest, Fletcher

Ongoing

Identify and implement two to three crossjurisdictional projects in the next 5 to 10 years.


Table 24. Goal 5: Project Development (continued)

Action #

Action

5.4

Develop consensus in City departments to adopt and use the transportation project development checklist. See Chapter 8 project development checklists.

5.5

Continue project development collaboration with NCDOT by continuing the City / NCDOT monthly Pedestrian Working Group.

5.6

5.7

5.8

Continue to work with NCDOT on integration of pedestrian, bicycle, greenway facilities in accordance with the evolving NCDOT Complete Streets process.

Review the Close the GAP project lists and project status and form consensus in advance of the next round of major transportation system projects to advocate for and submit through the FBRMPO/NCDOT SPOT Process

Increase land development incentives and mechanisms available to the development community to participate in Close the GAP project development.

Plan Impact Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Lead

Partner

Transportation, Planning & Urban Design, FBRMPO, Public Works, NCDOT Development Services, Capital Projects

Timeframe

Immediate (0-3 years)

How Success Will Be Measured

Resolution of departmental adoption.

Number of monthly meetings in a year. Transportation

NCDOT

Transportation, Planning & Urban Design, Public Works, NCDOT Development Services, Capital Projects

Number of projects advanced through the Pedestrian Working Group.

Ongoing

Use of NCDOT Complete Streets Checklists with project development – adapt as needed.

Ongoing

Integration of Close the GAP project in NCDOT Project Development. There are a number of ways to track progress, examples include:

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, City Council

NCDOT, FBRMPO

Number of projects from adopted corridor studies.

Ongoing

Number of projects developed in partnership with NCDOT.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Development Services, Planning & Urban Design

NCDOT

Increase the number (or percentage) of the Close the GAP projects implemented through private development.

Ongoing

Decrease in the number of ADA noncompliant sidewalks and curb ramps.

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Table 25. Goal 6: Policy Using Close the GAP as a guide, the City of Asheville has updated and new policies to guide pedestrian and greenway network development.

Action #

6.1

6.2

Action

Using the detailed review of the City’s UDO included with Close the GAP, update the UDO to facilitate pedestrian network implementation (Appendix 12.A). Using the detailed review of the City’s ASSDM included with Close the GAP, update the ASSDM to facilitate pedestrian network implementation. Expand the number and types of pedestrian-oriented tools available in the ASSDM (Appendix 12.B).

6.3

6.4

Work with Planning and Urban Design to evaluate current lighting standards and update standards as needed to increase lighting in high pedestrian areas, at crossings, and along greenways. Working with the City’s legal department (and other departments as needed), investigate utility agreements to reduce utility obstructions in the Public Access Route (PAR).

Plan Impact

6.5

214 /// GAP Plan /

Partner

Timeframe

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works, Planning & N/A Urban Design, Development Services

Updated Immediate UDO (0-3 years) standards.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works, Planning & N/A Urban Design, Development Services

Updated Immediate SSDM (0-3 years) standards.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Planning & Urban Design, Duke Energy Public Works, Development Services

Updated lighting Immediate standards (0-3 years) in the UDO and SSDM. Revised agreements with utility companies.

ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Legal, Public Works, Development Services

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Updated Public Works, Development Immediate policy and Development Community (0-3 years) guidebook. Services

Strengthen enforcement to ensure that utility company work within the public right-of-way is ADA compliant. Improve work zone traffic control for pedestrians with an updated policy and development of a work zone traffic control handbook. Utilize work zone traffic control checklist (See Accompanying Document: Pedestrian Accommodations in Work Zone Design Guidance and Checklist).

Lead

How Success Will Be Measured

Utility Companies

Immediate (0-3 years) Revised standards for work in the public right-of-way.


Table 25. Goal 5: Policy (continued)

Action #

6.6

Action

Update the Neighborhood Sidewalk program using Close the GAP as a guide. Include neighborhood greenways and alternatives to sidewalks (See Accompanying Document: Pedestrian Accommodations in Work Zone Design Guidance and Checklist)

Plan Impact

ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Lead

Partner

Transportation, Capital N/A Projects, Public Works

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured Update guidance to align with Close the GAP plans.

Immediate Increase (0-3 years) the annual amount of funding allocated for this program.

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Table 26. Goal 7: Funding The City of Asheville has identified adequate, consistent, and wide-ranging funding sources to implement the Close the GAP Network. Action #

Action

7.1

Increase the general fund annual allocation for Close the GAP network implementation.

7.2

Increase the general fund annual allocation for ADA Transition plan implementation.

Plan Impact

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

Greenway, Pedestrian

Transportation, Finance & N/A Management, City Council

Track annual allocation Immediate dedicated (0-3 years) for network implementation.

ADA Transition

Transportation, Finance & Management, N/A Risk Management, City Council

Track annual Immediate allocation (0-3 years) dedicated for ADA Transition Plan implementation. Track adopted measures resulting in dedicated funding sources.

7.3

Explore options to secure a dedicated funding source for Close the GAP implementation.

7.4

To address funding needs for unexpected projects and partner or grant matching funds, identify a source of set aside funds (or a quick response policy) to respond to partnership opportunities.

7.5

Establish a method to encourage developer / other partner participation in greenway design and construction. Explore opportunities to use developer participation as matching funds for other funding sources.

216 /// GAP Plan /

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Budget, City N/A Council

Transportation, Budget, City N/A Council

Use a measure to Mid – benchmark active Range (4-6 transportation years) funding: per capita investment, proposed miles, active transportation mode split. Track the value of set aside Mid-Range funds available to (4-6 years) respond to grant and partnership opportunities.

Developed policy. Greenway

Transportation, Development Legal Community

Immediate Amount of (0-3 years) developer participation.


Table 27. Goal 8: Tools Using a variety of existing and new technology and communication tools, the City of Asheville and its residents and stakeholders are informed about Close the GAP implementation progress and can interact with the City to request / share emerging needs.

Action #

Action

Plan Impact

8.1

Update the Asheville App (or similar) where records, City responses, and actions taken are visible to the public and data from the App can assist with City decisions.

8.2

The City is required to track and annually report on its ADA Transition Plan progress. Working with the City’s IT / GIS departments, develop a systematic project tracking system for data entry when corridors are evaluated for detailed ADA compliance, as well as uploading ADA design checklists, inspection forms, and Technically Infeasible Forms (TIFs).

8.3

Update the City public meeting checklists to ensure ADA compliance at public meetings. The checklist should include a list of accessible meetings locations, special ADA accommodations resources Transition and use policy. Also identify Plan a funding pool to hire American Sign Language interpreters, creation of accessible documents, and respond to other accommodations requests.

CAPE, Risk Management, Finance & Management

8.4

Develop a policy, process and program that includes ADA an easy-to-use web-based Transition tool that allows residents to Plan request accessible parking locations.

Transportation, Parking Services, IT & N/A GIS, CAPE

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

Updated App

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

ADA Transition Plan

How Success Will Be Measured

To be determined.

N/A

Information Technology, GIS, Transportation, N/A Development Services

Immediate (0-3 years)

Immediate (0-3 years)

Examples of how data is used in transportation decisions.

Launch of the ADA Transition Plan tracking tool. Annual reporting per ADA Transition Plan for the Public Rightof-Way.

Developed Policy Meetings held in fully accessible locations. N/A

Immediate (0-3 years)

Immediate (0-3 years)

Accomodations provided (e.g. sign language interpreters or audible format of materials).

Accessible parking request policy and process. Accessible parking request tool.

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Table 27 Goal 8: Tools (continued)

Action #

Action

8.5

Develop a single landing portal / communication dashboard (such as the dashboard used to report on bond project process) to provide Close the GAP project development updates and information, communication about the development process, and project engagement opportunities.

8.6

To build the case for active transportation funding and program expansion, expand the City’s regular pedestrian counting systems and practices to include point in time counts as well as permanent counts.

218 /// GAP Plan /

Plan Impact

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Lead

Partner

Transportation, Capital Projects, IT & N/A GIS, CAPE

Transportation, Bike/Ped Task FBRMPO Force

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

Ongoing

Launch of the project portal.

Ongoing

Standard practices for manually and/ or automatically counting pedestrians in place Additional data sets for use in reporting out for project funding and needs analyses.


Table 28. Goal 9: Safety As a result of implementing pedestrian safety best practices, pedestrian crashes in the City are significantly reduced. Action #

Action

9.1

Using strategies in and implementing projects from Close the GAP, reduce number of pedestrian crashes of all injury types.

9.2

Significantly reduce pedestrian crashes resulting in death or serious injury by developing and implementing a citywide Vision Zero strategy.

Plan Impact Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Lead

Partner

Transportation, Public Works, NCDOT Asheville Police Department Transportation, Public Works, NCODT Asheville Police Department

How Success Will Be Measured

Timeframe

Immediate (0-3 years)

Immediate (0-3 years)

Reduction in crash rates.

Adoption of a Vision Zero Action Plan. Implemented Vision Zero action items. Development of a share the road campaign. Examples: “Driving Change” from Grand Rapids, Michigan. http:// grdrivingchange.org/

9.3

Promote a shared sense of civility among all roadway users through share the road / safe road behavior programming.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, CAPE, NCDOT

FBRMPO

Mid – Range (4-6 years)

“Everyone is a Pedestrian”, US Dept. of Transportation. https://www. trafficsafetymarketing. gov/get-materials/ pedestrian-safety/ everyone-pedestrian “Heads Up”, Eureka, California. https://bit. ly/3J505fh San Francisco MTA safety campaigns: https://www.sfmta. com/educationcampaigns

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Table 28. Goal 9: Safety (continued)

Action #

Action

9.4

During Close the GAP, the team discovered inconsistencies between crash data provided by the City of Asheville Police Department and data available through PBIN. Work is needed to identify the source of these inconsistencies (for example, race is missing for many crashes reported through the PBIN where that data is available through the City). Recommendation is to correct inconsistencies between NCDOT, PBIN and City of Asheville crash statistics to better support crash analytics for more accurate safety evaluations. Also recommend that that the Police Department be tasked with making sure that the injury type gets updated on the reports if conditions change so that the crash data is accurate. A task force can investigate the inconsistencies and provide further recommendations.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

9.5

Improve pedestrian safety along corridors with high safety scores and known crash history by using pedestrian countermeasures such as those identified in the Close the GAP plan and document in other national guidance.

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

220 /// GAP Plan /

Plan Impact

Lead

Partner

Transportation, Asheville Police NC Department, Highway Asheville Fire Patrol Department

Transportation

NCDOT

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

Immediate (0-3 years)

Corrected inconsistencies between NCDOT, PBIN and City of Asheville crash statistics to better support crash analytics for more accurate safety evaluations.

Ongoing

Number of projects identified or implemented in along high crash corridors.


Table 29. Goal 10: Multimodal Vision Close the GAP is integrated with other multimodal plans and programs to reach the City’s overall multimodal vision. Action #

Action

10.1

To integrate the areas where Close the GAP overlaps with City bicycling goals, update the City of Asheville’s Bicycle Plan.

10.2

As noted in the City’s SSDM, incorporate additional Complete Streets Design Guidance to standardize complete streets element selection, context considerations and design details for elements that enhance the quality of the pedestrian experience and the balancing of all modes within the City’s right-of-way.

10.3

Develop an updated policy to address the use of e-devices (scooters, ebikes, Onewheels, etc.) on public streets, sidewalks, and greenways.

10.4

10.5

Plan Impact

Lead

Partner

Timeframe

How Success Will Be Measured

FBRMPO, NCDOT Integrated Mobility Division

Immediate (0-3 years)

An integrated and updated bicycle plan.

Greenway

Transportation

Greenway, ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Planning & Urban Design, Public Works, NCDOT Development Services, Capital Projects

Mid-Range (4-6 years)

Updated design manual.

ADA Transition, Pedestrian

Transportation, Public Works

N/A

Immediate (0-3 years)

An adopted e-device use policy.

Work with partners to update the City’s Greenway, pedestrian and greenway Pedestrian wayfinding system.

Transportation, Planning & Urban Design, Public Works

Buncombe County TDA, Funding Partners

Mid-Range (4-6 years)

Expanded and implemented pedestrian wayfinding system.

Encourage more programs, events, and projects that create a car-free environment.

Greenway,

Greenway, Pedestrian

Transportation, Parks and Recreation

FBRMPO, Community Ongoing Organizations

Number of open streets events per year. Number of car-free streets (temporarily or permanently closed to cars).

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11

APPENDICES


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CLOSE THE GAP APPENDIX REFERENCE Appendix #

Name

1

Glossary of Transportation Terms

2

FBRMPO Long Duration Pedestrian Counts

3

Existing Plan Document Review

4

Committee and Engagement Tracking

5

Greenway Intercept Survey

6

Online Survey Results

7

Destination and Equity Score and Methodology

8

Greenway Plan Constraint Analysis

9

Corridor Specific Analysis: Beaverdam and West Asheville Greenway

10

ADA and Pedestrian Project Lists

11

Funding Guide

12

UDO and ASSDM Review 12.A

UDO Review

12.B

ASSDM Review

ACCOMPANYING DOCUMENTS Asheville Unpaved Guidebook Alternatives to Sidewalks Guidebook Pedestrian Accommodations in Work Zones Design Guidance and Checklist ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan


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CLOSE THE GAP APPENDIX 1: GLOSSARY OF TRANSPORTATION TERMS


Glossary of Transportation Terms AASHTO: American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials, a non-profit and nonpartisan association which publishes specifications, test protocols and guidelines that are used in highway design and construction throughout the United States. ADA: Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, programs and services provided by state and local governments, goods and services provided by private companies, and in commercial facilities. Related to the built environment, the law mandates that a site, building, facility, or trail complies with the ADA Accessibility Guidelines and can be approached, entered, and used by people with disabilities. AIM (Asheville in Motion): AIM is a planning process intended to consolidate a variety of modal plans into a cohesive strategy and to express a method for prioritizing transportation investments in a manner consistent with desired outcomes. Alternative Transportation: modes of transportation, such as taking public transit, bicycling or walking, which are alternatives to automobile travel. Amenities: features that add to a good walking street. These are the aspects that make a street nice: street trees, plantings, bike racks, etc. Approaches (left or right): the areas of the sidewalk leading to the ramp. At-Grade Crossing: refers to a trail /roadway intersection where trail users are routed to cross the road, rather than above (pedestrian bridge) or below (tunnel).

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Audible Pedestrian Signals: devices at intersections with traffic lights that help people with low or no vision to know when it is safe to cross the street. There is an audible tone that indicates the location of the pedestrian push button, as well as whether the push button has been activated and a tone/noise that indicates to the user whether it is safe to cross. Bollards: posts of varying material (plastic, metal, wooden concrete) that are designed to restrict vehicular access to a trail. Bicycle Boulevard: low-volume streets that are enhanced for bicycle travel through pavement markings, signage, traffic calming, intersection crossing treatments. These enhance the already calm and quiet nature of neighborhood streets and are intended to be comfortable for people of all ages and abilities. Bike Lane: a travel lane that is striped a minimum of 5 feet and designated for bicycle use only. They are typically one-way treatments that carry bicycle traffic in the same direction as an adjacent motor vehicle lane. Bike lanes are identified with signage, striping and other pavement markings. Bike lanes can have parking adjacent. Bike Route: roadways that are identified, often through signage, as preferred for bicycles. Buffer: any type of natural or constructed barrier (trees, shrubs, berms or fences) used between a sidewalk, bike lane or greenway and adjacent lands to minimize impacts (physical or visual). Buffered Bike Lane: a bike lane with a horizontal buffer separating the bike lane and vehicle travel lane. This buffer is painted on the pavement and is typically wider than 2’. It is intended to enhance safety and comfort. Busy Street: streets that have a lot of traffic, are wide, and/or where the speed is fast (35 mph or more). Examples include: Tunnel Road, Patton Avenue, Hendersonville Road, Merrimon Avenue. City Connector Streets: from the Asheville in Motion Mobility Plan, this is a street that offers a balance between providing local land access and moving people and goods. These streets have lower travel speeds and traffic volumes than Workhorse Streets (i.e. Haywood Rd). City Walkways: streets that are well-traveled by pedestrians and connect districts within the City, such as Clingman Ave. Climbing Lane: hybrid bicycle facilities on two-way streets that include a bike lane on the up-hill side of the street and a shared lane marking on the other side. The bicycle lane allows the slower moving, uphill bicyclist to have a dedicated lane to travel that is separated from motor vehicles who can more easily travel uphill. The shared lane marking on the downhill side is more acceptable since the speed difference between people riding a bicycle and driving is not as great. As with all

2


bicycle facilities, the street characteristics (speed, volume) need to be considered when a facility such as this is evaluated. Comfortable: while what is comfortable for one person is different for another, when we say “comfortable” we mean that the places where you walk feel safe, unstressed, and where you may even enjoy yourself while walking. Complete Streets: Complete Streets are designed and operated to create safe and convenient access for all users, including bicyclists, pedestrians, motorists, and transit riders of all ages and abilities. Balancing the needs of all users can be challenging, but it is important. All Complete Streets have the same goals, but they don’t all look alike. Asheville’s City Council adopted a Complete Streets policy in 2012. Connectivity: connectivity links people with the destinations they want to travel to via comfortable and accessible streets or greenways. Continuity is critical to connectivity, such as continuous sidewalks with no gaps. For people walking, biking or using a mobility device, connectivity is particularly important because it contributes to a more comfortable and safe travel experience. As more streets and greenways are connected, and as the network is realized, the benefits of each element is greatly enhanced. Crosswalks: area where it is safe for a pedestrian to cross. It is typically marked with paint and can take many different forms, such as two parallel lines (called a transverse crosswalk), continental/zebra crosswalk which appears like a series of bars, or a ladder crosswalk which is similar to a continental/zebra crosswalk but with parallel lines on both sides (like a ladder). Curb Extension: also known as “bulb-outs”, these are an enlargement of the sidewalk to make crossing or boarding a bus easier. At crossings, they increase the ability of a person driving to see people waiting to cross the street, shorten the distance that a pedestrian needs to cross the street, and provides extra space for pedestrians to wait to cross. Curb Ramp: Sloped surfaces that connect the sidewalk to the street. These are disability access features and must meet requirements related to slope, width, location and surface treatments. Ramps allow people using a mobility device to mount and dismount sidewalk curbs. Ramps can include the following forms: ● Perpendicular Ramp – The ramp is perpendicular to the street to be crossed. ● Parallel Ramp – The ramp is parallel to the street to be crossed. ● Combination Ramp – The ramp has two sections, one of which is parallel and one of which is perpendicular to the street to be crossed. ● Diagonal Ramp – The ramp serves pedestrians crossing two intersecting streets and lies at a 45 degree angle to both streets. ● Built-Up Ramp – The ramp is constructed on the side of the curb and is built up to the level of the sidewalk.

3


Blended Transition – The entire corner of the intersecting streets is sloped toward the intersection.

Destination Point: location of interest that attracts people to it. Detectable Warning Surface (aka Truncated Domes): a distinctive surface pattern of domes detectable by cane or underfoot that alert people with vision impairments of their approach to street crossings and hazardous drop-offs. Easement: grants the right to use a specific portion of land for a specific purpose or purposes. Easements may be limited to a specific period of time, granted in perpetuity or predicated upon the occurrence of a specific event. An easement agreement survives transfer of landownership and is generally binding upon future owners until it expires on its own terms. Equity Focus Areas: areas of the City where people who most need to rely on walking, transit or biking for transportation live, work, or access services. Facility: a general term denoting improvements and provisions made to accommodate or encourage bicycling or walking, including bikeways, bike parking, sidewalks, or crosswalks. Flare: for curb ramps that are within sidewalks or other pedestrian paths, this is a sloped surface creating a transition between the sidewalk and the ramp. Flared Sides: when the sides of a curb ramp end in sloped panels that create a gradual transition between the ramp and the adjacent sidewalk. Flat Edges: when the sides of a curb ramp are flat, similar to a sidewalk. Floodplain: the lowland that borders a stream, creek, river, or water conveyance and is subject to flooding when the stream overflows its banks (1% chance each year of being flooded). Future Lane Use: city planners need to know which areas of a city are used for which purpose. Therefore, they produce a map of "land use", that identifies parts of a city and the major activities (land use) that happen there. The future land use map is a projection into the future for land use in a city. Freeway (or Expressway): a multi-lane road where access (i.e. driveways and entrances/exit) are controlled. These roads typically carry more traffic regionally, are higher speed and intended for longer distance travel (i.e. I-240). French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization (FBRMPO): a partnership between local and state government that makes decisions about transportation planning in urbanized areas and meets planning requirements established by federal legislation for 4


transportation funding. In addition, FBRMPO is required to prepare long range transportation plans for the planning area with a minimum 20-year horizon. Additional tasks include developing an annual planning work program and assistance in prioritization of projects to be included in the State Transportation Improvement Program (NCDOT’s funding for a 10-year period). FBRMPO was created in 1962 as the region centered around Asheville continued to experience growth and reached a population of 50,000 which constitutes the federally-mandated threshold for a Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). The MPO currently serves over 414,000 people across 21 municipalities. Good Walking Street: a street that has the facilities you need to feel comfortable walking down the street. Green Infrastructure: is an approach to water management that protects, restores, or mimics the natural water cycle. Using various strategies, green infrastructure reduces and treats stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social, and economic benefits. Greenway: a linear corridor of natural land, usually following features such as rivers, old railroad lines or utility lines, which is used for conservation, recreation, or alternative transportation purposes. Greenspace: natural areas, open spaces, parks, trails, and greenways that function for both wildlife and people. Gutter: the paved channel between the ramp/curb and the street that is designed for drainage of water. Hard Surface: trails with surfaces that use paved materials or other firm and stable surfaces that are capable of supporting wheels and accessibility. High Density Residential Areas: areas of the city that have a greater concentration of housing that serves more people, such as apartments, condominiums, or town houses. Landing: the flat area on the top or bottom of a ramp that is used by pedestrians to change direction of travel. Low Density Residential Areas: areas of the city that have housing that serves standalone homes typically occupied by individual families. Master Plan: a blueprint for the future expansion and implementation. It will identify economic and other factors such as utility infrastructure development, planning, acquisition design guidelines and sustainability.

5


Major City Walkways: streets that are well-traveled by pedestrians and connect to many destinations and to transit, such as Broadway St in downtown Asheville. Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP): this is a 25-year look into the future that forecasts changes in the region and seeks to identify transportation improvements needed to keep travelers and goods moving smoothly and how to pay for those improvements. Mode (of Transportation): a method of movement of people or goods, such as walking or biking. Mode Share (Mode Split): the percent of people that use a particular mode of transportation. Multimodal: modes of transportation, such as public transit, bicycle, or walking; alternative to automobile travel. Multi-Use Sidepath: see Shared Use Path or Trail (below). MUTCD: the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) is published by the US Department of Transportation and provides a uniform code for signage systems used in the construction and operation of transportation systems, including those for people walking and biking. Natural Surface: trails with surfaces that are made of natural material, such as compacted dirt, wood chips or stones. Neighborhood Collector Streets: from the Asheville in Motion Mobility Plan, this is a street that connects neighborhood traffic to points within and between existing neighborhoods. Neighborhood Greenways: A calm residential street with fewer numbers of cars and slower speeds like you might experience on a traditional greenway. While not a designated facility in the sense that a traditional greenway is, a neighborhood greenway occurs on an existing neighborhood street to improve safety, help people cross busy streets, and keep speeds low. They take a current residential street and make it even better for people walking and biking. Neighborhood Streets (also known as ‘Locals’ in the AIM Plan): streets where people live and lead the way to business areas. Examples include: Raleigh Rd., Jeffress Ave., Vermont Ave. Neighborhood Walkways: streets that are popular walking routes within neighborhoods and offer good connection from various destinations, such as Hillside St. Network: in the case of Close the GAP, a network comprises the streets and greenways that connect to offer designated places for people to bicycle and walk (for the purpose of this Plan, 6


‘walking’ is assumed to include wheeling, rolling, or using any other mobility device). A network usually starts out as a vision of how streets can accommodate multimodal options, and this vision is accomplished incrementally through the construction of accessible sidewalks and greenways. While every street in a community may eventually have multimodal transportation elements, the streets in the network are typically prioritized for these investments and offer connectivity to destinations that are desired by community members seeking multimodal transportation options. Off-Road Facilities: trails that are physically separated from motorized vehicular traffic by an open space, elevation or barrier. On-Road Facilities: extensions of the existing street system right-of-way, offering users the choice of sidewalks or bike facilities. Paved Shoulder: an extension of the pavement adjacent to a travel lane. Pedestrian District: areas that are prioritized for people walking, and the streets are designed in such a way to ensure pedestrians are comfortable. It may include wide sidewalks, streets that are for pedestrians-only, and features for pedestrians such as benches. Pedestrian Crossing: Locations where a pedestrian may legally cross the street and where curb ramps must be provided. Crossings can occur at intersections or mid-block locations and may be accompanied by signs, paint markings (e.g. crosswalks) and traffic control (e.g. stop signs, traffic lights or flashing devices) Pedestrian Push Button: a device at a traffic light that can be used by a pedestrian to activate the walk/don’t walk pedestrian signal. It is typically located at arm’s length of a seated pedestrian and can be pushed to activate the signal. Pedestrian Signal Head: some intersections have these mounted on the traffic light, and they are intended to communicate to the person walking whether it is safe to walk. When it is safe to walk the signal typically has a white human figure displayed. When it is not safe to begin walking, the signal typically displays an orange flashing hand; if someone is mid-way in the crosswalk when the flashing hand appears, this is intended to warn the person that the signal will soon change and they should finish quickly. When it is not safe to walk at all, the orange hand appears steady and does not flash. At most intersections, the pedestrian signal is activated by a push button, but sometimes the signal automatically comes up without having to push a button. Protected Bike Lane (aka Separated Bike Lane/Cycletrack): Physically separated facility from the roadway and the sidewalk, intended for the exclusive use of people on bikes. The separation usually takes the form of curbing or other vertical elements. Rail-to-Trail: a public shared-use path (paved or natural) created along an inactive or abandoned rail corridor. 7


Rail-with-Trail: any shared-use path that is located on or directly adjacent to an active railroad or fixed route transit corridor. Railbank(ing): retaining a rail corridor for future railroad uses after service has been discontinued. The National Trails System Act, Sec. 8d, provides for interim public use of the corridor, allowing the establishment of recreational trails. Returned Curb: when the sides of a ramp end in distinct curbs similar to the curb of a street. Riparian Zone: an area of vegetation that is strongly influenced by water and that occurs adjacent to streams, shorelines, and wetlands. Road Diet: a technique in transportation planning where the number of travel lanes and/or effective width of the road is reduced in order to achieve safety, traffic and multimodal benefits. A traditional road diet is to convert a street from four lanes to three lanes with bike lanes. Shared Streets: a street which is intended to be shared by people walking, biking and driving. These are low volume, low speed streets that do not have dedicated travel lanes for people walking, biking or driving. Sharrow: also known as a shared-lane arrow, a marking that includes a symbol of a bicycle and two “chevron” arrows to indicate the approximate area that a person on a bicycle may travel in a roadway. Shared-Use Trail or Path: any corridor that is designed to accommodate various uses including bicycling, walking, jogging, hiking, rollerblading, horseback riding; the trail should meet AASHTO standards. Sidepath: a two-way shared use path located immediately adjacent and parallel to a roadway. Sidewalk: a designated space along the side of a road for use by pedestrians. Sidewalk System: when we say "system of sidewalks" we mean sidewalks, curb ramps, crossing signals, crosswalks and other things that help pedestrians get around the City. Signed Bike Route: these are roadways that are designated as a part of the bike network with dedicated signage; sharrows often are installed on the pavement of these roadways. Spot Safety Program: An NCDOT funding program for small projects that will reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities by reducing the potential for and severity of these incidents on public roadways.

8


State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP): required by federal law, this is a multi-year plan that identifies the construction funding for and scheduling of transportation projects throughout the state. Strategic Prioritization (SPOT): this is NCDOTs project prioritization process based on the Strategic Transportation Investments Law. Striped Shoulder: roadways without curb and gutter may include a striped shoulder that is provided and can be used by people on bikes or people walking. Tactile Pedestrian Signal: These are devices at intersections with traffic lights that help people with low or no sight to know when it is safe to cross the street and which direction the particular push button serves.The device is a part of the push button, and has a raised arrow pointing in the direction of travel which vibrates when it is safe to begin walking. Trail: route on land or water with protected status and public access for recreation or transportation purposes, such as walking, jogging, hiking, bicycling, rollerblading, horseback riding, canoeing and kayaking. Trailhead: a designated public access point along a greenway which can include bicycle and paved or gravel automobile parking, restroom facilities, drinking fountains, signage, benches and picnic tables. Trail Tread: the surface of a trail. Uncomfortable: while what is uncomfortable for one person is different for another, when we say “uncomfortable” we mean the places where you are walking does not feel safe, is a stressful experience, and you only walk it because you don’t have a lot of options. Volume: a term used to survey the number of vehicles (traffic), pedestrians or bicycles crossing a section of road during a selected period of time. Walking Path: a linear route for general pedestrian use that is not a sidewalk and may not meet AASHTO standards, often found in parks. Wide Curb Lane: a lane where there is no designated bike lane and where the outside travel lane is wider than the usual lane width. Workhorse Street: from the Asheville in Motion Mobility Plan, this is a multi-lane street that can include a landscaped center median, requires separation between people walking and biking and the travelway, and accommodates traffic in and out of the city (i.e. Leicester Highway).

9


CLOSE THE GAP APPENDIX 2: LONG DURATION PEDESTRIAN COUNTS


French Broad River Greenway East Pedestrian Count Time Period: 6 weeks (42 days) between Wednesday, October 21, 2020

– Wednesday,

December 2, 202o

Location: Newly completed section of greenway near the Riverside Dr/Lyman St roundabout

Image: Google Maps

Results Total Users Users per Day (average) Users per Hour (average) Peak Day (24 hour usage) Peak 2-Hour Period (average) Minimum Day (24 hour usage)

29, 944 713 30 Saturday, November 21st (1,209) 12:00pm – 2:00pm Monday, November 30th (489)

French Broad River MPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Equipment: Eco-Counter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. The counter is bi-directional and accounts for users in both directions. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-byside or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Patterns of Use This section of multi-use path was completed in 2020 as part of the RADTIP. Parallel to this section is a dedicated cycle-track whose users would not be accounted for in this report.

The first chart shows users/day. It is clear the weekends saw the highest use, with Saturday being the peak day and Wednesday having the least users.

Image: FBRMPO

Number of Users

Users/Day 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

6,597

7,218 6,051

4,183 1,990

2,005

1,900

French Broad River MPO Pedestrian Counts

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The following chart illustrates the average count share by time of day (24 hour clock time). This includes both weekday and weekend data. The peak time, on average, is between 2:00pm-4:00pm with around 13% of users utilizing the greenway at that time.

16.00% 14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00%

0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

PERCENTAGE OF DAILY USERS

Average Hourly Use

This chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend. Both times seem to have similar patterns of users on the greenway, which may be attributable to milder weather occurring in November and shorter daylight hours.

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage Weekend

16.00% 14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00%

0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

PERCENTAGE OF DAILY USERS

Weekday

French Broad River MPO Pedestrian Counts

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Weather and Notes October 2020

November 2020 – Highest count day outlined

Source: Weather Underground

French Broad River MPO Pedestrian Counts

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Updated Report on the 2019 Bike and Pedestrian Count Each year the Asheville Bike-Pedestrian Task Force administers a survey for which we tabulate the number of pedestrians and cyclists entering intersections. Typical surveys start at 5 PM and last for two hours. These are done on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday of the second full week in September. (The volunteer chooses the day.) We also do a few surveys in the mornings of one of those days. These are from 7 to 9. We also survey Greenways on Saturday mornings from 9 to 11. When we have enough volunteers. All volunteers go through some training to maintain consistency. This year the dates for the surveys were Sept. 10 – Sept 12, and September 14. We had 27 volunteers collecting data on 23 sites. On Monday the 9th we gave one workshop which had 4 attendees. Most volunteers had previous experience, and for newcomers we did have online resources. Results Initially we had 27 volunteers sign up which was sufficient to cover all our top priority sites. The weather for the week of the survey was sunny and warm, a pleasant change from previous years. As in the past, we asked volunteers to count all pedestrians (including those on wheelchairs or in strollers), all cyclists (e-bikes counted as cyclists), and any other nonmotorized means of transportation that interred the intersection. Volunteers sent the results via phones to the coordinator (me), and I tabulated and summarized the findings in this report. In Table 1, I combined data into general groups (2 downtown areas, W.T. Weaver Blvd, Chestnut St, Haywood Rd, Hilliard St.) and compared the results to the past five-year average. The key results were: • • • •

Bike counts were similar to earlier years, but 44% higher than last year (weather was better). Pedestrian counts were up in some areas, but overall there was little change. Percentage of female cyclists (now at 30%) was sharp increase over last year. Helmet use has increased from 72% to 78%. (Note: Almost all female cyclists wore helmets.)

Table 1: Comparison of count data to previous 5 Year Average by Regions.

Region

Bike Count 2014-18 2019

Pedestrian Count 2014-18 2019

Downtown (Woodfin & Roundabout) 22 20 146 Downtown (College St.) 29 36 949 South Slope (Hilliard Ave) 20 20 228 West Asheville (Haywood Rd.) 48 45 202 106 Chestnut St. Corridor 17 11 84 North Asheville (W.T.Weaver Blvd) 27 20 27 49 137 Greenway (Saturday)* *Only one Greenway (WT Weaver) surveyed in 2019

157 808 297 352 62 64

136


Statistical Comments There is a high degree of variation between observations and one should be very careful in interpreting any changes. Weather, scheduled special events, and group activities can cause large shifts in numbers that are not trend related. Example of this are the downtown counts. These range from 300 to 700 people per hour. Numbers that distort any attempts at overall averages. Additional Comments •

Several people noted various assorted electric assisted vehicles, including scooters and hover boards. At the intersection on Chestnut and Broadway, pedestrians had trouble determining which button was needed for their choice of crosswalk. Running stop signs seems to be a major problem at the intersection on Banks St. and Coxe Ave.

• •

Table 2: Complete Bike Count Data Street 1

Street 2

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Central Ave

Woodfin

20

52

49

18

10

22

College St

Oak St. (Rndbt)

16

14

24

3

--

17

College St

Lexington

38

31

22

11

--

34

--

--

--

7

--

22

College St

College St

Haywood St.

27

37.5

45

31

19

38

Hilliard Ave

S. Lexington

--

--

--

14

4

23

Hilliard Ave

Coxe Ave

25

31

--

13

16

15

Hilliard Ave

S. French Broad Ave.

55

80

--

20

20

31

Coxe Ave

Banks Ave

--

--

--

7

--

10

Chestnut St

Charlotte

30

22

14

13

7

10

Chestnut St

Merrimon Ave

23

14

11

11

3

7

Chestnut St

Broadway

38

18

26

14

10

17

WT Weaver

Merrimon Ave

26

13

17

15

5

6

WT Weaver

Greenway (Rndbt)

38

29

32

31

22

35

2

30

50

28

26

49

WT Weaver

Lexington

Greenway

AM

Sat

WT Weaver

Broadway

58

31

39

--

13

18

Riverside Dr

Lyman

18

23

26

14

19

24

Haywood Rd

Clingman (Rndbt)

34

55

54

26

20

--

--

21

26

21

--

21

Haywood Rd

Clingman (Rndbt)

AM

Haywood Rd

Craven

41

54

48

43

--

56

Haywood Rd

Brevard

74

52

--

32

23

46

Haywood Rd

Vermont

67

58

44

36

53

33

Patton Ave

Louisiana

5

1

2

4

--

3

Tunnel Rd

Riceville

5

2

1

--

--

2


Table 3: Complete Pedestrian Count Data Street 1

Street 2

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Central Ave

Woodfin

128

135

170

141

108

151

College St

Oak St. (Rndbt)

120

135

191

177

--

163

College St

Lexington

833

791

709

751

--

838

College St

Lexington

--

--

--

134

--

371

College St

Haywood St.

1069

1184

1022

1010

1354

777

Hilliard Ave

S. Lexington

--

--

--

291

233

451

Hilliard Ave

Coxe Ave

149

269

--

253

207

230

Hilliard Ave

S. French Broad Ave.

178

165

--

160

129

138

Coxe Ave

Banks Ave

--

--

--

273

--

367

Chestnut St

Charlotte

213

76

123

125

66

53

Chestnut St

Merrimon Ave

112

129

95

126

88

72

Chestnut St

Broadway

126

85

85

79

56

62

WT Weaver

Merrimon Ave

106

124

86

93

54

34

WT Weaver

Greenway (Rndbt)

68

59

126

67

86

123

WT Weaver

28

199

176

133

149

136

WT Weaver

Broadway

82

78

82

--

69

36

Riverside Dr

Lyman

51

22

49

2

13

6

Haywood Rd

Clingman (Rndbt)

67

60

87

84

186

--

--

26

34

26

--

28

91

63

--

385

Haywood Rd

Greenway

AM

Clingman (Rndbt)

Sat

AM

Haywood Rd

Craven

28

32

Haywood Rd

Brevard

209

315

--

313

198

329

Haywood Rd

Vermont

323

182

334

357

267

342

Patton Ave

Louisiana

50

28

47

21

--

37

Tunnel Rd

Riceville

22

25

40

--

--

49

Note: Surveys from all sites were done in the afternoon from 5:00 to 7:00, unless otherwise noted.

Key items to consider in this process can be improved • • • •

Get notice out on the week before Labor Day. Evaluate more Greenways on Saturdays. Definition of “other” needs more clarity. Consider counting scooters & hoverboards.

Acknowledgements We wish to thank all the volunteers that collected the data, their dedication was invaluable. We also wish to thank the City of Asheville and the Bicycle and Pedestrian Task Force for organizing the counts. Respectfully resubmitted by Lothar A. Dohse on November 16th, 2019.


Downtown Asheville- Biltmore Avenue Pedestrian Count Time Period: Tuesday, December 2, 2014 1:00 P.M. – Tuesday, December 9, 2014 1:00 P.M. Location: Downtown Asheville, on the west side of Biltmore Avenue, about 150 feet south of Patton Avenue.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

27,200 161.90 6,676 Saturday, December 6th 1,393 2:00 – 4:00 P.M. Saturday, December 6th


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

10.00% 9.00% 8.00% 7.00% 6.00% 5.00% 4.00% 3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00% 0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Average Hourly Use

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00%

Weekday

4.00%

Weekend

2.00% 0.00% 0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage


The third chart shows users/day:

Users/Day 8000

Number of Users

7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Notes Weather was about average for most of the week, with a high around 65 degrees and a low of 34 degrees. Significant showers occurred on Saturday, December 6th and Tuesday, December 9th.


West Asheville- Haywood Road Pedestrian Count Time Period: Friday, December 12, 2014 12:00 A.M. – Friday, December 19, 2014 12:00 A.M. Location: West Asheville, on the north sidewalk of Haywood Road (US-23 B), west of Herron Avenue, east of Vermont Avenue, just outside of West End Bakery.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

8,881 52.9 1,857 Saturday, December 13th 362 1:00 – 3:00 P.M. Saturday, December 13th

French Broad River MPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk on Haywood Road. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00% 0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Average Hourly Use

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00%

Weekday

4.00%

Weekend

2.00% 0.00% 0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage

French Broad River MPO Pedestrian Counts

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The third chart shows users/day.

Users/Day 2000

Number of Users

1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 Monday

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Notes The weather was about average for this time of year. Highs were usually in the 50s with lows in the high 20s/low 30s, with a slight variation on Tuesday, December 16th with a low of 23 degrees and Wednesday, December 17th, with a high of 64 degrees. Very minor precipitation (.01 in) occurred on Tuesday, December 16th and Wednesday, December 17th.

French Broad River MPO Pedestrian Counts

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Asheville Pedestrian Count Time Period: Thursday, February 26, 2015 12:00 A.M. – Thursday, March 5, 2015 12:00 A.M. Location: Near the SW intersection of W.T. Weaver Boulevard and Broadway, just south of the marked crosswalk.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

1,353 8.1 330 Wednesday, March 4th 101 4:00 – 6:00 P.M. Sunday, March 1st

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk at the count location. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 23:00

22:00

21:00

19:00

20:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

14:00

13:00

12:00

11:00

10:00

9:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

0.00% 0:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Average Hourly Use

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

16.00% 14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00%

Weekday

6.00%

Weekend

4.00% 2.00% 0.00% 0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 2


The third chart shows users/day.

Users/Day 350

Number of Users

300 250 200 150 100 50 0 Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Notes The weather transitioned from wintry to spring during the week. Thursday was snowy and highs were in the low 40s/high 30s until Saturday. Highs then took off to the 50s and even into the 70s after Sunday. Wednesday was sunny with a high in the 70s. Significant precipitation occurred only on Thursday, February 26th.

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

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Asheville Pedestrian Count Time Period: Friday, March 6, 2015 12:00 A.M. – Friday, March 13, 2015 12:00 A.M. Location: Near the SE intersection of W.T. Weaver Boulevard and Merrimon Avenue, in North Asheville.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

438 2.6 123 Sunday, March 8th 50 2:00 – 4:00 P.M. Sunday, March 8th

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk at the count location. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

16.00% 14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 23:00

22:00

21:00

20:00

19:00

17:00

18:00

16:00

15:00

14:00

13:00

12:00

11:00

10:00

9:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

0.00% 0:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Average Hourly Use

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage Percentage of Daily Users

25.00% 20.00% 15.00% Weekday

10.00%

Weekend

5.00%

0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

0.00%

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 2


The third chart shows users/day.

Users/Day 140

Number of Users

120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Notes The weather was the warmest it had been in a while. Highs were in the 60s from Sunday – Thursday, but a little cooler on Friday and Saturday. Significant precipitation occurred on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, March 9-11.

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 3


West Asheville Pedestrian Count, Spring 2015 Time Period: Thursday, May 21, 2015 12:00 A.M. – Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:00 A.M. Location: West Asheville, on the north sidewalk of Haywood Road (US-23 B), west of Herron Avenue, east of Vermont Avenue, just outside of West End Bakery.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

9,407 56.0 1,909 Saturday, May 23rd 370 8:00 – 10:00 P.M. Saturday, May 23rd

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk at the count location. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

23:00

22:00

21:00

19:00

20:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

13:00

14:00

12:00

11:00

10:00

9:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

10.00% 9.00% 8.00% 7.00% 6.00% 5.00% 4.00% 3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00% 0:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Average Hourly Use

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

10.00% 9.00% 8.00% 7.00% 6.00% 5.00% 4.00% 3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00%

Weekday Weekend

0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 2


The third chart shows users/day.

Users/Day Number of Users

2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Saturday

Sunday

Page 3


Asheville Pedestrian Count, Spring 2015 Time Period: Friday, May 29, 2015 9:00 A.M. – Friday, June 5, 2015 9:00 A.M. Location: Downtown Asheville, on the west side of Biltmore Avenue, about 150 feet south of Patton Avenue.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

35,474 211.2 9,450 Saturday, May 30th 1,750 8:00 – 10:00 P.M. Saturday, May 30th

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk at the count location. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

23:00

22:00

21:00

20:00

19:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

14:00

13:00

12:00

11:00

9:00

10:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

10.00% 9.00% 8.00% 7.00% 6.00% 5.00% 4.00% 3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00% 0:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Average Hourly Use

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00%

Weekday

4.00%

Weekend

2.00% 0.00% 0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 2


The third chart shows users/day.

Users/Day 10000

Number of Users

9000 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Friday

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Saturday

Sunday

Page 3


Beaucatcher Greenway Pedestrian Count Time Period: Monday, November 27, 2017 12:00 A.M. – Monday, December 4, 2017 12:00 A.M. Location: About one hundred yards from the end of White Fawn Drive on the Beaucatcher Greenway.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

264 1.6 67 Saturday, December 2nd 29 4:00 – 6:00 P.M. Friday, December 1st

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk at the count location. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

Average Hourly Use Percentage of Daily Users

25.00% 20.00% 15.00% 10.00% 5.00%

23:00

22:00

21:00

20:00

19:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

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The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage Percentage of Daily Users

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0.00%

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 2


The third chart shows users/day.

Users/Day 80

Number of Users

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Monday

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Notes

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 3


Downtown Asheville Pedestrian Count Time Period: Monday, December 4, 2017 12:00 P.M. – Monday, December 11, 2017 12:00 P.M. Location: On the west side of Broadway Street, about 50 – 100 feet from the intersection with Walnut Street in Downtown Asheville.

(Image: Google Maps)

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

9,701 57.7 2,700 Saturday, December 9th 739 1:00 – 3:00 P.M. Saturday, December 9th

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 1


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk at the count location. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

Average Hourly Use Percentage of Daily Users

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The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage Percentage of Daily Users

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6.00%

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French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 2


The third chart shows users/day.

Users/Day 3000

Number of Users

2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 Monday

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

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Notes Major snowstorm on Friday, December 8th through Saturday, December 9th.

French Broad River MPO / Land of Sky RPO Pedestrian Counts

Page 3


Reed Creek Greenway Automated Count Time Period: Monday, September 15, 2014 5:10 P.M. – Tuesday, September 23, 2014 5:10 P.M. Location: Reed Creek Greenway, north of Cauble Street

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

DRAFT Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

2775 14.38 372 Monday, September 22 180 5:00-7:00 P.M. Thursday, September 18


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the Reed Creek Greenway by hour. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

Reed Creek Greenway Hourly Averages 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage 70 60 50 40 Weekday

30

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Notes Weather was generally pleasant throughout the count- no heavy rains, no excessive heat, no excessive cold.


South French Broad Avenue Automated Count Time Period: Monday, October 28, 2014 4:00 P.M. – Monday, November 4, 2014 4:00 P.M. Location: South French Broad Avenue, Asheville, NC – just north of Asheville Middle School – the counter was placed on a utility pole on the west side of the street, facing the sidewalk.

Equipment: EcoCounter Pyro Counter The Pyro Counter is able to count bicyclists, pedestrians, skateboarders, rollerbladers, or anyone who passes within approximately 16.5 feet of the equipment. However, the device is unable to differentiate between the different users and simply counts them as general users. Possible sources of error include facility-users walking side-by-side or very close to each other; this is likely to include people walking or running side-by-side, children being held by a parent or walking along side of them, or dense groups of users. It is unclear how many users are likely to have been missed due to these circumstances and there has been no effort to make up for this likely discrepancy.

DRAFT Results Total Users Users/Hour Peak 24-Hour Usage Peak Day Peak 2-Hour Period Peak 2-Hour Day & Time

992 5.90 372 Monday, November 3rd 107 5:00-7:00 P.M. Monday, November 3rd


Patterns of Use The following chart illustrates the average use of the sidewalk on South French Broad Avenue. This includes both weekday and weekend data and has greater weekday representation.

18.00% 16.00% 14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 23:00

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Percentage of Daily Users

Average Hourly Usage

The second chart illustrates the different pattern of usage between the weekday and weekend.

18.00% 16.00% 14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00%

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6.00%

Weekend

4.00% 2.00% 0.00% 0:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00

Percentage of Daily Users

Weekday vs. Weekend Usage

Notes Weather was generally pleasant during the week, averaging a high in the 60s with a low in the 40s; very little precipitation until late on 10/31 and morning of 11/1. Saturday, 11/1 and Sunday, 11/2 had lows below 32 degrees and small amounts of snow. Pedestrian volumes likely decreased below expected activity due to the inclement weather.


CLOSE THE GAP APPENDIX 3: EXISTING PLAN DOCUMENT REVIEW


City of Asheville Close the GAP Planning Documents Review September 22, 2021 (UPDATED) As a part of the Asheville Close the GAP Project, relevant planning documents have been reviewed and summarized. The purpose of this exercise is to ensure any recommendations that are developed from this plan are consistent with precedent, and to help establish vision and goals as Close the GAP advances. The plan review was limited to sections that related to pedestrian, ADA and greenway facilities within the City. The following are findings from this review that are directly relevant to this Study process. This review is presented in three sections: City of Asheville plans, County plans, and plans developed at the regional level by the French Broad River MPO. Relevant vision statements from these planning documents are also included.

City Plans Advancing Racial Equity in Asheville (2021) Following the summer 2020 protests that swept the Country after the death of George Floyd, the City of Asheville began to address its role in systemic racism and to address these issues for the next generation. This spurred the development of the 30/60/90 Day Work Plan which has since become a sustained program called the Advancing Racial Equity in Asheville. The Plan is a set of actions with associated timeframes towards applying a social, economic and environmental justice lens to all work in service of the Asheville community. The Plan includes improved performance measures to chart outcomes in equity as well as a 2021-2022 budget that advances racial equity.


Takeaway: equity will be a central part of the GAP Plans and the tools and measures developed in this Plan can be used to benchmark and evaluate projects in the GAP Plans.

Biltmore Avenue and McDowell Street Corridor Study (2021) The Biltmore/McDowell Corridor Study set out to study the feasibility of multimodal improvements on this pair of north/south arterial streets just south of downtown. Takeaway: The recommendations from this plan, as well as the two corridor studies led by the FBRMPO (found later in this document) were incorporated into the recommended Close the GAP network.

Downtown Master Plan Update: Public Space Management (2019-2020) This project is part of the City’s work on updates to the Downtown Master Plan that will help address concerns about the management of public spaces, as well as provide tools to enhance community character and expand options for placemaking. The updates are in response to the growing users of downtown and the associated demands and priorities for the use of public spaces, most specifically streets and sidewalks. Outcomes of the Downtown Master Plan Updates will aim to help expand downtown vitality, facilitate local business and enhance livability. As of the writing of this memo, the City has conducted extensive planning through the Public Space Management Committee and through an outreach survey. The Committee met six times in 2019 to discuss the scope of the issues related to public space in downtown and to develop a survey. In October 2019, the Committee participated in a workshop to prioritize topics and agree on goals, intents and values. The following are recurring themes from the Committee meetings: ●

There is a desired vision to maintain sidewalks and ped access


There is a discussion of what this means as it relates to construction closures and covered walkways ● Discussion of sidewalk requirements for new developments ●

The Workshop Meeting identified the following as urgent issues: ● ● ● ●

Construction related closures (both identified) Larger sidewalk spaces for gathering Unobstructed sidewalk space for walking and mobility Street and sidewalk lighting

The survey was available in late summer 2019, and over 900 responses were received. The following are key topics from the survey as it relates to Close the GAP: Top issues ○ Unobstructed sidewalk space ○ Lighting ○ Larger sidewalk/plaza space for gathering ○ Construction related closures ● What makes you feel safe ○ Lighting ○ Pedestrian activity ○ Walking/biking police ○ Wider, better maintained sidewalks ○ Crosswalks ● What makes you feel less safe ○ Wide intersections ○ Broken sidewalks ○ Police ○ Poor lighting ●

Takeaway: This process is defining priorities and setting policy as it relates to a number of issues that affect pedestrians in Asheville. It will be important for GAP efforts to closely coordinate with this planning effort to ensure that both are coordinated and contribute to overall City vision.


Transit Master Plan (2018) The City of Asheville Transit Master Plan (TMP) is the guiding document for the City of Asheville’s transit system. It provides specific routing recommendations to improve service in the short-term and serves as a long-term vision plan for future expansion and improvements. The TMP presents some interesting findings that have relevance to the GAP planning efforts and convey the need for multimodal transportation solutions in the City: ● Comparing population and job densities in 2010 to the 2014 projections, job growth is anticipated to occur in downtown and along major corridors in Asheville. These areas are all currently well served by ART. ● Employment centers are trip generators, and these are used to determine how effective the existing transit service is in serving the places that people need to get to in the community. ● Of the 43,548 drivers in Asheville (2016), 1.4% use public transportation as their primary means of transportation to work, 4.5% walk and 0.6% use some other means, including bicycling. ● Asheville drivers have relatively short travel times (average of 18 minutes per trip), which may represent an ideal market for potential public transit commute trips. ● The 2009 ART Rider Survey indicates that for 68% of riders, the bus is their only transportation and 68% make less than $15,000 annually. Similar numbers are reported in the 2013 Rider Survey, which also reports that 73% of riders live in a no vehicle household. ● The TMP notes that many places lack adequate connectivity to transit due to lack of sidewalks or challenging slopes to navigate to and from the main corridors. The plan recommends park-and-ride locations and super stops near the ends of routes and at locations closer to frequent service corridors. Potential park and ride locations offer areas where enhanced pedestrian access should be a consideration. These locations include the following: ● ● ● ● ●

Grace Baptist Church on Haywood Road Inanda Baptist Church on Brevard Road Biltmore Square Mall on Brevard Road Kmart on Brevard Road Anders Rice Funeral Home on Patton Avenue


Kmart on Patton Avenue and Louisiana Avenue Ingles on Hendersonville Road Publix on Hendersonville Road Skyland Plaza on Hendersonville Road Ingles on Tunnel Road Haywood Road east of State Street Patton Avenue at Louisiana Avenue Biltmore Village – All Souls Crescent Biltmore Village – Lodge Street Hendersonville Road north of Long Shoals Hendersonville Road near Caribou Road and Rock Hill Road Walmart and Kohls on Bleachery Boulevard ● Veterans Restoration Center on Tunnel Road ● Tunnel Road west of Asheville Mall ● Merrimon Avenue at WT Weaver Boulevard ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Takeaway: The TMP presents an analysis of existing transportation and demographics in Asheville. Most promising to the GAP Study, the TMP recommends locations where park and ride or super stops should be a consideration. The Pedestrian, ADA Transition Plan and Greenway Plan should ensure that these locations are considered as the GAP Study and projects are developed.

Living Asheville (LA) (2018) VISION: Asheville is a great place to live because we care about people, we invest in our City, and we celebrate our natural and cultural heritage. Our City is for everyone. Our urban environment and locally-based economy support workers, entrepreneurs and business owners, families and tourists, and people of all ages. Cultural diversity and social and economic equity are evident in all that we do. Our neighborhoods are strong, participation in civic life is widespread and collaborative partnerships are the foundation of our success.


Living Asheville, the City’s Comprehensive Plan, is a lengthy document that summarizes aspirational goals for the Asheville future. The plan is presented in four books: introduction, six themes, physical strategies and land use, and implementation. Each book in some way, touches on Asheville’s greenway and pedestrian network. Introduction / Key Aspirations The introduction leads to LA’s twelve Key Aspirations. While greenways, pedestrians and accessibility overlap with many of the Key Aspirations, the most relevant to Close the GAP include: Strengthen Urban Transit Corridors and Transit-Supportive Centers: This should include creating safe, attractive and well-connected places for all people that include environmentally friendly infrastructure, employ universal design concepts, and which allow for transportation choices beyond the car. Create an Integrated Green Infrastructure System and Transportation Network: In order to foster connectivity, reduce traffic congestion, mitigate the urban heat island effect and increase resilience in the face of climate change, the City should work to better integrate its network of complete streets, greenways, protected bike lanes and sidewalks with community parks, gathering places, neighborhoods, jobs, shopping areas and other activity centers. Connect Our Urban Centers: As urban nodal development in the City continues to coalesce, the City should work to better connect these growth centers to each other. Transit service should be improved connecting people to destinations. The City should study the feasibility of a Citywide bikeshare program and work toward integrating the greenway network with community places. Foster Resilient Neighborhoods: Neighborhoods are the soul of Asheville and should be included in all placemaking efforts. Other neighborhood strategies could include working with African American and other minority communities to enable better outcomes for their communities.


Grow a Thriving Urban Environment: The City should balance investment in transportation, public space, recreational amenities, social infrastructure and pedestrian infrastructure across neighborhoods. The City should also consider design guidelines for development adjacent to greenways and policies for greenway connectivity to increase the benefits and impact of greenway corridors. Themes The six themed chapters - Livable Built Environment, Resilient Economy, Harmony with the Natural Environment, Healthy Community, Interwoven Equity, and Responsible Regionalism - contain a wide variety of references to greenways in the form overview text, goals, outcomes, or strategies. While many, if not all, of the goals have relation to bicycle and pedestrian issues, the references that are most relevant to Close the GAP include: Relevant Livable Built Environment Goals ● Goal 5: Make Streets More Walkable, Comfortable and Connected: “...Sidewalks, marked crosswalks, lighting and street trees in Asheville should contribute to the pedestrian experience but should be contextually appropriate based on adjacent streets and land uses. The City should also continue to expand upon the greenways program, promoting the role of greenway corridors as an auxiliary facet of the multimodal network, connecting communities with destinations.” ● Goal 6: Increased Access to Safe Bicycling. “…An integrated network of appropriate facilities is needed to meet multiple and evolving needs.” ● Goal 9: Improve the Multimodal Transportation System: “...Asheville needs to move away from auto-centric planning and find a better balance on our streets to meet the needs of all users.” ● Goal 11: Build Out the Greenway Network: Greenway corridors provide connectivity and, when possible, an off-road experience to enjoy nature. Asheville has less than six miles of completed greenways but the Greenways Master Plan identifies approximately 60 miles of greenway corridors. Annually, public polls show that greenways are one of the most desired public facilities. The City should continue to expand upon the Greenways Program, promoting the role of greenways as an integral facet of the multimodal network connecting communities with destinations, such as job centers. Greenways should be well-designed, integrated with communities and be hospitable to a range of recreational activities. Harmony with the Natural Environment


● Goal 21: Promote Access to Well-Maintained Parks and Open Space for All: “...As the city urbanizes and as resources allow, Asheville should also work to develop new city parks of all types and greenways, with emphasis on neighborhood connectivity and equitable distribution of park and open space assets across the city.” A Healthy Community ● Goal 29: Enhance the Safety of the Public Realm Interwoven Equity ● Goal 32: Improve Community Involvement in Decision Making ● Goal 33: Prioritize Investments Equitably and Fairly Across Neighborhoods ● Goal 35: Increase Access to Opportunities for All Responsible Regionalism: ● Goal 36: Enhance Transportation To and From Asheville ● Goal 39: Enhance and Celebrate Asheville’s Unique Places and Destinations Physical Strategies and Land Use The Physical Strategies and Land Use book outlines growth strategies based on the preferred growth scenario developed during LA development. The book presents growth guidelines based on the community’s preference for growth. The guidelines in turn were used to identify growth areas across the City. Transit-Supportive Corridors are one type of growth area identified in LA. Additionally, LA identifies areas suitable for Town Centers. LA also includes multimodal transportation recommendations that will lead to a development pattern that aligns with the City’s preferred growth scenario. Recommendations relevant to GAP include: ● Develop equitable policies and secure funds to acquire needed property and easements to expand the existing Asheville and Buncombe County greenway programs. ● Work to eliminate gaps in the Citywide sidewalk network, especially where sidewalks tie in to greenways, in identified growth areas and in underserved communities.


These, and other strategies form the City’s Future Land Use Map that will guide land use policy and actions in the coming years. Town Center (red), Urban Corridors (pink), Urban Centers (dark blue), and Parks/Open Space (green), along with a small amount of land for Traditional Neighborhood Development (light pink) are the future land uses found along the SRG Corridor. Takeaway: The Living Asheville (LA) Plan is both visionary and specific. It establishes core goals and values for Asheville and provides specific strategies to achieve these goals. Many of these strategies relate to Close the GAP and should be closely coordinated.

Asheville in Motion (AIM) Mobility Plan (2016) – Street Measures VISION: The vision for Asheville is a clear, effective and connected transportation system that is lasting and offers enhanced choices. City Staff developed this matrix to document recommended street dimensions in a variety of contexts based on findings from the AIM Plan. The dimensions are provided for street types (workhorse streets, City connectors, neighborhood connectors, locals and freeways/expressways) and their corresponding street settings (residential, traditional neighborhood, downtown, suburban centers and corridors, regional centers and corridors, manufacturing/aerospace/logistics, craft industry, campus, parks and open space). Multiple modes are considered for each street type and setting, including the pedestrian realm (frontage, sidewalk, furniture/landscape), bicycle realm (facility type), curbside realm (curb zone, parking area), and vehicle realm (travel lane, median). Takeaway: This resource is important as the City considers implementation of facilities in the pedestrian master plan and as it works with developers to upgrade the transportation system. In addition, as the City considers updates to the Downtown Master Plan considering the Public Space Management effort, these standards need to be documented to ensure that downtown street standards are consistent across the City.

The Burton Street Neighborhood Plan (2018) The Burton Street Neighborhood Plan was developed by NCDOT, in partnership with the Burton Street Community Association, to address potential impacts resulting from the I-26


Connector project and current community concerns, enhance the quality of life of the Burton Street community and to preserve the strong sense of community among Burton Street residents. The Plan outlines several key goals and strategies, including the following related to pedestrian/greenway needs and opportunities. These are prioritized in the Implementation Plan: ● Make Streets More Walkable and Comfortable ○ Strategy: Improve existing sidewalks to meet ADA design standards ● Increase Neighborhood Connectivity ○ Strategy: Improve pedestrian connections between community resources by installing a sidewalk on Downing Street per agreement of property owners ○ Strategy: Improve sidewalk connections between commercial corridors, and include a pedestrian path from Buffalo Street to Patton Avenue that will connect to future greenway ● Improve Access to Transit ○ Strategy: Evaluate opportunities for new transit stops, such as near Burton Street and Haywood Road ○ Strategy: Install a sidewalk along Patton Avenue to connect pedestrian path and transit stop ● Improve Access to Parks and Greenspace ○ Strategy: Conduct a feasibility study to consider a future Smith Mill Creek greenway through the Burton Street neighborhood ● Increase Pedestrian Safety ○ Strategy: Implement traffic calming measures on Burton Street and Florida Avenue including improved speed bumps, and consistent speed limits throughout the neighborhood To address and remedy the anticipated impacts to the Burton Street Community as a result of the I-26 improvements, there are several mitigation strategies that will be implemented by NCDOT. Those relating to pedestrians include: ● Improve Existing Sidewalks to Meet ADA Design Standards ● Improve Pedestrian Connections Between Community Resources by Installing a Sidewalk on Downing Street per Agreement of Property Owners ● Improve Sidewalk Connections Between Commercial Corridors and Include a Pedestrian Path from Buffalo Street to Patton Avenue That will Connect to Future Greenway


● Install a Sidewalk along Patton Avenue to Connect Pedestrian Path and Transit Stop Takeaway: This Plan offers key recommendations for pedestrian and greenway connectivity at the neighborhood scale in a community that has experienced decades of inequities. These specific recommendations can form the basis of network improvements to connect the Burton Street neighborhood with the City.

Asheville Neighborhood Sidewalk Policy (2015) In 2015, the City developed this policy for construction of sidewalks from the Neighborhood Sidewalk capital program. This outlines requirements for consideration, prioritization of projects, initial and secondary screening, and public involvement. The criteria applies to streets that are identified in the Pedestrian Master Plan. Much like the Pedestrian Master Plan, the criteria include the following (initial screening): ● ● ● ●

Proximity to transit and community destinations Zoning Demographics Safety

Secondary screening factors include: ● ● ● ●

Connectivity Presence/absence of sidewalk on one side of the street Construction feasibility Geographic distribution

The initial public involvement plan consists of seeking input at the Neighborhood Advisory Committee via face-to-face input and a short survey. Additional outreach is planned via the City’s Neighborhood Coordinator and the community group, Just Economics, distributed the survey with their efforts. Future public involvement includes outreach with the Neighborhood Sidewalk Committee, which includes members from the Multimodal Transportation Commission and the Neighborhood Advisory Committee. Takeaway: Developed in 2015, the Sidewalk Program Policy is linked to the 2005 Pedestrian Master Plan. With a forthcoming update to this Master Plan, it presents an opportunity to also update this resource to ensure that projects are effectively prioritized,


planned, constructed, and evaluated, and that performance measures are relevant and being met.

River Arts District Transportation Improvement Project (RADTIP) The River Arts District Transportation Improvement Project (RADTIP) is a major roadway and greenway construction project along the east side of the French Broad River in Asheville’s River Arts District. The 2.2-mile improvement includes a continuous multi-use path along the river. It will also incorporate drainage systems for stormwater, wide sidewalks, bike lanes and additional parking. Intersections will be improved for better traffic flow. Takeaway: As a part of RADTIP, part of the City’s Greenway Master Plan is being implemented, allowing a greenway network to be achieved.

Downtown Master Plan (2009) Asheville’s 2009 Downtown Master Plan focuses on seven primary strategies that fall within three groupings: experiencing, shaping and managing downtown. The strategy that has the most relation to GAP is the following: provide good, interconnected transportation choices for better access and better health. Of the Areas of Concern, transportation is identified with a need for better access to downtown by multi-modes. The Plan conveys that walkability must be enhanced throughout downtown at blank or vacant storefronts, along parking lots, near heavy traffic and in areas with steep topography. Pedestrian friendly streets, storefronts and pedestrian scale buildings are themes that are intertwined throughout the Plan. Transportation choice is conveyed in the Plan, with a network of priority pedestrian streets and a bicycle network being identified. The Plan recommends extending greenways such as the Reed Creek and Clingman closer to downtown, as well as the implementation of


bikeways/greenways along Broadway to UNCA, Patton and Clingman to the River Arts District, and along Asheland/Biltmore to Mission, A-B Tech and Biltmore Village. Takeaway: The Downtown Master Plan leans on the Greenway Master Plan and Bike Plan as implementation tools to achieve a more multimodal downtown. As these planning documents are updated through GAP, coordination with the update to the Downtown Master Plan should be considered.

Comprehensive Bicycle Plan (2008) The Asheville Bike Plan was developed to identify continuous linear bicycle connections and facilities for a range of users, thereby increasing safety and mobility for people on bikes in the City. In total, it recommends 43 miles of bike lanes, 17 miles of climbing lanes, 21 miles of shared lane markings, 64 miles of shared roadways and 36 miles of striped shoulder. Recommendations are grouped into short-, medium- and long-term categories, and encouragement/education/enforcement programs are also addressed. Takeaway: While the Asheville in Motion (AIM) Mobility Plan is now the primary source for the bicycle network in the City, it is important that this resource be documented as the greenway and pedestrian network is developed to ensure consistency with this planning precedent.

Pedestrian Plan (2005) VISION: Asheville will develop and maintain a pedestrian network that includes sidewalks, pedestrian crossings and greenways that offer convenience, safety and connectivity to citizens and visitors, encourage and reward the choice to walk and use transit, improve access for those with disabilities, and add to the quality of life and unique character of the City of Asheville. The City of Asheville Pedestrian Plan (2005) provides a detailed context overview, identifies needs, outlines the vision, goals and objectives, and provides recommendations.


The Plan reviews the multiple tasks, costs and considerations involved in installing sidewalks or greenways. It provides background information on City responsibilities and management approaches, including determination of need, requirements and priorities, engineering and design, right-of-way acquisition, construction, and maintenance. The Plan also describes the sidewalk inventory and condition survey which had been collected in 1999 and 2004. One recommendation from these efforts was to update the condition survey every 2 years. This baseline information is the basis of the infrastructure recommendations. Based on this condition survey, at the time of the study, there were almost 27 million dollars in identified sidewalk construction needs within the City. This includes new sidewalks, ADA compliance needs and identified maintenance/upgrade needs. The City saw about 20 miles of sidewalk built since the prior sidewalk inventory in 1999 by new development and City efforts. Continuing at that rate would take the City of Asheville over 30 years to complete the sidewalk needs identified in this plan, without addressing future maintenance needs not yet identified. In addition to these sidewalk gaps, the Plan outlines pedestrian signal needs, crossing improvements, ADA compliance needs and greenway needs. These were compiled based on community input and City staff knowledge. Given that there are many more needs than resources available, the plan identifies prioritization criteria for sidewalks, based on the following: Zoning jurisdiction; 1. Proximity to Schools, Parks, and Community Centers; 2. Proximity to Transit Stops; 3. Needed linkages that complete a pedestrian thoroughfare or address a safety concern; 4. Feasibility of construction; and 5. Major Thoroughfares and Connector Roads. The Plan identifies 5 goals, 26 objectives and dozens of tasks to allow the City to arrive at its vision for pedestrians in the City. For the immediate two years following the Plan creation, there are 15 performance measures to keep the City on track towards meeting these goals. Beyond infrastructure, the key recommendations of the Plan are as follows:


● Maintenance of the sidewalk inventory data; ● Revisions to the UDO and Standards and Specifications Manual; ● Update the fee-in-lieu price structure once the new City sidewalk crew has completed a year of work; ● Establish other local funding sources; ● Work through the MPO and NCDOT Division office to establish a policy for managing sidewalk requests in ETJ areas; ● Incorporate walking into the City’s new Transportation Demand Management Program; ● Improve staffing and management of greenway and sidewalk projects and grants; and ● Establish design policies for NCDOT projects within the City limits. Takeaway: While 15 years old, the 2005 Pedestrian Plan is an infrastructure-heavy master plan that offers a good baseline from which to measure progress. It sets forth a prioritization model, as well as goals/objectives/tasks and recommendations, which the City can use as a basis to either build the current Pedestrian Program or revisit and revise based on initial limitations. For instance, the Plan established a performance measure of building 4 miles of new sidewalk between 2005-2007. The City may want to revisit such a task as a part of the current Pedestrian Plan to evaluate its effectiveness.

ADA Transition Plan (1992) This is largely a facilities transition plan, as well as a transition plan for the transit system. There is brief mention of ADA in the public right-of-way: “The City of Asheville, through its Director of Public Works, has begun incorporating the ADA standard handicap ramp design in the streets and sidewalk bond projects, the cities normal maintenance rehabilitation contracts, and the in-house work which the Street Division of Public Works is doing throughout the City. See attached timeframe for completion of corrective work. Community input channeled through the ADA Coordinator will assist in the timely development of all sidewalks incorporating the ADA handicap ramp design. The attached timeframe for completion was not available at the time of this review”.


Pg. 105 describes accessibility for public hearings, and the Plan later describes accessibility in City programs and services offered to those with disabilities. Takeaway: The City’s Transition Plan offers a framework for the City’s response to the new ADA law in relation to facilities, transit, community engagement and programming, but there is very little mention of public right-of-way in this document.

City Plans: Greenways Greenway Connector Project (2019) The City developed a plan to connect Town Branch Greenway to McCormick Field. From there, one could connect into the Beaucatcher Greenway. The Connector project identified on-street designs that could include pedestrian/bicycle connectivity and safety, as well as wayfinding opportunities. Takeaway: With this project, the City’s Greenway Master Plan is being implemented, allowing a greenway network to be achieved.

Swannanoa River Greenway Corridor and Feasibility Study (2019) VISION: The Swannanoa River Greenway will be a critical east-west active transportation corridor that provides a diverse community a place to connect to thriving spaces to work, shop, and play. It fulfills the vision of the Wilma Dykeman RiverWay Master Plan by stimulating economic investment and preserving open space to honor the river. A greenway study from Biltmore Avenue to Azalea Park was completed in-tandem with the beginning of NCDOT’s transportation redesign for the Swannanoa River Road Corridor. This study was broken into two segments (eastern and western), divided by the existing segment of the Swannanoa Greenway near Walmart. Further details of these two sections are: The Western Section. The western section study includes several options that are still in consideration:


● Converting Thompson Street into a one-way street and incorporating a greenway. ● Redesigning Swannanoa River Road into a complete street, with a greenway as part of the planned NCDOT project. ● Both options converge near Glendale Avenue and run along the south side of the river to the existing greenway at Walmart. The Eastern Section. This study area runs from the existing Walmart greenway to Azalea Park. The preferred alignment supported by the public and the City would follow Swannanoa River Road and be built as part of NCDOT’s road redesign. A bridge would be necessary to cross the Swannanoa River near the WNC Nature Center. The study also identified an opportunity for a trail running through the River Ridge apartments, which the landowners at the time indicated they were amenable to. Takeaway: This Feasibility Study advanced a concept from the 2013 Master Plan to further design that could be implemented as partnership and funding opportunities arise.

Greenway Master Plan (2013) This update identified new corridors, revised the previous corridors, and updated a definition of corridor type. It also updated a map showing the County Master Plan (which was completed that year) and how it interfaces with the City greenway plan. This Plan also identified greenways that should be included as part of the I-26 Corridor Study. Takeaway: This Plan was an update from the 2009 Master Plan, and offered additional definition of greenway corridors, prioritization, and coordinated with the County.

Parks, Recreation, Cultural Arts and Greenway Master Plan (2009) VISION: The City of Asheville’s parks and greenways system is an interconnected system of parks and greenways. Goals include: provide a diversity of parks and greenways, ensure all parks and greenways meet the City’s high standards for level of service, create a system of interconnected local and regional parks and greenways, including trails, paths,


and walks, and preserve and celebrate unique cultural, historical, and natural features within the City of Asheville throughout the system. Highlights from the plan include: ● The following are the most important to add, expand or improve (all rating above 70% “very important”): future unpaved/natural trails, open space/natural areas, more trail connections, playgrounds, paved recreational paths and community gardens ● The most important concerns for the City of Asheville to address through the Master Plan Update as indicated by respondents include more greenway trails (40% of respondents), better pedestrian/bike access (31%) and awareness of programs (25%). This desire for greenways is reinforced by the financial choices respondents made when asked how they would allocate $100 to City services (parks, trails, greenways, and open space ranked number two behind law enforcement) and $100 to parks, recreation, cultural arts and greenways (greenways rated as the top priority) The plan shortened the list of greenways by identifying 17 proposed priority greenway corridors. A variety of greenway recommendations in this plan, include: ● Improve wayfinding and signage to and between existing parks, greenways, and indoor facilities for pedestrian and bike navigation. ● Develop design standards for new and existing parks and greenways (this strategy includes a variety of action steps related to design standards). ● Create smaller seating areas along greenways, particularly at the water’s edge. ● Strive to provide parks, greenways, or indoor facilities within one third mile of all City residents to increase walkability. Takeaway: This Plan documents the long-standing support for greenways in the City, and it offers some key recommendations that should be considered in the Greenway Master Plan update as a part of Close the GAP.

Wilma Dykeman Riverway Master Plan (WDRMP) (2003) VISION: The Wilma Dykeman Riverway Master Plan (WDRMP) envisioned the revitalization of the surrounding lands of the French


Broad and Swannanoa Rivers within the City of Asheville. Revitalization was proposed through the development of open green space, greenways, and urban revitalization along the corridor. The goal of the plan is to make the riverfront, “so inviting and exciting and uniquely Asheville that you will want to BE THERE.” The BE THERE acronym represents the seven elements of the plan: Balance (B), Economic Development (E), Transportation (T), Health (H), Environment (E), Recreation (R), Education (E). As part of this Plan, a “parkway” concept was developed that envisions Riverside Drive, Meadow Road, and Swannanoa River Road as a parkway intended for vehicles and multimodal facilities, including a greenway. This greenway would allow pedestrians and bicyclists to interface with the river on a 12-14 foot path. Cross sections were developed to show the character of the Riverways proposed greenway and parkway. Takeaway: Much of the vision of this Plan was implemented in the River Arts Districts, but the Swannanoa River corridor is still in the planning and revitalization phase. The WDRMP remains the guiding vision for the Swannanoa River Corridor and there is opportunity to partner with NCDOT’s slated Swannanoa River Road redesign to implement the WDRMP vision as part of a multimodal corridor that can be a catalyst for redevelopment, provide opportunity for environmental/riparian improvements, and host opportunities for placemaking and recreation.

County Plans Buncombe County Trails Master Plan (2012) VISION: To support and promote the development of an environmentally friendly system of connected trails and greenways to improve health, alternative travel, economic development, and recreation in coordination with towns, cities, communities, businesses, non-profit organizations and adjacent counties. This Master Plan looked at connecting the entire county through a series of corridors that mostly followed waterways. The Plan identifies corridors that have assigned types/typologies. These corridors weave through incorporated and unincorporated areas of the county. There are priority corridors identified as well as unpaved walking paths, long-term planned greenways, and other greenway corridors. The


Plan also identified NCDOT complete streets routes, or areas where a multi-use path paralleling a state-owned road could occur. The Plan identifies City of Asheville corridors that mirror the City’s Greenway Master Plan. The priority corridors within the City include: ● The Wilma Dykeman RiverWay Corridor: Which is now termed in the City as the French Broad Greenway and the Swannanoa River Greenway. ● The Swannanoa River Greenway: Starting just east of Azalea Park and traveling east into the county and eventually Black Mountain. ● The French Broad Greenway: Traveling from Broadway/the Asheville municipal boundary north into Woodfin. This section is now called the Woodfin Greenway and Blueway. ● The Hominy Creek Greenway: Two connections stem from Hominy Creek and Highway 191. Much of this planned corridor is still within the City. ● The Lake Julian Greenway: The greenway is planned to connect to Biltmore Park/Lake Julian, most of which is within the City. Part of this network also proposes a greenway along Sweeten Creek Road. Takeaway: The County’s Greenway Master Plan was closely coordinated with Asheville’s greenway network, and this coordination should continue to occur as the networks develop.

Woodfin Blueway & Greenway / Highway 251 Greenway Study and Engineering (2018-2020) The Town of Woodfin, Buncombe County and nonprofits are partnering to implement a greenway/blueway system along the French Broad within Woodfin. The greenway would be an extension of the French Broad Greenway, which ends at the City of Asheville’s municipal boundary at Broadway. In 2020, Buncombe County is initiating preliminary engineering and construction documents and hopes to build the greenway within a few years. The study addresses how the greenway will terminate at the Broadway intersection. This intersection and junction will likely be addressed as part of NCDOT’s I-26/Riverside Drive project.


Takeaway: This greenway connection is an important junction point for both the City of Asheville’s planned French Broad and Reed Creek Greenways and represents important coordination efforts between the City and County to ensure that a network is achieved.

Bent Creek Greenway Feasibility Study (Brevard Road/191 Corridor) (2016) Led by Buncombe County, this study looked at the connectivity of Hominy Creek Greenway to both, the WNC Farmers Market and the Asheville Outlet Mall. Much of the proposed corridor is within the City of Asheville, as it runs along Highway 191/Brevard Road. The preferred alignment chosen by the county runs along the west side of Highway 191/Brevard Road and would require a signalized crossing on Brevard Road to connect into the Asheville Outlets. The greenway continues south and was studied as part of the Lake Julian Greenway Corridor Study. The connection to the WNC Farmers Market is proposed on the west side of Hominy Creek, utilizing a historic and decommissioned bridge owned by the City to cross the creek near the Hominy Creek Greenway trailhead. The preferred alignment was never officially adopted by the City and there was some disagreement between stakeholders on the preferred alignment. Takeaway: As much of the preferred alignment is within the City, this planning effort should be closely coordinated with the City.

Bent Creek-Lake Julian Feasibility Study (2015) The study looks at connecting the Asheville Outlet Mall to Lake Julian, following I-26 and the French Broad River. The greenway would cross over Long Shoals Road where it would parallel the road to Biltmore Park. The preferred alternative closely matches the route shown on Asheville's Greenway Master Plan, but some slight changes were made near the Asheville Mall. Takeaway: This greenway alignment was closely coordinated with Asheville’s greenway network, and this coordination should continue to occur as the networks develop.


NC 251 / Riverside Drive Greenway Feasibility Study Buncombe County led this study, with input from City staff, who were on the steering committee. This study looked at the connection from Hillside Street to Broadway, all within the City limits. It looked at comparing routes that were parallel “on-street” facilities vs. a route that ran along the river. The study selected two routes as being the preferred, one which is on the road and the other along the river. In an update to this effort, the City is pursuing a more detailed study of what they are now calling the “North RADTIP,” which will advise the City on the final alignment. Consensus has been reached that a greenway along the road may be best from Pearson Bridge Road running north to Broadway. South of Pearson Bridge Road, the alignment will be determined based on the future North RADTIP study. Takeaway: This section is often referred to as the “missing mile” as it would connect the planned Woodfin Greenway to the constructed French Broad Greenway in the River Arts District and is critical to greenway network connections.

Regional, NCDOT, & French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization Plans Hendersonville Road and Tunnel Road Corridor Studies (2021) In 2020, the FBRMPO set out to study two key corridors in the Asheville urban area: Hendersonville Road and Tunnel Road. The purpose of these studies was to develop strategies to improve multimodal options and provide better connectivity. Takeaway: the recommendations from both corridor studies were incorporated into the Close the GAP network planning.


I-26 Connector Project (Asheville Area) I-26 Project (I-26/I-40 Interchange to Hendersonville) The I-26 Connector Project runs through the heart of Asheville. Advocates and the City have continuously engaged NCDOT to ensure the accommodations of bicycle and pedestrian facilities in the project. In 2018, the City contracted to have a firm independent of NCDOT analyze the design and make recommendations. Known as the Sam Schwartz Study, the Study provided future land use/redevelopment and pedestrian and bicycle facility improvements related to the I-26 Connector project. Through input from the Greenway Committee and City staff, the consultant proposed pedestrian/bicycle facility improvements (most of which came from City plans like the Greenway Master Plan), which was proposed back to NCDOT for inclusion into final plans. The City then formed an Aesthetics Committee that worked with NCDOT to integrate suggested pedestrian/bicycle facilities (much of which mirrored the Sam Schwartz Study). Many of these facilities were incorporated into early 30% Design Plans for the I-26 Connector Project. The City continues to work through the Aesthetics Committee to finalize agreements with NCDOT on what pedestrian/bicycle facilities will make it into final design and construction. The I-26 Project extends from the I-26 interchange with I-40 into Hendersonville. There are no new greenway facilities accommodated as part of this project. The proposed Hominy Creek Greenway and Bent Creek Greenway cross through this project, but there is no facility redesign in the areas where the greenways would interface with the interstate. Takeaway: The redesign and widening of Interstate I-26 has been many years in the making and through intensive City staff and public input, will likely achieve some gains for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

I-26 Asheville Connector Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (2020) A Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) assesses the physical, biological and social/human impacts of a proposed project


and all reasonable alternatives, including an alternative where the project is not built, and proposes mitigation. In this FEIS developed by NCDOT, the existing conditions are described and the alternatives assessed for environmental impacts, compatibility with local planning goals, cost-effectiveness and public sentiment. Takeaway: A number of pedestrian, bicycle and greenway recommendations are being advanced through this project, including sidewalk, crossing, and ADA improvements within and connecting to the Burton Street neighborhood, connectivity to Carrier Park, and upgrades to existing greenways. These projects will be incorporated into the GAP planning efforts as they move forward.

The Hellbender Regional Trail System The Hellbender Regional Trail System concept originated from the French Broad Metropolitan Planning Organization and has been supported by many partners. The Swannanoa and French Broad River Greenways are the core to a regional system that includes the counties surrounding Buncombe County. This greenway system would be the spine or major “highway route” for pedestrian/bike connectivity within the region. Takeaway: The City’s French Broad and Swannanoa River Greenways are the heart of this regionally proposed system, which offer regional greenway connectivity.

The Fonta Flora State Trail The Fonta Flora Trail originated from Burke County as a trail that would circumnavigate Lake James. However, the idea evolved into a regional trail system that would connect Morganton to Asheville via a hundred-mile trail. Black Mountain, Marion, and others are actively working on connecting their portions of this plan. In 2015, the trail was designated as a North Carolina State Trail, giving it a higher level of attention. The trail already has several miles of officially designated sections and branding has been developed for it. In 2018, Asheville City council officially approved that the planned Swannanoa Greenway would be part of the Fonta Flora State Trail.


Takeaway: Another regional greenway corridor, the Fonta Flora State Trail offers connectivity from Asheville to Morganton and is important to regional pedestrian and bicycle access.

Comprehensive Transportation Plan (CTP) for French Broad River MPO and Rural Areas of Buncombe and Haywood Counties (2008) The Comprehensive Transportation Plan (CTP) is the region’s multimodal transportation plan that seeks to identify needed improvements. The CTP represents a community’s consensus on the future transportation system (including the existing system and improvements) needed to support anticipated growth and development over a 25-30-year timeframe. When a CTP is adopted by NCDOT, it represents the state’s concurrence with the identified transportation needs and proposed recommendations. There are many projects identified in the CTP that are within the City limits and have important implications to pedestrian and bicycle access. Takeaway: While over a decade old, the recommendations in the CTP provide some roadway and multimodal solutions that are relevant to this Study. The roadway improvements should be coordinated closely with any trail recommendations as they offer an avenue for partnership and implementation with NCDOT and the MPO.

French Broad River MPO 2040 MTP The French Broad River Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP) looks 25 years into the future. It forecasts changes in the region and seeks to identify transportation improvements needed to keep travelers and goods moving smoothly and how to pay for those improvements. It is a fiscally constrained document, meaning the anticipated revenues must cover the anticipated costs. The following are bicycle or pedestrian projects in the City of Asheville from the MTP: ● New Leicester Highway Sidewalks ● Clingman Forest and Town Branch Greenways


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French Broad River West Greenway Asheville Greenway Connectors Riceville Road Sidewalks Bent Creek Greenway Phase I and Phase II McDowell St and Choctaw St Pedestrian Improvements McDowell St and All Souls Crescent Bicycle Improvements Broadway Street Road Diet

Takeaway: Projects must be in the MTP to receive state and federal transportation funding in the North Carolina Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), so this document is critical to ensure future funding opportunities and should be coordinated with closely, especially as the MPO is updating this document in 2020.

French Broad River MPO Transportation Improvement Projects Projects within the TIP, and Highway Safety Improvement Project (HSIP) will be reviewed as a part of the mapping documentation of the Close the GAP Project.

Blue Ridge Bike Plan (2013) VISION: The Vision for the Blue Ridge Bike Plan is to help create a community in Western North Carolina where bicycling can serve to improve the physical and mental health of the community; and where people have transportation choices, stronger economic development, safer bicycling opportunities for live-work-play connections, a complete street transportation system, and less dependence on foreign oil. In 2013, the Blue Ridge Bike Plan was developed, having been awarded funding from the NCDOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Division. The purpose of the Blue Ridge Bike Plan is to identify and define improvements to both create and enhance a regional bicycle route system in seven counties of Western North Carolina. A key goal of the Plan is to provide bicycle mobility and connections in the region.


The Blue Ridge Bike Plan identifies several Regional Priority Corridors for bicycle improvements, which connects various communities and key destinations. The following are Buncombe County corridors that traverse through Asheville: ● ● ● ●

Swannanoa River Road to Tunnel Road Sand Hill Road to US 19/23 US 74A to Blue Ridge Parkway Sweeten Creek Road to Hendersonville Road

The following are Asheville proper priority corridors: ● ● ● ● ●

Lyman Street to Biltmore Avenue Charlotte Street to Edwin Place Patton Avenue to Hazel Mill Road Haywood Rod to Patton Avenue College Street to Beaucatcher Tunnel

The highest priority recommendation from public input and the steering committee was the following: “Develop, implement and maintain a core network of safe and well-connected bicycle facilities (bike lanes and greenways).” Takeaway: While regional in focus, the Blue Ridge Bike Plan supports extensive bicycle network development within and to Asheville that connect local destinations and communities.

NCDOT Complete Streets Implementation Guide (2020) The purpose of this guide is to provide a resource to NCDOT staff in the implementation of the agency’s Complete Streets policy. There are eight primary sections of the Guide that outline the agency’s approach to integrating Complete Streets in projects: 1. Planning. A community’s Comprehensive Transportation Plan (CTP) is considered the controlling plan for the identification of non-motorized facilities to be evaluated as part of a roadway project. Other locally adopted plans will be considered so long as 1) the planned facility address s a transportation need and 2) the planned facility


meets the design guidance standards referenced in Section 7. Each proposed roadway project will include the preparation of a Complete Streets Project Sheet (example can be found in the Guide). The Project Sheet will identify planned multimodal facilities and document any exceptions considered in the course of project development. Certain projects may have a Project Sheet that was developed as a part of the CTP process. Exceptions to Complete Streets implementation may be requested and considered any time throughout the process through the Complete Streets Program Administrator in the Integrated Mobility Division. A multi-disciplinary Complete Streets Review Team will review all requests for exceptions to the Complete Streets Policy. 2. Project Development. The Guide outlines three primary phases of project development. a. Project Scoping: The Integrated Mobility Division will participate in scoping meetings and provide a written summary memo identifying facility recommendations and design guidance as appropriate. b. Bridge Projects: The Project Engineer will coordinate with the Integrated Mobility Division through scoping requests to incorporate Complete Streets elements in bridge designs for each bridge replacement project undertaken by NCDOT. The Guide describes conditions where pedestrian, bicycle or multi use path needs should be accommodated in bridge projects. c. Equal or Better Performance of a Facility: Conditions often change between the time a project is added to the Strategic Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) and the when the project development process begins, that may support the incorporation of a different type of bicycle or pedestrian improvement than shown in an adopted plan. NCDOT will review an alternative facility to the bicycle and/or pedestrian facility type proposed in the adopted plan upon the written request of the local representatives to the Project Engineer. 3. Resurfacing and Maintenance Activities. a. Resurfacing. Each year, a county-level resurfacing schedule is developed within each NCDOT Division. NCDOT Division staff will meet with local agencies to review the scheduled roadways and identify locations to evaluate Complete Streets improvements. The Guide offers a process to be followed in reviewing these projects for complete streets improvements.


b. Rumble Strips/Stripes. Rumble strips/stripes will not be extended across the shoulder of the roadway or other areas intended for bicycle travel. The Mobility & Safety Division in coordination with the Integrated Mobility Division will evaluate situations on a case by case basis where rumble strips/stripes recommended for safety may conflict with bicycle travel. 4. Work Zone Accommodations. The continuity of existing bicycle and pedestrian facilities will be maintained during construction and maintenance activities. During the construction phase of a roadway project, NCDOT’s Guidelines for the Level of Pedestrian Accommodation in Work Zones will be followed. 5. Related Policies. This section outlines policies that are superseded by the Complete Streets Implementation Guide, and those NCDOT policies that include Complete Streets elements. 6. Cost Share. Bicycle, pedestrian and public transportation facilities that appear in an adopted Plan directly or by reference will be fully funded, not including elements identified as betterments (more below). The following table illustrates the funding responsibilities for complete streets facilities.

Projects that are not identified in an adopted plan may be included in a project, but these require the local jurisdiction to share the incremental cost of construction based on the population thresholds below.


A roadway project betterment is defined as: ● A requested bicycle, pedestrian or public transportation improvement that exceeds the recommendations appearing in an adopted plan and/or exceeds the needs identified through the project development process; or ● Aesthetic materials and treatments, if this cost is determined to exceed the cost of standard construction materials; or ● Landscaping in excess of standard treatments as defined by NCDOT Roadside Aesthetics Policy; or ● Lighting in excess of standard treatments as defined by NCDOT lighting policy. The additional costs associated with inclusion of these elements in a roadway project are the responsibility of the local jurisdiction, executed through a local agreement. Local and County maintenance is also addressed in this Guide. 7. Design Guidance. This section includes the design guidance for Complete Streets design, including the NCDOT Roadway Design Manual, AASHTO guides, NACTO guides and FHWA supplemental guidance. 8. Administration. This section outlines the process to review and maintain the Guide.

In Closing: The City of Asheville and other partners have a wide variety of planning documents to guide pedestrian, ADA and greenway related decisions. Through the Close the GAP planning process, the City is presented with a prime opportunity to integrate the ideas and policies from previous studies into this project; the City also has the opportunity to bring forth new ideas and update concepts and policy documents.


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CLOSE THE GAP APPENDIX 4: COMMITTEE AND ENGAGEMENT TRACKING


Close the GAP Committee and Engagement Tracking Sheet Last Updated September 2022

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Think Tank Team Meeting #1 Project introduction and initial information gathering Attendees: Think Tank Team members December 18, 2019 9:30-11:00am Public Works Conf Room 109 161 S Charlotte St

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Citizens Advisory Committee Meeting #1 Project introduction and initial information gathering Attendees: CAC members January 23, 2020 3:00-4:30pm Lenoir Rhyne University

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Citizens Advisory Committee Drop In Meeting Project introduction and initial information gathering Attendees: Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation, NCDOT, AARP January 27, 2020 12:00-2:00pm Pack Memorial Library

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Asheville Unpaved Alliance Kick-off Meeting Kick-off to being an alliance of organizations and individuals to support the Asheville Unpaved Initiative Attendees: Asheville Unpaved Alliance Members and Consultant Team February 10, 2020 12:00 - 1:00pm The Rhu, 10 S Lexington Ave, Asheville, NC 28801

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City of Asheville Transportation SWOT Meeting Discussion of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to pedestrian, greenway and ADA issues in the City Attendees: City Transportation Staff and Consultant Team. For Attendees see this document.

Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 1of 8


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https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wu4VDYz06Sy2aL20qkCBKfpQXnQItqauC7H1x 1BOOug/edit March 4, 2020 2:00-4:00pm City Hall

Asheville Unpaved Alliance Meeting The group brought forward ideas of potential locations for trails, what kind of trails the group would want to see, and potential roles of the members. Attendees: Task Force Members and Consultant Team April 28, 2020 Google Meet

City/County Greenway Discussion Project updates and best practices Attendees: City and County Staff, Consultant Team, County Greenway Staff (Peyton O’Conner, Karla Furnari) June 3, 2020 11:45am-1:15pm Google Meet

City of Asheville Public Works SWOT Meeting Discussion of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to pedestrian, greenway and ADA issues in the City Attendees: City Staff and Consultant Team July 14, 2020 10:00am-12:00pm Google Meet

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City of Asheville NCDOT SWOT Meeting Discussion of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to pedestrian, greenway and ADA issues in the City Attendees: NCDOT, City Staff and Consultant Team For attendees see video https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LVUqrbEFEH_jr0uVCyQC8l0hJ2lMmQ9G/view?usp=sh aring July 16, 2020 2:00-3:30pm Google Meet

City of Asheville ADA Admin Meeting

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Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 2of 8


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Discussion of project goals and objectives with a focus on ADA Transition Plan funding needs to set the stage of funding decisions that will need to be made during the project recommendations phase. Attendees: Eric Edgerton, Barbara Whitehorn, Cathy Ball, Brad Stein, Lucy Crown, Barb Mee, Kristy Carter, Christy Staudt, Melissa Anderson, Brad Branham, Jessica Morriss July 17, 2020 Google Meet

City of Asheville Planning and DSD SWOT Meeting Discussion of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to pedestrian, greenway and ADA issues in the City Attendees: City Staff from Planning and Development Services Departments and Consultant Team. July 17, 2020 3:00-5:00pm Google Meet

Asheville Unpaved Alliance - Meeting with Blue Ridge Southern Railroad Met with Blue Ridge Southern Railroad to discuss potential greenway alignments that would utilize the railroad’s right-of-way. The railroad company was tentatively open to future discussion. Attendees: WATCO, City Staff and Consultant Team July 21, 2020 11:00-11:30am Zoom

City of Asheville Capital Projects SWOT Meeting Discussion of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to pedestrian, greenway and ADA issues in the City Attendees: Consultant Team and Capital Project Managers and Staff (Including Parks) July 27, 2020 2:00-4:00pm Google Meet

Asheville Unpaved Alliance Meeting Asheville Unpaved Alliance met to review potential “trail hub” locations and discuss the potential role of the alliance. Attendees: Asheville Unpaved Alliance August 12, 2020, 12:00-1:30pm

Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 3of 8


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Asheville Unpaved Alliance Meeting Meeting with Bill Botten (US Access Board) to discuss ADA and Natural Surface Trails The City of Asheville and the consultant team met with one of the nation’s foremost experts on ADA accessibility as it relates to requirements for pathways and trails. September 28, 2020, 10:00-11:00am Microsoft Teams

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Asheville Unpaved Alliance Meeting Alliance met in person to develop an action plan for next steps to implement pilot projects. Attendees: Asheville Unpaved Alliance October 7, 2020, 6:30-8:00pm Carrier Park Pavilion

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GAP and ADA TP Surveys Collect information about current and desired state of walking and rolling in Asheville October 30, 2020 - January 18, 2021 PublicInput

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AVL Unpaved Alliance: in March 2021, the committee began meeting weekly to advance project ideas outside of the Close the GAP project. These are not captured in this plan document.

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TTT Meeting #2 Project status update with Destination and Equity Evaluation, Review of How Projects Will be Developed and Results of First Public Survey Attendees: Think Tank Team Members March 18, 2021 12:30-2:00pm Google Meet

CAC Meeting #2

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Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 4of 8


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Project status update with Destination and Equity Evaluation, Review of How Projects Will be Developed and Results of First Public Survey Attendees: CAC members March 23, 2021 2:00-2:30pm Google Meet

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Friday Brown Bag Lunch with City Staff Project status update, intermediate network plan to review Attendees: COA Planning, COA Transportation and Consulting Team June 11, 2021 12:00 - 1:30pm Google Meet

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Friday Brown Bag Lunch with City Staff Overview of GAP prioritization methodology and network draft Attendees: COA Planning, COA Transportation, COA Capital Projects and Consulting Team July 19, 2021 12:00 - 1:00pm Google Meet

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Intercept Survey To meet people where they are walking and wheeling and ask them about their trip to help inform an understanding of economic impacts of greenways. August 10, 2021 (7:00am-7:00pm) and August 14, 2021 (7:00am (Reed Creek) 8:00am (RAD)-3:00pm) Wilma Dykeman Greenway/River Arts District and Reed Creek Greenway/Botanical Gardens

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Friday Brown Bag Lunch with City Staff Review of public meeting materials Attendees: COA Planning, COA Transportation and Consulting Team August 13, 2021 12:00 - 1:30pm Google Meet

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Presentation to Multimodal Transportation Commission (MMTC) To share an update on the project and gather feedback on the pedestrian and greenway networks

Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 5of 8


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Attendees: MMTC members, COA Transportation staff and Consulting Team August 25, 2021 (3:00-5:00pm) Google Meet

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Public Meeting #1 To share an update on the project and gather feedback on the pedestrian and greenway networks August 25, 2021 (6:00-7:30pm) August 27, 2021 (10:00-11:30am) Google Meet

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ADA Focus Group Meeting #2 To share an update on the project and gather feedback on the ADA Transition Plan priority corridors. Attendees: ADA Focus Group Members September 14, 2021 (6:00-7:30pm) September 16, 2021 (10:00-11:30am) Google Meet

Individual Meetings to Obtain Input on Plan Recommendations ○ City Transportation Staff - December 13, 2021 ○ Various City Departments - December 14, 2021 ○ NCDOT - January 20, 2022 Google Meet

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Presentation to Greenway Committee Presentation of Findings Attendees: Committee members, COA Transportation staff and Consulting Team February 3, 2022 (3:00-5:00pm) Google Meet

● ● ● ●

Presentation to Multimodal Transportation Commission (MMTC) Presentation of Findings Attendees: MMTC members, COA Transportation staff and Consulting Team February 23, 2022 (3:00-5:00pm)

Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 6of 8


Google Meet

● ● ● ● ●

TTT Meeting #3 Presentation on Final Findings Attendees: Think Tank Team Members March 22, 2022 3:00-4:30pm Google Meet

● ● ● ● ●

CAC Meeting #3 Presentation on Final Findings Attendees: CAC members March 28, 2022 3:00-4:30pm Google Meet

● ● ● ● ●

ADA Focus Group Meeting #3 To share an update on the project findings and ADA Transition Plan priority polices and findings. Attendees: ADA Focus Group Members March 31, 2022 (3:00-4:30pm) Google Meet

● ● ● ●

Final Community Survey To gather feedback on the pedestrian and greenway networks February 21 - March 31, 2022 PublicInput.com

● ● ● ●

Draft Plan for Community Input To gather feedback on the Draft Close the GAP Plan April 2022 City of Asheville Website

● ●

City Budget Meetings and ADA Discussions May - August 2022 Attendees: Various city departments such as Transportation, Capital, Administration, Budget

Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 7of 8


● ●

To discuss ADA Transition Plan implementation and funding needs. Google Meet

Appendix 4: Community Engagement Summary 8of 8


Intentionally blank to facilitate double-sided printing


CLOSE THE GAP APPENDIX 5: GREENWAY INTERCEPT SURVEY


GAP Intercept Survey Summary *River Arts District (RAD), Reed Creek Greenway (RCG)

Trail Activity Removed blanks RAD Bike Run Skate (roller, board) Walk RCG Bike Run Skate (roller, board) Walk Grand Total

299 62 71 7 159 176 24 53 1 98 475

21% 24% 2% 53% 14% 30% 1% 56%

How Travel to Trail Removed blanks, added fill in values RAD Bicycle Bus Car Walk/Run Roll/Skate RCG Bicycle Bus Car Walk/Run Grand Total

318 27 1 223 64 3 189 27 1 54 107 507

8% 0% 70% 20% 1% 14% 1% 29% 57%

Primary Purpose Removed blanks RAD Commuting Dining, Shopping, Errands Exercise, Fitness, Socializing Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment RCG Commuting Dining, Shopping, Errands

337 3 9 274 51 220 10 22

1% 3% 81% 15% 5% 10%


Grand Total

557

Secondary Purpose Removed blanks RAD Commuting Dining, Shopping, Errands Exercise, Fitness, Socializing Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment RCG Commuting Dining, Shopping, Errands Exercise, Fitness, Socializing Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Grand Total

154 4 20 35 95 36 2 15 18 11 190

3% 13% 23% 62% 6% 42% 50% 31%

Active Minutes Removed blanks and values that had too much variability (“30-60 minutes”) or were unclear (“no idea” or “5 miles”) RAD 316 <15 minutes 7 2% 16-30 minutes 40 13% 31-45 minutes 49 16% 46-60 minutes 83 26% 61-75 14 4% 76-90 39 12% 91-120 35 11% >120 49 16% RCG 222 <15 2 1% 16-30 31 14% 31-45 47 21% 46-60 68 31% 61-75 8 4% 76-90 19 9% 91-120 32 14% >120 15 7% Grand Total 538

How Often Use Trail Removed blanks RAD 2-3 times a month A few times per year

314 46 14

15% 4%


Everyday Few times a week First visit Once per month RCG 2-3 times a month A few times per year Everyday Few times a week First visit Once per month Grand Total

52 138 56 8 201 20 3 51 111 13 3 515

17% 44% 18% 3% 10% 1% 25% 55% 6% 1%

Primary Activity Removed blanks; when multiple responses provided (fill), used first mentioned mode RAD 331 Bicycling 71 21% Running 70 21% Skating 7 2% Walking/Rolling 178 54% Other (frisbee, one wheel, yoga, kayaking, scooter) 5 2% RCG 199 Bicycling 30 15% Running 44 22% Walking/Rolling 124 62% Other (frisbee, one wheel, yoga, kayaking, scooter) 1 1% Grand Total 530

Spending Habits Removed responses that were indicated with “?” or responses such as “don’t know yet”. If it was a range (“$5-10”) I used the average ($7.50). On their trip to the RAD, users spent an average of $72.49 on expenses during their trip. ● 33 people (15% of those interviewed) spent an average of $24.30 on restaurant meals and drink expenses ● 6 people (2% of those interviewed) spent an average of $92.14 on groceries/convenience items ● 7 people (2% of those interviewed) spent an average of $143.00 on retail expenses ● 1 person (<1% of those interviewed) spent $10 on entertainment (at the skate park) ● 3 people (<1% of those interviewed) spent an average of $93 at “other” establishments (Odyssey ClayWorks, Pisgah Fitness, kayak rental) On their trip to the RCG, users spent an average of $53.81 on expenses during their trip.


● ● ● ● ●

9 people (5% of those interviewed) spent an average of $13.44 on restaurant meals and drink expenses 15 people (9% of those interviewed) spent an average of $48.13 on groceries/convenience items (many went to the North Asheville Tailgate Market) 2 people (<1% of those interviewed) spent an average of $23.50 on retail expenses 1 person (<1% of those interviewed) spent $160 on bicycle-related expenses (Flying Bike Tour & Rentals) 4 people (<1% of those interviewed) spent an average of $24 at “other” establishments (garage sales, gas)

Living Status – Permanent, Seasonal, Visitor Removed blanks RAD Permanent Resident Seasonal Resident Visitor RCG Permanent Resident Seasonal Resident Visitor Grand Total

323 246 12 65 210 184 9 17 533

76% 4% 20% 88% 4% 8%

Living Status – Permanent, Local Removed blanks RAD Arden Asheville Biltmore Forest Brevard Buncombe Co Burnsville Candler Fairview Hendersonville Jupiter Leicester Mars Hill Swannanoa Waynesville Weaverville Woodfin RCG Alexander Asheville Buncombe Co

241 1 186 1 1 1 2 11 5 1 1 7 1 2 1 10 10 182 1 162 1

0% 77% 0% 0% 0% 1% 5% 2% 0% 0% 3% 0% 1% 0% 4% 4% 1% 89% 1%


Candler Fairview Swannanoa Weaverville Woodfin Grand Total

2 5 1 8 2 423

1% 3% 1% 4% 1%

Living Status – State Removed blanks or unknown. Originally, I did not include all of the detail of the state travelling from but decided to keep in case this could make a fun graphic. RAD 309 CA 5 2% CO 1 0% CT 2 1% DC 1 0% FL 8 3% GA 4 1% IL 3 1% MD 4 1% MN 1 0% MO 1 0% NC 257 83% NY 6 2% NJ 1 0% OH 1 0% OR 1 0% PA 1 0% SC 3 1% TN 1 0% TX 3 1% VA 4 1% WV 1 0% RCG 198 CA 1 1% CO 1 1% FL 5 3% KY 1 1% MA 2 1% MN 1 1% MO 1 1% NC 182 92% NY 2 1% VA 1 1% WA 1 1%


Grand Total

507

Visit Nights Removed blanks, unknown data RAD 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 >7 RCG 1 3 5 6 7 >7 Grand Total

34 2 2 7 12 2 2 2 5 10 1 1 1 1 1 5 44

6% 6% 21% 35% 6% 6% 6% 15% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 50%

Visit: Trail Importance Removed blanks RAD Not Important Somewhat Important Very Important RCG Not Important Very Important Grand Total

64 26 19 19 17 10 7 540

Visit: Money Spent (Total Trip, Not Just to the Trail) Removed blanks, unknown RAD <100 100-200 201-500 501-1000 1001-2000 2001-3000 3001-5000 RCG

53 6 5 19 11 7 2 3 16

11% 9% 36% 21% 13% 4% 6%


<100 100-200 201-500 501-1000 1001-2000 2001-3000 3001-5000 5000-6000 Grand Total

1 2 2 2 2 5 1 1 69

6% 13% 13% 13% 13% 31% 6% 6%

Visit: Stay Removed blanks RAD AirBnB / Short Term Rental Campground Motel / Hotel Other W / Friend, Relative RCG AirBnB / Short Term Rental Motel / Hotel Other W / Friend, Relative Grand Total

55 23 4 17 3 8 16 6 1 2 7 71

42% 7% 31% 5% 15% 38% 6% 13% 44%

Number in Group Removed blanks RAD 1 2 3 >4 RCG 1 2 3 >4 Grand Total

55 164 116 19 21 16 132 58 14 4 71

You – Age Removed blanks, unknowns Median age of the person travelling in the RAD was 46 years old (NOTE: excel only allows median to be calculated for 255 values so I used an online calculator for this value). Median age of the person travelling in RCG was 53 years old.


RAD 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 RCG Under 5 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85 and older Grand Total

288 1 0 1 7 20 30 37 36 25 32 22 29 28 15 3 2 205 5 2 5 9 15 17 23 12 20 15 24 18 25 11 3 1 493

Companion Removed blanks 12% of travelers on the RAD had at least one companion with them. 7% of travelers on the RCG had at least one companion with them.

Companion – Age Removed blanks, unknowns. Median age of a child travelling with an adult in the RAD was 6 years old. Median age of a child travelling with an adult on the RCG was 6.5 years old.


You – Gender RAD Female Male Non-Binary RCG Female Male Grand Total

322 149 172 1 210 114 96 532

46% 53% <1% 54% 46%


Intentionally blank to facilitate double-sided printing


2. How Travel to Trail (Choice) Bicycle Walk

How Travel to 3. Trail Activity Trail Other (Choice) (Fill) Bike Walk

Trail Activity Other (Fill)

Barnard Ave RC3

5. Off for Destination (Fill) Catawba Steet RC17

RC6

RC12

Wedge

RC6

Chatham Rd

Exercise, Fitness

RC17

Chestnut St

Chestnut St Home

RC3 RC18

Chestnut St 377 Merrimon Ave

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Station # (Choice)

1. Start Trip (Fill)

1 2

RCG RCG

55 Maney 501 Merrimon Ave

3

RCG

Chatham Rd

4 5

RCG RCG

RC17 RC1

6

RCG

Montview

7 8

RCG RCG

RC6 5 Points West

Walk Walk

Walk Walk

9

RCG

Cumberland Cir

Walk

Walk

10

RCG

11

RCG

226 Merrimon Ave

12

RCG

RC3

Exercise, Fitness

13

RCG

Flint St

Exercise, Fitness

14 15 16 17 18 19

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Federal Credit Union parking lot (SECU?) 2 Howland Woodrow Ave Elizabeth St Starnes 1086 Hendersonville Rd

Bicycle Walk Bicycle Walk Bus

20

RCG

B7?

21

RCG

22

Walk

4. Get On Trail (Fill)

Walk

6. Destination (Fill) Coffee Shope RC17

7. Exit Trail (Fill)

8. End Trip (Fill)

Trip Miles (Calculate)

9. Primary Primary Purpose Purpose (Choice) Other (Fill) Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

#

Catawba Street 55 Maney RC3 501 Merrimon Ave

Primary Purpose Other2 (Fill) Dinin

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Walk Walk

RC6 RC14

Campus CVS

RC13

RC3

RC3

RC3

300 Barnard Ave 5 Points West

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

Cumberland Cir

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

Exercise, Fitness Walk

Walk

RC16

?

R16

Exercise, Fitness

Bike Walk Walk Walk Walk

RC7 RC2 Magnolia R17 RC17 RC3

Car

Bike

RC10

Reynolds Mtn

Bicycle

Bike

RCG

Founder Dr Apt

Bicycle

Walk

RC9

23 24 25 26 27 28

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Bontanical Parking Charlotte and Max St Home and Lookout Rd W Chestnut St Weaver Park

Walk Car Walk Walk Car

Walk Walk Walk Walk Run

Botanical Parking RC7 RC9 RC16

29

RCG

Five Points

Car

Run

Chestnut

Merrimon

Chestnut

Five Points

Exercise, Fitness

30

RCG

Montford

Walk

Run

RC16

RC3

RC16

Montford

Exercise, Fitness

31

RCG

Beaver Dam

Car

Walk

RC9

RC7

UNCA

RC9

Beaver Dam

Exercise, Fitness

32 33

RCG RCG

Montford RAD

Walk Bicycle

Walk Bike

RC14 WD23

RC7

Montford Tail Gate Market

RC3 WD23

Montford WD23

Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Errands

34

RCG

26 Huntington

Walk

Run

RC3

R18

35

RCG

Pearson and Rosewood

Walk

RC13

RC7

Walk Bicycle Walk

Bike

Walk

102 Montford Ave Tailgate Market RC7 Botanical Gardens RC9

RC12 RC2 Woodrow R17 RC17

226 Merrimon Ave

al Credit Union (SECU?) 2 Howland Woodrow Elizabeth St Starnes 1086 Hendersonville Rd

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Errands Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Dinin

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Bike

RC9

RC9

Founders Dr Apts

RC17 Botanical parkingBotanical parking RC17 RC7 harlotte and Max St ome and Lookout Rd RC6 RC6 Farmers Market RC17 W Chestnut St

RC7

Exercise, Fitness

Exercise, Fitness Sightse Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitnessel to/from Dinineeing/Art/Entera Exercise, Fitness

R18

p back to Huntington

Exercise, Fitnessmuting to/from ping/running err

RC13

arson and Rosewood

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin


36

RCG

37

RCG

38

Botanical Gardens Botanical Gardens

RC8

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

Car

Walk

RC8

Fulton St

Walk

Walk

R15

RC2

Grove Park Inn

RC15

RC15

Exercise, Fitness

RCG

Carlton Pl

Car

Walk

R17

RC3

RC17

RC17

Carclton Pl

Exercise, Fitness

39

RCG

Cumberland Ave

Walk

Run

RC14

RC7

Tailgate Market

RC14

Cumberland Ave

Dining, Shopping, Errands

40

RCG

Salem Ave

Walk

Walk

RC6

High Five Coffee High Five Coffee

RC18

RC6

Commuting

Em

RCG

In-town/Patton Ave

Walk

Run

RC2

RC3

RC17

Patton Apts

Exercise, Fitness

42 43

RCG RCG

Pioneer Building Larchmont Rd

Bicycle

Bike

RC17 RC3

RC7

RC17

Pioneer Bldg

Exercise, Fitness

44

RCG

Grove Park

Walk

Run

RC1

RC12

Grove Park

Exercise, Fitness

45

RCG

Downtown

Walk

Walk

RC17

Merrimon

RC17

Downtown

Exercise, Fitness

46

RCG

Oakley

Car

Walk

RC16

RC3

Tailgate Market

RC16

Oakley

Exercise, Fitness

47 48 49 50 51 52

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Home (N Asheville) Pack Square Home (N Asheville) Home Home (Weaverville)

Car Bicycle Bicycle Car Walk Car

Run Bike Bike Walk Walk Walk

RC17 RC3 RC5 RC6 RC1

RC3 RC17 RC7 RC7 RC7

Tailgate Market

RC3 RC6 RC1

Pack Square Home (N Asheville) Pack Square Home (N Asheville) Home Home (Weaverville)

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Errands Dining, Shopping, Errands Dining, Shopping, Errands

53

RCG

N Downtown

Walk

Walk

RC18

Tailgate Market

RC18

N Downtown

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

54

RCG

RC2

Car

Walk

RC2

RC10

RC17

Weaver Park

55 56

RCG RCG

45 Pearson Pack Square

Walk Car

Walk Run

RC16 ?

RC7 RC17

Tailgate Market

RC16

45 Pearson

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

57

RCG

Grove Park neighborhood

Walk

Run

RC1

Carrier Park

RC1

58 59 60 61

RCG RCG RCG RCG

Lakeshore Montford and Watauga N Aville, W Street Merrimon

Walk Walk Bicycle Walk

Run Run Bike Walk

RC12 RC13 RC14 RC3

RC7 RC7 RC7

Tailgate Market Tailgate Market Tailgate Market

RC3 RC13 RC14 RC3

62

RCG

Downtown hotel

Walk

Walk

RC18

RC7

63

RCG

Candler

Car

Run

RC13

64

RCG

Swannanoa

Car

Run

RC13

65 66

RCG RCG

Oakley YMCA

Car Walk

Run Run

67

RCG

Bent Creek

Car

Run

68

RCG

WT Weaver Park

69

RCG

28804

Car

70

RCG

N. Aville

71

RCG

72

RCG

Run

Tailgate Market

Pack Square Tailgate Market

ve Park neighborhood Lakeshore ontford and Watauga W Street ?

RC18 Luella's

Dinin Sightse Sightse

Sightse

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Errands Dining, Shopping, Errands Dining, Shopping, Errands Exercise, Fitness

RC13

Candler

Exercise, Fitness

RC3

RC14

Swanannoa

Exercise, Fitness

RC12 WD11

RC1

RC12 RC2

Oakley YMCA

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC18

RC1

RC18

YMCA

Exercise, Fitness

RC6

RC17

RC6

WT Weaver Park

Exercise, Fitness

Run

RC18

RC1

RC18

28804

Exercise, Fitness

Car

Run

RC2

RC17

RC2

N. Aville

Exercise, Fitness

W Aville

Bicycle

Bike

WD3

RC7

Tailgate Market

don't know

W Aville

Dining, Shopping, Errands

Westover St

Walk

Walk

RC13

RC7

Tailgate Market

RC13

Westover St

Dining, Shopping, Errands

Dunkin Donuts

Dinin

Dinin


73 74

RCG RCG

Northwood Rd Montford

Bicycle Walk

Bike Walk

RC12 RC14

RC3 RC7

Tailgate Market

RC3 RC14

Northwood Rd Montford

Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Errands

75

RCG

Grocery store

Car

Run

RC17

RC9

RC12

RC17

Grocery store

Dining, Shopping, Errands

76 77 78 79 80 81

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Hillside St Edwin Pl Magnolia Ave Flint St Downtown Montford

Walk Bicycle Walk Walk Walk Walk

Walk Bike Walk Walk Walk Walk

RC14 WD17 Carrier Park RC16 RC16 RC17 RC14

RC3 RC3 RC7 RC9 RC7

RC14 Hillside St RC3 Edwin Pl Tailgate Market RC16 Magnolia Ave RC16 Flint St Merrimon or Elizabe Downtown Tailgate Market RC14 Montford

82

RCG

Spears Ave

Bicycle

Bike

RC3

RC11

RC11

83

RCG

W Aville

Bicycle

Bike

RC14

84

RCG

Magnolia Ave

Walk

Walk

RC16

85 86

RCG RCG

Woodrow Pl Griffen Blvd (?)

Walk Walk

Run Run

RC12

87

RCG

Fudruckers

Car

88 89

RCG RCG

Botanical Gardens Montford

Walk Bicycle

90

RCG

Northview St

91

RCG

92

Spears Ave

RC14 RC7

Tailgate Market

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Errands Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness socializing Dining, Shopping, Erraeing/art/entertainment Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Fun

RC16

Magnolia Ave

Dining, Shopping, Errands

RC12

Woodrow Pl

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC12

Fuddruckers

Dining, Shopping, Errands

Botanical Gardens Montford

Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Errands

Dinin

RC12

RC9

Tailgate Market

Run Bike

? RC17

? RC9

Tailgate Market

Walk

Walk

RC17

RC3

?

Walk

Walk

RC10

RC7

aybe Tailgate Mark

RC10

RAD

Candler

Car

Run

WD2

WD9

Shopping/errands

WD23

93

RAD

Southside

Bicycle

Walk

WD6

WD2

WD6

Southside

Exercise, Fitness

94

RAD

W Aville

Walk

Walk

WD22

WD9

WD22

W Aville

Exercise, Fitness

95

RAD

W Aville near Carrier

Car

Run

WD3

WD10

s loop crossing rive

WD3

W Aville near Carrier

Exercise, Fitness

96 97

RAD RAD

Greenleaf Dr, Beaver Lake Downtown, Pack Place

Walk

WD6 WD4

WD22 ?

New Belgium

Walk

WD6 WD6

Greenleaf Dr Downtown

98

RAD

Downtown near RAD

Car

Bike

WD6

WD1 then WD9

WD6

Home

Exercise, Fitness

99

RAD

28801

Car

Walk

WD2

WD9

WD2

28801

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

100

RAD

28806

Walk

Run

WD22

WD8

WD22

28806

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

101

RAD

28804

Car

Bike

WD6

WD21

WD6

28804

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

102

RAD

28803

WD21

28803

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

103

RAD

Blue Ridge Pkwy (camping)

Car

Walk

WD6

?

WD6

not sure

104

RAD

W Aville (home)

Car

Walk

WD2

WD8

WD2

W Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

105

RAD

Downtown Starbucks

Walk

Walk

WD5

WD6

WD5

not sure

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Rolling

RC7

Wedge

WD1

nas Gerard Studio

orthview St (home) Botanical Gardens

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Dinin

Exercise, Fitness

Walk dog

Sightseeing, Art, Enterta Beer Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

meeting friends


106

RAD

W Aville (home)

Car

Walk

WD2

WD8

WD2

W Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

107

RAD

Short St

Bicycle

Bike

WD22

WD21

WD6

Short St

Exercise, Fitness

108

RAD

Leicester, past Mt Carmel

Car

Bike

WD8

?

109

RAD

Airport

Car

Walk

WD6

WD1

110

RAD

28806

Car

Walk

WD8

WD9(?)

111

RAD

28806

Car

Walk

WD6

WD9 (bridge)

WD6

112

RAD

W Aville

Car

Bike

WD2

WD9

113 114 115

RAD RAD RAD

W Aville Downtown (home) Downtown

Car Car Car

Walk Walk Walk

WD6 WD22 WD6

? WD6 WD10

116

RAD

Pfifer St

Walk

Walk

WD6

117

RAD

Kenilworth

Walk

118

RAD

Kenilworth

Walk

119

RAD

Montford

120

RAD

121

Ridge share

RAD Skate Park

WD8

ester, past Mt Carmel

? Just exploring Airbnb Asheville

Fun

Sightse

Sightse

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

28806

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD2

W Aville

Exercise, Fitness

WD6 WD22 WD6

Atlanta Downtown (home) Downtown

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

WD3

WD6

Pfifer St

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

WD6

WD5

WD8

Kenilworth

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Walk

WD6

WD5

WD8

Kenilworth

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Car

Walk

WD6

WD8

WD6

Montford

W Aville

Car

Bike

WD3

WD21

WD3

W Aville

RAD

Downtown/Aston

Bicycle

Bike

Downtown College

AB Tech

122

RAD

28801 (home)

Car

Walk

WD3

WD9

123

RAD

Green Mtn, NC

Car

Bike

WD10

WD1

124

RAD

W Aville

Car

Walk

WD3

125

RAD

Oakley

Car

Walk

126

RAD

Lake Lure

Car

Run

127

RAD

Leicester, past Mt Carmel

Car

Walk

128 129 130 131 132 133 134

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Hotel Hotel Home Home Hotel Montford (home) 21 Skyview Pl

Car Car Car Car Car Bicycle Car

135

RAD

Montford (home)

Car

skating/skateboa

Summit Coffee

WD10

WD8

Sightse Dinin

Exercise, Fitness outdoor time recreation

Downtown

Exercise, Fitness

WD3

28801 (home)

Exercise, Fitness

WD10

Green Mtn, NC

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

WD8

WD3

W Aville

Exercise, Fitness

WD8

WD1

WD8

Oakley

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

W8

W1

Summit Coffee

W8

?

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

WD3

WD9

Summit Coffee

WD3

Leicester

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Run Run Run Bike Walk Run Run

WD2 WD2 WD5 WD1 WD8 WD10 WD22

WD9 (?) WD9 Carrier Park

Hotel Hotel Home

WD5 WD5 WD21

WD2 WD2 WD5 WD10 WD8 WD5 WD22

Montford (home) WD5

Run

WD2

WD9

WD2

Montford (home)

rolling/skateboar

White Duck

Carrier Park Hominy Ck

socializing

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Erraercise and fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse Sightse Sightse Sightse Sightse


136

RAD

Clingman (home)

Walk

Walk

WD6

137

RAD

Home

Car

Bike

WD21

138

RAD

W Aville (Haywood Rd)

Car

Run

WD6

139

RAD

Crest Mtn (home)

Car

Walk

140 141

RAD RAD

W Aville (home) Home (28806)

Walk Car

142

RAD

W Aville, off Louisiana

143 144

RAD RAD

145

WD6

Clingman (home)

Exercise, Fitness

WD21

Home

Exercise, Fitness

WD9

WD6

East Aville (work)

Exercise, Fitness

WD6

WD9

WD6

Crest Mtn (home)

Exercise, Fitness

Walk Run

WD9 WD5

W Aville Ingles WD9

WD5 WD5

W Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

Car

Walk

WD5

WD9

WD5

Aville, off Louisiana

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Home (28806) Home (28805)

Car Car

Walk Walk

WD6 WD5

WD8 WD9

WD6 WD5

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse Sightse

RAD

North - Riverside Dr (home)

Car

Walk

Summit parking lo

WD5

146 147 148

RAD RAD RAD

Hotel Mills Gap Rd (home) Hotel

Car Car Car

Run Walk Walk

WD6 WD9 WD4 (7?)

? WD5 WD9

WD6 WD9 WD4 (7?)

149

RAD

Home (near VA in Haw Creek)

Bicycle

Bike

WD6

WD9

WD6

150

RAD

Home/HFE

Walk

Walk

WD5

N/A

WD13

Home

Exercise, Fitness

151

RAD

Home (E Aville)

Car

Walk

WD6

WD8

WD6

Home (E Aville)

Exercise, Fitness

152

RAD

Leicester

Car

Walk

WD6

?

WD6

Leicester

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

153

RAD

Off Leicester HWY

Car

Walk

WD3

WD8

WD3

Exercise, Fitness Get baby out

Sightse

154

RAD

Home (Montford)

Car

Walk

WD2

Maybe past Pleb?

WD2

Home (Montford)

Exercise, Fitness

155 156 157

RAD RAD RAD

Pisgah Natl Forest Tunnel Rd - Hampton Home (E Aville)

Car Car Car

Run Walk Run

WD? WD3 WD

Lyman WD9 WD10

WD? WD3 WD2

Pisgah Natl Forest unnel Rd - Hampton Home (E Aville)

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

158

RAD

Home (?)

Walk

Run

WD3

WD9

WD3

Home

Exercise, Fitness

159 160

RAD RAD

Home (Oakley area) RAD

Car Walk

Walk Run

WD6 WD4

WD10 WD9

WD6 WD9

Home (Oakley area) ?

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

161

RAD

Home (Bent Creek)

Car

Run

WD11

WD1

WD11

Home (Bent Creek)

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

162

RAD

Home (Five Points)

Car

Walk

WD11

WD1

WD11

Home (Five Points)

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

163

RAD

Home (28806)

Car

Run

WD18

WD4

round @ Haywood

WD18

Home (28806)

Exercise, Fitness

164

RAD

Arden

Car

Run

WD18

WD4

round @ Haywood

WD18

Arden

Exercise, Fitness

165

RAD

Home (Tunnel Rd and Kenilworth)

Car

Run

WD3

WD18

166

RAD

Home (N Aville-Howland)

Car

167

RAD

Riverside Dr Complex

Car

Run

WD1 aggy Dam Reservoir

WD6 Walk

WD3

RAD

Home (28806) ?

Summit parking loh - Riverside Dr (home)

White Duck Taco

Hotel Mills Gap Rd (home) Hotel (near VA in Haw Creek)

Sightse

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertaercise and fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Exercise, Fitness

WD3

Tunnel Rd and Kenilworth)

Exercise, Fitness

WD21

WD6

me (N Aville-Howland)

Exercise, Fitness

RAD

WD3

verside Dr Complex

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Sightse Sightse

Dinin


168

RAD

W Aville

Car

Run

WD6

Amboy Bridge

WD6

W Aville

Exercise, Fitness

169 170

RAD RAD

E Aville Near Biltmore Estate

Car Car

Run Run

WD5 WD6

WD5

E Aville

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

171

RAD

Candler

Car

Skate (roller, board)

WD3

WD3

Candler

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

172

RAD

White Duck

Car

Walk

WD1

D23 (Amboy Bridg

White Duck

WD1

WD1

173

RAD

W Aville

Car

Bike

WD21

White Duck Taco

White Duck

?

W Aville

174

RAD

W Aville

WD14

WD22

New Belgium

WD14

W Aville

175

RAD

Woodfin

Car

Bike

WD5

WD2

RAD

WD5

176

RAD

Outside of Aville

Car

Run

WD6

?

?

WD6

177

RAD

S Aville

Car

Walk

WD5

WD9

Baby Bull

178

RAD

Kenilworth

Bicycle

Bike

WD6

179

RAD

East Aville

Car

Run

E Aville

180

RAD

Haywood (?)

Car

Walk

181

RAD

E Aville

Car

Bike

182

RAD

Shiloh

Car

Walk

183

RAD

184

WD22 unplanned, don't know

Amboy Bridge ould've been WD1

RAD

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Erraercise and fitness

Sightse Dinin

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Maybe a brewery

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Sightse

WD5

S Aville

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

Sunset, back hom

Broadway

Home (Sunset?)

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD9

RAD

W2

W2

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD4

WD23

Home

WD4

Home

Exercise, Fitness

WD3

Amboy Bridge

WD3

E Aville

WD3

not sure

WD3

Shiloh

Exercise, Fitness

W Aville

WD4

WD23

WD4

W Aville

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

RAD

Kenilworth

WD2

WD6

Wedge

WD2

Kenilworth

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Sightse

185

RAD

Emma Rd

Car

Bike

WD14

WD1

White Duck

WD14

?

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

186

RAD

Downtown

Car

Bike

WD1

WD21

WD2

?

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

187

RAD

Hickory

Car

Walk

WD6

WD5

Studios in RAD

WD6

Hickory

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

188 189

RAD RAD

Weaverville (home) Spartenburg

Car Car

Bike Walk

WD6 WD10

WD21 WD1 (?)

Hominy Ck White Duck

WD6 WD10

Weaverville (home) Spartenburg

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

190

RAD

S Aville

Car

Bike

WD21

WD1

WD21

S Aville

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

191

RAD

Montford Ave

Car

Walk

WD6

WD8

2 Bones & gallerie

WD6

Montford Ave

Dining, Shopping, Errands

192

RAD

Weaverville

Car

Walk

WD5

WD8

sibly Foundy for lu

WD5

Weaverville

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

193 194

RAD RAD

S Aville Alaxander

Car Car

Bike Walk

WD5 WD6

WD5 WD6

S Aville Alexander

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Run, cycle

WD23 elburne/Sandhill Amboy Bridge

Sightse


195 196

RAD RAD

Salvage Station Burnsville

Car Car

Walk Bike

WD6 WD15

WD3 ???? k 2. Broadway WD1; Craven St

WD6 WD15

Infocenter Burnsville

Dining, Shopping, Errands Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

197

RAD

Burnsville

Car

Bike

WD16

k 2. Broadway WD1; Craven St

WD16

Burnsville

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

198

RAD

Oakley

Car

Walk

WD8

WD5

E Aville/Tunnel Rd

WD8

Oakley

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

199

RAD

Reynolds/home

Car

Walk

WD6

WD8

Baby Bull

WD6

Reynolds/home

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

200 201 202 203 204

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Fairview/home ? Home Cedar Wood Reynolds Home

Car Car Car Car Walk

Run Run Walk Walk Run

WD2 WD4 WD2 WD4 WD1

WD14 WD10 WD9 WD2 WD21

Amboy/Carrier Dog park

? WD4 WD2 WD4 WD1

Fairview/home ? Home?

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse Sightse

205

RAD

Michigan Ave near Haywood

Walk

Walk

WD22

WD6

WD22

206

RAD

Home

Car

Walk

WD10

WD1

WD10

Home

Exercise, Fitness

207

RAD

84 Clingman

Walk

Walk

WD22

WD6

84 Clingman

Exercise, Fitness

208

RAD

Home

Car

Run

WD2

WD9

WD2

Home

Exercise, Fitness

209

RAD

Leicester

Car

Run

WD6

WD12

WD6

Leicester

Exercise, Fitness

210 211

RAD RAD

Home Ultra

Bicycle Car

Bike Walk

WD2 WD8

WD1

w Belgium, White D

WD21 WD8

Home W Aville

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Sightse Dinin

212

RAD

W Aville

Car

Walk

WD6

WD8

RAD, Foundy

RAD

Dining, Shopping, Errands

Sightse

213

RAD

Home

Car

Skate (roller, board)

WD2

WD9

WD2

Home

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

214

RAD

Fairview

Car

Bike

WD17

Fairview

Exercise, Fitness

215 216 217 218 219 220

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

NW Aville Fairview-home Leicester - Old County Home Rd Candler Supper Club W Aville-home

Car Car Car Car Car Car

Run Walk Run Walk Walk Walk

?

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

221

RAD

S Aville

Car

222 223

RAD RAD

Woodfin Candler

224

RAD

225 226 227 228 229

?

WD17 Carrier Parkth ends/twice round Bike

WD3 WD14 WD22 WD23 WD2 WD5

FBR Park WD2 WD9 WD9 WD9 WD9

FBR WD14 WD22 WD23 WD2 WD5

Bike

WD5

WD21

WD5

Car Car

Run

WD22 WD22

Home

Car

Walk

WD4

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Home Candler W Aville/home Woodfin/home Home

Bicycle Car Walk Walk Car

Walk Bike Run Run

WD6 WD6 WD2 WD14 WD2

230

RAD

RAD

Walk

Run

231 232 233 234 235

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Downtown Hotel Hotel Home Hernsonville, Horse Shoe

Walk Car Car Walk Car

Walk Walk Run Run

WD5

Home gan Ave near Haywood

er - Old County Home Rd Candler Supper Club W Aville-home

WD9 to Reed Ck, downtown, Clingman WD11 The Owl ? WD8 WD21

WD8 ea, maybe New Belgium WD6 WD2 WD6 WD2 WD2 WD6 WD9 WD2 New Belgium ?

Sightse

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Sightse

Sightse

Dinin Sightse

S Aville

Exercise, Fitness

Woodfin Candler

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

WD4

Home

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD6 WD6 WD2 WD14 WD2

Home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

to Hominy Ck thru Carrier to this tra WD22 WD22 Hominy Ck onto this sect WD9

Sightse

W Aville - The Owl Woodfin-home Home

WD5 WD4 WD6 WD6 WD6

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Market St Hotel Hotel Home

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse Sightse


236

RAD

Kenilworth

Car

Run

WD3

WD21

WD3

Exercise, Fitness

237

RAD

W Aville, Logan Circle

Walk

Walk

WD22

WD9

WD22

238

RAD

Leicester

Walk

Run

WD3

WD21

WD3

239

RAD

by Hall Fletcher School

Walk

Walk

WD10

WD23

WD23

Hall Fletcher School

Exercise, Fitness

240

RAD

W Aville, Logan St

Walk

Walk

WD27

WD23

WD27

W Aville, Logan St

Exercise, Fitness

241 242

RAD RAD

Car Car

Walk Bike

WD6 WD14

WD8 T (sewage treatment)

WD6 WD14

Kenilworth

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Kenilworth

243

RAD

W Aville, Brevard

Car

Run

WD6

White Duck Taco

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

244 245 246

RAD RAD RAD

Weaverville W Aville Grove Park Inn

Walk Car Bus

Walk Skate (roller, board) Walk

WD4 WD4 WD5

Amboy WD9 WD8

WD4 WD4 WD5

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Sightse

Boat Ramp Trolly

247

RAD

Downtown

Bicycle

Bike

WD6

WD2

WD6

Downtown

248

RAD

Candler

Car

Bike

WD21

WD21

Candler

Exercise, Fitness

249 250

RAD RAD

Waynesville Waynesville

Car Car

Bike Bike

WD21 WD21

WD2 WD22

WD21 WD21

Waynesville

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

251

RAD

W Aville, Weaverville

WD3

WD9

252 253

RAD RAD

W Aville Weaverville

Walk Car

Walk Bike

WD1 WD6

WD8

254

RAD

Montford

Bicycle

Bike

WD1

255

RAD

Swannanoa

Car

Bike

256

RAD

W Aville

257

RAD

Montford

Walk

258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Candler Foundry Carwell (?) Farms N Aville, Riverside WD4 (staying in van) Airbnb-not sure Summerfield, NC Downtown hotel Haw Creek Hollywood St Weaverville W Aville ? Drive, E Aville W Aville, Riverview E/W Aville Work/Biltmore ? W Aville

Car Car Car Car

Aville, Logan Circle Leicester

Bridge

WD1 (Broadway) roadway/Riversid New Belgium

WD3

Exercise, Fitness

? A RAD tour/Business

Weaverville

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

WD9

WD1

Montford

Exercise, Fitness

WD1

WD9

WD1

Swanannoa

Exercise, Fitness

WD5

WD8

WD5

W Aville

Dining, Shopping, Errands

Walk

WD1

WD9

WD1

Montford

Exercise, Fitness

Bike Walk Bike

WD8 WD6 WS22 WD1 WD4 WD4 WD5 WD4 WD4 WD6 WD3 WD6 WD5 WD2 WD6 WD6 WD6

WD14 WD4

WD8 WD6 WS22 WD1 WD4

Candler Chapel Hill Carwell (?) Farms N Aville (home) WD4 (van) Downtown Wicked Weed/home Biltmore Haw Creek Hollywood St

Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness

Car Car Car Car Car Car Walk Car Car

Walk Walk Bike Walk Bike Walk Run Walk

Car Car

Walk Walk

12 Bones

WD9 free restroom ? no plan, just stroll WD1 Mellowdrome 12 Bones 12 Bones WD21 WD1 WD5 downtown WD9 Amboy WD9 not sure WD9

WD5 WD4 WD4 WD6 WD3 WD6 WD5 WD2 WD4 WD6 WD6

Sightse Sightse

Exercise, Fitness

WD1 WD6

Skate (roller, board)

RAD Skate Park

Exercise, Fitness

W Aville ? Drive, E Aville W Aville, Riverview E/W Aville Work W Aville

Dinin

Sightse

Sightse


275

RAD

Alexander

Car

Run

WD22

276

RAD

E Aville/Oakley

Car

Bike

WD6

277

RAD

278

RAD

Woodfine (Old Marshall Hwy)

Bike

WD3

WD21

279

RAD

W Aville (home)

Walk

Walk

WD5

WD9

Beer

280 281

RAD RAD

Tunnel Rd W Aville

Bicycle Walk

Bike Walk

WD9 WD3

WD8

Downtown galleries

282

RAD

Weaverville

Car

Bike

WD2

WD21

WastePro

283

RAD

Alexander

Car

Bike

WD2

284 285

RAD RAD

Riverview Home Grown Restaurant

Walk Walk

Walk Walk

286

RAD

Oakley

Car

Run

287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Candler 99 Richmond Hill Rd Westwood Airbnb-Lincoln Park? N Aville Adams Hill Rd (home) White Duck E Aville near Pkwy

Bicycle Walk Walk Car Car Car Car Bicycle

Walk Run Run Walk Walk Run Walk Bike

295

RAD

Swannanoa Depot parking

Car

Walk

WD6

WD2

WD6

Swanannoa

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

296

RAD

Swannanoa Depot parking

Car

Run

WD6

WD1

WD6

Swanannoa

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

297

RAD

Craven parking

Walk

Walk

WD5

WD1

WD5

Craven parking

Exercise, Fitness

298

RAD

S Aville

Car

Walk

WD8

not sure

WD8

S Aville

Exercise, Fitness

299

RAD

Haw Creek

Car

Walk

WD6

WD8

WD6

Haw Creek

Exercise, Fitness

300

RAD

Erwin Hills (home)

Car

Walk

WD3

WD10

WD3

Erwin Hills (home)

Exercise, Fitness

301 302

RAD RAD

Oakley W Aville

Car Car

Walk Walk

WD4 WD6

WD9 WD1

WD4 WD

Oakley W Aville

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

303

RAD

E Aville (home)

Car

WD6

WD21

WD6

E Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

304 305

RAD RAD

N Aville (home) W Aville

Car Car

WD2 WD2

WD10 WD10

WD2 WD2

N Aville (home) W Aville

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Track

Run Walk

Run

Skate/roll

WD9

White Duck

WD22

op Amboy-Broadway

tewater raft, Marshall

Exercise, Fitness

WD?

Oakley

Exercise, Fitness

WD3

Woodfin

Exercise, Fitness

WD5

W Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

Loop through townirbnb on Tunnel Rd WD3 W Aville

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Dining, Shopping, Errands

WD2

Weaverville

Exercise, Fitness

WD21

WD2

Alexander

Exercise, Fitness

WD9 WD14

bus stop WD1

WD3 WD14

WD21

WD1

WD21

Oakley

Exercise, Fitness

WD6 WD1 WD5 WD4 WD4 WD23 WD1 ?

Candler 9 Richmond Hill Rd Westwood irbnb-Lincoln Park? N Aville (home) dams Hill Rd (home) White Duck E Aville B&B

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

WD6 WD1 WD5 WD4 WD4 WD23 WD1 WD8

WD2 WD9 WD20 WD9 don't know yet not sure; 20 mins, then tur WD1 WD8 WD9 ?

Riverview me Grown Restaurant

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Sightse

Sightse

Dinin

Sightse

Sightse Sightse

Sightse

Sightse


306

RAD

Gerdwood & Park Ave

Walk

Walk

WD5

307

RAD

Home Grown

308

RAD

Home Grown

309

RAD

Home Grown

310

RAD

Home Grown

Walk

311

RAD

Home Grown

Walk

312

RAD

Home Grown

313

RAD

E Aville/Haw Creek

Car

Walk

WD2

314

RAD

Near White Duck

Walk

Walk

315

RAD

Downtown; CBD

Walk

Walk

316 317 318

RAD RAD RAD

Candler N Aville Tunnel Rd motel

Car Car Car

Walk Walk Walk

319

RAD

W Aville - Euclid

Walk

320

RAD

W Aville (home)

321 322

RAD RAD

323

WD9

WD5

erdwood & Park Ave

Exercise, Fitness

WD10

WD10

Home grown

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD10

WD10

Home grown

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD10

WD10

Home grown

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Walk

WD10

WD10

Home grown

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Walk

WD10

WD10

Home Grown

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD10

WD10

Home Grown

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

WD8

WD2

Haw Creek

Exercise, Fitness

WD1

WD6

WD9

Amboy Bridge

WD1

WD9

WD1

Downtown; CBD

Exercise, Fitness

WD1 WD3 WD6

WD6 WD8 WD8

WD23 WD3 WD6

Candler W Aville motel

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Walk

WD23

WD22

WD23

Euclid Blvd

Exercise, Fitness

Bicycle

Bike

WS22

WD22

WS22

W Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

Haw Creek W Aville (Haywood/Allen)

Car Walk

WD3 WD6

WD9

Run

WD3 WD12

RAD

Home - S Slope

Walk

Walk

WD6

WD1

WD6

Home

Exercise, Fitness

324

RAD

Leicester

Car

Skate (roller, board)

WD5

WD12

WD5

Leicester

Exercise, Fitness

325 326

RAD RAD

W Aville (Starnes Cove) Woodfin Airbnb

Car Car

Walk Walk

WD6 WD22

WD1

WD6

gym Woodfin

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

327

RAD

Weaverville/Woodfin (home)

Car

Walk

WD1

WD9

328

RAD

Kenilworth

Car

Run

WD3

WD10

WD3

Kenilworth

Exercise, Fitness

329

RAD

Downtown (home)

Car

Walk

WD8

WD22

WD8

work

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

330

RAD

Swannanoa (home)

Car

Walk

WD8

WD22

WD8

work

Exercise, Fitness

Dinin

331

RAD

Park Ave (home)

Walk

Walk

WD3

WD8

WD3

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

332

RAD

Dorchester (home)

Walk

Walk

WD22

WD1 & WD8 - family

WD22

Millbrook (home)

Exercise, Fitness

333

RAD

Mt Carmel Acres (home)

Car

Walk

WD6

Wd8

WD6

Carmel Acres (home)

Exercise, Fitness

Walk

Walk

drive

bike

not sure - one mile or so

Exercise, Fitness leaning up trash

Haw Creek Aville (Haywood/Allen)

WD1

Sightse

Dinin

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

verville/Woodfin (hExercise, Fitness play/nature

socializing


334 335 336 337 338

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

home Burton St (home) W Aville (home) home Vine Wood ? W Aville (home)

Car Car Car Bicycle Car

Walk Walk Walk Bike Walk

WD3 WD3 WD6 WD3

WD8 + WD1

339

RAD

Home

Car

Walk

WD3

340 341 342 343

RAD RAD RAD RAD

Oakley (home) Logan Ave (home) home N Aville (home)

Car Walk Car Car

Run Walk Skate (roller, board) Run

WD3 WD6 under bridge

344

RAD

Swannanoa (home)

Car

Run

345 346 347

RAD RAD RAD

home N Aville (Norwood) W Aville (home)

Car Car Bicycle

Bike Run Bike

Craven St bridge WD1 WD22

WD11 WD1

348

RAD

Haw Creek (home)

Car

Run

WD8

WD2

349 350 351

RAD RAD RAD

86 Langwell Ave Park Square (home) Bartlett (home)

Walk Walk

Walk Run Run

WD13 WD4 WD6

WD8 WD10

352

RAD

home

Car

Walk

WD22

353 354

RAD RAD

Woodfin (home) Erwin High School, home

Car Car

Run Run

355

RAD

W Aville, N Bear Creek

Car

356 357

RAD RAD

home home

358

RAD

359

Amboy Rd Burton St (home)

WD3

W Aville (home) AB Tech Home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Commuting Exercise, Fitness

WD10

WD3

?/home

Exercise, Fitness

WD9 WD8 Amboy Amboy

WD3 WD6

Oakley (home) Logan Ave (home) home home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness

home

Exercise, Fitness

WD1

N Aville (home) Woodfin (work)

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Commuting

WD8

Haw Creek (home)

Exercise, Fitness

WD13 WD4

86 Langwell Ave home Bartlett (home)

Dining, Shopping, Errands Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

WD14

WD22

home

Exercise, Fitness

WD1 WD4

WD14 WD9

WD1 WD4

Woodfin (home) home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Bike

240

Amboy

240

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Car Car

Walk Run

WD1 WD2

White Duck Taco WD5

Sightse Sightse

Downtown, work

Car

Run

WD1

RAD

E Aville (home)

Car

Run

360 361

RAD RAD

home home

Car Bicycle

362

RAD

Haywood Services (work)

363

RAD

364

WD9

home WD3

White Duck

FB Park Riverside

Wedge FB Park end Lyman

Dog park

Dinin

WD1 WD2

home home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

WD10

WD1

Fairview (home)

Exercise, Fitness

WD6

WD9

WD6

E Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Walk Bike

WD6 WD13

WD9 WD23

WD6 WD2

home home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse Sightse

Walk

Walk

WD6

WD22

WD6

home

Bicycle

Bike

WD21

?

WD21

RAD

Biltmore Forest (home)

Car

Walk

WD6

WD8

WD6

365

RAD

S Aville (home)

Car

Walk

WD6

WD1

WD6

366

RAD

Beaver Dam and Merrimon

Car

Walk

?

WD8

?

367

RAD

BRCC

Car

Bike

WD2

?

WD6

Hominy Ck Trail

Exercise, Fitness home

tmore Forest (home)

S Aville (home) me, off Elk Mtn Scenic

Candler

Exercise, Fitness

Exercise, Fitness

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse


368 369 370

RAD RAD RAD

home W Aville (home) Fairview (home)

Car Walk Car

Walk Walk Walk

WD6 WD6 WD3

371

RAD

Office - 2 blocks away

Bicycle

Bike

WD22

372

RAD

W Aville (home)

Walk

Walk

WD22

6 mile loop

WD21

W Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

373 374 375 376

RAD RAD RAD RAD

home office Woodfin (home) A ville (home)

Car

Walk

WD9 WD22 Hominy Ck

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse Sightse Sightse

Bike

WD5 WD22 ? WD21

home

Car Car

WD5 WD22 ? WD1

377

RAD

Central Aville (home)

Car

Walk

WD6

to the end

WD9

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

378 379 380 381

RAD RAD RAD RAD

downtown hotel Asheville (home) home Parking garage

Car Walk Walk Car

Walk Walk Run Walk

WD6 WD22 WD5 WD6

? WD8 WD1

WD6 WD9

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Sightse Sightse

382

RAD

Home-Biltmore Central (?)

Car

Walk

WD2

WD11

Home-Biltmore Central

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

383

RAD

Home via Leicester Hwy

Car

Walk

WD6

WD9

WD6

?? WD6

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

384

RAD

Car

Bike

WD4

WD21

WD4

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

385

RAD

Woodfin (home)

Car

Walk

WD5

WD9

WD5

Woodfin (home)

Exercise, Fitness

Nature

386

RAD

W Aville

Car

Walk

SP Br

SP Br

W Aville

Exercise, Fitness

Nature

387 388

RAD RAD

Asheville (home) Asheville

Bicycle Bicycle

Bike Bike

WD1 WD9

? Riverview

Asheville (home) Home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

389

RAD

Work-Aville

Car

Run

WD11

WD3

Work-Aville

Exercise, Fitness

390 391 392 393 394 395

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Cambria Hotel Cambria Hotel Downtown Mars Hill Clingman Ave Home 1/4 mile away (but lives in W'ville?)

Walk Walk Walk Car Walk Car

Walk Walk Walk Walk Walk Run

WD6 WD6 WD6 WD6 WD6 WD2

WD2 WD2 WD2 WD8 (?) WD22 WD9

WD4 WD4 WD4 WD6

Cambria Hotel Cambria Hotel Downtown Aville Airport Home Home

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

396

RAD

Work, S Aville

Car

Run

WD3

WD17

WD3

Haywood Rd

Exercise, Fitness

397 398 399 400 401 402 403

RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD RAD

Work-off of Brevard Haw Creek Fairview - Hickory Nut Gap Farm S Aville Mars Hill

Walk

California for real

Car Car Car Car Car Car Walk

404

RAD

Edward (?) SE WAX Craven Bridge

Bicycle

405 406 407 408

RAD RAD RAD RAD

67 Craggy W Aville Greeville SC Alexander

Bicycle Car Car Car

Bike Walk Walk Skate (roller, board) Walk car

Bike

WD8 WD22 WD9

WD6 WD6

WD22

New Belgium

home W Aville (home) Fairview (home) fice - 2 blocks away

home entral Aville (home)

WD5 White Duck

WD2 ? After 6000 steps WD2 WD5 WD9 WD5 Haw Creek WD6 1/WD9 back and forth WD6 WD6 just south of here WD6 S Aville WD5 maybe WD8 WD5 Aville Airport WD6 (Jean Webb) WD6 (Jean Webb)Not sure, traveling WD5 will float river ng to RAD food tru not sure

Bike

WD6

WD21

Bike Walk Walk Walk

WD5 WD3 WD6 WD6

WD8 WD9 WD8

s, circled entire greenway here making a loop

WD5 WD3 WD6 WD6

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Exercise, Fitness Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment Spread love and truth Spiritual Exercise, Fitness

Desoto Rd Greenville SC Alexander

Sightse Sightse

Commuting Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

Sightse


409

RAD

Kenilworth (home)

Car

410 411 412

RAD RAD RAD

W Aville Candler W Aville

413

RAD

Home (Emma something?)

414

RAD

W Aville (home)

Car

415

RAD

Near UNCA (home)

416

RAD

417

Run

WD8

Kenilworth (home)

Exercise, Fitness

WD23-WD8 t trail, then went t WD23/WD7(&)

WD23 WD22 WD22

W Aville Riverview Dr Candler W Aville

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

WD6

WD8 and WD2

WD6

Home

Sightseeing, Art, Entertainment

Bike

WD5

WD5

WD9

W Aville (home)

Car

Bike

WD4

WD21

WD4

Near UNCA (home)

Exercise, Fitness

Weaverville

Car

Run

WD6

WD14

WD6

Weaverville

Exercise, Fitness

RAD

Weaverville

Car

Walk

Summit

418

RCG

N Aville - Macedonia

Car

Walk

RCG10

RC9

419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Home-Broad Coleman Ave Downtown S Slope Barnard Ave RC10 Beaver Lake Magnolia Ave Barnard Ave Broad St Norwood Park Forsyth St Elizabeth St(?) RC17 RC2 Forsyth St 24 Laurel Ave Merrimon Weaver Park Liberty/Hill Side Magnolia Ave Woodrow Ave

Walk Walk Bicycle Walk Bicycle Car Car Walk Car Walk Walk Walk

Walk Walk Bike Walk Bike Walk Walk Walk Run Run Run

RC11 ? RC17 RC6 RC10 RC7 RC16 RC6 RC3 RC1 RC14

RC3 ? RC3 ?

439

RCG

440

Walk

Run

Walk Walk Car

Walk Walk Skate (roller, board)

Walk Walk

Run Walk

Lookout Dr

Car

Walk

RCG

Weaver Park

Bicycle

Bike

441

RCG

Home

442

RCG

RCG

Home

Bike & roll

WD8 WD10 WD22 WD22

RC2 RC13 RC6 RC3 RC3 RC16 RC3

WD5

skate park

e N to White Duck

bridge

eBon Coffee (RC1 Town Mtn Hominy/Shelburn

RC17 RC3 RC17 RC11 RC11 RC4 Founders RC13 RC1 RC11

RC14 RC7

Summt N Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

RC11 Park(?) RC17 ? RC10 RC7 RC16 RC6 RC3 RC11 RC14

Home Coleman Ave Downtown S Slope Barnard

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC2 RC12 RC6 RC12

Forsyth St 23 Laurel Ave Verge Apt

RC16 RC15

Liberty/Hill Side Magnolia Ave Woodrow Ave

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Commuting Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Lookout Dr

Exercise, Fitness

Le Bon Woodrow Ave

Sightse

Sightse

Exercise, Fitness

RCG10

?? RC11

Exercise, Fitnessding time with her son

Beaver Lake e-Haw Creek, Woodfin Barnard Ave Murdock Woodward Ave Forsyth St Elizabeth St RC17

RC1

RC17

RC1

Weaver Park

Exercise, Fitness

RC3

RC18

RC

Home

Exercise, Fitness

RC1

RC17

RC1

Weaver

Exercise, Fitness

Socialize

Shopping


443

RCG

Pioneer Building

Bicycle

Bike

RC18

RC3

RC18

Pioneer Building

Exercise, Fitness

444 445 446

RCG RCG RCG

Botanical Gardens Botanical Gardens 35 Chadwick Wade Dr

RC3 RC3 RC3

RC10 RC3

Walk

RC10 RC10 RC9

Botanical Gardens Botanical Gardens 35 Chadwick Wade Dr

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

447

RCG

UNCA

RC4

RC16(?)

RC9

UNCA

Exercise, Fitness

448

RCG

Maney Ave

Walk

Walk

RC9

RC2

RC9

Maney Ave

Exercise, Fitness

449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

RC?Home Chestnut Pearson Cumberland Ave Barnard (home) Pearson Mt Clair Ave Hawthorn/?

Walk

Walk

RC4 RC17

RC1?

RC4 RC3

Walk Walk Walk Walk

Walk

RC4 Chestnut Kimberly

457

RCG

Pearson Dr

458 459 460

RCG RCG RCG

461

Car

YoLo

Up and Back

Run

RC16 RC17 RC6 RC12 RC17 RC8 to RC3 to RC16; Merrimon to Mt Clair RC3 Bike RC16

Sunset

RC16

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Commuting Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Pearson Exercise, Fitness Mt Clair Ave Exercise, Fitness Hawthorn/? en returns home, tExercise, Fitness

Walk

Walk

RC11

RC9

survey

RC11

Pearson Dr

Exercise, Fitness

Univ. Dr Barnard Cumberland Ave

Walk Bicycle

Walk Bike

RC7 RC5 RC17

RC17 RC12 RC3

round trip RC3

RC7 RC5 RC17

RC5 Cumberland

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RCG

Harrison Apts

Walk

Walk

RC17

RC7

UNCA Bookstore

RC17

Harrison Apts

Exercise, Fitness

462

RCG

Hawthorne

Walk

Walk

RC3

Montford

RC3

Hawthorne

Exercise, Fitness

463 464 465

RCG RCG RCG

Lynwood Rd Montford Leicester

Walk Walk Car

Run Run Walk

RC17 RC13 RC17

RC2 RC2 RC12

RC13 RC17

Lynnwood Rd Montford Leicester

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

466

RCG

Northwood/Grovewood

Car

Walk

RC6

RC17

RC6

rthwood/Grovewood

Exercise, Fitness

467 468

RCG RCG

Monroe St 55 W Chestnut St

Walk

Walk

RC17 RC16

RC3 RC3

RC17 RC16

Monroe St 55 W Chestnut St

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

469

RCG

South Slope

Walk

Run

RC16

RC3

RC16

South Slope

Exercise, Fitness

470

RCG

N Weaver Park

Walk

Walk

RC2

loop

RC2

N Weaver Park

Exercise, Fitness

471

RCG

Kenilworth and E Aville

Car

Walk

RC6

RC17

472

RCG

Lee Ave

Walk

Walk

RC6

473

RCG

Flint and Chestnut St

Walk

Walk

474 475 476

RCG RCG RCG

5 Points ? near Merrimon, S Aville retirement communit YMCA

Walk Car Walk

477

RCG

5 Elkwood

Car

478 479 480

RCG RCG RCG

WT Weaver-home Coleman and Merrimon Botanical Gardens

Walk Walk Car

Walk

Walk Run Bike

Car

home

sometimes to RAD

RC6

asn't sure-first time

RC3

RC13

RC2 RC4 RC12

loop RC17 RC3

Run

RC12

RC17

Walk Walk Run

RC2 RC5 RC10

RC11 5 Pts RC3

Run Walk

Run

RC6 RC12

Back to YMCA

nilworth and E Aville

Sightse

Dinin Socialize

Exercise, Fitness

Lee Ave

Exercise, Fitness

Flint and Chestnut

Exercise, Fitness

RC2 RC4 RC3

home S Aville YMCA

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC12

5 Elkwood

Exercise, Fitness

RC2 WT Weaver-home leman and Merrim Hanger Hall leman and Merrimon RC17 Botanical Gardens

Dinin

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

Socialize Socialize


481

RCG

Austin Ave

Walk

Run

482 483 484 485

RCG RCG RCG RCG

Luella's Barnard Vivian Reed Creek RC16

Car Car Car Car

Walk Run Walk Run

486

RCG

N Aville

Car

Walk

RC10

487 488 489 490 491

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Botanical Gardens Catawba St Magnolia Park 330 Merrimon North St-home

Walk Walk

Walk Run

RC19 RC13

Walk Walk

Walk Walk

RC14 RC11

492

RCG

Botanical Gardens

Car

Walk

493

RCG

Botanical Gardens

494 495 496 497 498

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Magnolia RC16 Merrimon & Weaver RC1 Botanical Gardens RC10 Botanical Gardens Flint and Chestnut St

Walk Walk Car Car Walk

Walk Walk Run Walk Walk

RC16

499

RCG

Office on Merrimon

Walk

Run

RC9

RC9

500

RCG

Merrimon

Car

RC3

RC17

501

RCG

Weaver Park

Car

Bike

RC2

RC17

502

RCG

Elizabeth St

Car

Run

RC17

503

RCG

Weaver Park

Car

Walk

RC3

504

RCG

Merrimon

Walk

Walk

505 506

RCG RCG

Hyanis St RC10

Walk Car

Walk Run

RC7 RC10

RC17 RC2

507

RCG

work/downtown

Walk

RC16

RC3

508 509 510 511 512

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Weaver Park Cauble, Weaverville Grove Arcade/home Cauble-Hillside Norwood Park

Car Walk Walk

Run Run

RC16(?) RC? RC1

Walk

Run

RC2 RC14 RC16 RC14 RC2

513

RCG

Tacoma Circle

Walk

Run

RC9

514 515 516 517 518

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Luella's Montview Dr Botanical Gardens Hyanis Dr ?

Walk Car Walk

Run Walk Run

RC2 RC14 RC10 RC7 RC16

519

RCG

Grovewood/Maplewood

Bicycle

Bike

RC3

Bike

Run

RC3

RC9

RC3 RC4 RC8 to RC3 to RC16; Merrimo ?

RC17

Bike

Friend's Meeting

RC3

Austin Ave

RC3 RC4 RC8

Luella's Barnard Vivian lot RC16

RC8

RC10

N Aville (home)

Exercise, Fitness

RC7 RC3 Merrimon RC3 RC9

RC19 RC12

Botanical Gardens Catawba St Magnolia Ave 330 Merrimon North St-home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Commuting

?

Botanical Gardens

Exercise, Fitness

Merrimon RC3

Botanical Gardens

Exercise, Fitness

RC17 RC17 RC3 RC3

RC14 RC11

Vivian Lot RC8 - UNCA trails to Mt Clare RC8 RC8 Merrimon & Weavewr Weaver/RC12 Elizabeth St RC 17; ? Street RC3 Elizabeth RC17 Weaver Park Weaver Park RC17 RC9 Flint and Chestnut UNCA trails, turned around RC9

Commuting

ercise and fitness

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Dining, Shopping, Erraercise and fitness

Sightse

Sightse

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC3

Merrimon

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

RC2

Weaver Park

Exercise, Fitness

Sightse

RC?

RC17

Elizabeth St

Exercise, Fitness

RC16(?)

RC2

Weaver Park

Exercise, Fitness

Merrimon

Commuting

Hyanis St Fairview/home

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

home/N Aville

Commuting

Weaver Park

5 Guys after

Montford RC7 RC10

king thru neighborhood

RC11

RC14 RC1 RC1 RC2

Grove Arcade/home Cauble-Hillside Norwood Park

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC17

RC17

Tacoma Circle

Exercise, Fitness

RC2 RC7 RC7 RC16

Luella's Montview Dr Botanical Gardens Hyanis Dr ?

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC3

ovewood/Maplewood

Exercise, Fitness

RC17 RC17 errimon to B gardens to Elizabeth RC17 RC3 RC9?

Sightse

Sightse

Socialize

Socialize


520

RCG

Coffe shop @ Catawba

Car

RC14

RC5

521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537

RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG RCG

Weaverville Downtown Montford Beaverdam/Webb Cove (Home) Woodrow (home) 5 Points Mt Clare/Marlowe (home) Grovewood Rd/Sumner Pl (home) Montford Broadway & Elizabeth Larchmont & Merrimon King St (home) Weaverville Botanical Gardens Norwood Park 5 Points Merrimon & Edgewood

Car Walk Walk Car Walk Bicycle Walk Bicycle Walk

Walk Walk Walk Walk Walk Bike Run Bike Run

Walk

RC10 RC17 RC13 RC10 RC17 RC1 RC3 RC3 RC13 RC17 RC4 RC5 RC6 RC10 RC3 RC14 RC7

RC3 RC5 RC1 RC3 RC6 RC10 RC17 RC9 RC3 RC6 RC11 RC17 RC12 RC3 RC17 RC8 RC16(?)

Car Walk Car Walk Walk

Walk Walk

Walk

538

RCG

?/home

Walk

Run

RC7

RC16(?)

539

RCG

Montford (home)

Walk

Walk

RC17

RC1

540

RCG

Norwood Park

RC2

RC17

541 542 543 544 545

RCG

Pine Crest Inn, Montford

RC16

Walk Walk

Run

UNCA walking

Hi Five GPI home Woodrow (home) home home Beaver Lake

Hi Five loop Chestnut & Broadw

WT Weaver

RC14

ffee shop @ Catawba

Exercise, Fitness

RC10 RC17 RC13 RC10 RC17 RC1 RC3 RC3 RC13 RC17 RC4 RC5 RC6 RC10 RC3

Home Downtown Montford dam/Webb Cove (home) Woodrow (home) 5 Points Clare/Marlowe (home) ood Rd/Sumner Pl (home) Montford oadway & Elizabeth rchmont & Merrimon King St (home) Weaverville Botanical Gardens Norwood Park 5 Points errimon & Edgewood

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Commuting Exercise, Fitness Commuting Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

RC7

home

Exercise, Fitness

RC17

Montford (home)

Exercise, Fitness

RC2

Norwood Park

Exercise, Fitness

RC2

Exercise, Fitness


10. Secondary Secondary Purpose Purpose Other (Choice) (Fill) 1 ng, Shopping, Errands 2

#

11. Active Minutes (Fill) 45 60

12. How Often Use Trail Use Trail Notes / Other (Fill) (Choice) Few times a week 2-3 times a month

13. Primary Primary Activity Activity Other (Choice) (Fill) Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

3 4 5

60 60

Few times a week 2-3 times a month

1080

Few times a week

7 8 ng, Shopping, Errands

60 90

Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

9 ng, Shopping, Errands

45

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

10

60-90

First visit

Walking/Rolling

11

105

A few times per year

12

20

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

13

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

60 40-60 100 45 90 15

Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week First visit

Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

6 Exercise, Fitness

14 15 ng, Shopping, Errands 16 17 Exercise, Fitness 18 Exercise, Fitness 19

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

20

75

21

90

Few times a week

Bicycling

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

30-45 50 90 90 57

Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week Everyday Few times a week

Running Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

29

90

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

30

90

Everyday

Running

31

30

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

120 12 Miles

Everyday Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

60

Few times a week

22

Commuting

23 24 eeing, Art, Entertainment 25 26 27 ng, Shopping, Errands 28

32 33 Exercise, Fitness 34 rands

35 ng, Shopping, Errands

14. $Restaurants (Fill) $ 10

Where (Fill)

$Retail (Fill)

LeBonn Coffee

$

5

Wedge

$

3

LeBonn Coffee

$

$Groceries (Fill)

Where (Fill)

x

x

x

x

35

Running

x $

80 Tailgate Market x

Bicycling

Few times a week

$

10

Le bon Café

$

30 Tail Gate Market

$

80 Tail Gate Market

Running

x

Walking/Rolling

Bicycling

x

$

75

Market

Where (fill)

$Entertainmen t (Fill)

Where (Fill)


36 ng, Shopping, Errands

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

40

Market

37

120

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

$

10

gas

38

60

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

39 Exercise, Fitness

40

Few times a week

Walking/Rollingning, Bicycling, Skating

$

50 Tailgate Market

40 Exercise, Fitness

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

Em

90

Few times a week

20-30

Everyday

44

60

Few times a week

Running

45

60-75

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

90

Few times a week

60 20 60-90 40 45 20

Once per month Few times a week 2-3 times a month Few times a week Few times a week 2-3 times a month

Running Bicycling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

53 ng, Shopping, Errands

90

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

54

90

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling Enjoying nature

55 ng, Shopping, Errands 56

50 60

Few times a week 2-3 times a month

Running

57

120

Few times a week

Running

58 59 60 61

60 60 30 Hours

Few times a week First visit Few times a week Everyday

62

45

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

63

40

Few times a week

Running

60

Once per month

Running

65 66

60 90

Few times a week Few times a week

Running Running

67

120

Few times a week

68

30

Few times a week

69 ng, Shopping, Errands

60

Few times a week

70

80

Few times a week

71

30

Few times a week

Bicycling

72

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

42 ng, Shopping, Errands 43

46 ng, Shopping, Errands 47 eeing, Art, Entertainment 48 eeing, Art, Entertainment 49 50 Exercise, Fitness 51 Exercise, Fitness 52 eeing, Art, Entertainment

64

mental health

x

Bicycling

$

15

High Five

x

x

Tailgate Market

Bicycling

Bicyling

Walking/Rolling

$

30 Tailgate Market

$ $ $

50 Tailgate Market 60 Tailgate Market 50 Tailgate Market

$

60 Tailgate Market

70-100

Tailgate Market

40-60 0-5

100 Tailgate Market Tailgate Market Tailgate Market

$

Walking/Rolling

?

$

25

Cracker Barrel

$

15

Dunkin Donuts

$

15

Five Points

Tailgate Market

$

10

City Bakery

$

75

Ingles

$

10 Tailgate Market

Walking/Rolling


73 74

60 60

A few times per year Few times a week

Bicycling Walking/Rolling

75

45

Few times a week

Running

76 77 78 79 80 81

60 60 30-60 45 60 60

Everyday Few times a week Everyday First visit Everyday A few times per year

Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

82

69

Few times a week

Bicycling

2-3 hrs

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

84 Exercise, Fitness

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

85 86

60 120

Few times a week

87

45

2-3 times a month

88 89 Exercise, Fitness

50 20

90 91

$

20 Tailgate Market

$

50 Tailgate Market

$

20 Tailgate Market

$

25 Tailgate Market

$

65 Tailgate Market

Bicycling

$

80 Tailgate Market

Few times a week 2-3 times a month

Running Bicycling

$

70 Tailgate Market

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

40

First visit

Walking/Rolling

60-90

Few times a week

Running

93

60

Everyday

94

60

95

83 ng, Shopping, Errands

92 ng, Shopping, Errands

bicycling $

10

Coffee shop

Running

Running

2x/day

ating/skateboarding

$

Bicycling

Walk dog

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

Frisbee

90

Few times a week

Running

96 97

120 180

First visit First visit

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

98

30

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

99 eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

100eeing, Art, Entertainment

35

Few times a week

101 ng, Shopping, Errands

90

Few times a week

Bicycling

10-25

Wedge

102eeing, Art, Entertainment

75

Few times a week

Bicycling

8-10

water and snacks

103

60

A few times per year

Walking/Rolling

104

20

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

105 Exercise, Fitness

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$ 40-50

60 ffee, beer (did not specify) ?

Bicycling

$

25

?

Bicylcling 8

coffee

30

RAD browsing


106

20

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

Running

107eeing, Art, Entertainment

180

Everyday

Bicycling

walk & runn

108eeing, Art, Entertainment

90

First visit

Bicycling

$

30

109

no idea

First visit

Walking/Rolling

$

50 staurants/breweries

110eeing, Art, Entertainment

60-120

First visit

Walking/Rolling

$

111eeing, Art, Entertainment

60-80

First visit

Walking/Rolling

40

Few times a week

Bicycling

20-30 45 120

First visit First visit Everyday

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

120

A few times per year

Walking/Rolling

117 Exercise, Fitness

4-5 hrs

First visit

118 Exercise, Fitness

4-5 hrs

119

?

8

Summit Coffee

$ $ $

15 10 5

? New Belgium beer

Walking/Rolling

$

25 ad (on Biltmore) and Wedge

First visit

Walking/Rolling

$

25 ad (on Biltmore) and Wedge

45

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

120

90

Few times a week

Bicycling

$

10

121

30

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

40 drinks and food

122

45

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

180-240

First visit

Bicycling

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

60-90

Everyday

126 ng, Shopping, Errands

60

Few times a week

127eeing, Art, Entertainment

180

Few times a week

128eeing, Art, Entertainment 129eeing, Art, Entertainment 130 131eeing, Art, Entertainment 132eeing, Art, Entertainment 133eeing, Art, Entertainment 134

45 45 60

First visit Few times a week Everyday Few times a week

Running Running Running Bicycling

60

Few times a week Everyday

Running

135

45

Few times a week

Running

112 113 114eeing, Art, Entertainment 115 ng, Shopping, Errands 116

123 Exercise, Fitness 124 125eeing, Art, Entertainment

ating/skateboarding

Bicycling

60-100

FB Outfitters

hite Duck and Wedge

Walking/Rollingng, skating/skateboarding Running

$

Walking/Rolling g, skating/skatebo $

16

Summit Coffee

12 offee, New Belgium, Wedge

$ $

15 15

? ?

$ $

10 20

? ?

$

50

?


136eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Once per month

Walking/Rolling

137

120

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

138

40

Few times a week

Running

139

45

Once per month

Walking/Rolling

25 20-25

Everyday Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Running

142eeing, Art, Entertainment

30

Few times a week

Running

143eeing, Art, Entertainment 144eeing, Art, Entertainment

60 30

Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

$

9

?

145

120

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

$

10

Summit

146 147 148eeing, Art, Entertainment

120 60 45

First visit Few times a week First visit

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

$

50

?

149

60-120

Everyday

Bicycling

150

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

151

15

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

152eeing, Art, Entertainment

40

First visit

Walking/Rolling

153eeing, Art, Entertainment

30

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

5

Summit

45-60

Few times a week

Walking/Rollingunning and bicycling

155 156eeing, Art, Entertainment 157eeing, Art, Entertainment

60 60 60

A few times per year

Running $

30

?

Few times a week

Running

158

30

Everyday

Running

159 160

60 40

Everyday Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Running

161eeing, Art, Entertainment

70

Few times a week

162eeing, Art, Entertainment

30

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

$

20

?

163

270

Few times a week

Running

164

150

2-3 times a month

Running

165

120

2-3 times a month

Running

166 ng, Shopping, Errands

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

15

Ulta

?

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

140 ng, Shopping, Errands 141

154

167

$

10

White Duck

$

Running

40

W Aville Ingles


168

?

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

169 170

? don’t know yet

Few times a week First visit

Running Walking/Rolling

don't know yet

?

171

?

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

172

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

10-20/per person

White Duck

173eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Few times a week

Bicycling

174 ng, Shopping, Errands

40

Few times a week

Bicycling

175eeing, Art, Entertainment

?

Few times a week

Bicycling

176eeing, Art, Entertainment

?

A few times per year

Walking/Rolling

$

50 Wedge, Zillicoa

177 ng, Shopping, Errands

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

40

178eeing, Art, Entertainment

180

Few times a week

Bicycling

179eeing, Art, Entertainment

45

Few times a week

Running

5-10

180

75

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

5-10

r, money to homeless

181

40

Few times a week

Bicycling

10-15

le doughnuts, Wedge

182

30-60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling running, bicycle

183eeing, Art, Entertainment

90

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

184eeing, Art, Entertainment

40

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling running, bicycling

185 ng, Shopping, Errands

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

186 ng, Shopping, Errands

45

Once per month

Bicycling

187

30

A few times per year

Walking/Rolling

188 189

60 120

Few times a week First visit

Running Walking/Rolling

190

90

Few times a week

191

60

First visit

192 Exercise, Fitness

120

193eeing, Art, Entertainment 194

60

Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

Bicycling Walking/Rolling

6

coffee shop

maybe

bicycling

bicycling

$

coffee shops

20 20-60

$

beer ?

25 ?

bicycling

Baby Bull

White Duck k, Hominy (?) Outdoor Center

$

50

don't know

$ $

25 beer, don't know 30 don't know yet

$

20

White Duck

$

30

12 Bones

$

20

?

don't know yet

galleries

30-70

galleries


195eeing, Art, Entertainment 196 Exercise, Fitness

60 120

First visit First visit

Walking/Rolling Bicycling

$ $

15 20

Ultra ?

$

100

REI

197 Exercise, Fitness

120

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

$

20

?

$

100

REI

198 ng, Shopping, Errands

30

A few times per year

Walking/Rolling

199 ng, Shopping, Errands

120

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

200eeing, Art, Entertainment 201eeing, Art, Entertainment 202 Exercise, Fitness 203 204eeing, Art, Entertainment

70 45 60 90 ?

Few times a week 2-3 times a month 2-3 times a month Few times a week 2-3 times a month

Running Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running

205 Exercise, Fitness

90

Few times a week

206eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

208eeing, Art, Entertainment

35

2-3 times a month

Running

209

75

Few times a week

Running

210eeing, Art, Entertainment 211 ng, Shopping, Errands

60-75

Few times a week Few times a week

Bicycling Walking/Rolling

212eeing, Art, Entertainment

90

First visit

Walking/Rolling

$ $ $

500 100 150

RAD art art

$ $

50

$

30 l, Smoky Park, White Duck

$

10

200

E Aville

200

Walmart

Baby Bull

207

213eeing, Art, Entertainment

20-50 $

Starbucks New Belgium

50

2-3 times a month

Foundation ?

214

90

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

215 216 217 ng, Shopping, Errands 218 Socialize 219eeing, Art, Enterta Socialize 220

180 45 40 60 10 51

Few times a week Everyday 2-3 times a month 2-3 times a month Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

221

60

Everyday

Bicycling

$

10

New Belgium

222 223

120 120

Few times a week Few times a week

Running Running

bikes and walking $ $

15 15

? ?

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

224eeing, Art, Entertainment 225 226 227 228 229eeing, Art, Entertainment

390 90 35 140 30

Once per month Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week Everyday

Running Bicycling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

230 Exercise, Fitness

120

A few times per year

6-8 hrs 90 90 40 90

First visit A few times per year First visit Few times a week 2-3 times a month

231 Exercise, Fitness 232eeing, Art, Entertainment 233 Exercise, Fitness 234eeing, Art, Entertainment 235

$

$

25

?

Running 5-50

brewery

30-60

brewery

$ $

15 he Owl/Sunny Point 6 miny Ck FB Outfitters

Running

$

50

?

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running Running

$ $ $

50 12 13

RAD ?


236

160

Few times a week

Running

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

238

90

Few times a week

Running

239

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

240

90

241eeing, Art, Entertainment 242

30 60

First visit Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Bicycling

243eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

244eeing, Art, Entertainment 245 246

60

2-3 times a month Everyday First visit

Walking/Rolling

247

180

Few times a week

Bicycling

248

75

Everyday

Bicycling

249eeing, Art, Entertainment 250eeing, Art, Entertainment

120 120

A few times per year First visit

251

120

Few times a week

252 253

60 30

Few times a week

254

60

Everyday

Running

255

60

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

$

5

White Duck

256 Exercise, Fitness

60

First visit

Walking/Rolling

$

50

12 Bones

257

60

Few times a week

Running

258 ng, Shopping, Errands 259 Exercise, Fitness 260 261 262eeing, Art, Entertainment 263 264 265 266 267 Exercise, Fitness 268 269eeing, Art, Entertainment 270 Exercise, Fitness 271 272 273 274

60 30 90 60 10 20 120 60 80 60 75 60 35 50 60 60 50

2-3 times a month First visit 2-3 times a month Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Bicycling Running

$

60 ffee shop, 12 Bones

First visit First visit First visit 2-3 times a month Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week First visit Everyday A few times per year First visit Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Running Walking/Rolling

237

Socialize

$

10

Hole

Running

$

15

Ultra

Bicycling One wheel

$

40

12 Bones

Bicycling Bicycling

$ $

30 100

New Belgium New Belgium

Running

ating/skateboardi $

Walking/Rolling

35 b, Wedge, Smoky Park

Bicycling

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

$ Bicycling

$

$ $ $ $

20 vary 30 TBD 30 Wicked Weed 100 offee and Biltmore

$

50

12 Bones

$

15

TBD

$ $

40 50

coffee, etc ?

200

Target, TJ Maxx

10

Skate Park


275eeing, Art, Entertainment

30

First visit

Running

90-120

Few times a week

Bicycling

278eeing, Art, Entertainment

120

Few times a week

279

90

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

280 Exercise, Fitness 281eeing, Art, Entertainment

10 45

First visit First visit

Bicycling Walking/Rolling

282

55

Everyday

283

60

Few times a week

284 285 ng, Shopping, Errands

60 120

Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling ating/skateboarding Walking/Rolling $

286

90

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

287 Commuting 288 289eeing, Art, Entertainment 290 291 292 293eeing, Art, Entertainment 294eeing, Art, Entertainment

75 75 60 70 40 51 20 120-180

2-3 times a month Everyday Everyday First visit Few times a week 2-3 times a month Few times a week First visit

Walking/Rolling Running

295 Exercise, Fitness

60-120

First visit

296 Exercise, Fitness

60-120

276

$

30

White Duck

$

30

unknown

277

?

unknown

Bicycling 15

Home Grown

Running

$

13

Summit

Running

$ $

40 10

lunch, TBD lunch

$

25

?

Walking/Rolling

$

20 coffee/ice cream

First visit

Walking/Rolling

$

20 coffee/ice cream

First visit

Walking/Rolling

90-120

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

45

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

45 50

2-3 times a month First visit

Walking/Rolling

303

60-90

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

304 305

60 40

A few times per year

Running

297 298 299eeing, Art, Entertainment

300

301 302eeing, Art, Entertainment

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Bicycling

scooter 40-50

$

ark, Summit, White Duck

5

coffee

$

150

Art


306

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

307eeing, Art, Entertainment

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

8

Home Grown

308eeing, Art, Entertainment

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

8

Home Grown

309eeing, Art, Entertainment

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

8

Home Grown

310eeing, Art, Entertainment

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

8

Home Grown

311eeing, Art, Entertainment

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

8

Home Grown

312eeing, Art, Entertainment

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

8

Home grown

313

40

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

314

8 hrs

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

315eeing, Art, Entertainment

120

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

316 317 318 Exercise, Fitness

60 30 90-120

2-3 times a month Everyday First visit

Walking/Rolling

319

70-90

Everyday

320 ng, Shopping, Errands

60

Few times a week

321 322

45 45

Everyday

323

60

Everyday

324

60-70

Few times a week

Skating

325 326eeing, Art, Entertainment

10 45

Few times a week A few times per year

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

327

120

Few times a week

328

60-90

Few times a week

Running

329 ng, Shopping, Errands

30-60

2-3 times a month

330 ng, Shopping, Errands

30-60

331eeing, Art, Entertainment

10-15

coffee

$

3

All Day Darling

$

30

lunch

$

22

Home Grown

$

5

Penny Cup

Walking/Rolling

$

5

coffee

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

$

5

coffee

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

9

Summit

332

65

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

333

45

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

Walking/Rolling

g loop; will go up W

Bicycling Running

some walking

Bicycling


334 335 336 337 338

60 25 60 33 45

Everyday Few times a week Few times a week Everyday Everyday

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling

339

30

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

60 25 20 30-35

Few times a week Everyday Everyday 2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Skating Running

344

7

2-3 times a month

Running

345 346 347 Exercise, Fitness

30

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

45

Everyday

Bicycling

348

80

Few times a week

Running

210 45 40

2-3 times a month Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Running Running

5 miles

Everyday

Running

353 354eeing, Art, Entertainment

75 60

Everyday Few times a week

355eeing, Art, Entertainment

30

Few times a week

Bicycling

356eeing, Art, Entertainment 357eeing, Art, Entertainment

90

First visit

Walking/Rolling

358

40

Few times a week

Running

359eeing, Art, Entertainment

30

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

360eeing, Art, Entertainment 361eeing, Art, Entertainment

60 90

Everyday Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Bicycling

362

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

363eeing, Art, Entertainment

120

Few times a week

Bicycling

20

Once per month

Walking/Rolling

365

35

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

366

25

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

90

Few times a week

Bicycling

340 ng, Shopping, Errands 341 342 Exercise, Fitness 343

Commuting

349 Exercise, Fitness 350 351 352

364

367

Commuting

Commuting

$ Running

$

5

coffee

$

30

Wedge

$

15

?

$

50

30

?


368eeing, Art, Entertainment 369eeing, Art, Entertainment 370

40 60 60

Everyday Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Bicycling

371

90

Few times a week

Bicycling

372

90

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

373eeing, Art, Entertainment 374eeing, Art, Entertainment 375eeing, Art, Entertainment 376

60 60 40 50

Everyday Few times a week Few times a week 2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Bicycling

377eeing, Art, Entertainment

30

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

378 Exercise, Fitness 379eeing, Art, Entertainment 380eeing, Art, Entertainment 381 Exercise, Fitness

45 60 90 60

First visit Everyday Few times a week First visit

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running Walking/Rolling

382eeing, Art, Entertainment

90

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

383eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Once per month

Walking/Rolling

384eeing, Art, Entertainment

90

Few times a week

Bicycling

385

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

386

60

First visit

Walking/Rolling

387 388eeing, Art, Entertainment

120 60

Few times a week 2-3 times a month

Running

389

45

Few times a week

Running

60 60 60 30 20 75

First visit First visit First visit First visit Everyday Everyday

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running

$ $ $

15 15 15

60

Everyday

Running

$

12

Wedge

30-45

Few times a week Few times a week Once per month 2-3 times a month A few times per year First visit First visit

$

10

Summit

$ $ $

150 50 25

Liberty Café ? food truck

390 391 392 393 394 395

Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness Exercise, Fitness

396 397eeing, Art, Entertainment 398 399 Exercise, Fitness 400 401 Exercise, Fitness 402 Bidding of elders 403

45 20 30 90 all day

404 405 Exercise, Fitness 406 407 408

10 30 60 20

Kayaking

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Bicycling Walking/Rolling Skating cation, connectio Walking/Rolling

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

Few times a week 2-3 times a month First visit A few times per year

Bicycling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

$

10

$

50

$

40

Riot

White Duck

$

50 ole Foods, Merrimon

?

$

Hopi Grocery

25

?


409

60

Once per month

Running

410 411 412

50 100 70

Everyday First visit Few times a week

Running Walking/Rolling Running

413 Exercise, Fitness

30

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

414

30

First visit

Bicycling

415eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Few times a week

Bicycling

$

22

416

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

10

417eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

$

30 Summit and lunch

418

40

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438

30 145

Few times a week Everyday

Walking/Rolling

90 30-45 60 45 22 1.15-2.0 hrs

Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running Running Running Walking/Rolling

60

Few times a week Everyday Few times a week

45 60 30 30-45 45 20 90

Everyday Everyday Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week First visit Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

439

45

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

440

45

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

441

45

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

442

60

Everyday

Running

Bicycling

?

$

$

5 psy Wagon Espresso

$

4

100 ole Foods, Merrimon

Running

One wheel Le Bon

Running Walking/Rolling

$

$

5 ger's Revenge/Luella's

27

CVS


443

45

Everyday

Bicycling

444 445 446

60 40

Everyday Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

447

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

448 ng, Shopping, Errands

60

2-3 times a month

Bicycling

449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456

40 45 35 45 40 45 90

Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week 2-3 times a month Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

457

40

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

Everyday Everyday Everyday

Walking/Rolling

30 45-60

461

120

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

462

120

463 464 465

60 60 60

Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

466 ng, Shopping, Errands

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

Socializing

467 468

65 40

Everyday Everyday

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

Biking

469

50

First visit

Walking/Rolling

470

60

Everyday

Running

471

60

472

60

First visit

Walking/Rolling

473

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

474 475 476

60 90 43

Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

477

30

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

Running

478 479 480

20 45 60

Everyday Everyday Everyday

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

Dogwalking Birding

458 459 460eeing, Art, Entertainment

$

10

YoLo

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

running

Bicycling $

?

?

Running ?

coffee

er store Montford, Shell

Tailgate Market

20 UNCA Bookstore


481

120

Everyday

482 483 484 485

45 40 35 90

Few times a week Few times a week Everyday Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running

486

10

Once per month

Walking/Rolling

487eeing, Art, Entertainment 488 489 490 491 Exercise, Fitness

30 30 30 60 30

Few times a week Few times a week 2-3 times a month Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling Running Running

492

35

2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

493eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

494 495 496 497 498

70 45 30 30 50

Few times a week Few times a week 2-3 times a month Few times a week Everyday

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Running Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

Running

500eeing, Art, Entertainment

40-60

First visit

Running

Biking

501eeing, Art, Entertainment

60

First visit

Bicycling

35-40

Few times a week

Running

503eeing, Art, Entertainment

45

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

504 Exercise, Fitness

40

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

505eeing, Art, Entertainment 506

60 30

Everyday 2-3 times a month

Walking/Rolling

507 Exercise, Fitness

60

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

508 509 510 511 512

120 30 105

Few times a week Few times a week Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

30

Few times a week

513

50

Few times a week

514 515 516 517 518

45 120 45 45

Few times a week 2-3 times a month Everyday Few times a week First visit

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

519

20

Few times a week

Bicycling

Commuting

499

502

Socializing Dogwalking $

30

CFA

Biking Biking $

50

Harris Teeter

$

20

?

Walking/Rolling

Biking

Running

$

20

5 Guys

Walking/Rolling

Bicycling

? Running

coffee


520 521 522 523 524 525 526 Exercise, Fitness 527 528 Exercise, Fitness 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537

45-60

Few times a week

Walking/Rolling

60 45

2-3 times a month First visit Few times a week Few times a week Everyday Few times a week Everyday Few times a week Everyday Few times a week Everyday Everyday Everyday

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

45-50 75 30 60 30

Socializing Socializing

60 30 90 20-25 30 60 40 75

Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Bicycling Running Bicycling Running Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling Walking/Rolling

2-3 times a month Everyday Few times a week

Running Walking/Rolling

538

60

Few times a week

Running

539

75

Everyday

Walking/Rolling

540

60

Few times a week

Running

541 542 543 544 545

60

First visit

Running

$

15

Hi Five

$

10

Hi Five

Running

Running


#

$Bikes (Fill)

Where (Fill)

$Other (Fill)

Where (Fill)

15. Living 16. Perm Res: Status (Choice) City (Fill)

Perm Res: State (Fill)

PermRes: Zip (Fill) 28804

Visit: Nights (Fill)

V1. Visit: Trail Importance (Choice)

V2. Visit: Spending (Fill)

V3. Visit: Stay (Choice)

1 2

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

3

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

4 5

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

6

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

7 8

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28804 28801

9

Visitor

Palo Alto

CA

94306

Not Important

200

W / Friend, Relative

10

Visitor

Lyons

CO

80540

Not Important

2000

Motel / Hotel

11

Visitor

Long Prairie

MN

Not Important

200

W / Friend, Relative

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

13

Perm Resident

Asheville

14 15 16 17 18 19

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Seas Resident Perm Resident

Woodfin Asheville Asheville Asheville Santiago, Chile Asheville

NC NC NC NC

28804 28804

NC

28803

20

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

21

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

22

Seas Resident

Beverly

MA

1915

23 24 25 26 27 28

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Buncombe Co Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC NC

29

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

30

Visitor

31

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

32 33

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28801 28806

34

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

35

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

12

$

25

x

garage sales

Visit: Stay Other (Fill)

17. Safety (Fill)

Signage (Fill)

Maintenance (Fill)

x

x

x x

28801 28801 x

x

x x

Very Important

3000

W / Friend, Relativ

15

x

x


36

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

38

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

39

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

40

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

Em

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

42 43

Seas Resident

Naples

FL

44

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

45

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

46

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

47 48 49 50 51 52

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Fairview Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Weaverville

NC NC NC NC NC NC

53

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

54

Perm Resident

Weaverville

NC

28787

55 56

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28801

57

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

58 59 60 61

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC NC

28804 28804

62

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

63

Perm Resident

Candler

NC

64

Perm Resident

Swannanoa

NC

65 66

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

67

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

68

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

69

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

70

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

71

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

72

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

37

$

17

garage sale

x x 28801

x 28732 28804

x

28804 28787

x

x

x

28801


73 74

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28801

75

Perm Resident

76 77 78 79 80 81

x

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident Visitor

Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC

28801 28801 28802

Asheville

NC

82

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

83

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

84

Seas Resident

Atlanta

85 86

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

87

Perm Resident

Fairview

NC

88 89

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Alexander Asheville

NC NC

90

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

91

Visitor

Chapel Hill

NC

92

Perm Resident

Candler

NC

28715

93

Perm Resident Southside Aville

NC

28801

94

Perm Resident

Aville

NC

28806

95

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

96 97

Visitor Visitor

Chapel Hill Austin

NC TX

27516 78701

98

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

99

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

100

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

101

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

102

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

103

Visitor

104

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

105

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

5

Very Important

5000

1

Not Important

20

nB / Short Term Rental W / Friend, Relative

28801 x x 28801

28801 x

IL

x

x 2 ?

omewhat Importa omewhat Importa

750 1000

nB / Short Term Rental

x Hostel

x

x

Not Important

400

Campground

x x x


106

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

107

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

108

Perm Resident

Leicester

NC

28806

109

Visitor

Portland

OR

97227

110

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

111

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

112

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

113 114 115

Visitor Atlanta Seas Resident Minneapolis Perm Resident sheville (downtow

GA MN NC

30308 55405 28801

116

Visitor

Ithaca

NY

14850

117

Visitor

Houston

TX

77023

118

Visitor

Houston

TX

77023

119

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

120

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

121

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

122

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

123

Seas Resident

Jupiter

FL

33477

124

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

125

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

126

Visitor

Matthews

NC

28104

127

Visitor

Leicester

NC

28806

128 129 130 131 132 133 134

Visitor Visitor Perm Resident

Mt Airy Mt Airy

MD MD

Visitor Perm Resident Perm Resident

Washington Asheville Asheville

DC NC NC

21771 21771 28807 28804 20003 28801 28801

135

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

10

omewhat Importa

2000

nB / Short Term Rental

x

Not Important

300

nB / Short Term Rental

x

Somewhat Importa

unknown

W / Friend, Relative

3

omewhat Importa

500

nB / Short Term Rental

x

3

omewhat Importa

500

nB / Short Term Rental

x x

x

x

?

Very Important

Somewhat Importa Somewhat Importa

1

Not Important

60

700 500

Motel / Hotel Motel / Hotel

300

Motel / Hotel

x x

x x x x

x


136

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

137

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

138

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

139

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

140 141

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28806 28806

142

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

143 144

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28806 28805

145

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

Visitor Perm Resident Visitor

Ervine Asheville Clearwater

CA NC FL

92618 28803 33601

149

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

150

Perm Resident

Ashville

NC

28806

151

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

152

Visitor

Franklenton

NC

27525

153

Perm Resident

Leicester

NC

28806

154

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

155 156 157

Visitor Visitor Perm Resident

Durham Baltimore Asheville

NC MD NC

27701 21794 28805

158

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

159 160

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28803 ?

161

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

162

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

163

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

164

Perm Resident

Arden

NC

28704

165

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28807

166

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

167

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

146 147 148

?

be kayak rental for

x

x

3

Not Important

6

300

Motel / Hotel

2700

Motel / Hotel

x

Not Important

100

W / Friend, Relative

x

2

Not Important Not Important

500 500

nB / Short Term Rental Motel / Hotel x

x

x


168

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

x

169 170

Perm Resident Visitor

Asheville

NC IL

28805

171

Perm Resident

Candler

NC

28715

172

Perm Resident

Perm + visitor

?

?

173

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

174

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

175

Perm Resident

Woodfin

NC

28804

176

Visitor

Durham

NC

27517

177

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

178

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

179

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

180

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

?

181

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

182

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

183

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

184

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

185

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

?

187

Visitor

Charlottesville

VA

22930

0

Not Important

50

188 189

Perm Resident Visitor

Weaverville Spartenburg

NC SC

28787 29303

0

Very Important

30

190

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

191

Visitor

Greensboro

NC

27401

Not Important

200

192

Visitor

Charlotte/SC ?

29710

Not Important

500-600

Very Important

2000

nB / Short Term Rental

Not Important

x x

3

omewhat Importa

500

nB / Short Term Rental x

x

x

x

x

186

193 194

Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Woodfin/Alexande

NC NC

28803 28804

W / Friend, Relative nB / Short Term Rental


195 196

Visitor Perm Resident

New York Burnsville

NY NC

14741 28714

197

Perm Resident

Burnsville

NC

28715

198

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

199

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

200 201 202 203 204

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Seas Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Candler Dunedin Asheville

NC NC NC FL NC

28803 28806 28715 34698 38801

205

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

206

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

207

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

208

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

209

Perm Resident

Leicester

NC

28748

210 211

Seas Resident Seas Resident

Asheville Chicago

NC IL

28801 60657

212

Visitor

Winston Salem

NC

27104

213

Perm Resident

214

Perm Resident

Fairview

NC

28730

215 216 217 218 219 220

Perm Resident Perm Resident Seas Resident Seas Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Fairview Asheville Port ? Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC FL NC NC

28806 28803

221

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28704

222 223

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Woodfin Candler

NC NC

28804

224

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

2880?

225 226 227 228 229

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Candler Asheville Woodfin Weaverville

NC NC NC NC NC

28806 28715 28806 28804 28787

230

Visitor

Raleigh

NC

27610

NC NC

27519 27604

NC NC

28801 28791

231 232 233 234 235

Not Important

30-100

Campground

x x

x

x 4

omewhat Importa

2000

nB / Short Term Rental

x

28805

Visitor Cary Visitor Raleigh Visitor Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Hendersonville

x Very Important Not Important

33953

owns home

x

x

2 2 1

Very Important

1000

Not Important omewhat Importa omewhat Importa

2000 100 900

nB / Short Term Rental

Motel / Hotel Motel / Hotel


236

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

237

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

238

Perm Resident

Leicester

NC

28748

239

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

240

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

241 242

Visitor Perm Resident

New York Asheville

New York NC

243

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

244 245 246

Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor

Weaverville

NC

Cincinatti

OH

247

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

248

Perm Resident

Candler

NC

28715

249 250

Perm Resident Visitor

Wayneville Knoxville

NC TN

28785

251

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

252 253

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Weaverville

NC NC

254

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

255

Perm Resident

Swanannoa

NC

256

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

257

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274

Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor Visitor Visitor Visitor Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident Visitor

Candler Bakersfield Asheville Asheville Lynchburg Brunswick Summerfield Edgewater (?) Asheville Southbury Asheville

NC CA NC NC VA GA NC NJ NC CT NC

28715 93309

28805 6488 28806

Not Important

Louisville Asheville St Louis Asheville

CO NC MO NC FL

80027

Very Important

N/A

W / Friend, Relative

6 wks

Not Important

2000

W / Friend, Relative

15

omewhat Important

3

omewhat Importa

300

nB / Short Term Rental

x 28787

x 3

Not Important

3

Very Important

2

Not Important

10 5

Not Important omewhat Importa Very Important omewhat Importa

Motel / Hotel

500

Campground

28787

28801

28801 24502 31520 27358

2

Motel / Hotel

200 2000 30 1000

van nB / Short Term Rental Motel / Hotel W / Friend, Relative

x x

63119

W / Friend, Relative

x


275

$

200 White water rafting

Visitor

Morehead City

NC

28557

Perm Resident

Oakley

NC

28803

278

Perm Resident

Woodfin

NC

28804

279

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

Visitor Visitor

Chicago, New York Ossining

NY

10520

Somewhat Important Not Important

282

Seas Resident

Hickory

NC

28601

Very Important

283

Perm Resident

Weaverville

NC

28787

284 285

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28806 28806

286

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294

Candler Perm Resident NC Perm Resident Asheville NC Perm Resident Asheville NC Morgantown Visitor WV Perm Resident Asheville NC Perm Resident mbe-just outside of city Perm Resident Oakley NC Visitor NYC NY

28804 28804 28806 26501 28804

276

6

Not Important

3000-4000

nB / Short Term Rental

277

280 281

maybe

unknown

x x AirBnB / Short Term Rental AirBnB / Short Term Rental seasonal house

x x

x

x

Very Important

2000

28803 10007

4

Not Important

600

nB / Short Term Rental

x

x

x

295

Visitor

Carboro

NC

27510

3

Very Important

300

nB / Short Term Rental

x

296

Visitor

Durham

NC

27707

3

Very Important

300

nB / Short Term Rental

x

297

Visitor

2 months

Very Important

1000

298

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

299

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

300

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

301 302

Perm Resident Visitor

Lorton

VA

22079

Very Important

1000

303

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

304 305

Perm Resident Visitor

Asheville

NC

28804

e-convention traveler

x

Other

3000

x

conversion van

nB / Short Term Rental

x x

Very Important

x

nB / Short Term Rental

x


306

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

307

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

308

Perm Resident

Brevard

NC

28712

309

Visitor

Greenville

SC

29605

310

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

311

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

312

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

313

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

314

Perm Resident

315

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

316 317 318

Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor

Candler Asheville Baltmore

NC NC MD

28804

319

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

320

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

321 322

Visitor Perm Resident

Savannah Asheville

GA NC

31302 28806

323

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

324

Perm Resident

Leicester

NC

28806

325 326

Perm Resident Visitor

Asheville Philadelphia

NC PA

28806

327

Perm Resident

Woodfin

NC

28804

328

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

329

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

330

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28778

331

Seas Resident

Ormond Beach

FL

32176

332

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

333

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

Very Important

25

not staying overnight

x 21201

Somewhat Importa

Very Important

400

1000

Motel / Hotel

x

x

x

x

28806

x


334 335 336 337 338

Seas Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Seas Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Eaglewood

NC NC NC NC FL

28804 28806 28804 33947

339

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

340 341 342 343

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Woodfin Asheville

NC NC NC NC

28806 28804

344

Perm Resident

Swanannoa

NC

345 346 347

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC

28806 28804 28806

348

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

349 350 351

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC

28806

352

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

353 354

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Woodfin Asheville

NC NC

28804 28806

355

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

356 357

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

2880? 28803

358

Perm Resident

Fairview

NC

28730

359

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

x

360 361

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28803 28806

x

362

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

363

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

Biltmore Forest

NC

28803

364

$

60Clayworks/Odysse Perm Resident

x x

x

x

x

365

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

366

Perm Resident

Woodfin

NC

28804

367

Perm Resident

Candler

NC

28715

x


368 369 370

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Fairview

NC NC NC

28801 28806 28730

371

Perm Resident

Weaverville

NC

28787

372

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

373 374 375 376

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Leicester Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC NC

2880? 28748 28801 28803

377

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

378 379 380 381

Visitor Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor

? Asheville Asheville Richmond

NC NC VA

28806 28806 28574

382

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

383

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

384

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28805

385

Perm Resident

Woodfin

NC

28804

386

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

387 388

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

28805 28806

389

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

390 391 392 393 394 395

Visitor Visitor Visitor Visitor Perm Resident Perm Resident

Berkeley Berkeley Long Island Asheville Weaverville

CT CA CA NY NC NC

6511 94705 94705 91934 28801 28787

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

397 398 399 400 401 402 403

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor Visitor

Weaverville Haw Creek Fairview Asheville Mars Hill None

404

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

405 406 407 408

Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Greenville Alexander

NC NC SC NC

396

$

20

Pisgah Fitness

x x

Not Important

NC NC NC NC NC box in FL but transient CA, mostly transien

300

Motel / Hotel x

3 x

x

x

2 3 3 5

Not Important Not Important Not Important omewhat Importa

500 500 500 100

Motel / Hotel Motel / Hotel Motel / Hotel W / Friend, Relative

28787 28805 28730

x x

28754 93101

28806 28701

?

Very Important Very Important

5000 ?

Silent Reflections in Burnsville Motel / Hotel camping


409

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28803

410 411 412

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Candler Asheville

NC NC NC

28715

413

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

414

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28806

415

Seas Resident

Atlanta

GA

30337

416

Perm Resident

Weaverville

NC

28787

417

Perm Resident

Weaverville

NC

28787

418

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Fairview Asheville

NC NC

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

Perm Resident Asheville, Woodfin Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Seas Resident Louisville Visitor Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Visitor Perm Resident Asheville

NC NC NC NC NC KY NC NC NC NC NC NC VA NC

439

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

440

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

441

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

442

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

x

x

28804 28804 28801 40056

x

Very Important

W / Friend, Relative

28804 28804

9

Not Important

?

?

28804 28804

x x


443

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

444 445 446

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC

28804

447

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28715

448

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC NC NC NC NC NC

457

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

458 459 460

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC

461

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

462

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

463 464 465

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC

28804 28801

466

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

467 468

Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville

NC NC

469

Visitor

New York

NY

470

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

471

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

472

Perm Resident

Surf City

NC

28445

473

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

474 475 476

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Candler

NC NC NC

28801 and 28804 28803 28715

477

Visitor

Tampa

FL

34601

478 479 480

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

Asheville

NC

x

x

x x

28801

28801

x

x x x x

28801 s of moving; don't know zip

Not Important

500

x

28801 x 250 x

14

Very Important

2500

nB / Short Term Rental


481

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

482 483 484 485

Perm Resident Perm Resident Seas Resident Perm Resident

Woodfin Asheville Coral Gables Weavervile

NC NC FL NC

28804 28804 33134 28787

486

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

487 488 489 490 491

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Asheville Weaverville Asheville

NC NC NC NC NC

492

Seas Resident

Naples

FL

34109

493

Perm Resident 54 Albemarle Rd

NC

28801

494 495 496 497 498

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Asheville Asheville Weaverville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC NC NC

28801 28787 28801

499

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

Visitor

Kansas City

MO

501

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

502

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

503

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

504

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

Visitor Perm Resident

? Fairview

NC

28730

507

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28804

508 509 510 511 512

Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Fairview Weaverville Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC NC NC NC NC

28730 28787

513

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

514 515 516 517 518

Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Perm Resident Asheville Seas Resident Hyannis/Miami (?) Visitor Boston

NC NC NC

28804 28801

519

Perm Resident

NC

500 $

505 506

160

Flying Bike

$

44

gas

Asheville

x

x x

28804 28787

x Very Important

x x

8

7

MA

x

1000-2000 (6 peoplnB / Short Term Rental

Not Important

1000

W / Friend, Relative

28801 28801

x x x 3

Not Important

1000

nB / Short Term Rental


520

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537

Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Seas Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident Visitor Perm Resident Perm Resident Perm Resident

Weaverville Del Ray Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville Asheville London Asheville Asheville Asheville Weaverville NYC Asheville Asheville Asheville

NC FL NC NC NC NC NC NC

538

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

539

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28801

540

Perm Resident

Asheville

NC

28894

541 542 543 544 545

Visitor

Seattle

WA

98008

$

10

Shell station

NC NC NC NC NY NC NC NC

28787 14

Not Important

5k-6k

Other x

28804 28801 28804 Very Important

3000

W / Friend, Relative

Very Important

3000

nB / Short Term Rental

28804 28804 28787

x 6

28804 28804

x x

8

Not Important

2500-3000

Other

B&B


#

Services (Fill)

1 2

x x

Restrooms (Fill)

Parking (Fill)

Lodging (Fill)

Trail (Fill)

x

Art (Fill)

Picnic (Fill)

Special (Fill)

x

Lighting (Fill) x

x

4 5

x

6

x

7 8 x

x

10 11

x

12

x

13

x

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

x

x

23 24 25 26 27 28

x

x

x

x

x

Roots are easy to trip over

No No

1 2

45 41

No

1

61

No No

1 1

54 37

No

1

67

No Yes

1 2

31 60

No

2

27

No

2

62

No

2

66

No

3

43

No

2

78

No No No No No No

1 2 1 3 1 1

63 27 72 46 43 66

No

1

41

cracks up to Merrimon

No

1

76

Separate bike and walk lanes, better lighting, more things to do along trail

No

1

21

No No No No

2 1 1 3 3

33 60 68 43 57

No

1

45

No

1

37

No

2

71

1 1

63 70

No

1

26

No

3

40

Merrimon concerns (?), N/S connection (?) Make it longer Emergency panic button Maintenance on bike lane, don't overdo stop signs, need speed limits More trail Connect to Riverside More shade, art/historical features Remove invasive/exotic plants Removal of kudzu, access to places for people to walk and bike

E-Device Type (Fill)

Separate bike and walk trails x x

x

x

x

x x

31 32 33 34

35

20. You - Age (Fill)

x

29 30

19. # In Group (Fill)

Bus stops More trails, trucks don't care on Riverside bike lanes

21 22

18. E-Device (Choice)

Benches for resting; I love this trail, nice to have near house More shade, longer trail More! Kudzu killing trees Trash cans

x

x

x

Specific Concern or Improvements

x

3

9

Other (Fill)

x

x

Connection to other trails. Crosswalk improvement at bottom of Founders Dr Connections to other trails Cyclists riding side by side; folks with mental health issues (guy yelling @ people w/masks) Need trash cans for dog poop Road maintenance Beaucatcher Trails, please! And parking in future, please! Expand ? River to Reed Creek Fewer pets; clear guidelines about leash length and pets approaching people

No Yes

Bike


36

Not so close to road More garbage cans; bathrooms = age discrimination More length; Enforce leash Daughter to bike @ Hanger Hall; homeless folks not acting ? Amboy, feeling safe biking, pond runoff Emergency thing out of order; have seen bears ??? Gets people ??

No

1

50

No

1

50

No

2

60

No

2

40

No

2

24

No

1

57

1

72

1

38

No

2

70

No

2

62

No No No No No No

10 1 10 4 3 2

46 35 28 34 ? 73

No

1

72

No

2

70

No No

2 2

62 55

No

1

50

No No No

1 1 1 1

34 30 75 69

Trash can availability

No

1

58

63

Continue trail up Riverside

No

1

65

64

Dark with trees on portion of trail

No

1

63

No No

1 3

58 49

No

3

64

No

1

70

3

52

1

62

1

45

2

51

37 38 39 40

x x

x

x

Em 42 43 44

x

45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

x Tree roots causing bumping trail Longer

x x x x

x More connections- this would be a great use of my tax dollars More bike trails, any place to ride bike, city streets are not wide enough More trails; I bike occasionaly

53 54 55 56

x

57

x

58 59 60 61

x

62

x

65 66

x

x

More trail, extensions, mile markers, 1/2 mile markers Longer/more beautiful ?, easy ? ? None- likes it all

x

x

67 68 69

Connection, longer trails, rails to trails, emergency buttons Extend northward; rails to trails along River Rd; Replace bridge at Amboy Clarify button usage at corner; mud/drainage at Carrier Park

x

x

Extend to Woodfin Extensions; make it safer on Meadow Rd (traffic) Parking to walk 4 mile loop?? Bridge very dangerous

Yes

x

70

x

Extend from Elizabeth; trail remediation

71

x

Ultimately want all greenways to connect; would like to see Amboy connect to Biltmore Village

Yes

Connect to downtown

No

72

Bike

Bike


73 74

Lanes for walkers and cyclists x More greenways - Hominy Ck by waste transfer station

75 76 77 78 79 80 81

x

x x

x x Extend it to Broadway to Riverside x

83

x Tackle kudzu, clean up waterway

x

87 88 89

Bike lanes, dedicated bike facility x

x

91 92

93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

x

101 102

x (water)

103

x (water)

104 105

x

x

No

1

53

1 1 2 1 2 2

51 74 24 53 78 66

1

58

2

53

No

2

59

No No

1 1

50 64

No

1

37

1 1

33 44

No

1

50

No

2

didn't say

No

2

60

1

47

No

1

42

No

1

50

No

2 2

30 21

No

1

66

Bike

No

No Yes Mentally ill confrontation, bears, more trees and shade dogs at Botanical Gardens well behaved More pullouts, more benches; Homeless/transients, needles; bridge is deterant Reported a ? Didn't know how to tell location. Location markers! For 91 all boxes + mile markers More native species along trail; cleaner river; bridge is sketch Trash cans for dog waste; near Amboy bridge ??? Safe trail for any road

90

42 68

Yes

84 85 86

2 1

No Yes No No No No

x x

82

No No

Yes

Bike

Bike

?

Trail map, water fountain Have alternate sports courts/field even flat walls. Amboy Bridge improve safety Poop! Lame (?) people pick up their dog's poop! More trails!

No

1

54

No

1

18

Trail courtesy

No

2

72

No

2

33

No

2

35

No

2

67

No

1

55

water stops, off road trails (natural surface) more bathrooms and signs to bathrooms; shade; water along trail Improve crossing at Amboy Bridge - make it safer Walk lanes for walking; speed bumps?


106

Drainage; more pet waste recepticals; improve crossing at Amboy Bridge

No

2

44

107

More miles of trails that are connected; a couple patches are rough; Amboy Bridge unsafe; would be nice to have other bike connection to FBR GW

No

1

64

108

some playground equipment; more shade

No

3

35

No

2

37

No

2

39

2

55

No

2

29

No No No

2 1 1

22 63 25

No

1

63

No

2

42

No

2

35

No

2

34

No

3

46

No

1

?

No

2

52

Better crossing on Amboy Bridge

No

2

57

124

More trash cans; crossing bridge is too dangerous

No

2

36

125

Trash is overflowing; "poop stink" at survey site, more shade/shelter

No

1

50

1

24

No

2

29

No No No No No No No

4 1 1 1 2 4(?) 1

45 51 25 60 50s 51 43

No

1

42

109 110 111 112 113 114 115

x (rest area) x

x

Some kind of concessions (drinks?) more benches; snacks/water bathrrooms, water fountains w/dog access

x

116

x

More paths across road Make it longer! More trail; no more pollution in river

117 118 119 120 121 122 123

126

127

x x

More signage on n. end Only dangerous spot notcied was RR crossing More connectivity Amboy connect ?? Safety too. Have a loop Better access right on greenway and commerce; better views of river

x

Less pollen water

x

More public restrooms, bridge crossing too dangerous, need clean up boxes, better bike lanes, go all the way to Biltmore, more connections, sometimes unexpected homeless camps, volley ball beach area, grill. Water fountain

128 129 130 131 132 133 134

x

135

x

Mile markers Mile markers More trails, bridge is sketchy More access; bridge at Amboy Signage from downtown Pedestrian at bridge Mile markers Extend trail, widen Amboy Bridge, Mile Markers


136 137 138

x

x

139 140 141

x

x x

x

142

x

143 144

x

145 146 147 148

x

x

149

x

150

x

x

Pocket Map/Guide Completion of dirt areas, widen shoulders Trash cans More places to put dog poop, more trees for shade

x Motivational signs More trails, make Amboy Bridge safer Trash cans, doggie bags Trash cans, more trails Bridge is too narrow for stroller and dog; shade - very exposed None yet - first time Playground Trash cans, would visit shops but looks run down - not sure what's what Transient housing Bike access from E Aville, bike/walk guide

151 152

No

1

36

No

1

40

No

1

34

No

2

61

No No

1 1

50 32

No

1

31

No No

1 1

50 66

No

2

34

No No Yes

1 2 2

55 56 64

No

1

78

No

1

44

No

1

70s

Yes

2

63

153

Educating users so diff users don't collide; more greenways

No

2

55

154

Bridge across Amboy is dangerous; under bridge stinks; needs better signage under Riverside for parking; protected lanes for roads and peds. Other things but unable to read (CB)

No

1

67

No No No

1 2

30 42 43

No

1

45

No No

2 2

58 40

No

1

?

No

2

?

No

2

36

No

2

38

No

1

53

No

2

40

No

1

69

155 156 157

x

Poop cans Pedestrian way across Amboy bridge; connect to Biltmore Village

158 159 160

161

Trash/poop cans

x

162 163 164

x x x

165 166 167

Less grass, more pollinator plantings, and more tree conservation

x

More bathrooms and ones that open early Keep it going; make it longer…to Woodfin Concerns for how wildlife is managed, safety for wildlife. More water fountains


168

x

169 170

x

Map underneath bridge is flipped around. Connect Carrier other than crossing bridge. Dog water spigot More trash cans

No

1

31

No No

3 2

44 30

171

Bridge is a little rough. Would like to get to Hominy Ck from Candler. Turned around at Amboy Bridge because didn't want to go over on roller blades and w/stroller

No

2

40

172

"You are here" signs; more shade

No

5

?

No

1

?

1

?

No

2

80

No

4

30

Need signs saying "keep to right" Fix Amboy Bridge! Longer out Riverside Dr

173 174

Some cyclists come from behind too fast. Amboy Bridge is problem w/glass and being too narrow

175

176 177

More shade, didn't want to cross Amboy Bridge. Grow trees fast!

No

3

44

178

More greenways, more street sweeping, more ?? Mellowdrome

No

1

61

No

2

34

179

180

x

181 182 183 184 185

x

Bridge across to Carrier - couldn't cross; connecting more peds in E Avel Add trailhead parking to Reed Ck by Botanical Gardens; art festivals, gatherings Amboy Bridge sucks w/kids; more greenway Keep extending Fix Amboy Rd Bridge, gravel path underneath bridge Connection and amount Expand future (?) on river. Patton bridge parking unsafe because of homeless

? 2

?

3

?

1

?

2

?

1

?

No

2

29

No No

2 2

60 28

No

2

45

No

2

78

No

2

32

No No

1 1

38 41

186 More views on section they're walking External connectivity

187 188 189

More trails that are connected; more a higher priority than over built/?; more parking at Hominy Ck Park area

190 191 192

x

193 194

x

More treess on sidewalks by road (Riverside)


195 196

More river access Connectivity All greenways connected w/bike lanes or bike crossing on Amboy More garbage cans Need more signs, directions, maps, to local businesses Safety for a woman alone Fruit trees, map, ? And ? Extending Extending trail

197 198

x

199 200 201 202 203 204

x x x x x

More dedicated bike lanes; educate about how to use trails w/others

205 206

x

x Noise from bridge; extend connect to Carrier Park; call boxes Shade trees; extended

207 208

x

Consider ped crossing over river; pave trail under Amboy Rd bridge; functional water fountains

209 210 211

Longer x

213 214

More miles of trails Extended and connected Homeless ?? Improved Dog waste stations x Cameras for safety Extend trail; more trash cans; Talk to N/S RR about replacing bridge to help w/flooding Expand trail Expand trail, trash cans Shade trees, more trails connected Mile makers, map is backwards

221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229

x

x

x x

x

230 231 232 233 234 235

2 2

27 50

No

2

65

No

2

61

No

2

?

No No No No No

2 2 1 2 1

? 45 54 72 43

No

2

51

No

1

52

No

1

62

No

1

39

No

2

49

No No

1 1

66

3

parent

3

37

No

1

71

No No No No No No

1 1 1 2 2 1

46 52 51 mid 60s 66 45

No

1

76

No No

2 2

51 66

No

2

49 61 70

No

1 1 1 1 2

No

2

27

No No No No No

`2 1 1 1 4

40s 40 35 38 56

Disoriented on where to go, a map will be helpful Food truck, shade trees

212

215 216 217 218 219 220

No No

x

x

Safety at night Connectivity needs to improve Extend trail Safe ped crossing on Amboy Bridge, more unpaved trails, water Extend More flowers More trails Longer

No No

68


More trails, esp to Bilmore Village; trash near campers ? To have exercise stations; more shade Water; longer distance, connect to more trails Mile makers every 1/2 mile Want to see West side of FBRT finished; improve bridge crossing at Amboy Shade structures Longer Low speed limits on roads; finish trail; more shade; portajohns/restrooms at ends; build new bridge Longer trails; access over bridge

236 237 238

x

239 240 241 242 243

x

244 245 246

x x Complete trail connections thru KC Park; cycle track continue along Swannanoa River Rd to E Aville

247

Better way for bikes to cross Amboy Bridge; connection to Biltmore Village Amboy Bridge

248 249 250 251

x

252 253

x

255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274

x x

1

50

No

2

64

No

1

26

No

1

55

No

1

46

No

2 1

40 70

2

69

Yes No

One wheel

2 1 2

64 47 68

Yes

E Bike

2

42

1

67

2 2

72 62

2

32

No

1 2

27 7

Yes

1

67

No

1

68

No

3

50

3

40

2 5 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 4 1 2 2 1 1 1 2

33 56 61 33 22 32 59 34 64 64 65 56 37 69 65 54 62

No Yes

Connect the bridge at Carrier, widening bridge at Amboy x

254

No

x

River access; plant shade trees White fine p[ea gravel as the trail or alongside for horses; more connection Put a maze in - like a corn maze for children Water for dogs; trees Extensions: Biltmore, N Aville, maintain green space Expand greenway Longer More shade-it's very hot Shade trees

x

food Amboy Water for boys Dirt trails Ped bridge at Amboy Maps Plant allergy ???; Amboy Bridge

x Lengthened and connected

No

axfoot/Assist bike


275

277

x

278

x

x

x

282 283 284 285 286

More shade trees; gravel alongside; better access fo restrooms; did not want to answer other questions ? Trail (workers)

2

71

2

32

No

2 2

49 59

No

1

71

No

1

63

1 2

31 72

1

44

No No

2 1 1 3 1 1 1 4

53 39 50 54 44 53 28 48

No

4

26

No

4

27

No

1

30

No

3

39

No

4

39

No

2

65

No

1 2

67 57

No

1

62

2 1

57 36

No

Tree buffer b/t trail and road Water stop; shelter from sun Cut limbs; connect Lyman to French Broad River Park Marked signs (right, left); education on how to use trail More trees b/t road and trail Connect existing greenways More workout stations - like at Hominy; rubber path; softer asphalt for joints dog litter Connectivity

x More greenway Homeless support

296 297 x

299

300

x

301 302

x

303 304 305

70

x

295

298

1

Connection from RAD to Carrier; wider bridge at Amboy; waste

279

287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294

45

Bike lane ends before Broadway; cars courteous but ? For more bike lane; anxiety crossing Amboy Bridge

276

280 281

4

x x

Need maps; railroad trax needs improve Hate railroad trax crossing to get here; small maps to pickup Mile markers Ramps for biking, jumping; fast bikes on trails feel dangerous Longer, better Closer bathrooms to trail and water; Amboy-way too risky fro pedestrians, runners, walkers; more waste receptacles and more frequent pick up; curbing b/t protected bike lane and car lane doesn't seem sufficient to keep cars from bike lane No cracks, roots, cleanliness Safety w/Carrier Park restrooms; Amboy Bridge bike&ped fatalities; Carrier Park GW need to be smoothed out Bathroom and water availability Bathroom open water


Sidewalk from Boat Park to connect to trail would be nice for trail to loop city Keep connecting, expand into more neighborhoods Keep expanding, connect more communities

306 307 308 309

No

9

66

No

9

67

No

9

64

No

9

71

No

9

65

No

9

72

2

70s

x

Keep expanding Keep expanding, connect more communities Keep expanding, connect more communities More trash cans, dog waste stations Less trash along river

1

39

1

64

2 1 4

32 68 36

1

35

3

39

No No

1 1

55 31

Need signs "keep dogs on leash"; sewage smell near White Duck and water quality

No

1

43

Would like to skate entire length; connection expedite bridge work

No

1

51

1 3

42 53

No

2

37

No

1

65

2

45

2

37

No

2

65

No

2

40

No

2

65

312 313

No

Want more shade and plants/trees, wildflowers, edibles; do a better job addressing homeless issue; mural under Haywood Bridge has been defaced a few times; ???

315

316 317 318

playground Litter playground Connect to Biltmore; water tunnel on UNCA connection More trails, Carrier Park hard w/trailer

319 320 321 322

x

323

324

x

325 326

X

327

x

More trails, homelessness

328 329 330 331

333

53

Keep expanding, connecting area

311

332

2

x

310

314

No

x

x

Park spaces for kids; naturebased education features Make longer; trash bins; alternative to Amboy Bridge crossing More trails, connectivity, expansion More trail Finish West side and keep doing what you're doing A few security call boxes; wataer for dogs and people; lighting at night for safety Get rid of hom? homeless people sleeping and ? Around (3 nearby)


334 335 336 337 338

Homeless; security boxes x x

No

339 340 341 342 343

Fencing at river More!

x

x

x

x

353 354

x

x

355

356 357

x

358

x

359

x

360 361

x

362

x

363

Used to live in Tuscon; more miles, more separation, more ? Trash cans for dog cleanup More trails More miles of trails; clearer signage about use of diff spaces (bike lane, trail); Amboy Bridge in bad shape and ? Need safe bike passage

x Dangerous Amboy Bridgge-needs a plan; more lighting at night

x

Concerned with individuals following or harrassing Extend Amboy Rd; food on greenway Furthering trail system; clear some greenway for river view Longer! West side; pollinator habitat; Amboy bridge Push carts w/vendors; small playground; open up views of river at places, remove invasives; food and drink closer to greenway

364

367

41

2 1 1

41

No

1

47

No

1 1 1

46

1

36

No No

1 2

50 27

No

1

51

No No

3 1

25 38

No

1

36

No

3

30

No No

2 2

59 42

No

1

50

No

2

35

No

1

58

No

1

80

No

1

47

No

1

45

x

352

366

1 No

348

365

60

Use NC firms; need more greenways So sunny, trees would be great Connectivity Bikes need to go slower or ride on the road;one wheelers (motorized) shouldn't be on greenway (too fast)

x

More trails; flat easy Security at night, can't come alone at night as a female Reminders (?) that need to ? Trail use like traffic use (dotted lines); gathering (?) places like benches, tables

62 71

1 1 1 1

Bridge ?

x

58

40-45 No No

x x

345 346 347

2 1 1 1 1

Bathrooms are open longer distance

x

344

349 350 351

Yes Yes

20 33

40

38


368 369 370

x

x x

371

x

372

x

373 374 375 376

Need more parking; Amboy Bridge is dangerous; need another bridge; need security presence due to homeless Lots of sticks on path after rain Winter/Off-Season Act for roller blader

x Amboy Bridge x x

No No No

1 1 2

62 39 55

No

1

41

No

2

62

No No No No

1 2 1 1

55 42 26 39

377

Outdoor workout bar; restroom signage

No

2

24

378 379 380 381

Safety after dark History of area

No No No No

2 1 1 2

48 32 34 28

More homeless on the trail concerning

No

1

55

No

2

70

No

1

45

No

1

62

No

2

44

No No

1 1

31 ?

No

1

?

No No No No No No

3 3 3 4 adults/2 kids 1 1

34 27 ? ? ? ?

No

1

37

No No

1 1 2 2 4 1 1

40 ? 39 43 45 53 38

x

382 383

x

x

x Homeless west side of river; glass at dog park FBR Park nice but a little overgrown; extend greenways north and south More impervious surface w/infill develop need to continue; more plants, trees

384 385

386 387 388 389

Safety cross over Amboy Bridge Amboy Bridge need safe crossing to dog park -extend Biltmore Village would be great

x

390 391 392 393 394 395

x Extend and connect greenways and spaces/places

396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403

x

x

x x

x x

404 x (casual dining)

x

405 406 407 408

x

x

x

x

Invasives Bike lane cross Amboy Playgrounds

x

No No Didn't know there was access to water-signage to it and more water; more trees planted

No

No No No

51 1 1 1 1

65 49 29 24


409

More parking proximate to downtown; splash area; small playground, zipline; bike air/fix it station

x

410 411 412

more shade more trails Want it to be kept as real & natural as possible; don't want to see more businesses; want to keep some old, historic; more shade & native plants; not more touristy & commercialized; more trash cans &pet waste stations; more features to encourage meeting/gathering; more history exhibits including native people's history; edible plants

413

414

More shade Directional signs at Amboy; ? For new people to navigate & from Carrier Park towards Hominy Ck ? Park More trails; more edible forest installations Bike users on walking path

415

416 417

x

418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438

x

x

1 1 1

30 72 35

No

1

39

No

2

43

No

1

48

No

1

29

2

54 50s

Recycling drop off More of it; River Rd ?

No No

2 1

68 65

No No No No No No No No No No No No Yes

1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

72 65 73 70 27 45 31 62 38 70 64 19 25 43 15 69

?? x More dog stations Work on homeless camps

x More greenways Want the path to go to RAD

No Trail upkeep is clean (?)

One-wheel

No

440

442

No No No

1

439

441

42

No

x

x

3

More dog stations, out of bags; invasive species along Broadway

Longer, more; more dog bags Shade x

No

x

60

Shade

No

3

41

? Garbage receptacle; restrooms

No

1

62

No

1

28


443

x

x

Broadway/Weaver crosswalk signal synchronize No

2

No

1

52 52 64

1

44

1

46

No

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1

38 34 34 46 60 50 40 36

No

2

No No

1 2 1

40 72 61

No

1

21

Kudzu of wetland; add art walk participating design; more creatvie stormwater reclamationlike Atlanta; lantern making

No

1

More of it!

No No

1 1 2

67 42 58

No

5

74

No No

2 1

50 31

No

1

39

No

1

33

3

70

No

2

56

No

1

41

No No No

2 1 1

45

No

1

66

No No No

1 1 2

40 64 54

444 445 446 447

448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456

x

x x x

Longer connectivity Fix root bumps; longer route Work with city and Homeward Bound to clean up homeless camps More greenway Dog stations - more repair on?? Gardens Connect to UNCA trail system; shade

458 459 460 461

462

466

No

No No No

x

457

463 464 465

Safety & security: homeless, dogs w/o control; contemplating carrying mace Intersections: drivers, peds, cyclists don't watch signals, crosswalks, et Shade Safety phone

x

63

x

x x x

467 468

Get rid of kudzu; water and rest areas unhorned folks Expand Signage for road crossings; Weaver Park ? Tree roots, poison ivy by Merrimon Poisonous bushes, hemlock; take home fold out map w/with lots of street names

x x

469 470 x

471 472

Dark at UNCA and dark at Broadway; bears More trail

473 474 475 476

x

477

x

478 479 480

x x

x

x x

feel safe running Disconnected; length needs to be longer Connected to other trails

50


481

More trails; want to walk to town

482 483 484 485

x

486

x

487 488 489 490 491

x

492

x

x

x x

499

x

503

x

x

x

x

x x

41 56 33 1 1

Asked about signage b/t Magnolia and new section-didn't know it was there until looked at out map

No

2

80

Need overall map for whole GW length ? Carrier Park

No

1

51

No No No No No

1 1 1 2 1

38 74 40 30 81

No

1

1

1

1

2

34

2

56

No

3

77

No

1

38

No

1 1

55 44

1

42

No No No

2 1 2 1 1

70 59 68 63 47

No

1

58

No No No

2 1 1 1 1

75 53 77 76 44

No

1

74

More trails Ice on wooden bridge, water doesn't drain off People passing on E bikes w/out calling out

No No No

Yes

x Concerns about e bikes, esp big groups x

No More nature, less traffic More benches, seating

x

513

x

514 515 516 517 518

x x x

519

No

2 1 2 1 1

x

x

507 508 509 510 511 512

35

Feel fairly safe on GW; concealed carry Access coming off Chestnut; neighborhood signs

504 505 506

1

x

500

x

68 65 77 27

x

x

502

2 1 1 2

Line in middle of greenway Connecting to other greenways

x

x

No No No No Bird friendly plants, nesting boxes

x x

501

74

x

x x

x

1

x

493 494 495 496 497 498

No

natural surface/dirt; asphalt better than concrete; used system more when natural surface More, longer Kudzu maintenance

x

Parking-parked in neighborhood Get NCDOT to make "walk" signals automative

E bike


Beaverdam, Elk Mtn, 1/4 mile stretch would improve safety for bicyclists

520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537

2

68

2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 2 3 1 2 1

74 63 73 75 78 59 70 74 37 35 88 39 83 40 39 27 20

1

34

2

45

No

1

1

No

1

38

No More trails Kudzu, roots! More greenways Bikers/walkers in same space

No No No No

More connectivity Dog park

x x

Widlife

x x

x

No No No No

Separate bike and peds x

x

No

538 539

x

x

540

x

x

541 542 543 544 545

No

More accessible to more people; maps Lighting in Weaver Park; open restrooms more; more call boxes, better functioning


#

You - Sex

You - Travel

#1 - Age

#1 - Sex

#1 - Travel (Choice)

1 2

Female Male

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

38

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

3

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

4 5

Male Male

Run/Jog Run/Jog

6

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

7 8

Male Female

Run/Jog 68

Female

9

Male

27

Female

10

Female

11

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

12

Male

Run/Jog

14

Male

Run/Jog

13

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

87

Male

Run/Jog

14 15 16 17 18 19

Male Female Male Female Female Male

27

Male

13

Male

20

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

21

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

22

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

23 24 25 26 27 28

Female Male Female Female Female

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Run/Jog

33

Male

Run/Jog

43 46

Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

29

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

30

Male

Run/Jog

31

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

75

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

32 33

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along

34

Female

Run/Jog

35

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

#2 - Age

#2 - Sex

#2 - Travel (Choice)

14

Female

Run/Jog

13

Male

12 35

Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

Run/Jog Run/Jog

Run/Jog

4

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

7

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

#3 - Age

#3 - Sex

#3 - Travel (Choice)

#4 - Age

#4 - Sex

#4 - Travel (Choice)

#5 - Age

#5 - Sex


36

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

37

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

38

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

35

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

39

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

41

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

40

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

24

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Em

Female

Run/Jog

42 43

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

44

Female

Run/Jog

45

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

46

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

62

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

47 48 49 50 51 52

Male Male Female Female Female Male

Run/Jog Run/Jog Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

34 5 72

Male Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

53

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

54

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

70

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

55 56

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

63 ?

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

57

Male

Run/Jog

58 59 60 61

Female Female Male Female

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

62

Male

63

Female

Run/Jog

64

Female

Run/Jog

65 66

Male Male

Run/Jog Run/Jog

?

?

67

Male

Run/Jog

?

?

68

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

69

Female

Run/Jog

?

?

70

Male

Run/Jog

71

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

72

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

9

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

6 8

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

71

Female

Walk/Wheelchair


73 74

Male Female

Bicycle/Tag-along Run/Jog

2

Male

75

Male

Run/Jog

76 77 78 79 80 81

Female Male Female Female Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

82

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

83

Female

84

Bicycle/Tag-along

14 months

Non-Binary

? 68

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

Bicycle/Tag-along

61

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

59

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

85 86

Male Male

Run/Jog Run/Jog

87

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

88 89

Male Male

Run/Jog Bicycle/Tag-along

90

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

91

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

55

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

92

Female

48

Male

93

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

94

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

95

Female

96 97

Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

34 20

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

98

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

99

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

100

Male

Run/Jog

101

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

67

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

102

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

15

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

103

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

30

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

104

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

105

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Stroller/Other Dependent


106

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

?

107

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

108

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

35

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

109

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

39

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

110

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

52

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

111

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

58

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

112

Female

Other Independen

29

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

113 114 115

Female Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

24

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

116

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

117

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

118

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

119

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

6 months

Male

Stroller/Other Dependent

120

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

11

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

121

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

122

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

72

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

123

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

60

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

124

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

35

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

125

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

126

Male

Run/Jog

127

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

23

Female

Run/Jog

128 129 130 131 132 133 134

Female Female Male Male Female Male Female

Run/Jog

?

Run/Jog Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along Run/Jog

50s

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

135

Male

Run/Jog

6

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

?

11

Bicycle/Tag-along


136

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

137

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

138

Female

Run/Jog

139

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

140 141

Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

142

Male

Run/Jog

143 144

Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

145

Female

146 147 148

60

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

35

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

Male Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

48 65

Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

149

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

150

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

151

Female

152

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

25

Female

Run/Jog

153

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

11 days

Female

154

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

155 156 157

Male Female Female

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

47

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

158

Female

Run/Jog

159 160

Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

57 30

Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

161

Male

Run/Jog

162

Male

?

Female

163

Female

Run/Jog

?

164

Female

Run/Jog

?

165

Female

Run/Jog

166

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

167

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

49

Female

Stroller/Other Dependent

Walk/Wheelchair


168

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

169 170

Male Female

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair

15 40

Male Female

Non-Binary Other Independen

53

Male

Stroller/Other Dependent

?

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

171

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

12

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

?

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

?

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

27

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

172

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

173

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

174

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

175

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

71

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

176

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

20

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

11

177

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

41

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

37

178

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

179

Female

Run/Jog

34

Male

Run/Jog

181

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

?

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

182

Female

Run/Jog

?

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

183

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

184

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

?

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

185

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

187

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

29

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

188 189

Female Male

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

56 28

Male Female

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

190

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

?

191

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

75

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

192

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

31

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

193 194

Male Male

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

180

186

?

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

?

Female

Walk/Wheelchair


195 196

Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along

30 ?

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

197

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

198

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

7

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

199

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

?

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

200 201 202 203 204

Male Male Male Female Female

Run/Jog

? 35

Female Female

Run/Jog

205

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

38

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

206

Male

207

Male

208

Female

209

Male

Run/Jog

48

Female

Run/Jog

210 211

Male Male

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

212

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

parent

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

child

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

213

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

3

Female

Stroller/Other Dep

3

Female

Stroller/Other Dependent

214

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

215 216 217 218 219 220

Male Female Male Female Female Male

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair

66

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

221

Male

222 223

Female Female

224

Male

39

Female

225 226 227 228 229

Male Male Female Male Male

230

Male

231 232 233 234 235

Male Female Female Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

70 Run/Jog Run/Jog 72

Female

Run/Jog

25

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

40s

Female

Run/Jog

?

Run/Jog

?

?


236

Male

Run/Jog

237

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

238

Female

Run/Jog

239

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

240

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

241 242

Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along

38

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

243

Female

Run/Jog

66

Male

Run/Jog

244 245 246

Female Male Male

69

Male

Other Independent Walk/Wheelchair

68

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

247

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

42

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

248

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

249 250

Female Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

67 65

Male Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

251

Female

Run/Jog

29

Female

Run/Jog

252 253

Male Female

Run/Jog 68

Male

254

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

255

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

256

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

33

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

32

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

257

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

36

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

4

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274

Male Male Male Female Male Male Male Female Male Female

32 54

Female Female

18

Male

32

Female

34

Female

4

Male

Run/Jog

63

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

Female Female Female Female Female Female

Bicycle/Tag-along Run/Jog

Walk/Wheelchair

13

Female

16

Male


275

Male

276

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

278

Female

279

42

Female

15

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

79

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

52

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

280 281

Male Male

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

48 60

Male Female

Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

282

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

283

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

284 285

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

69

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

286

Male

Run/Jog

287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294

Female Male Male Male Male Female Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

15

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

45

Female

Run/Jog

18

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

295

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

28

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

?

296

Female

26

Male

297

Female

298

Female

7

Male

Other Independen

5

Male

299

Female

8

Female

6

Male

300

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

64

Female

301 302

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair 56

Female

303

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

304 305

Female Male

Run/Jog

60

Male

11

Female

277

Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

Run/Jog

Run/Jog

?

Other Independent 4

Male


306

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

307

Female

308

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

309

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

310

Male

311

Male

312

Male

313

Male

314

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

315

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

316 317 318

Male Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair

319

Male

Run/Jog

320

Female

321 322

Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

323

Male

Run/Jog

324

Female

Other Independent

325 326

Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair

327

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

328

Male

Run/Jog

329

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

330

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

331

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

332

Female

333

Female

52

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

70s

Female

3

Male

33

Female

7

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

18 months

Female

Stroller/Other Dependent

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

63

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

Run/Jog

42

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

72

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

2

Female

3

Female

5

Bicycle/Tag-along

Male


334 335 336 337 338

Male Female Male Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

339

Female

Run/Jog

340 341 342 343

Male Female Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

344

Female

Run/Jog

345 346 347

Female Male Male

Run/Jog Bicycle/Tag-along

348

Male

Run/Jog

349 350 351

Female Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair

352

Female

Run/Jog

353 354

Female Male

Run/Jog Run/Jog

355

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

356 357

Male Male

Run/Jog

358

Female

359

Female

Run/Jog

360 361

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair

362

Male

363

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

364

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

365

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

366

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

367

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

57

Female

16 months

Male

Run/Jog

Bicycle/Tag-along

?

25

Female

55

Male

Run/Jog

70 2

Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair

33

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

Female

Male

Run/Jog


368 369 370

Male Female Male

371

Male

372

Male

373 374 375 376

Male Male Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along Walk/Wheelchair

377

Male

378 379 380 381

Female Female Male Male

382

Female

383

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

46

Female

56

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

24

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

48

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair

22

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

?

384

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

385

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

386

Male

387 388

Male Female

Bicycle/Tag-along Bicycle/Tag-along

389

Female

Run/Jog

390 391 392 393 394 395

Male Male Male Female Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Other Independent Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

396

Male

Run/Jog

397 398 399 400 401 402 403

Female Female Male Male Male Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along

404

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

405 406 407 408

Female Male Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

? ?

8 6 40

? ? Female

Run/Jog

Female Female Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

?

3

?

Female

6

Female


409

Male

Run/Jog

410 411 412

Female Male Male

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

413

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

414

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

415

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

416

Male

Run/Jog

417

Female

418

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

Male Male Female Female Female Male Female Male Female Female Male Male Male Female Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Run/Jog Run/Jog Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Other Independent Run/Jog Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair

439

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

440

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

441

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

442

Male

8

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

9

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

65

Male

2

Male

Stroller/Other Dependent

65 1

Male Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

64

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

11

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

5

Male

Other Independent

9

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along


443

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

444 445 446

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

447

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

448

Female

Bicycle/Tag-along

449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456

Female Female Female Female Female Female Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

457

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

458 459 460

Male Male Male

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along

461

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

462

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

463 464 465

Male Female Female

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

466

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

467 468

Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

469

Female

Run/Jog

470

Female

Run/Jog

471

Female

472

?

45

Female

Run/Jog

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

58

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Walk/Wheelchair

73

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

13

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

473

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

474 475 476

Female Female Female

Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

45

Female

Run/Jog

477

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

478 479 480

Female Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

59

Female

Walk/Wheelchair


481

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

482 483 484 485

Female Male Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

486

Female

Run/Jog

487 488 489 490 491

Female Female Female Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

492

Male

493

Male

494 495 496 497 498

Male Female Male Female Male

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

499

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

500

Male

Run/Jog

Bike

501

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

27

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

502

Female

Run/Jog

56

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

503

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

81

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

504

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

505 506

Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

507

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

508 509 510 511 512

Female Male Male Female Female

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog

71

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

65

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

513

Female

Run/Jog

514 515 516 517 518

Female Female Male Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair

519

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Run/Jog

?

26

Female

Run/Jog

9

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

35

Male

Run/Jog

68

Female

3

Male

?

Stroller/Other Dependent

Male

76

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

Bicycle/Tag-along


520

Male

Walk/Wheelchair

67

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537

Male Female Female Male Male Male Female Female Male Female Female Male Female Male Female Male Female

Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Bicycle/Tag-along Run/Jog Bicycle/Tag-along Run/Jog Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair Walk/Wheelchair

66

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

73

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

74

Male

Bicycle/Tag-along

Female

Stroller/Other Dep

5 months

Male

Stroller/Other Dependent

Female

Walk/Wheelchair

18 months

Male

Stroller/Other Dependent

538

Male

539

Male

540

Male

Run/Jog

541 542 543 544 545

Male

Run/Jog

? 4 ? 42 27

Female

45

Female

Walk/Wheelchair


#

#5 - Travel (Choice)

21. w/Pet (Fill)

1 2

N N

3

N

4 5

N

NOTES

incomplete survey

6 7 8

N Y

9

N

10

Y

11

N

12

N

13

N

14 15 16 17 18 19

Y N Y N N N

Said most of his walk was not on the greenway

20

N

use trails for fun, social

21

N

Love it, proud of what city's done

22

N

23 24 25 26 27 28

No No No N

29

Y

30

N

31

Y

32 33

Y N

34

35

N

Love it! On oxygen, survey helper

Love the views


36

N

37

Y

38

N

39

N

40

N

Em

N

42 43

N

44

N

45

N

46

N

47 48 49 50 51 52

N Y N N N N

53

N

54

N

55 56

N N

57

N

58 59 60 61

N N N N

62

N

63

N

Just moved here, waiting for house to close; says greenways were very important reason for moving here Was with a large group of runners

64

Y

Part of big running group

65 66

N N

Part of big running group 10 miles total

67

N

68

N

69

N

70

71 72

N

Amazing (RAD)

Group of 10 runners Bicycling to lead runners

First visit, "first of many"


73 74

N

75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 Loves signage in RAD; I don't understand their route (cb)

83 84 85 86

Y

Looking forward to connecting to river Love it. Running 13 miles

87 88 89 90

Doing great!

91 92

93

Y

Uses greenway twice a day, once to ride bike and once to walk dog

94

N

More! Such a lovely thing to have in the neighborhood

Y N

Like the signs

95 96 97 98 99 100 101

N

102 103

Y

104

Y

105

From WD21 up to Shelburne then come back to WD21 to Wedge - 14 miles


106

Y

107

108 109 110

Y

111 112 113 114 115

Y

116

Y

117

Walked from Biscuit Head on Biltmore and headed north

118 119

Y

120 121 122 123 124 125 126

127

128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135

Yes Saved me mentally during pandemic. All the parking is great and a lot have shade. Tether ball. I'm loving it! A game changer. It's pretty awesome.

We are really grateful this happened. Good vibe. Favorite new additon to Asheville. Go everywhere you want without a car.

Highlight of visit!


136 137 138 139

Y

140 141 142

Y

143 144

Y

145

Y

So happy to have it!

146 147 148 149 150

Round trip to home via trail.

151 152 153

154

155 156 157

"Keep building more trails"

158 159 160 "We really appreciate all the work that was done to connect the greenways. The diversity of people/users on the greenways is what I like the most. It brings people together, and the area along the greenway has been cleared up."

161

162

Y

163 164 165 166 167

Y

Looking forward to Silverline Park area


168 169 170

Y Greatest thing Asheville has done in last decaded

171

172 173 174

Excited!

175

176 177

Greenway allowing them to see different aspects of the city they otherwise would not see Man surveyed was permanent resident. Had visitors from out of town.

178

179

We love it. Use this section more than any with food/shopping near, can be ?.

180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189

Trails main reason for visit

190 191 192 193 194

Everything's great. Grew up here and nice to see


195 196 197

Love the new facilities

198 199 200 201 202 203 204

Y

Y

205

So awesome to have this now

206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 Trail is wonderful and feels safe; along bringing grandkids

214 215 216 217 218 219 220

Y

221 222 223 224

Y

225 226 227 228 229

Y

Hope we keep it clean and trimmed; it is a beautiful

230 231 232 233 234 235

Y Fabulous


236 237 238 239 240

Y

241 242

Y

243 244 245 246 247

248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274

Y

Y

Love it


275 276

277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294

Y

295

Love signage-that's how found

296

Found trail by signs

297

Yes

298 299

Yes

300

301 302 303 304 305

Love it because it's flat


306

Y

Good job

307 308 309 310 311 312 313

Y

314

Glad to see trees planted; excited about extending greenways to the north and through Woodfin

315

316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323

Y

324 325 326

Y Y

327 328 329 330 331 332

333

Y

No complaints; love that the dog waste bags are full!


334 335 336 337 338

Gets ride home

339 340 341 342 343 344

person was grouchy

345 346 347 348 349 350 351 If more connections, would bike more

352 353 354

355

356 357

Y

358 359 360 361 362 363

364

365 366

367

Y


368 369 370 371

372 373 374 375 376

Y Y

377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385

386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408

A pretty good job.


409 410 411 412

413

Y

This has become one of my favorite things to do and places to go.

Y

Loves width and no traffic

414 415

416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442

Y Often use RAD, also

Y Y

Since the pandemic this greenway has kept me sane Surveyor has note that says "this is the lady who assaulted (?) (verbally) by ugly.


443 444 445 446 447

I love it

448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456

Love the greenway Y

Like it as it is

457 458 459 460 461

462

Y

463 464 465 466 467 468

Y

Enjoys it all; walks 2x a day Well maintained, love greenways

469 470 471 472

Y

473 474 475 476

Wonderful! Wide!

477

Y

478 479 480

Y Regularly commutes on trail as well


481 482 483 484 485 486

Y

Y Y

487 488 489 490 491 492

Y

493

Y

494 495 496 497 498

Y

499 This person was on Flying Bike tour ride and then out for run Not in same household but same group. Ride the other greenways lots

500 501 502

Y

503

Y Really clean, well maintained; uses trail to get to UNCA gardens

504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512

Y Y

513 514 515 516 517 518 519

I love using the greenway; settled here for running (?) Been loving it


520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537

Very pleasurable experience; people are nice

Y Y

Y

538 539

540 541 542 543 544 545

Really good enjoy getting further to downtown


Intentionally blank to facilitate double-sided printing


CLOSE THE GAP APPENDIX 6: ONLINE SURVEY RESULTS


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Close the GAP Survey Project Engagement VIEWS

PARTICIPANTS

4,459

1,570

RESPONSES

COMMENTS

56,154

4,259

SUBSCRIBERS

603 * In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you live? By answering this question, it helps us make sure we are hearing from people across the City. We won't be able to identify your specific address. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

1331

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

1/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you work? If you are not working, you can skip this question. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

2 2 1079

3

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

What is your favorite street to walk in Asheville?

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

2/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Thinking about your favorite street, please choose up to five (5) of the following design-related items that contribute to the quality of this walking street for you. (Select up to five options). 68%

Direct and complete sidewalk route (e.g. sidewalks where I need them with no missing sections)

757 

56%

Shade or trees

623 

49%

Low traffic and/or low car speeds

549 

45%

Sidewalks separated from traffic (e.g. a grass strip so I don't have to walk next to traffic)

497 

35%

Wider sidewalks without obstacles (e.g. utility poles)

386 

33%

Quality of street crossings - location, visibility, medians for refuge

371 

30%

Marked crosswalks

337 

28%

Lighting at night

315 

12%

Accessible features (e.g. well design curb ramps)

138 

10%

Benches to rest

106 

9%

Other (please specify)

103 

1,114 Respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

3/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Choose the top five (5) factors that make walking along some Asheville streets difficult. (Select up to five options). 79%

53%

Sidewalks missing (or significant gaps) on high traffic streets

Sidewalks missing to key destinations such as parks, schools, grocery stores

899 

603 

51%

Narrow sidewalks on high traffic streets

579 

45%

Sidewalks without a buffer from driving lanes

519 

43%

Sidewalks missing (or significant gaps) on low traffic neighborhood streets

496 

39%

Buckled or cracked sidewalks, or other obstacles like puddles after rain

447 

39%

Barriers or obstacles, like power poles, in the sidewalk

441 

25%

Poor lighting

285 

18%

Narrow sidewalks to key destinations such as parks, schools, grocery stores

205 

9%

Narrow sidewalks on low traffic neighborhood streets

98 

7%

Other

78 

1,143 Respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

4/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Select your top five (5) factors that make a street crossing difficult at locations with traffic lights. (Select up to five options). 77%

Turning vehicles do not stop for me when I'm crossing

808 

46%

Missing or hard to see pedestrian signals

484 

45%

Too long to wait for the pedestrian signal

472 

31%

26%

25%

Not enough time to cross the street (the pedestrian signal is not long enough) Pedestrian signal does not have countdown information (I don't know how much time I have left to cross) Unsure of when it is safe to cross the street (I can't see the signal indications as a pedestrian)

331 

272 

260 

15%

Missing or hard to reach pedestrian signal push buttons

160 

13%

Missing audible or tactile crossing signals to cross safely

139 

10%

Other (please specify)

104 

1,051 Respondents

Select your top three (3) factors that make a street crossing difficult at locations without traffic lights. (Select up to three options). 83%

81%

37%

32%

3%

Drivers don't stop or yield for pedestrians

Crossing locations feel unsafe (e.g. cars travel too fast or there are too many cars to find a break in traffic)

I'm not sure where to cross (e.g. there are no marked crosswalks)

Marked crosswalks are too far apart (i.e. I have to walk too far to use a marked crossing).

Other (please specify)

890 

871 

396 

339 

37 

1,073 Respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

5/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Using the map to draw a line or drop a point, identify some of the uncomfortable walking streets you use or see people using. We encourage you to use the map; however, if it does not work for you, provide your answer in the comment box below. An uncomfortable walking street is one where we would worry about letting young children (think about an 8 year old) or older adults (think about an 80 year old) walk without assistance. To draw a line or add a point, zoom in to your area of interest. Then click the button on the top right, 'Draw Line' or 'Add Point.' Then click on the map to create a line segment or point. When you are done adding points or lines, a comment box will appear; you can add notes to this box or if you make any errors you can click the 'X' on the top right of the comment box to delete and start over.

As an alternative to mapping, indicate the street/route name and beginning/end points. Please be as specific as possible.

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

6/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Select your top five (5) areas where the City should prioritize sidewalk connections, accessibility improvements or greenways. (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'.). 49%

Along routes to schools

Rank: 2.22

432 

58%

Along routes to parks, libraries or community centers

Rank: 2.41

516 

In areas with vehicle related safety concerns (including high traffic

Rank: 2.53

487 

Rank: 2.73

489 

Rank: 2.82

17 

Rank: 2.84

385 

55%

55% 2%

roads, higher speed roads or locations with pedestrian crash history)

Along routes to grocery stores and shopping areas

Other (please specify in comment box)

In areas with equity concerns (neighborhoods with barriers that

43%

prevent people from accessing essential needs, opportunities for wellbeing, and their full potential)

31%

In residential areas

Rank: 2.88

278 

42%

Along transit lines and near transit stops

Rank: 2.99

372 

Rank: 3.53

49 

Rank: 3.61

105 

6% 12%

Near public buildings like City Hall or the Health Department

Along routes to healthcare offices and hospitals 888 Respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

7/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

If you were in charge of Asheville's pedestrian and greenway programs and budget, which of the following efforts would you prioritize to make walking and greenway use more convenient, safe, and well connected. (Select up to five options). 75%

Connect the major greenways that can get us across the city (greenway network)

719 

67%

Add missing sidewalks

638 

59%

Add more neighborhood greenway connections

563 

42%

Connect sidewalks and greenways to transit

400 

41%

Address speeding traffic (e.g. traffic calming)

391 

28%

Increase maintenance and repair of existing sidewalks

265 

26%

Add more natural surface (dirt trail) connections

252 

24%

Add more marked crosswalks and/or more visible marked crosswalks

233 

24%

Add street trees, plantings and landscaping

227 

14%

Add new or improved street lights (for night time visibility)

134 

12%

12%

Add pedestrian features (benches, signs and maps highlighting pedestrian destinations)

Add missing curb ramps

116 

112 

7%

Improve curb ramps that are challenging to use

66 

5%

Other (please specify)

48 

4%

Add countdown timers at pedestrian signals

41 

959 Respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

8/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

How should the City fund new or improve existing greenway or pedestrian connections? (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 57% 9%

Rank: 2.00

468 

Rank: 2.01

77 

Rank: 2.06

505 

With current funding sources

Rank: 2.07

423 

Grant programs and/or outside funding sources (not normally

Rank: 2.26

434 

Rank: 3.14

224 

More developer participation

Other (please specify in comment box)

61%

51%

53%

27%

Dedicated tax increase for pedestrian improvements (e.g. sidewalks, greenways, accessibility improvements)

available for sidewalk maintenance)

General tax increases 826 Respondents

How willing would you be to pay a small increase in property taxes to fund pedestrian and greenway projects in the City? (Click and use the slider to indicate your willingness). As a way to fund pedestrian or greenway projects, many communities bring a property tax increase proposal to the voters for approval. The community decides what amount is needed (i.e. a "penny") and if approved, taxpayers would pay an additional penny, or one cent, on every dollar of property tax. Average

Not at all willing

Very willing

How much of an increase in property tax would you support to fund pedestrian and greenway projects? (Click and use the slider to indicate your willingness). Average

No pennies

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

Two pennies

9/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

How do you use the City's greenways (or multi-use paths)? (Select up to five options). 94%

Exercise, fitness and health

879 

61%

Socialization with friends

569 

45%

Walk my pet

419 

34%

Access daily needs (shopping, groceries, restaurants, doctor, etc.)

317 

33%

Place to play with my kids or family

306 

19%

Commute to work - by bike

176 

7%

Commute to work - walk / wheelchair

63 

5%

Take my kid(s) to school

49 

4%

Other (please specify)

33 

936 Respondents

How often do you use Asheville's greenways? 30% 2-3 times per week 15% 2-3 times per month 12% 1 time per week 12% 4-6 times per week 9% I am not a regular greenway user 9% Everyday 7% 1 time per month 5% A few times per year 2% Other (please specify)

965 respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

10/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

As a greenway user, these improvements would enhance my experience. (Select up to five options). 55%

Correct drainage (puddles or muddy spots)

471 

47%

Better crossings at roadways

404 

39%

Repair of cracks, roots, trip hazards

336 

30%

Better lighting

258 

30%

More trash cans along greenways

255 

29%

Bathrooms

250 

24%

More dog waste stations

208 

21%

Places to rest or sit

176 

17%

Wayfinding

143 

14%

Other (please specify)

116 

858 Respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

11/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What would increase your use of greenways as a transportation network through all parts of the day and seasons of the year? (Select up to five options). 83%

Better connectivity (greenways going to the places I need to get to)

752 

51%

More frequent access points to the greenway

461 

33%

Lighting along the greenway

298 

31%

More "eyes" on the greenway (more people on the greenway, proximity

279 

to active places such as dense residential area or commercial areas)

30%

More safe crossing roads crossing

268 

27%

Bike share on or near the greenway

244 

24%

More trees for shade

220 

21%

More parking at trailheads

186 

11%

Park and ride lots

100 

Other (please specify)

52 

6%

902 Respondents

How likely are you to use the following greenway or greenway connector types for recreation and transportation needs? (Click and use the slider to indicate your willingness). Traditional Asphalt or Concrete Greenway Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Traditional Greenway with Natural Surface Shoulder Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Sidewalks with Bike Lane Average

Very unlikely

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

Very likely

12/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Sidewalk with Buffered Bike Lane Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Sidewalks with Bicycle Boulevard (Signs, Markings and Traffic Calming) Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Shared Streets Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Designated Roadway Shoulders Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Combination Sidewalks with Cycletrack or Protected Bike Lane (Separated from the roadway with curbing or other vertical element) Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Multi-use sidepath (shared bicycle and pedestrian facility adjacent to a roadway) Average

Very unlikely

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

Very likely

13/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

The City is considering partnering in a community-supported initiative to develop and maintain a natural surface trail system, called Asheville Unpaved. How likely are you to use this natural trail system? Natural surface trails are unpaved, dirt trails that would connect with greenways and sidewalks to help build a network to allow people to get places. 76% Very likely 18% Somewhat likely 4% Not very likely 1% I will not use

938 respondents

If you would use the trail system, what kind of user would you most likely be? (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 79%

Walker/Hiker

Rank: 1.62

688 

54%

Other bicyclist (cross, gravel, road, hybrid)

Rank: 1.69

466 

36%

Runner

Rank: 1.80

316 

23%

Mountain biker

Rank: 1.97

196 

2%

Other (please specify in comment box)

Rank: 2.52

21 

4%

User of adaptive recreation equipment

Rank: 3.21

34 

866 Respondents

The idea of Asheville Unpaved will need community support, including donations, volunteers for maintenance, and partnerships and sponsorships with organizations. Are you a part of an organization that would be interested in supporting this initiative? Please list your contact information and how you might be able to help.

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

14/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What gender do you identify as? (Select all that apply). 54%

Female

459 

43%

Male

364 

3%

Prefer not to say

1%

Non-binary/third gender

8 

0%

Other

2 

0%

Transgender

0 

0%

Prefer to self-describe

0 

24 

854 Respondents

What is your age? 27% 36-45 20% 56-65 19% 46-55 16% 26-35 13% 66-75 6% Others

944 respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

15/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What is your race? (Select all that apply). 89%

White

790 

7%

Prefer not to answer

63 

1%

Some other race or origin

11 

1%

Asian

10 

1%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

8 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

8 

0%

Black or African American

4 

0%

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

0 

884 Respondents

Are you of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or of Spanish origin? (Select all that apply). 87%

No, not of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or Spanish origin

670 

8%

Prefer not to answer

61 

2%

Some other race, ethnicity, or origin

12 

1%

Yes, Another Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish origin

11 

1%

Yes, Cuban

9 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

5 

1%

Yes, Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano/a/x

4 

0%

Yes, Puerto Rican

2 

771 Respondents

Please share your contact information. Survey participants who provide their name and email will be entered in a drawing to receive a $25 Ingles Gift Card, awarded after the survey has closed. No data to display...

ADA Transition Plan Survey https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

16/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Project Engagement VIEWS

PARTICIPANTS

1,007

251

RESPONSES

COMMENTS

4,955

451

SUBSCRIBERS

51 * In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you live? By answering this question, it helps us make sure we are hearing from people across the City. We won't be able to identify your specific address. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

211

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

17/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you work? If you are not working, you can skip this question. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

187

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

2

18/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Rank your top five (5) items by order of importance. (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 81%

Pedestrian sidewalks

Rank: 1.72

162 

74%

Greenways and trails

Rank: 1.76

147 

59%

Street crossings, including traffic signals

Rank: 3.16

117 

41%

Pedestrian curb ramps

Rank: 3.22

81 

31%

Access TO bus stops (getting to the bus stop)

Rank: 3.25

61 

Rank: 3.47

15 

8%

Other (please specify in comment box)

24%

Access AT bus stops (using the bus stop)

Rank: 3.52

48 

22%

On-street parking

Rank: 3.72

43 

17%

Accessible signage and wayfinding assistance

Rank: 3.88

34 

200 Respondents i cannot believe that there isn't a safe place to cross broadway between weaver and chestnut. ! and, even worse, no pedestrian crossing at the 240 bridge/ramp near moog on broadway to get to lexington. super dangerous. 3 months ago

 12 Agree

The lack of sidewalks in many parts of Asheville is embarrassing, particularly on bus routes. Merrimon Avenue past Beaver dam and Swannanoa River Road near the municipal golf course come to mind. 3 months ago

 9 Agree

Benches and trash service at bus stops 3 months ago

 7 Agree

Honestly everything needs work in this city. Limiting to 5 priorities doesn't quite cut it. I couldn't imagine trying to navigate Asheville as someone with mobility limitations. 3 months ago

 4 Agree

On street parking that blocks sight of on coming traffic! 3 months ago

 3 Agree

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Think about the places you travel. Indicate the difficulty that sidewalk and curb ramp obstacles create as you move around Asheville. Not Not at

No curb ramp where needed.

Applicable

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

all

(I do not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

experience

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

this) 28%

15%

13%

23%

12%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

Challenging curb

14%

12%

31%

10%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

too steep, poor

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

turning areas, poor

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

ramps. For example,

drainage (puddles).

25%

this) Sidewalks in poor

25%

28%

31%

7%

4%

5%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

example, cracks and

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

broken areas that

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

condition. For

create obstacles.

this) Sidewalks are too

28%

27%

29%

7%

4%

6%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

obstacles in the

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

sidewalk. For

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

narrow or there are

example, utility poles in the middle of a

this)

sidewalk. Signalized roadway

16%

17%

28%

17%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

accessible features

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

like audible

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

crossings lack

pedestrian signals or broken, missing and

13%

this)

hard to reach push buttons. Unsignalized

23%

24%

27%

10%

6%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

with inadequate

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

facilities to cross the

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

roadway crossings

road. For example, missing or poorly

this)

aligned pedestrian ramps. Skewed or crooked crosswalks markings.

9%

14%

26%

18%

16%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

17% Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

20/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Not Not at

Applicable

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

all

(I do not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

experience

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

this) 30%

Ability to get to bus

20%

15%

17%

12%

6%

stops. For example,

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

no sidewalk access,

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

no place to sit, (no

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

sidewalk or poor design). Not enough accessible on-street parking.

this) 13%

13%

25%

18%

10%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

20% Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

169 respondents How about a road diet on Broadway from Chestnut to the I-240 bridge? Why are there 4 vehicular lanes here? Let's get bike lanes and/or parallel parking (adding a buffer between the cars and pedestrians much needed!) 3 months ago

 12 Agree

Bike lanes are not consistent or sometimes not wide enough and biking in the road can be scary 3 months ago

 10 Agree

We need to slow down the traffic on many of the main streets in Asheville 3 months ago

 6 Agree

So many sidewalks have poles right in the middle with no ramps nearby to allow for ADA travelers to navigate around them. State Street in particular is a significant pedestrian corridor that forces ADA travelers into the busy, high traffic streets. Many bike lanes simply end at the most inopportune and dangerous places. 3 months ago

 5 Agree

No seating, no trash cans, and no covered area at bus stops is a huge problem, but it isn't a problem for me personally, so I didn't rank it. But it still needs to be addressed! 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

 4 Agree

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

How do you get around on an average day? 71% I have a car and drive 14% I walk or use a wheelchair or other mobility device to get around 6% I have a reliable automobile transportation option, for example, I use a service or have someone who can take me places 5% Other (please specify) 4% I use Asheville's transit system (ART) 0% I use Mountain Mobility

189 respondents biking and walking are also other ways that I get around town 3 months ago

 9 Agree

I would bike but it is extremely unsafe, particularly my commute on Biltmore from Biltmore Village to downtown. 3 months ago

 4 Agree

Also use Mountain Mobility one month ago

plus Mountain Mobility and walking. one month ago

My boyfriend uses a wheelchair, and you just don’t know how impassible how our city is until you try to get around on wheels like that. Minor cracks to us can cause someone to flip over. Let’s not wait for some one to get hurt, or killed, or the city get another huge lawsuit before we fix our sidewalks. one month ago

Are there times when you would like to walk or use a mobility device to reach a destination, but you do not because the curb ramps, sidewalks and street crossings conditions present barriers? If so, please indicate your alternative transportation. 65% Yes and I have a car and can drive to places I cannot walk 27% No 4% Yes and I have a reliable transportation option, for example, I use a service or have someone who can take me places 4% Others

181 respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

22/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What routes/areas should the City prioritize for accessibility improvements? (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). In areas with vehicle related safety concerns (including high traffic

62%

Rank: 2.63

93 

In areas with higher equity concerns (neighborhoods with barriers thatRank: 2.66

80 

roads, higher speed roads or locations with pedestrian crash history)

53%

prevent people from accessing essential needs, opportunities for wellbeing, and their full potential)

63%

Along routes to grocery stores and shopping areas

Rank: 2.87

95 

55%

Along routes to parks, libraries or community centers

Rank: 3.04

83 

49%

Along routes to schools

Rank: 3.39

74 

Rank: 3.50

4 

3%

Other (please specify in comment box)

39%

Along transit lines or near transit stops

Rank: 3.69

59 

31%

Along routes to healthcare offices and hospitals

Rank: 4.26

47 

32%

In residential areas

Rank: 4.44

48 

19%

Near public buildings like City Hall or the Health Department

Rank: 5.96

28 

151 Respondents DOWNTOWN! Bury utilities if you have to - getting poles out of sidewalks, wider sidewalks everywhere possible, midblock crossings, street trees, and intersections where plenty of people can gather comfortably to wait to cross. 3 months ago

 11 Agree

I like the idea of getting rid of electric poles so you have more room on sidewalks. Too many are too narrow for a wheelchair to negotiate. 3 months ago

 6 Agree

A frame signage in front of stores used for advertising creates such a barrier. Especially for people who are blind/visually impaired. Not a good universal design ie. pushing strollers, pulling carts. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Restrooms and benches 3 months ago

 1 Agree

All of these are obviously important but certainly routes that are frequently used and utilized by pedestrians but remain inaccessible to those with disabilities. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

23/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Tell us the places you would like to walk or use a mobility device to get to. Along Broadway to Riverside Drive; on Merrimon (safely - need a buffer between cars and pedestrians!!!!); Swannanoa River Road (either on a greenway or a sidewalk); Tunnel Road (with a buffer between cars and pedestrians!!!) 3 months ago

 7 Agree

Smokey park hwy, Patton ave 2 months ago

 6 Agree

Merrimon Ave, Lakeside Drive, Tunnel Rd 3 months ago

 3 Agree

Would love to walk from sand hill 600 block road to hominy creek greenway and sports complex 3 months ago

 3 Agree

Can all of Asheville look like the new RAD? 3 months ago

 3 Agree

The City of Asheville is working to identify areas that are high priority for pedestrian facility repairs. Use the map or comment box below to show us specific locations that cause problems when traveling as a pedestrian (including use of mobility devices). To draw a line or add a point, zoom in to your area of interest. Then click the button on the top right, 'Draw Line' or 'Add Point.' Then click on the map to create a line segment or point. When you are done adding points or lines, a comment box will appear; you can add notes to this box or if you make any errors you can click the 'X' on the top right of the comment box to delete and start over.

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

24/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

We encourage you to use the map; however, if it does not work for you, provide your answer here. Indicate the street/route name and beginning/end points. Please be as specific as possible. Johnston Blvd to Haywood Rd.; Leicester Hwy to Patton. Bridge from Amboy Road to Lyman. 3 months ago

 7 Agree

cutting brush back along city sidewalks and roads would be a good start. leicester highway , sweeten creek , merrimon, broadway, riverside 2 months ago

 5 Agree

Merrion Avenue is a nightmare. the entire length needs to be replaced, the driveway aprons are not ADA compliant, the concrete is broken, cracked, there are utility poles in the way. there needs to be better street lighting to make it safe at night 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Between Amboy, Biltmore Village, Tunnel Road, and Fairview, along Swannanoa River 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Hominy creek road between the greenways 2 months ago

 1 Agree

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

25/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

I am an individual that has functional needs or disabilities affecting my ability to use the streets, sidewalks, trails, or transit system in Asheville. The things that affect me include: (Select all that apply) 78%

Does not apply

98 

17%

Walking

21 

7%

Moving

9 

5%

Breathing

6 

4%

Vision

5 

3%

Hearing

4 

3%

Cognitive abilities (thinking or focus)

4 

2%

Other (please specify)

2 

126 Respondents Wheelchair user, so adequate sidewalks and curb ramps are essential. But shucks, even people with strollers have a hard time! 3 months ago

 4 Agree

Why does Asheville continually rank as the most dangerous city for pedestrians, yet keeps on approving mega developments without consideration of the infrastructure needs and geographical limitations? It seems Asheville's motto is "We're on the road to nowhere." We seem to value roads more than the destination and definitely more than the safety of pedestrians and cyclists. 2 months ago

 2 Agree

I am a strong supporter of accommodations for aging in place and with pedestrian improvements North Asheville has the potential to be a great area for older adults or those unable to drive and I am very cognizant of these challenging whether they apply to me. So, while this does not currently apply it may in the future. 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Stamina while walking, so distance is my main issue. 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Cane user for walking due to mobility challenges. Too many ramps and driveways have slopes that are severe and I fear for injury or falling into traffic. 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

 1 Agree

26/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

I am related to, or care for, an individual that has functional needs or disabilities affecting their ability to use the streets, sidewalks, trails, or transit system in Asheville. The things that affect them include: (Select all that apply) 68%

Does not apply

84 

24%

Walking

30 

12%

Moving

15 

7%

Hearing

8 

7%

Vision

8 

7%

Cognitive abilities (thinking or focus)

8 

6%

Breathing

7 

0%

Other (please specify)

0 

123 Respondents I am a senior and can see in the future the need for having better sidewalks 2 months ago

 1 Agree

It is very difficult to get around downtown using a wheelchair. Sidewalks and curb ramps are in bad shape and many of the curb ramps are too steep. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

My boyfriend has a spinal cord injury and uses a wheelchair. one month ago

Parent to a young child. 3 months ago

Poll Questions 'Other' Responses: children going to school or walking to park 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

27/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Please tell us if you use a smartphone to assist you with your travel as a pedestrian (including using mobility devices). If so, what services do you use? (Select all that apply). 74%

Yes, for mapping and directions

26%

Yes, for mapping to see if sidewalks or trails are present

35 

21%

Yes, for bus schedules or stop locations

28 

13%

No, I prefer not to use one

17 

100 

8%

Yes, to check terrain

11 

6%

No, I don't have one

8 

1%

Yes, to use apps that provide sighted assistance

2 

1%

Other tool

2 

136 Respondents Please don't let NCDOT do what others are doing and having people rely on smart phone apps to connect to cars and traffic signals. If the phone won't regularly work properly with earbuds, there is no way it will work with their primitive technology. 2 months ago

 2 Agree

I often use the Asheville App to send comments on areas that need maintenance. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Use a smartphone occasionally to confirm a location: Have I arrived at my destination? Where exactly did the neighbor see a bear? one month ago

I don't use a smart phone because a smart phone with any kind of mobility app on it will pull my attention away from my cane and my environment, and those are the two primary mobility devices to keep me safe. one month ago

Poll Questions 'Other' Responses: Use phone, just not for above features. We use the Asheville App to report sidewalk issues. one month ago

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28/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What are the most effective ways for you to receive information on upcoming events, announcements, projects, or general information about the ADA Transition Plan? (Select all that apply). 64%

Email notifications

98 

52%

Social Media

80 

26%

Press release

40 

16%

City of Asheville Pedestrian web page and tools

24 

6%

2%

Public meetings

9 

Emails to disability groups (if you have a suggested contact, please list that in the comment box below)

3 

2%

Other

3 

0%

Brochures

0 

153 Respondents VIP Support Group (c/o Judy Davis) one month ago

NC Spinal Cord Injury Association (NCSCIA.org) Spinal Cord Injury Support Group - meets once a month at Care Partners (Debbie Johnson, Physical Therapist) one month ago

I found out about this survey through Nextdoor post. 2 months ago

Poll Questions 'Other' Responses: Text one month ago

Avl Commission for the Blind, Paula Springer one month ago

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29/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What gender do you identify as? (Select all that apply). 57%

Female

89 

39%

Male

61 

3%

Prefer not to say

5 

1%

Non-binary/third gender

2 

0%

Transgender

0 

0%

Other

0 

0%

Prefer to self-describe

0 

157 Respondents

What is your age? 26% 36-45 20% 56-65 17% 26-35 17% 46-55 13% 66-75 3% Over 75 4% Others

164 respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

30/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What is your race? (Select all that apply). 88%

White

139 

6%

Prefer not to answer

9 

3%

Some other race or origin

4 

2%

Black or African American

3 

1%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

2 

1%

Asian

2 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

1 

0%

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

0 

158 Respondents

Are you of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or of Spanish origin? (Select all that apply). 89%

No, not of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or Spanish origin

131 

6%

Prefer not to answer

9 

2%

Yes, Another Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish origin

3 

1%

Yes, Cuban

2 

1%

Yes, Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano/a/x

1 

1%

Some other race, ethnicity, or origin

1 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

1 

0%

Yes, Puerto Rican

0 

148 Respondents

Please share your contact information. Survey participants who provide their name and email will be entered in a drawing to receive a $25 Ingles Gift Card, awarded after the survey has closed. No data to display...

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

31/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Project Engagement VIEWS

PARTICIPANTS

4,459

1,570

RESPONSES

COMMENTS

56,154

4,259

SUBSCRIBERS

603 * In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you live? By answering this question, it helps us make sure we are hearing from people across the City. We won't be able to identify your specific address. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

1331

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8690?embeddedreport=False

32/47


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you work? If you are not working, you can skip this question. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

2 2 1079

3

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

What is your favorite street to walk in Asheville?

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Thinking about your favorite street, please choose up to five (5) of the following design-related items that contribute to the quality of this walking street for you. (Select up to five options). 68%

Direct and complete sidewalk route (e.g. sidewalks where I need them with no missing sections)

757 

56%

Shade or trees

623 

49%

Low traffic and/or low car speeds

549 

45%

Sidewalks separated from traffic (e.g. a grass strip so I don't have to walk next to traffic)

497 

35%

Wider sidewalks without obstacles (e.g. utility poles)

386 

33%

Quality of street crossings - location, visibility, medians for refuge

371 

30%

Marked crosswalks

337 

28%

Lighting at night

315 

12%

Accessible features (e.g. well design curb ramps)

138 

10%

Benches to rest

106 

9%

Other (please specify)

103 

1,114 Respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Choose the top five (5) factors that make walking along some Asheville streets difficult. (Select up to five options). 79%

53%

Sidewalks missing (or significant gaps) on high traffic streets

Sidewalks missing to key destinations such as parks, schools, grocery stores

899 

603 

51%

Narrow sidewalks on high traffic streets

579 

45%

Sidewalks without a buffer from driving lanes

519 

43%

Sidewalks missing (or significant gaps) on low traffic neighborhood streets

496 

39%

Buckled or cracked sidewalks, or other obstacles like puddles after rain

447 

39%

Barriers or obstacles, like power poles, in the sidewalk

441 

25%

Poor lighting

285 

18%

Narrow sidewalks to key destinations such as parks, schools, grocery stores

205 

9%

Narrow sidewalks on low traffic neighborhood streets

98 

7%

Other

78 

1,143 Respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Select your top five (5) factors that make a street crossing difficult at locations with traffic lights. (Select up to five options). 77%

Turning vehicles do not stop for me when I'm crossing

808 

46%

Missing or hard to see pedestrian signals

484 

45%

Too long to wait for the pedestrian signal

472 

31%

26%

25%

Not enough time to cross the street (the pedestrian signal is not long enough) Pedestrian signal does not have countdown information (I don't know how much time I have left to cross) Unsure of when it is safe to cross the street (I can't see the signal indications as a pedestrian)

331 

272 

260 

15%

Missing or hard to reach pedestrian signal push buttons

160 

13%

Missing audible or tactile crossing signals to cross safely

139 

10%

Other (please specify)

104 

1,051 Respondents

Select your top three (3) factors that make a street crossing difficult at locations without traffic lights. (Select up to three options). 83%

81%

37%

32%

3%

Drivers don't stop or yield for pedestrians

Crossing locations feel unsafe (e.g. cars travel too fast or there are too many cars to find a break in traffic)

I'm not sure where to cross (e.g. there are no marked crosswalks)

Marked crosswalks are too far apart (i.e. I have to walk too far to use a marked crossing).

Other (please specify)

890 

871 

396 

339 

37 

1,073 Respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Using the map to draw a line or drop a point, identify some of the uncomfortable walking streets you use or see people using. We encourage you to use the map; however, if it does not work for you, provide your answer in the comment box below. An uncomfortable walking street is one where we would worry about letting young children (think about an 8 year old) or older adults (think about an 80 year old) walk without assistance. To draw a line or add a point, zoom in to your area of interest. Then click the button on the top right, 'Draw Line' or 'Add Point.' Then click on the map to create a line segment or point. When you are done adding points or lines, a comment box will appear; you can add notes to this box or if you make any errors you can click the 'X' on the top right of the comment box to delete and start over.

As an alternative to mapping, indicate the street/route name and beginning/end points. Please be as specific as possible.

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Select your top five (5) areas where the City should prioritize sidewalk connections, accessibility improvements or greenways. (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'.). 49%

Along routes to schools

Rank: 2.22

432 

58%

Along routes to parks, libraries or community centers

Rank: 2.41

516 

In areas with vehicle related safety concerns (including high traffic

Rank: 2.53

487 

Rank: 2.73

489 

Rank: 2.82

17 

Rank: 2.84

385 

55%

55% 2%

roads, higher speed roads or locations with pedestrian crash history)

Along routes to grocery stores and shopping areas

Other (please specify in comment box)

In areas with equity concerns (neighborhoods with barriers that

43%

prevent people from accessing essential needs, opportunities for wellbeing, and their full potential)

31%

In residential areas

Rank: 2.88

278 

42%

Along transit lines and near transit stops

Rank: 2.99

372 

Rank: 3.53

49 

Rank: 3.61

105 

6% 12%

Near public buildings like City Hall or the Health Department

Along routes to healthcare offices and hospitals 888 Respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

If you were in charge of Asheville's pedestrian and greenway programs and budget, which of the following efforts would you prioritize to make walking and greenway use more convenient, safe, and well connected. (Select up to five options). 75%

Connect the major greenways that can get us across the city (greenway network)

719 

67%

Add missing sidewalks

638 

59%

Add more neighborhood greenway connections

563 

42%

Connect sidewalks and greenways to transit

400 

41%

Address speeding traffic (e.g. traffic calming)

391 

28%

Increase maintenance and repair of existing sidewalks

265 

26%

Add more natural surface (dirt trail) connections

252 

24%

Add more marked crosswalks and/or more visible marked crosswalks

233 

24%

Add street trees, plantings and landscaping

227 

14%

Add new or improved street lights (for night time visibility)

134 

12%

12%

Add pedestrian features (benches, signs and maps highlighting pedestrian destinations)

Add missing curb ramps

116 

112 

7%

Improve curb ramps that are challenging to use

66 

5%

Other (please specify)

48 

4%

Add countdown timers at pedestrian signals

41 

959 Respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

How should the City fund new or improve existing greenway or pedestrian connections? (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 57% 9%

Rank: 2.00

468 

Rank: 2.01

77 

Rank: 2.06

505 

With current funding sources

Rank: 2.07

423 

Grant programs and/or outside funding sources (not normally

Rank: 2.26

434 

Rank: 3.14

224 

More developer participation

Other (please specify in comment box)

61%

51%

53%

27%

Dedicated tax increase for pedestrian improvements (e.g. sidewalks, greenways, accessibility improvements)

available for sidewalk maintenance)

General tax increases 826 Respondents

How willing would you be to pay a small increase in property taxes to fund pedestrian and greenway projects in the City? (Click and use the slider to indicate your willingness). As a way to fund pedestrian or greenway projects, many communities bring a property tax increase proposal to the voters for approval. The community decides what amount is needed (i.e. a "penny") and if approved, taxpayers would pay an additional penny, or one cent, on every dollar of property tax. Average

Not at all willing

Very willing

How much of an increase in property tax would you support to fund pedestrian and greenway projects? (Click and use the slider to indicate your willingness). Average

No pennies

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Two pennies

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

How do you use the City's greenways (or multi-use paths)? (Select up to five options). 94%

Exercise, fitness and health

879 

61%

Socialization with friends

569 

45%

Walk my pet

419 

34%

Access daily needs (shopping, groceries, restaurants, doctor, etc.)

317 

33%

Place to play with my kids or family

306 

19%

Commute to work - by bike

176 

7%

Commute to work - walk / wheelchair

63 

5%

Take my kid(s) to school

49 

4%

Other (please specify)

33 

936 Respondents

How often do you use Asheville's greenways? 30% 2-3 times per week 15% 2-3 times per month 12% 1 time per week 12% 4-6 times per week 9% I am not a regular greenway user 9% Everyday 7% 1 time per month 5% A few times per year 2% Other (please specify)

965 respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

As a greenway user, these improvements would enhance my experience. (Select up to five options). 55%

Correct drainage (puddles or muddy spots)

471 

47%

Better crossings at roadways

404 

39%

Repair of cracks, roots, trip hazards

336 

30%

Better lighting

258 

30%

More trash cans along greenways

255 

29%

Bathrooms

250 

24%

More dog waste stations

208 

21%

Places to rest or sit

176 

17%

Wayfinding

143 

14%

Other (please specify)

116 

858 Respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What would increase your use of greenways as a transportation network through all parts of the day and seasons of the year? (Select up to five options). 83%

Better connectivity (greenways going to the places I need to get to)

752 

51%

More frequent access points to the greenway

461 

33%

Lighting along the greenway

298 

31%

More "eyes" on the greenway (more people on the greenway, proximity

279 

to active places such as dense residential area or commercial areas)

30%

More safe crossing roads crossing

268 

27%

Bike share on or near the greenway

244 

24%

More trees for shade

220 

21%

More parking at trailheads

186 

11%

Park and ride lots

100 

Other (please specify)

52 

6%

902 Respondents

How likely are you to use the following greenway or greenway connector types for recreation and transportation needs? (Click and use the slider to indicate your willingness). Traditional Asphalt or Concrete Greenway Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Traditional Greenway with Natural Surface Shoulder Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Sidewalks with Bike Lane Average

Very unlikely

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Very likely

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Sidewalk with Buffered Bike Lane Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Sidewalks with Bicycle Boulevard (Signs, Markings and Traffic Calming) Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Shared Streets Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Designated Roadway Shoulders Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Combination Sidewalks with Cycletrack or Protected Bike Lane (Separated from the roadway with curbing or other vertical element) Average

Very unlikely

Very likely

Multi-use sidepath (shared bicycle and pedestrian facility adjacent to a roadway) Average

Very unlikely

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Very likely

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

The City is considering partnering in a community-supported initiative to develop and maintain a natural surface trail system, called Asheville Unpaved. How likely are you to use this natural trail system? Natural surface trails are unpaved, dirt trails that would connect with greenways and sidewalks to help build a network to allow people to get places. 76% Very likely 18% Somewhat likely 4% Not very likely 1% I will not use

938 respondents

If you would use the trail system, what kind of user would you most likely be? (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 79%

Walker/Hiker

Rank: 1.62

688 

54%

Other bicyclist (cross, gravel, road, hybrid)

Rank: 1.69

466 

36%

Runner

Rank: 1.80

316 

23%

Mountain biker

Rank: 1.97

196 

2%

Other (please specify in comment box)

Rank: 2.52

21 

4%

User of adaptive recreation equipment

Rank: 3.21

34 

866 Respondents

The idea of Asheville Unpaved will need community support, including donations, volunteers for maintenance, and partnerships and sponsorships with organizations. Are you a part of an organization that would be interested in supporting this initiative? Please list your contact information and how you might be able to help.

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What gender do you identify as? (Select all that apply). 54%

Female

459 

43%

Male

364 

3%

Prefer not to say

1%

Non-binary/third gender

8 

0%

Other

2 

0%

Transgender

0 

0%

Prefer to self-describe

0 

24 

854 Respondents

What is your age? 27% 36-45 20% 56-65 19% 46-55 16% 26-35 13% 66-75 6% Others

944 respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What is your race? (Select all that apply). 89%

White

790 

7%

Prefer not to answer

63 

1%

Some other race or origin

11 

1%

Asian

10 

1%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

8 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

8 

0%

Black or African American

4 

0%

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

0 

884 Respondents

Are you of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or of Spanish origin? (Select all that apply). 87%

No, not of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or Spanish origin

670 

8%

Prefer not to answer

61 

2%

Some other race, ethnicity, or origin

12 

1%

Yes, Another Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish origin

11 

1%

Yes, Cuban

9 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

5 

1%

Yes, Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano/a/x

4 

0%

Yes, Puerto Rican

2 

771 Respondents

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

ADA Transition Plan Survey Project Engagement VIEWS

PARTICIPANTS

1,007

251

RESPONSES

COMMENTS

4,955

451

SUBSCRIBERS

51 * In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you live? By answering this question, it helps us make sure we are hearing from people across the City. We won't be able to identify your specific address. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

211

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you work? If you are not working, you can skip this question. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

187

2

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Rank your top five (5) items by order of importance. (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 81%

Pedestrian sidewalks

Rank: 1.72

162 

74%

Greenways and trails

Rank: 1.76

147 

59%

Street crossings, including traffic signals

Rank: 3.16

117 

41%

Pedestrian curb ramps

Rank: 3.22

81 

31%

Access TO bus stops (getting to the bus stop)

Rank: 3.25

61 

Rank: 3.47

15 

8%

Other (please specify in comment box)

24%

Access AT bus stops (using the bus stop)

Rank: 3.52

48 

22%

On-street parking

Rank: 3.72

43 

17%

Accessible signage and wayfinding assistance

Rank: 3.88

34 

200 Respondents i cannot believe that there isn't a safe place to cross broadway between weaver and chestnut. ! and, even worse, no pedestrian crossing at the 240 bridge/ramp near moog on broadway to get to lexington. super dangerous. 3 months ago

 12 Agree

The lack of sidewalks in many parts of Asheville is embarrassing, particularly on bus routes. Merrimon Avenue past Beaver dam and Swannanoa River Road near the municipal golf course come to mind. 3 months ago

 9 Agree

Benches and trash service at bus stops 3 months ago

 7 Agree

Honestly everything needs work in this city. Limiting to 5 priorities doesn't quite cut it. I couldn't imagine trying to navigate Asheville as someone with mobility limitations. 3 months ago

 4 Agree

On street parking that blocks sight of on coming traffic! 3 months ago

 3 Agree

Repair and maintenance of current sidewalks, including removing barriers, such as poles in the middle of the sidewalk. 3 months ago

 3 Agree

Most streets in Asheville only have sidewalks on one side making it necessary for folks in wheelchairs....low to ground...to have to cross where there are often no crosswalks. Baffles the mind. 3 months ago

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 3 Agree

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Bus stops SUCK in Asheville. It's pathetic. A freakin' bench without shelter is NOT a functional bus stop. A sign in the mud without even a bench to sit on IS NOT A BUST STOP! 90% are functionally obsolete. Make them better. Minimal standard should be a bench, with shelter from the elements, and a trash can. And, duh, put them on an ADA concrete pad, not in the goddamn mud. 3 months ago

 3 Agree

ADA compliant sidewalks 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Sand hill road has many people that walk up and down but no side walks once you reach bear creek area . Very dangerous for bikers and walkers 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Interested in pedestrian friendly features, and access to mass transit 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Prohibit ALL on street parking in residential areas 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Look at population density in an area, and historically neglected areas. Include consideration for conditions that are just beyond the City's limits. For instance, many areas of West Asheville have far more people who need these improvements yet the funding goes to places with the more wealthy and politically connected citizens but without the population density. Look at who is taking this survey - who has time, energy, and belief in giving feedback to city gov't? Who has the city gov't taken care of historically? The loudest voice does not equal the greatest need. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

I wish I could click the "agree" button a thousand times for this. I spoke with someone at the city several years ago about making this type of feedback more readily accessible to folks who aren't so connected and engaged. Many of our older residents don't have computers and certainly couldn't navigate this type of thing on a tiny little phone screen - if they even have a smart phone (many don't). Her answer was that those folks should find a way if they want to participate and pointed out that libraries have free computer/internet access. But many have no idea how to use a computer, wouldn't be comfortable doing so, and folks who are older and/or living with disabilities often lack the kind of transportation options needed to take advantage of that service. I prefer to give my feedback online but many would prefer to have a phone number they can call or a paper survey they can mail back. And getting information out to those folks that this type of engagement is even available should be a consideration as well - newspaper, local news, robocall messages or push notifications to phones. 2 months ago

Sidewalks that are unusable (especially for wheelchairs and strollers) due to being too narrow, interrupted by light poles, heaved by roots, parked on by cars pulling half onto them, overhung by shrubs, etc. State Street is a great example of a sidewalk that was completely redone in the last 10 years or so -- just as useless to wheelchairs after as it was before. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

Accessible parking and walkway to Hazel Robinson Amphitheatre. It’s a shame the city won’t support the facility for a nice resource to citizens $ tourists. Kinda shady. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

More bike lanes 3 months ago  1 Agree

we need more bike lanes 3 months ago

 1 Agree

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Slower traffic in downtown, never APD giving speeding tickets 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Bike lanes 3 months ago  1 Agree

Bike Lanes 3 months ago  1 Agree

Other: slower traffic, less traffic one month ago

Sidewalks that do not have utility poles sticking up in the middle of them. one month ago

Connecting greenways to each other so I can get from Reems Creek to downtown via safe pedestrian or bike travel. one month ago

Difficult to narrow to just 5 as all of these are important and challenging obstacles in Asheville for a person like me who uses a wheelchair. one month ago

More signage regarding pet leash laws. one month ago

Patton Avenue needs more safe, accessible crosswalks. There is no safe way to cross Patton at the Sisters of Mercy Urgent Care, even though it's where the sidewalk ends. one month ago

Benches/rest areas one month ago

I do use greenways and parks and would like more access such as wheelchair accessible trails, areas. Maybe more education to the public, most people do not use wheelchairs unless absolutely necessary. there are some that abuse it. also, some can walk a very short distance, but not long distance and then need the chair. people need to understand this and that we are not just trying to take up their space or get in their way. this is our only way to get around. one month ago

monitoring handicap parking. too many drivers use expired, borrowed and even stolen placards. this makes it difficult for people that are truly legit. maybe use pictures or other id like other states. this is truly frustrating to see and experience. one month ago

Bike lanes one month ago

Avl needs more verbal cross-walk cues for the blind. Sidewalks full of poles and guide-wires are perilous for we who use a tap-cane to walk. More concrete sidewalks are not the answer: I favor Avl Unpaved. one month ago

Sidewalks that are free of trash or broken, unlevel tiles one month ago

uneven pavement or obstacles in sidewalk such as poles, parking meters etc that visually impaired or others with physical limitations may trip over one month ago

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2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation The gap in sidewalks on New Haw Creek Rd between the Tunnel Rd entrance and Arco Rd continues to frighten me. With sidewalks at each end of this gap, pedestrians routinely walk the 1/4 mile strip without sidewalks. It's scary to see persons of all ages navigating this stretch with vehicles passing by at 40 MPH. 2 months ago

The city needs to replace every tree they've removed and add additional trees. It's very hard to walk "naked" streets in the hot weather. 2 months ago

The city needs to replace the trees they've removed and also add more. It's difficult to walk naked streets in the hot weather. 2 months ago

We submitted a request for a sidewalk six years ago! We walk all around town and there is a definite need for sidewalk repair and sidewalks in general. 2 months ago

Bike paths on major streets to city center 2 months ago

As a bike rider here there have been large improvements over the last 10 years but would like to see more. 2 months ago

Can’t get greenways and trails to #1 spot 2 months ago

I would really encourage Asheville to begin getting cars out of the downtown. Not by making mandates, but by providing park-n-rides where the major highways leading into Asheville meet, in the N, S, E, and West outskirts of the city. The park-n-rides would then have buses come and go every 15 minutes that shuttle people to our downtown. People will quickly realize it's much easier to park in the park -n-rides than it is to find downtown parking. In addition, the city should zone off most areas of downtown parking to be used only for those who work in city or county jobs. People would pay parking fees at the parking garages outside the city, then pay bus fees generating money that stays in Asheville and can be used to get our sewers repaired so there is not so much clogging which adds to the problem of flooding and unclean water from runoff. The city could also invest in roads-skyways that take people from the park n rides into the city. The skyways would be used only by pedestrians, bicycles or an el type train or trolleys, while our current e-buses take people from their neighborhoods to the park -n-rides. Getting cars out of our downtown solves many of the 2030 goals that I read on the city's long term plans-on the website. This plan, with the skyways, reduces car usage which causes 24% of the air pollution in cities in our country. It provides jobs, revenue, and attracts businesses who depend on a workforce that has a fast and reliable method of getting to work. CEO's and workers alike could use the system enabling Asheville to grow without changing our downtown footprint which is so attractive with mom and pop shops. This plan would free up parking so that pedestrian only zones could be established. Shade sails could be put up high between buildings reducing summer heat, providing protection from summer storms and winter winds, and further keeping our downtown weirdly fabulous with buskers, great food, shops and ambiance that is so needed to compete for visitors and relocators as outlying towns are attracting large numbers of relocators after 2020 flooding, hurricanes, and fires. We must get ready now,.....for what will most likely happen as we continue to grow. Thank you to whomever is listening...please pass on my message....I grew up in Ohio, lived in Portland, Oregon for the past 35 yrs. and moved to Asheville 2.5 yrs. ago because I love Asheville and am now retired. You can reach me: Jean Bedore, 503-705-8123 or email: bedorejm@comcast.net. 2 months ago

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6/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation There are zero sidewalks in and around our neighborhood in South Asheville, and no greenways at all either. South Asheville in general is super lacking in greenways and sidewalks. It would be wonderful and much safer if those existed. Trying to walk up Rock Hill Road for example, is incredibly dangerous. I see kids/teens walking on the side there all the time and people driving have blindspots and come zooming up and down. Access to public low cost transport and equity in accessibility are always high on my priority list too. 2 months ago

Until the Greenway into downtown is completed from Five Points/Montford, there's not safe way to bike into downtown. I'd love to see bike lanes on Broadway, even if this means a narrowing of the car-traffic lanes, which I've almost never seen full. Similarly, bike lanes from Broadway to Riverside, which already much used by runners and cyclists is very dangerous until the bike lanes begin near the Bywater. 2 months ago

More bike lanes 2 months ago

More people with cars and access will complete this survey than those who need the bus. Please prioritize services for our most vulnerable. 2 months ago

Asheville is known for its outdoor attraction and beauty. This should be a bike and walking akk access city/county 2 months ago

Bike friendly roads/paths for commuting across Asheville/Buncombe 2 months ago

No shoulders, no sidewalks Super dangerous 2 months ago

I work in the transportation industry and constantly hear about the difficulties people have navigating the ART system. The primary issue I hear is that the nearest bus stop is very far away or doesn't have a sidewalk leading to/from. This is dangerous in many places for everyone but even more so for those who use wheelchairs or walkers and are vision or hearing impaired. I have also noticed that many of the new sidewalks are tilted to one side, have obstructions like light poles or have landscaping elements that force pedestrians to move to the curb edge (rather than having placed those elements on the road side which would allow pedestrians to stay further away from the road. Additionally, standing/ponding water that doesn't drain properly during a rain leaves pedestrians exposed to large sprays of water from passing vehicles or obscures the surface for those walking on the road due to lack of sidewalks. 2 months ago

connectors and bike lanes to existing greenways 2 months ago

There absolutely needs to be a sidewalk on Lakeshore Drive in north Asheville down to Beaver lake. There’s so much foot traffic and that road is extremely dangerous with a lot of car traffic. I’ve been almost hit multiple times walking down to the lake. 2 months ago

Ada access to the river itself. Ada. Bathrooms at carrier park. Tried to go and the bathrooms by the track were closed and had to use the ramp after trying so hard to find access to a bathroom. Need signs and maps of where you can find a bathroom with running water. Thank you for providing two Some what Ada parking spaces...the terrain is uneven, it’s hard to back out because park behind you...the city employees park in the space while they empty the trash and restock the dog bags, also have noticed people park in the space that is NOT a parking g space that blocks trying to get out of a vehicle. 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

7/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation it is dangerous every single day walking on deaverview road to the bus stops. it’s dangerous every single day driving on deaverview watching out for pedestrians in the road- trash days are the worst since they have to walk further out in the road- rainy days and dark nights are scary. please add sidewalks. 2 months ago

Wyoming needs a sidewalk! There are always children and people with dogs walking down to the park, and drivers use it as a cut-through to get from Biltmore to Tunnel and drive so fast! It's narrow and dangerous. 2 months ago

Buses need to be outfitted with complete sets of wheelchair tie downs and occupant restraint systems which work, and bus drivers should be thoroughly trained in how to safely use them. 2 months ago

Stop catering to tourists and the hotel industry instead of the taxpayers that LIVE here. I have lived here my entire life and sick of being a second class citizen in lieu of everybody from everywhere else. You allow overbuilding, cut down our forests, push our natural resources to their limit and destroy all natural habitat - all the things that actually draw people here in the first place. When is it going to stop when everything is one big blob of asphalt and traffic doesn’t even move anymore? We’re almost there... 2 months ago

Please PLEASE complete the section of sidewalk beginning near the bowling alley on Kenilworth Road all the way to the top of the hill. We have heard over and over that it would be done - and NEVER completed! Almost every day I see people AND KIDS walking, on bikes, even in wheelchairs trying to navigate this area - absolutely ridiculous that this has not been done yet. Also, the power poles have been replaced - and kept in the MIDDLE of the sidewalk making it practically impossible for anyone in a wheelchair, or someone pushing a stroller to navigate Kenilworth Road without having to go into the traffic lane. Many of us have asked FOR YEARS for this to be done - money has even been paid by a couple of developers for the sidewalk - yet it STILL remains unfinished while other much less used sidewalks are built. This is an ADA issue - why can we not get it done? 2 months ago

I am unable to take my wheelchair even on roads with sidewalks throughout asheville because there are light polls right in the middle of the walkway! 2 months ago

Let's be honest here....how many of us are using the bus? I suggest we structure a high level private transit system (slightly higher cost) where people can use the bus stops and NOT sit it urine. 2 months ago

Community parks that you can walk to 2 months ago

No sidewalk access on dangerous curved and narrow road on wood near Parker and sayles 2 months ago

The Amboy Rd. bridge is a glaring continuity issue. We now have what amounts to three seperate greenways that are not connected, yet all are within sight of each other. I know bridges are expensive, but the whole thing seems silly. 2 months ago

There are almost no sidewalks or shoulder in Beaverdam. Almost every time I run/walk on Beaverdam I get buzzed by a car/truck. 2 months ago

Inaccessible pedestrian push buttons. Poor routing and detours in construction zones for pedestrians. Poor snow plowing that blocked ramps, crosswalks and sidewalks. 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

8/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Pedestrian bridge across the French Broad River. 2 months ago

Decreasing the noise pollution caused by nearby interstates and four-lane roads. 2 months ago

Parks we need at park at cedar hill and Pisgah view not more housing. Address the issues with the available housing and improve it not build more on our land. Make more parks that are safe for kids and families 2 months ago

Encourage on street parking in ALL residential areas. 3 months ago

Why in the world would you recommend this? I have a drive on both sides of my house - as many do - why would I park in the street instead of my driveway. 2 months ago

Lack of sidewalks in high pedestrian communities, lack of separated bike lanes on or near city streets, lack of trash and dog waste receptacles. 3 months ago

Repairing / replacing sidewalks especially Merrimon Avenue the entire sidewalk needs to be replaced and street trees and lighting need to be added. 3 months ago

Accessible parking and seating for Hazel Robinson Amphitheatre 3 months ago

We need to leave forest and stop building some many houses in West Asheville. The Wildlife are starting to have no where to go. 3 months ago

Audible signal on Chestnut and Broadway at Five Points 3 months ago

Focus on crosswalks, pedestrian signals, safe crossings. Low cost improvements while funding is tight. 3 months ago

The lack of sidewalks down beaverdam rd. There are so many people who walk in the neighborhoods but no sidewalks to connect them. You can't walk from neighborhoods on beaverdam to the busstop at the merrimon cross road on sidewalks and the road is windy with fast traffic 3 months ago

Get buses and cars out of downtown by offering park n rides in N,S,E,W. Zone for city, county workers, handicapped and downtown residents. This would make downtown more walkable, keep the same footprint, reduce pollution, keep cars from cruising and beeping horns....put shade sails up between buildings. America's Most Enchanting Town! 3 months ago

I feel safer riding a bike in DC and Manhattan as compared to Asheville. I’m not sure exactly what makes it so unsafe, but whatever it is, please fix it. 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

9/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Think about the places you travel. Indicate the difficulty that sidewalk and curb ramp obstacles create as you move around Asheville. Not Not at

No curb ramp where needed.

Applicable

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

all

(I do not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

experience

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

this) 28%

15%

13%

23%

12%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

Challenging curb

14%

12%

31%

10%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

too steep, poor

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

turning areas, poor

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

ramps. For example,

drainage (puddles).

25%

this) Sidewalks in poor

25%

28%

31%

7%

4%

5%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

example, cracks and

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

broken areas that

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

condition. For

create obstacles.

this) Sidewalks are too

28%

27%

29%

7%

4%

6%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

obstacles in the

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

sidewalk. For

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

narrow or there are

example, utility poles in the middle of a

this)

sidewalk. Signalized roadway

16%

17%

28%

17%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

accessible features

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

like audible

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

crossings lack

pedestrian signals or broken, missing and

13%

this)

hard to reach push buttons. Unsignalized

23%

24%

27%

10%

6%

9%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

with inadequate

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

facilities to cross the

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

roadway crossings

road. For example, missing or poorly

this)

aligned pedestrian ramps. Skewed or crooked crosswalks markings.

9%

14%

26%

18%

16%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

17% Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

10/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Not Not at

Applicable

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

all

(I do not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

experience

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

this) 30%

Ability to get to bus

20%

15%

17%

12%

6%

stops. For example,

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

no sidewalk access,

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

no place to sit, (no

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

sidewalk or poor design). Not enough accessible on-street parking.

this) 13%

13%

25%

18%

10%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

20% Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

169 respondents How about a road diet on Broadway from Chestnut to the I-240 bridge? Why are there 4 vehicular lanes here? Let's get bike lanes and/or parallel parking (adding a buffer between the cars and pedestrians much needed!) 3 months ago

 12 Agree

Bike lanes are not consistent or sometimes not wide enough and biking in the road can be scary 3 months ago

 10 Agree

We need to slow down the traffic on many of the main streets in Asheville 3 months ago

 6 Agree

So many sidewalks have poles right in the middle with no ramps nearby to allow for ADA travelers to navigate around them. State Street in particular is a significant pedestrian corridor that forces ADA travelers into the busy, high traffic streets. Many bike lanes simply end at the most inopportune and dangerous places. 3 months ago

 5 Agree

No seating, no trash cans, and no covered area at bus stops is a huge problem, but it isn't a problem for me personally, so I didn't rank it. But it still needs to be addressed! 3 months ago

 4 Agree

I see many people on Patton Avenue/Smoky Park Highway crossing the road randomly and not using crosswalks. From my understanding, this is one of the most dangerous roads for pedestrians. This and other poorly designed roads need to be overhauled to protect pedestrians. We need more pedestrian only streets downtown. We need more safe pedestrian crossings on roads such as Smoky Park Highway. Get the cars out of downtown. Protect pedestrians. 2 months ago

 2 Agree

Why is handicap parking not free in the garages? If it's free on the street, the garages should be too. There are not enough on-street handicap available. 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

 2 Agree

11/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Although I do not have mobility challenges, our sidewalks and crosswalks are not sufficiently accessible for many people, including those with mobility challenges, people pushing strollers, etc. There are not enough sidewalks and the existing ones are often too narrow to navigate. It is very common in West Asheville, even on busy side roads such as Virginia Ave, for people to have to walk in the street, which is dangerous considering the volume and speed of traffic. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

Not enough emphasis is placed on accessibility. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

Sidewalks we need sidewalks and people to only be able to park on one side of the street! There shouldn’t be parking on both sides of pedestrian residential streets as it makes it impossible to see people on foot or to navigate the roads 2 months ago

 1 Agree

More benches 3 months ago  1 Agree

Poor drainage on Biltmore between the hospital and charlotte st. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Complete lack of sidewalks or sidewalks on only one side of the road in some places. For example, Depot Street needs a sidewalk from the parking lot across the street from the studios to the new traffic circle. Also, in front of the apartment complex across the street from Green's where there is currently only a dirt path. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

roundabout at chestnut and broadway seems like a "no-brainer" 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Lack of sidewalks or sidewalk curb ramps means people in wheelchairs have to go in roads, where people driving have trouble seeing something they don’t expect. Very unsafe to get around. one month ago

Need more bike lanes to protect cyclists and have fewer cars on the road one month ago

Asheville is an extremely difficult city to navigate using a wheelchair (especially manual), not only due to the steep and hilly terrain but also due to the deteriorating and pre-ADA pedestrian infrastructure and lack of inclusive accessibility in many places. I have noticed some improvements in and around downtown which is much appreciated but other neighborhoods and parts of the City remain inaccessible and risky to navigate. one month ago

West Gate needs a pedestrian overpass over the highway. I've seen too many people risk their lives entering the highway just to get to the otherside. The bus stop at Westgate near the Fed Ex office is a disgrace. one month ago

We need more safe crosswalks all up and down Patton Ave! one month ago

I'm blind and use a tap-cane to navigate. Between the phone poles, guide-wires, joggers, dogs, etc. I don't feel safe walking in West Avl. We don't need more concrete, but Avl Unpaved. We need more verbal cues at crosswalks citywide. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

12/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Sidewalks are not being maintained and cleaned. There is broken glass and used needles everywhere. They are cracked and uneven. one month ago

I moved here from a city with exceptional transportation and sidewalk access — both crucial to neighborhood health and safety. I feel like I've moved to a post-apocalyptic dystopian society where the entire kingdom is crumbling underfoot. Come on Asheville! clean-up your act! Construct sidewalks and bike lanes, mitigate poor rainwater overflow causing flooding, build better infrastructure and fewer hotels, PAVE THE ROADS AND CLEAN UP YOUR DAMN TRASH! 2 months ago

Broken sidewalk system is a huge issue and daily barrier 2 months ago

What’s up with the sidewalk on Haywood Road on the hill going down to the river? There are curbs every 10 ft. No one with a wheelchair could use that sidewalk. And there is no why that land will ever be developed. Fix the sidewalk so it isn’t such a tripping hazard. 2 months ago

As long as we have parking garages conveniently located the on street parking is ok 2 months ago

You should have the general Public shoppers put in their comments after their comments and feedback, 2 months ago

We need to slow down traffic in general and through neighborhoods. Implementing sidewalks on streets that were designed to be mixed use is not a good solution. Propose traffic calming measures that make people drive slower. 2 months ago

I am a newcomer. An urban person, but it is ridiculously difficult to find parking downtown. Kills any desire to go downtown. 3 months ago

if you are urban, then you shouldn't mind walking to downtown 3 months ago

There are too many homes that have no parking and people have to park on the street, which makes it hard to navigate when traveling by vehicle on already narrow streets. 3 months ago

Kenilworth streets are so narrow people can't walk safely let alone us a wheelchair safely. Our downtown should be ped only and parking saved for handicapped, city and gov. workers and those who live downtown. This would eliminate the huge trucks that have taken to cruising, honking, revving their motors and disrupting asheville's beautiful nights. How? Park n rides in N, S, E and W with skyways to downtown. Keeps Asheville small and sweet! 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

13/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

How do you get around on an average day? 71% I have a car and drive 14% I walk or use a wheelchair or other mobility device to get around 6% I have a reliable automobile transportation option, for example, I use a service or have someone who can take me places 5% Other (please specify) 4% I use Asheville's transit system (ART) 0% I use Mountain Mobility

189 respondents biking and walking are also other ways that I get around town 3 months ago

 9 Agree

I would bike but it is extremely unsafe, particularly my commute on Biltmore from Biltmore Village to downtown. 3 months ago

 4 Agree

Also use Mountain Mobility one month ago

plus Mountain Mobility and walking. one month ago

My boyfriend uses a wheelchair, and you just don’t know how impassible how our city is until you try to get around on wheels like that. Minor cracks to us can cause someone to flip over. Let’s not wait for some one to get hurt, or killed, or the city get another huge lawsuit before we fix our sidewalks. one month ago

and bicycle. one month ago

I also commute by bike across town for work. one month ago

I walk to and from work a lot but when it’s wet I can’t because the grass I have to walk in is so saturated and muddy I don’t want to ruin my shoes so I have to drive. one month ago

I would prefer to bike in town but done feel safe doing so. I run and walk for exercise. I would walk for transportation if there were sidewalks where I live one month ago

I also use a car and drive. Wheelchair accessible parking downtown is extremely limited and practically nonexistent during peak times. one month ago

Could use Mountain Mobility or ART, but on the average day I have an auto available one month ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

14/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation I also have a car. one month ago

I work from home and walk to do errands and get serves almost every day. one month ago

I have a car and drive but work with many blind pedestrians who encounter the problems you are discussing one month ago

but I would love to bike and ride the bus more if there was better safe connections between stops and UNCA, downtown etc. one month ago

I also use Mountain Mobility when I need see a specialist in Charlotte or other faraway places. one month ago

My family (wife and 18mo child) and I are trying to do more of our regular trips by bike, but the lack of safe connectors to certain areas of Asheville prevent us from doing all trips. 2 months ago

Bicycle 2 months ago

Would love to bike more there but it is way too dangerous!! 2 months ago

I bike and walk as alternative was of getting around. 2 months ago

Bicycle 2 months ago

biking and walking are how a commute to/from work. Car is utilized for grocery and other travel. 2 months ago

I walk too, even if only from where I am parked to where I am going. 2 months ago

Walk each day to places as well. 2 months ago

I have both a car, bike and walk 2 months ago

Walk a lot as well 2 months ago

I wish I could say that I walked to get groceries, pick up meds, ran other errands as I did in my previous, very pedestrian-friendly town, but Asheville is nothing like that. The only way I would consider walking to the grocery or into the downtown area is if I meandered through neighborhoods to get there, avoiding Merrimon Avenue at all costs. 2 months ago

I also walk and bike as often as possible. 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

15/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation I ride a bike 2 months ago

By foot or by bike. 2 months ago

I use the greenways for exercise. And love them. Thank you for all the RAD improvements! 2 months ago

I’d like to bike more to get around, but need better safe access 2 months ago

I equally 1) walk and 2) have a car and drive to get around on an average day 2 months ago

I prefer to walk and ride a bike, but its so dangerous in this city that it is often not an option and I am forced to drive. thankful to have a car, but would rather not use it as much 2 months ago

I walk where I can when the weather is good and there is daylight. I try to avoid peak times when there is a lot of traffic, but sometimes I choose to drive when the roads are busy even if it is close by. If I can't get where I am going by walking, sometimes because of the condition of the sidewalks, I just drive. 2 months ago

I would bike, but AVL is a straight up nightmare 2 months ago

Bikes 2 months ago

Biking is not an option because it isn’t safe 2 months ago

I work from home so most days I'm walking. 2 months ago

I have a car and walk often 2 months ago

I can walk and take frequent long walks in my neighborhood, but my answers are also informed by my experiences with my wheelchair-bound husband. 2 months ago

I also walk but i cannot ever take my dog or child for fear of being hit by a car as there are no sidewalks in west Asheville at all 2 months ago

I use crutches to walk. Even sidewalks make walking much easier, and safer 2 months ago

I have a car and drive, but would prefer to walk/bike -- would likely sell car if Asheville was more walkable 2 months ago

Am very much a multimodal user. Currently with Covid, working much less and from home, walking is more frequent, but often drive. In non-Covid times I also take the bus. 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

16/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation I do not feel like there are routes where it is safe for me to bike where I need to go 3 months ago

Biking and walking 3 months ago

also bike, run and walk 3 months ago

Biking would be a preferred method but is not an option due to safety of roads and lack of accessible bike lanes. 3 months ago

I WOULD bike if it were safe, but it just isn't in this town. 3 months ago

If we had safer roads/ bike lanes/ sidewalks...maybe more folks would choose biking/ walking as a way to get around...therefore less cars, therefore less pollution, therefore a healthier population...etc. 3 months ago

Bike and Walk 3 months ago

I bike and use a car when I have to 3 months ago

Bike, walk, drive - in that order. 3 months ago

I walk or ride my bike as well. 3 months ago

I also walk to places 3 months ago

I also use ride services but would love to have access to a safe bike route and bus service 3 months ago

Would walk more but there aren't enough benches and restrooms 3 months ago

auto/bike/walk 3 months ago

Our buses are never full. Use buses to take people to park n rides keeping cars out of downtown. Skyways take people and bikes to downtown on trolleys or trams. Rezone downtown for county workers and downtown residents so Asheville becomes the world's most enchanting city! 3 months ago

It would make sense for daily commuters like the city and county workers and employees at other larger businesses to use park and ride and free up parking for others. 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

17/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Keep cars off the streets by providing park n rides in N,S,E, and W. Buses take workers to park n rides where skyway trolleys or trams take people to and from town. Pretty soon people get how easier it is to use than to circle endlessly trying to find parking. Put shade sails up between buildings and zone current spaces for city county workers and downtown residents. Keep Asheville Enchanting. 3 months ago

I also ride my bike. The new bike lanes on Charlotte are great but I find riding my bike from charlotte st at college to Mission to be very scary and Biltmore ave is too narrrow. 3 months ago

If I could bike to work I would, but that would be incredibly unsafe. 3 months ago

I deliberately chose to live in a walkable neighborhood where I can drive or ride the bus to most locations. However, I commute to Haywood County for work (by car - though would love an express bus along I-40 with a stop in Canton and Clyde). 3 months ago

Are there times when you would like to walk or use a mobility device to reach a destination, but you do not because the curb ramps, sidewalks and street crossings conditions present barriers? If so, please indicate your alternative transportation. 65% Yes and I have a car and can drive to places I cannot walk 27% No 4% Yes and I have a reliable transportation option, for example, I use a service or have someone who can take me places 4% Others

181 respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

18/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What routes/areas should the City prioritize for accessibility improvements? (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). In areas with vehicle related safety concerns (including high traffic

62%

Rank: 2.63

93 

In areas with higher equity concerns (neighborhoods with barriers thatRank: 2.66

80 

roads, higher speed roads or locations with pedestrian crash history)

53%

prevent people from accessing essential needs, opportunities for wellbeing, and their full potential)

63%

Along routes to grocery stores and shopping areas

Rank: 2.87

95 

55%

Along routes to parks, libraries or community centers

Rank: 3.04

83 

49%

Along routes to schools

Rank: 3.39

74 

Rank: 3.50

4 

3%

Other (please specify in comment box)

39%

Along transit lines or near transit stops

Rank: 3.69

59 

31%

Along routes to healthcare offices and hospitals

Rank: 4.26

47 

32%

In residential areas

Rank: 4.44

48 

19%

Near public buildings like City Hall or the Health Department

Rank: 5.96

28 

151 Respondents DOWNTOWN! Bury utilities if you have to - getting poles out of sidewalks, wider sidewalks everywhere possible, midblock crossings, street trees, and intersections where plenty of people can gather comfortably to wait to cross. 3 months ago

 11 Agree

I like the idea of getting rid of electric poles so you have more room on sidewalks. Too many are too narrow for a wheelchair to negotiate. 3 months ago

 6 Agree

A frame signage in front of stores used for advertising creates such a barrier. Especially for people who are blind/visually impaired. Not a good universal design ie. pushing strollers, pulling carts. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Restrooms and benches 3 months ago

 1 Agree

All of these are obviously important but certainly routes that are frequently used and utilized by pedestrians but remain inaccessible to those with disabilities. one month ago

Show all comments

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

19/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Tell us the places you would like to walk or use a mobility device to get to. Along Broadway to Riverside Drive; on Merrimon (safely - need a buffer between cars and pedestrians!!!!); Swannanoa River Road (either on a greenway or a sidewalk); Tunnel Road (with a buffer between cars and pedestrians!!!) 3 months ago

 7 Agree

Smokey park hwy, Patton ave 2 months ago

 6 Agree

Merrimon Ave, Lakeside Drive, Tunnel Rd 3 months ago

 3 Agree

Would love to walk from sand hill 600 block road to hominy creek greenway and sports complex 3 months ago

 3 Agree

Can all of Asheville look like the new RAD? 3 months ago

 3 Agree

The City of Asheville is working to identify areas that are high priority for pedestrian facility repairs. Use the map or comment box below to show us specific locations that cause problems when traveling as a pedestrian (including use of mobility devices). To draw a line or add a point, zoom in to your area of interest. Then click the button on the top right, 'Draw Line' or 'Add Point.' Then click on the map to create a line segment or point. When you are done adding points or lines, a comment box will appear; you can add notes to this box or if you make any errors you can click the 'X' on the top right of the comment box to delete and start over.

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

20/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

We encourage you to use the map; however, if it does not work for you, provide your answer here. Indicate the street/route name and beginning/end points. Please be as specific as possible. Johnston Blvd to Haywood Rd.; Leicester Hwy to Patton. Bridge from Amboy Road to Lyman. 3 months ago

 7 Agree

cutting brush back along city sidewalks and roads would be a good start. leicester highway , sweeten creek , merrimon, broadway, riverside 2 months ago

 5 Agree

Merrion Avenue is a nightmare. the entire length needs to be replaced, the driveway aprons are not ADA compliant, the concrete is broken, cracked, there are utility poles in the way. there needs to be better street lighting to make it safe at night 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Between Amboy, Biltmore Village, Tunnel Road, and Fairview, along Swannanoa River 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Hominy creek road between the greenways 2 months ago

 1 Agree

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

21/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

I am an individual that has functional needs or disabilities affecting my ability to use the streets, sidewalks, trails, or transit system in Asheville. The things that affect me include: (Select all that apply) 78%

Does not apply

98 

17%

Walking

21 

7%

Moving

9 

5%

Breathing

6 

4%

Vision

5 

3%

Hearing

4 

3%

Cognitive abilities (thinking or focus)

4 

2%

Other (please specify)

2 

126 Respondents Wheelchair user, so adequate sidewalks and curb ramps are essential. But shucks, even people with strollers have a hard time! 3 months ago

 4 Agree

Why does Asheville continually rank as the most dangerous city for pedestrians, yet keeps on approving mega developments without consideration of the infrastructure needs and geographical limitations? It seems Asheville's motto is "We're on the road to nowhere." We seem to value roads more than the destination and definitely more than the safety of pedestrians and cyclists. 2 months ago

 2 Agree

I am a strong supporter of accommodations for aging in place and with pedestrian improvements North Asheville has the potential to be a great area for older adults or those unable to drive and I am very cognizant of these challenging whether they apply to me. So, while this does not currently apply it may in the future. 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Stamina while walking, so distance is my main issue. 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Cane user for walking due to mobility challenges. Too many ramps and driveways have slopes that are severe and I fear for injury or falling into traffic. 2 months ago

Show all comments

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

 1 Agree

22/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

I am related to, or care for, an individual that has functional needs or disabilities affecting their ability to use the streets, sidewalks, trails, or transit system in Asheville. The things that affect them include: (Select all that apply) 68%

Does not apply

84 

24%

Walking

30 

12%

Moving

15 

7%

Hearing

8 

7%

Vision

8 

7%

Cognitive abilities (thinking or focus)

8 

6%

Breathing

7 

0%

Other (please specify)

0 

123 Respondents I am a senior and can see in the future the need for having better sidewalks 2 months ago

 1 Agree

It is very difficult to get around downtown using a wheelchair. Sidewalks and curb ramps are in bad shape and many of the curb ramps are too steep. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

My boyfriend has a spinal cord injury and uses a wheelchair. one month ago

Parent to a young child. 3 months ago

children going to school or walking to park 2 months ago

Show all comments

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

23/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Please tell us if you use a smartphone to assist you with your travel as a pedestrian (including using mobility devices). If so, what services do you use? (Select all that apply). 74%

Yes, for mapping and directions

26%

Yes, for mapping to see if sidewalks or trails are present

35 

21%

Yes, for bus schedules or stop locations

28 

13%

No, I prefer not to use one

17 

100 

8%

Yes, to check terrain

11 

6%

No, I don't have one

8 

1%

Yes, to use apps that provide sighted assistance

2 

1%

Other tool

2 

136 Respondents Please don't let NCDOT do what others are doing and having people rely on smart phone apps to connect to cars and traffic signals. If the phone won't regularly work properly with earbuds, there is no way it will work with their primitive technology. 2 months ago

 2 Agree

I often use the Asheville App to send comments on areas that need maintenance. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Use a smartphone occasionally to confirm a location: Have I arrived at my destination? Where exactly did the neighbor see a bear? one month ago

I don't use a smart phone because a smart phone with any kind of mobility app on it will pull my attention away from my cane and my environment, and those are the two primary mobility devices to keep me safe. one month ago

Use phone, just not for above features. We use the Asheville App to report sidewalk issues. one month ago

Show all comments

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

24/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What are the most effective ways for you to receive information on upcoming events, announcements, projects, or general information about the ADA Transition Plan? (Select all that apply). 64%

Email notifications

98 

52%

Social Media

80 

26%

Press release

40 

16%

City of Asheville Pedestrian web page and tools

24 

6%

2%

Public meetings

9 

Emails to disability groups (if you have a suggested contact, please list that in the comment box below)

3 

2%

Other

3 

0%

Brochures

0 

153 Respondents VIP Support Group (c/o Judy Davis) one month ago

NC Spinal Cord Injury Association (NCSCIA.org) Spinal Cord Injury Support Group - meets once a month at Care Partners (Debbie Johnson, Physical Therapist) one month ago

I found out about this survey through Nextdoor post. 2 months ago

Text one month ago

Avl Commission for the Blind, Paula Springer one month ago

Show all comments

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

25/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What gender do you identify as? (Select all that apply). 57%

Female

89 

39%

Male

61 

3%

Prefer not to say

5 

1%

Non-binary/third gender

2 

0%

Transgender

0 

0%

Other

0 

0%

Prefer to self-describe

0 

157 Respondents

What is your age? 26% 36-45 20% 56-65 17% 26-35 17% 46-55 13% 66-75 3% Over 75 4% Others

164 respondents

https://publicinput.com/Reporting/ReportPreview/8689?embeddedreport=False

26/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

What is your race? (Select all that apply). 88%

White

139 

6%

Prefer not to answer

9 

3%

Some other race or origin

4 

2%

Black or African American

3 

1%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

2 

1%

Asian

2 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

1 

0%

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

0 

158 Respondents

Are you of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or of Spanish origin? (Select all that apply). 89%

No, not of Hispanic, Latino/a/x, or Spanish origin

131 

6%

Prefer not to answer

9 

2%

Yes, Another Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish origin

3 

1%

Yes, Cuban

2 

1%

Yes, Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano/a/x

1 

1%

Some other race, ethnicity, or origin

1 

1%

Prefer to self-describe

1 

0%

Yes, Puerto Rican

0 

148 Respondents

Loading more report objects...

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27/27


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

ADA Transition Plan Survey - Disabled Respondents * In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you live? By answering this question, it helps us make sure we are hearing from people across the City. We won't be able to identify your specific address. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

211

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

1/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

In what area of Asheville (or the region) do you work? If you are not working, you can skip this question. You can enter the nearest cross streets in the boxes below; or, using the map, drag the blue point to Asheville and then zoom in and drag it to the approximate location where you live. Toggle Clustering

􏗿 

187

2

Map data ©2021 Google, INEGI

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

2/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

 􏗾

Rank your top five (5) items by order of importance. (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 10%

On-street parking

Rank: 1.00

2 

70%

Pedestrian sidewalks

Rank: 2.14

14 

45%

Street crossings, including traffic signals

Rank: 2.67

9 

30%

Access TO bus stops (getting to the bus stop)

Rank: 2.67

6 

60%

Pedestrian curb ramps

Rank: 2.83

12 

50%

Greenways and trails

Rank: 2.90

10 

20%

Access AT bus stops (using the bus stop)

Rank: 3.25

4 

30%

Accessible signage and wayfinding assistance

Rank: 3.33

6 

30%

Other (please specify in comment box)

Rank: 3.50

6 

20 Respondents Most streets in Asheville only have sidewalks on one side making it necessary for folks in wheelchairs....low to ground...to have to cross where there are often no crosswalks. Baffles the mind. 3 months ago

 3 Agree

Bus stops SUCK in Asheville. It's pathetic. A freakin' bench without shelter is NOT a functional bus stop. A sign in the mud without even a bench to sit on IS NOT A BUST STOP! 90% are functionally obsolete. Make them better. Minimal standard should be a bench, with shelter from the elements, and a trash can. And, duh, put them on an ADA concrete pad, not in the goddamn mud. 3 months ago

 3 Agree

ADA compliant sidewalks 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Sidewalks that are unusable (especially for wheelchairs and strollers) due to being too narrow, interrupted by light poles, heaved by roots, parked on by cars pulling half onto them, overhung by shrubs, etc. State Street is a great example of a sidewalk that was completely redone in the last 10 years or so -- just as useless to wheelchairs after as it was before. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

Other: slower traffic, less traffic one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

3/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Sidewalks that do not have utility poles sticking up in the middle of them. one month ago

Difficult to narrow to just 5 as all of these are important and challenging obstacles in Asheville for a person like me who uses a wheelchair. one month ago

I do use greenways and parks and would like more access such as wheelchair accessible trails, areas. Maybe more education to the public, most people do not use wheelchairs unless absolutely necessary. there are some that abuse it. also, some can walk a very short distance, but not long distance and then need the chair. people need to understand this and that we are not just trying to take up their space or get in their way. this is our only way to get around. one month ago

monitoring handicap parking. too many drivers use expired, borrowed and even stolen placards. this makes it difficult for people that are truly legit. maybe use pictures or other id like other states. this is truly frustrating to see and experience. one month ago

Avl needs more verbal cross-walk cues for the blind. Sidewalks full of poles and guide-wires are perilous for we who use a tap-cane to walk. More concrete sidewalks are not the answer: I favor Avl Unpaved. one month ago

Sidewalks that are free of trash or broken, unlevel tiles one month ago

I would really encourage Asheville to begin getting cars out of the downtown. Not by making mandates, but by providing park-n-rides where the major highways leading into Asheville meet, in the N, S, E, and West outskirts of the city. The park-n-rides would then have buses come and go every 15 minutes that shuttle people to our downtown. People will quickly realize it's much easier to park in the park -n-rides than it is to find downtown parking. In addition, the city should zone off most areas of downtown parking to be used only for those who work in city or county jobs. People would pay parking fees at the parking garages outside the city, then pay bus fees generating money that stays in Asheville and can be used to get our sewers repaired so there is not so much clogging which adds to the problem of flooding and unclean water from runoff. The city could also invest in roads-skyways that take people from the park n rides into the city. The skyways would be used only by pedestrians, bicycles or an el type train or trolleys, while our current e-buses take people from their neighborhoods to the park -n-rides. Getting cars out of our downtown solves many of the 2030 goals that I read on the city's long term plans-on the website. This plan, with the skyways, reduces car usage which causes 24% of the air pollution in cities in our country. It provides jobs, revenue, and attracts businesses who depend on a workforce that has a fast and reliable method of getting to work. CEO's and workers alike could use the system enabling Asheville to grow without changing our downtown footprint which is so attractive with mom and pop shops. This plan would free up parking so that pedestrian only zones could be established. Shade sails could be put up high between buildings reducing summer heat, providing protection from summer storms and winter winds, and further keeping our downtown weirdly fabulous with buskers, great food, shops and ambiance that is so needed to compete for visitors and relocators as outlying towns are attracting large numbers of relocators after 2020 flooding, hurricanes, and fires. We must get ready now,.....for what will most likely happen as we continue to grow. Thank you to whomever is listening...please pass on my message....I grew up in Ohio, lived in Portland, Oregon for the past 35 yrs. and moved to Asheville 2.5 yrs. ago because I love Asheville and am now retired. You can reach me: Jean Bedore, 503-705-8123 or email: bedorejm@comcast.net. 2 months ago

Ada access to the river itself. Ada. Bathrooms at carrier park. Tried to go and the bathrooms by the track were closed and had to use the ramp after trying so hard to find access to a bathroom. Need signs and maps of where you can find a bathroom with running water. Thank you for providing two Some what Ada parking spaces...the terrain is uneven, it’s hard to back out because park behind you...the city employees park in the space while they empty the trash and restock the dog bags, also have noticed people park in the space that is NOT a parking g space that blocks trying to get out of a vehicle. 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

4/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Inaccessible pedestrian push buttons. Poor routing and detours in construction zones for pedestrians. Poor snow plowing that blocked ramps, crosswalks and sidewalks. 2 months ago

Repairing / replacing sidewalks especially Merrimon Avenue the entire sidewalk needs to be replaced and street trees and lighting need to be added. 3 months ago

Audible signal on Chestnut and Broadway at Five Points 3 months ago

Get buses and cars out of downtown by offering park n rides in N,S,E,W. Zone for city, county workers, handicapped and downtown residents. This would make downtown more walkable, keep the same footprint, reduce pollution, keep cars from cruising and beeping horns....put shade sails up between buildings. America's Most Enchanting Town! 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

5/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

 􏗾

Think about the places you travel. Indicate the difficulty that sidewalk and curb ramp obstacles create as you move around Asheville. Not Not at

No curb ramp where needed.

Applicable

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

all

(I do not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

experience

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

this) 11%

47%

16%

16%

-

11%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

Challenging curb

35%

18%

29%

-

6%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

too steep, poor

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

turning areas, poor

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

ramps. For example,

drainage (puddles).

12%

this) Sidewalks in poor

50%

22%

22%

-

6%

-

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

example, cracks and

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

broken areas that

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

condition. For

create obstacles.

this) Sidewalks are too

58%

21%

16%

5%

-

-

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

obstacles in the

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

sidewalk. For

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

narrow or there are

example, utility poles in the middle of a

this)

sidewalk. Signalized roadway

31%

31%

12%

12%

6%

6%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

accessible features

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

like audible

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

crossings lack

pedestrian signals or broken, missing and

this)

hard to reach push buttons. Unsignalized

32%

26%

26%

11%

5%

-

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

with inadequate

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

facilities to cross the

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

roadway crossings

road. For example, missing or poorly

this)

aligned pedestrian ramps.

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

6/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Not Not at

Skewed or crooked crosswalks markings.

Applicable

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

all

(I do not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

experience

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

this) 11%

21%

11%

37%

16%

5%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

Ability to get to bus

39%

6%

11%

17%

-

stops. For example,

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

Not

no sidewalk access,

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

no place to sit, (no

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience

sidewalk or poor

28%

design). Not enough accessible on-street parking.

this) 25%

15%

15%

20%

5%

Extremely

Very

Somewhat

No So

Not at

20% Not

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

Difficult

all

Applicable

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Barrier

Difficult

(I do not

Barrier

experience this)

20 respondents How about a road diet on Broadway from Chestnut to the I-240 bridge? Why are there 4 vehicular lanes here? Let's get bike lanes and/or parallel parking (adding a buffer between the cars and pedestrians much needed!) 3 months ago

 12 Agree

Why is handicap parking not free in the garages? If it's free on the street, the garages should be too. There are not enough on-street handicap available. 2 months ago

 2 Agree

Not enough emphasis is placed on accessibility. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

Lack of sidewalks or sidewalk curb ramps means people in wheelchairs have to go in roads, where people driving have trouble seeing something they don’t expect. Very unsafe to get around. one month ago

Asheville is an extremely difficult city to navigate using a wheelchair (especially manual), not only due to the steep and hilly terrain but also due to the deteriorating and pre-ADA pedestrian infrastructure and lack of inclusive accessibility in many places. I have noticed some improvements in and around downtown which is much appreciated but other neighborhoods and parts of the City remain inaccessible and risky to navigate. one month ago

I'm blind and use a tap-cane to navigate. Between the phone poles, guide-wires, joggers, dogs, etc. I don't feel safe walking in West Avl. We don't need more concrete, but Avl Unpaved. We need more verbal cues at crosswalks citywide. one month ago

Sidewalks are not being maintained and cleaned. There is broken glass and used needles everywhere. They are cracked and uneven. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

7/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation You should have the general Public shoppers put in their comments after their comments and feedback, 2 months ago

Kenilworth streets are so narrow people can't walk safely let alone us a wheelchair safely. Our downtown should be ped only and parking saved for handicapped, city and gov. workers and those who live downtown. This would eliminate the huge trucks that have taken to cruising, honking, revving their motors and disrupting asheville's beautiful nights. How? Park n rides in N, S, E and W with skyways to downtown. Keeps Asheville small and sweet! 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

8/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

􏗾 

How do you get around on an average day? 42% I walk or use a wheelchair or other mobility device to get around 42% I have a car and drive 16% I have a reliable automobile transportation option, for example, I use a service or have someone who can take me places 0% Others

19 respondents Also use Mountain Mobility one month ago

plus Mountain Mobility and walking. one month ago

My boyfriend uses a wheelchair, and you just don’t know how impassible how our city is until you try to get around on wheels like that. Minor cracks to us can cause someone to flip over. Let’s not wait for some one to get hurt, or killed, or the city get another huge lawsuit before we fix our sidewalks. one month ago

I also use a car and drive. Wheelchair accessible parking downtown is extremely limited and practically nonexistent during peak times. one month ago

I also use Mountain Mobility when I need see a specialist in Charlotte or other faraway places. one month ago

I can walk and take frequent long walks in my neighborhood, but my answers are also informed by my experiences with my wheelchair-bound husband. 2 months ago

Our buses are never full. Use buses to take people to park n rides keeping cars out of downtown. Skyways take people and bikes to downtown on trolleys or trams. Rezone downtown for county workers and downtown residents so Asheville becomes the world's most enchanting city! 3 months ago

Keep cars off the streets by providing park n rides in N,S,E, and W. Buses take workers to park n rides where skyway trolleys or trams take people to and from town. Pretty soon people get how easier it is to use than to circle endlessly trying to find parking. Put shade sails up between buildings and zone current spaces for city county workers and downtown residents. Keep Asheville Enchanting. 3 months ago

I deliberately chose to live in a walkable neighborhood where I can drive or ride the bus to most locations. However, I commute to Haywood County for work (by car - though would love an express bus along I-40 with a stop in Canton and Clyde). 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

9/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

􏗾 

Are there times when you would like to walk or use a mobility device to reach a destination, but you do not because the curb ramps, sidewalks and street crossings conditions present barriers? If so, please indicate your alternative transportation. 50% Yes and I have a car and can drive to places I cannot walk 23% Yes and I have a reliable transportation option, for example, I use a service or have someone who can take me places 18% No 5% Yes and I use Mountain Mobility 5% Yes and I use Asheville's transit system (ART) 0% Other (please specify)

22 respondents

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

10/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

􏗾 

What routes/areas should the City prioritize for accessibility improvements? (Click your top selections and they will move above and turn blue. You can then drag the blue selections to order your priorities. Then click 'Confirm Priorities'). 6%

Other (please specify in comment box)

Rank: 1.00

1 

39%

Along routes to parks, libraries or community centers

Rank: 2.29

7 

61%

Along routes to grocery stores and shopping areas

Rank: 2.45

11 

In areas with vehicle related safety concerns (including high traffic

Rank: 2.89

9 

Rank: 3.43

7 

In areas with higher equity concerns (neighborhoods with barriers thatRank: 4.22

9 

50%

39%

50%

roads, higher speed roads or locations with pedestrian crash history)

Along transit lines or near transit stops

prevent people from accessing essential needs, opportunities for wellbeing, and their full potential)

33%

Near public buildings like City Hall or the Health Department

Rank: 4.33

6 

28%

Along routes to schools

Rank: 4.40

5 

39%

Along routes to healthcare offices and hospitals

Rank: 5.29

7 

28%

In residential areas

Rank: 6.00

5 

18 Respondents DOWNTOWN! Bury utilities if you have to - getting poles out of sidewalks, wider sidewalks everywhere possible, midblock crossings, street trees, and intersections where plenty of people can gather comfortably to wait to cross. 3 months ago

 11 Agree

This is a great idea. this it the only city I have lived it that the City did not require all utilities to be placed underground 3 months ago

 1 Agree

A frame signage in front of stores used for advertising creates such a barrier. Especially for people who are blind/visually impaired. Not a good universal design ie. pushing strollers, pulling carts. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

All of these are obviously important but certainly routes that are frequently used and utilized by pedestrians but remain inaccessible to those with disabilities. one month ago

Downtown sidewalks are dangerous. one month ago

People are subdividing land into micro plots — walkability not keeping pace with relentless increase in new residents. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

11/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation While I am happy with the new Greenway around the RAD, it needs to be paved in spots and have drainage in spots near the river. I was nearly injured today due to the mud. I'm blind and this was an unpleasant surprise. one month ago

It is important to improve accessibility in all of these areas. 3 months ago

Loading options for All participants

Tell us the places you would like to walk or use a mobility device to get to. Along Broadway to Riverside Drive; on Merrimon (safely - need a buffer between cars and pedestrians!!!!); Swannanoa River Road (either on a greenway or a sidewalk); Tunnel Road (with a buffer between cars and pedestrians!!!) 3 months ago

 7 Agree

Downtown businesses and restaurants 3 months ago

 1 Agree

Crossing Chestnut and Broadway to access grocery stores in Five Points area. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

The other side of Kenilworth Rd and up the connecting side streets. All along Kenilworth Rd from Tunnel Rd to Biltmore Ave. one month ago

the post office my drugstore my talking ATM where I vote a couple of grocery stores one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

12/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

The City of Asheville is working to identify areas that are high priority for pedestrian facility repairs. Use the map or comment box below to show us specific locations that cause problems when traveling as a pedestrian (including use of mobility devices). To draw a line or add a point, zoom in to your area of interest. Then click the button on the top right, 'Draw Line' or 'Add Point.' Then click on the map to create a line segment or point. When you are done adding points or lines, a comment box will appear; you can add notes to this box or if you make any errors you can click the 'X' on the top right of the comment box to delete and start over.

􏗿 

Map data ©2021 Google

We encourage you to use the map; however, if it does not work for you, provide your answer here. Indicate the street/route name and beginning/end points. Please be as specific as possible. Johnston Blvd to Haywood Rd.; Leicester Hwy to Patton. Bridge from Amboy Road to Lyman. 3 months ago

 7 Agree

cutting brush back along city sidewalks and roads would be a good start. leicester highway , sweeten creek , merrimon, broadway, riverside 2 months ago

 5 Agree

Merrion Avenue is a nightmare. the entire length needs to be replaced, the driveway aprons are not ADA compliant, the concrete is broken, cracked, there are utility poles in the way. there needs to be better street lighting to make it safe at night 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Between Amboy, Biltmore Village, Tunnel Road, and Fairview, along Swannanoa River 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Hominy creek road between the greenways 2 months ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

 1 Agree

13/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

 􏗾

I am an individual that has functional needs or disabilities affecting my ability to use the streets, sidewalks, trails, or transit system in Asheville. The things that affect me include: (Select all that apply) 79%

Walking

15 

37%

Moving

7 

26%

Vision

5 

21%

Breathing

4 

11%

Cognitive abilities (thinking or focus)

2 

11%

Other (please specify)

2 

5%

Hearing

1 

5%

Does not apply

1 

19 Respondents Wheelchair user, so adequate sidewalks and curb ramps are essential. But shucks, even people with strollers have a hard time! 3 months ago

 4 Agree

Stamina while walking, so distance is my main issue. 3 months ago

 2 Agree

Cane user for walking due to mobility challenges. Too many ramps and driveways have slopes that are severe and I fear for injury or falling into traffic. 2 months ago

 1 Agree

Wheelchair use is difficult downtown because of holes/gaps/cracks/poorly designed and steep curb cuts. 3 months ago

 1 Agree

I hope that you are looking at the responses of disabled individuals' separately from non-disabled individuals. Disabled voices should be highlighted, as disabled people have much greater awareness of what is currently lacking in our community. 3 months ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

Show all comments

 1 Agree

14/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

􏗾 

I am related to, or care for, an individual that has functional needs or disabilities affecting their ability to use the streets, sidewalks, trails, or transit system in Asheville. The things that affect them include: (Select all that apply) 54%

Walking

7 

46%

Moving

6 

38%

Does not apply

5 

23%

Breathing

3 

15%

Hearing

2 

15%

Vision

2 

15%

Cognitive abilities (thinking or focus)

2 

0%

Other (please specify)

0 

13 Respondents My boyfriend has a spinal cord injury and uses a wheelchair. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

15/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

 􏗾

Please tell us if you use a smartphone to assist you with your travel as a pedestrian (including using mobility devices). If so, what services do you use? (Select all that apply). 53%

Yes, for mapping and directions

9 

29%

Yes, for mapping to see if sidewalks or trails are present

5 

18%

Yes, for bus schedules or stop locations

3 

12%

Yes, to check terrain

2 

12%

No, I prefer not to use one

2 

12%

No, I don't have one

2 

12%

Other tool

2 

6%

Yes, to use apps that provide sighted assistance

1 

17 Respondents Please don't let NCDOT do what others are doing and having people rely on smart phone apps to connect to cars and traffic signals. If the phone won't regularly work properly with earbuds, there is no way it will work with their primitive technology. 2 months ago

 2 Agree

Use a smartphone occasionally to confirm a location: Have I arrived at my destination? Where exactly did the neighbor see a bear? one month ago

I don't use a smart phone because a smart phone with any kind of mobility app on it will pull my attention away from my cane and my environment, and those are the two primary mobility devices to keep me safe. one month ago

Smartphones are too complicated; sight-based tech, not very helpful to the blind. one month ago

Use phone, just not for above features. We use the Asheville App to report sidewalk issues. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

Show all comments

16/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Loading options for All participants

What are the most effective ways for you to receive information on upcoming events, announcements, projects, or general information about the ADA Transition Plan? (Select all that apply). 80%

Email notifications

35%

Social Media

7 

20%

Press release

4 

15%

Public meetings

3 

10%

Other

2 

5%

16 

Emails to disability groups (if you have a suggested contact, please list that in the comment box below)

1 

0%

City of Asheville Pedestrian web page and tools

0 

0%

Brochures

0 

20 Respondents VIP Support Group (c/o Judy Davis) one month ago

Text one month ago

Avl Commission for the Blind, Paula Springer one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

17/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Loading options for All participants

What gender do you identify as? (Select all that apply). 60%

Female

30%

Male

12 

6 

5%

Non-binary/third gender

1 

5%

Prefer not to say

1 

0%

Transgender

0 

0%

Other

0 

0%

Prefer to self-describe

0 

20 Respondents

Filtered by Participant Segment

􏗽 All participants 

􏗾 

What is your age? 43% 56-65 26% 36-45 13% 46-55 13% 66-75 4% 18-25 0% Others

23 respondents

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

18/19


2/23/2021

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Loading options for All participants

What is your race? (Select all that apply). 74%

White

14 

5%

Asian

1 

5%

Black or African American

1 

5%

Some other race or origin

1 

5%

Prefer not to answer

1 

5%

Prefer to self-describe

1 

0%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

0 

0%

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

0 

19 Respondents

Loading more report objects...

https://publicinput.com/report?id=8338

19/19


Close the GAP Project Network Survey An online survey was hosted from August 25 - October 31, 2021 to collect community input on a draft network of recommendations for walking and greenway needs. A series of maps proposed a citywide network of sidewalk repairs, ADA upgrades, completion of missing sidewalk sections and greenway links. The survey asked users to share what streets they felt were overlooked, to rank key greenway segments, and to share any remaining feedback. This survey was promoted through the City’s Communications and Public Engagement Department; staff and the project team presented the survey to several committees of the City; and City staff led targeted outreach to Asheville neighborhoods at this intermediate stage of the project. The following summary follows the document ‘2021-11-12 GAP Survey Responses_COA.xlsx’. Each tab in the spreadsheet references the following sections.

About You A total of 1,636 unique views were made to the project network survey site in the time that the survey was open for feedback and there were 1,164 responses to the surveys. The following outlines the demographics of the survey respondents (this was not a required question): ● ● ●

89% White (City Demographics: 83% White) 59% Female (City Demographics: 52.2% Female) 79% Not Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish (City Demographics: 77.9% Not Hispanic, Latino/a/x or Spanish)

Walking Needs There were 170 responses to the pedestrian network map, which resulted in 28 changes or additions to the priority network map. These are captured in the document ‘2021-11-12 GAP Survey Responses_COA.xlsx’ with Internal Notes that suggest ‘Add’, ‘Revise existing line’ or ‘Revise existing score’ (cells are shown in pink).

Greenway Needs A total of 412 rankings were provided for the greenway network map, which helped prioritize projects. Respondents were asked to rank projects on a scale of 1-5, from which a list of medium-high priority projects were identified (based solely on community feedback). Since the Greenway Spines are the highest priority and critical to the network, the decision was made to have the public only weigh in on the Arterial Greenways and Neighborhood Greenways. The results from the Walking and Greenway Needs sections were incorporated into the overall ranking process.


Final Thoughts Comments in this section of the survey were reviewed for additional project considerations and general feedback. A total of 98 open-ended comments were received.


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Close the GAP Community Opinion Survey Project Engagement VIEWS

PARTICIPANTS

RESPONSES

COMMENTS

1,953

519

4,216

471

* Did you watch the overview video? If not, please scroll back up. 5% No

95% Yes 518 respondents

STEP 2: On a scale of 1 - 10, how much do you support the proposed Greenway Spine Network? Average

1 (do not support)

10 (it's fantastic)

STEP 2: On a scale of 1 - 10, how much do you support the proposed Arterial Greenway Network? Average

1 (do not support)

10 (it's fantastic)

STEP 2: On a scale of 1 - 10, how much do you support the proposed Neighborhood Greenway Network? Average

1 (do not support)

https://publicinput.com/report?id=13616

10 (it's fantastic)

1/35


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation

Use this space if you would like to make a comment on the greenway network. I support any improvement that makes the city more friendly to bikers and pedestrians. one month ago

 34 Agree

I am in support as long as it does not require access to private property! one month ago

 16 Agree

How would you like a greenway going through your yard? In some neighborhoods that is what is being proposed. one month ago

 6 Agree

BIke and pedestrian access and bus lines are the best solution to ease vehicle-crowded roads. They also provides access to jobs for many who cannot afford cars. one month ago

 30 Agree

Needs improvement one month ago  4 Agree

I think this wotk has been done very well. I support it. one month ago

 1 Agree

I DO NOT WANT A GREENWAY RUNNING THROUGH HAPPY VALLEY. OUR NEIGHBORHOOD IS EASY TO WALK THROUGH VIA THE EXISTING ROADS. PUTTING A GREENWAY IN IS NEITHER WANTED OR NEEDED. IT IS A WASTE OF TAX DOLLARS one month ago

 16 Agree

I am deeply concerned about making a greenway that encourages people to walk through people's yards one month ago

 15 Agree

This goes right through people's yards in the Happy Valley area. I don't approve of this. one month ago

 14 Agree

I DO NOT WANT A GREENWAY GOING THROUGH HAPPY VALLEY. IT IS NEITHER WANTED OR NEEDED. one month ago

 14 Agree

I do not support the Bullman Masters Park Greenway in Upper Haw Creek. It passes diagonally through the Happy Valley neighborhood disrupting current neighborhood activities and benefits. one month ago

 13 Agree

I am strongly opposed to any proposal that includes greenways in the Happy Valley Subdivision, including adjacent properties! It's ABSURD this initiative is underway, without informing affected owners one month ago

 13 Agree

I strongly oppose any sort of initiative that could potentially force a private property owner to give up a portion of their property for the purposes of this project! one month ago

 13 Agree

I disagree with the arterial trails planned through the Happy Valley property shown in Map ID# A9. Section A9 is labelled as "Contingent on Landowner Support". Being a landowner, I do not support. one month ago

 13 Agree

This is an absolutely stupid idea. This greenway network runs through private property that is actually in people's back yards. This will become a throughfare for the homeless. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=13616

 13 Agree

2/35


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation I am concerned about what is proposed for Happy Valley . The neighborhood is already easily walkable - public paths through private yards seems a bit much. What about the sidewalks for New Haw C Rd?? one month ago

 12 Agree

I do not support the Bullman Masters Park Greenway in Haw Creek. It bisects the Happy Valley neighborhood disrupting current neighborhood activities and characteristics. one month ago

 11 Agree

A sidewalk along the New Haw Creek roadway would be better for the neighborhood. one month ago

 11 Agree

Another waste of taxpayer money. Asheville is no longer safe due to the homeless drug users growing daily. It's not safe to use any greenspace or Greenway. Fix the issue you all have caused. one month ago

 11 Agree

Hey Madison! Surprised to see you here. I thought you were moving to the 13th district? *waves goodbye* one month ago

 4 Agree

NO WAY! NO "CLOSE THE GAP!" We will fight you all the way! With the multitude of homeless, mentally ill, drugs, drug dealers and crime rate you want to allow people into Haw Creek neighborhoods! NO!! one month ago

 10 Agree

I agree with the spine and neighborhood projects. However, I strongly disagree with the arterial trails planned through people's private property in areas that needs sidewalks, not trails. one month ago

 10 Agree

I am concerned that neighborhood yards will have strangers walking through them one month ago

 10 Agree

This is a poor format for a survey. The bars don’t work properly and I don’t know what you think I have rated them for. It is also a very vague explanation.More clear info is needed. Where,when,how? one month ago

 10 Agree

Yes, I don’t want to come off as not being an advocate for greeenways, I’m just concerned for the areas left unaddressed. one month ago

 1 Agree

There are no connections to help get residents north of smokey park highway in candler onto any of the county or city greenways. Those greenways are most accessible for more affluent residents one month ago

 10 Agree

Hoped for greenway or accessibility from city boundary line at New Leicester, to connect people to the West AVL Rails trail. Increased bicycle & pedestrian access is long overdue. Worthy $$. one month ago

 9 Agree

I live in Haw Creek. How are you going to convince property owners to give up part of their property and then have to deal with strangers walking through. I think this will create a lot of blow back. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=13616

 8 Agree

3/35


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation The use homeowners property as a means of creating the greenway network it becomes a non starter. additional pavement to existing roadways for bikes lanes and walkers would help. one month ago

 8 Agree

Spines look good, arterial and neighborhood layouts need work. Leans too much towards arterial, will overbuild in areas that don't need it. Expect significant pushback when crossing private one month ago

 8 Agree

Please prioritize increasing the lengths and connection of the "spine network" to facilitate commuting. The arterial and neighbor hood networks just add duplication, complexity, and waste resources one month ago

 8 Agree

I support greenways, sidewalks, trails, walking paths. This all sounds great! I do NOT support any path, trail or greenway through private properties or through the middle of existing neighborhoods. one month ago

 7 Agree

NO to the Happy Vally haw creek proposed projects. This is a very bad idea with our current drug,theft,crime and homeless problem in Asheville. Please do not bring this to our neighborhood. one month ago

 7 Agree

We do need safer bike/walk trails thru AVL, I do NOT support them running thru neighborhoods. The HC design from Bullman Park to Masters Park is completely unacceptable. It creates a safety issue. one month ago

 7 Agree

NO NO NO to the Arterial Greenway! You cannot put a pedestrian highway through private backyards in an established neighborhood. This would pass 10 feet from my kitchen window. Not going to happen! one month ago

 7 Agree

As a property owner directly affected, I strongly oppose cutting directly through small private yards. Who would want this 10 ft from their kitchen window? Follow roads, creek beds, & railways only. one month ago

 7 Agree

The Asheville City Council has failed the law-abiding citizens. Asheville caters to the drug using community without any regard to the safety of neighborhoods. Greenways would only be good if safe. one month ago

 7 Agree

Why do you have to go through established neighborhoods and in between houses? Follow the creek beds and existing roads. The Happy Valley route will be met with tremendous resistance. one month ago

 6 Agree

The Bullman Masters park greenway does not make any sense at all and is a terrible idea. one month ago

 6 Agree

Due to the number of "campers", vagrants, trespassers, and illegal activities that they inflict which will not be addressed by the police, I cannot support greenways that encroach into neighborhoods. one month ago

 6 Agree

Bike lanes will create more congestion and accudents. Walkways will attract vagrant tents and litter like in River Arts District, especially where Beloved has a pantry. one month ago

 6 Agree

If this were implemented 10 years ago, that would have been all fine and good. However, crime is so rampant in the Asheville area that I would NOT feel comfortable using this network at all. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=13616

 5 Agree

4/35


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Stay out of peoples' properties. Even if you receive an easement from a property owner, what about the neighboring homeowner or property owner? You are affecting s/he/they. one month ago

 5 Agree

In a perfect world, it would be great. In the actual real world, where law enforcement is not a priority, this creates an unsafe network running through peoples' yards. one month ago

 5 Agree

The Haw Creek map needs significant work. Cutting directly through Happy Valley is not a viable option. one month ago

 5 Agree

Allowing 200 characters means you are not serious about obtaining opposing feedback. It is 20 characters longer than a twitter post and from this you think you are hearing from the public. one month ago

 5 Agree

Should not allow access to private property. We shouldn’t be spending money on stuff like this until we fix other more pressing issues. one month ago

 5 Agree

This is a bad idea. You may not realize it, but you are opening up more places for homeless camps. Please stop this. NOW! one month ago

 5 Agree

I am in support of the arterial network except for the piece that connects the Charlie Bullman park through Happy Valley to above Maple Drive. That seems like extra foot traffic in our neighborhood. one month ago

 5 Agree

All this time and money spent on planning that should be focused on moving our homeless camps out of our community not into them. Where are your priorities people? one month ago

 5 Agree

Moving unhoused people away from resources is definitely not my priority. I support thinking up creative ways to address homelessness and 100% support Close The Gap. one month ago

 1 Agree

side walk along new haw creek rd = good trail thru private property (bullman masters)= bad one month ago

 5 Agree

I am against the Beaucatcher neighborhood greenway due to the amount of trees that need to be removed the destruction of the mountain to make it ADA compliant including concrete retaining walls. one month ago

 5 Agree

Poor explanation of what you are trying to accomplish. I totally disagree with making Merrimon 3 lanes of traffic. It needs to be widened where possible. Bikers should us other streets. Merrimon is a one month ago

 5 Agree

NCDOT proposed widening Merrimon back in 2018, but the neighbors fought against. It. You should thank them for not having a left turn lane the length of Merrimon. one month ago

Is this why you are proposing a Road Diet on Merrimon Ave? Which is totally absurd to go backwards. Same as Merrimon, Asheville needs to go underground with all of our Tele poles & utilities first. one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=13616

 5 Agree

5/35


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation With crime out of control in Asheville, I don’t support increased connectivity until there is an increase in investment in public safety. one month ago

 4 Agree

In principle, this is a great idea. I am a resident of Haw Creek, and the proposed greenway in our neighborhood needs a route change. No way this should cut right through Happy Valley/private property one month ago

 4 Agree

The videos maps are not clear about where the greenways will be built. Granular information means transparency. What these maps are is opaque and suggests community interest does not matter. one month ago

 4 Agree

Love the idea. However, the proposed path has some greenways going through private property and very close to private homes in my area of Haw Creek. hope this is just the GIS overlay and not accurate. one month ago

 4 Agree

They made it obscure intentionally. They could have used text to make clear where it was going but chose not to. And why do people who are outsiders get to decide on what happens in Happy Valley? one month ago

 3 Agree

While this is nice, and obstructions need to be removed from sidewalks, a comprehensive plan with more public transportation would be nice. one month ago

 4 Agree

I would love more protected bike lanes, I would definitely run errands and make quick visits for food if there were more protected greenways one month ago

 4 Agree

Expansion of our greenway network is responsible and desperately needed. The improvements will be well worth the cost and I fully support any and all greenway development. one month ago

 4 Agree

Please be more transparent. one month ago

 4 Agree

Money well spent. Greenways improve the ability to bike and walk for recreation or to work and make the city more livable. one month ago

 4 Agree

I fully support a functional and recreational greenway network. This would not only improve commutes and transportation but also recreational and tourist opportunities. one month ago

 4 Agree

Need this done asap one month ago  4 Agree

The City of Asheville has more important things to spend the money on. The roads in this town are really bad. Also the homeless problem is out of control. This greenway system will become a campway. one month ago

 3 Agree

stay out of Happy Valley!!! one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=13616

 3 Agree

6/35


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation also need priority on paving existing streets and walks and curbs and then do more greenways one month ago

 3 Agree

I am in support of greenways along public access. I do NOT support greenways through private property! I do not want a greenway through the Happy Valley neighborhood. Existing streets are accessible one month ago

 3 Agree

I am supportive of greenways as long as they do not include the use of private property. one month ago

 3 Agree

I live on Parkview Drive and feel VERY STRONGLY about not having this greenway go through my backyard. We can safely walk down any of the streets in our neighborhood to access the proposed sidewalks. one month ago

 3 Agree

Why do outsiders get to make decisions about what happens in Happy Valley. Why do they get to participate in decisions that affect our property values. one month ago

 3 Agree

Not in Happy Valley or up the mountain from Happy Valley. one month ago

 3 Agree

I would like to see the City of Asheville make Progress on the Growing Homeless issue(s) first...before undertaking these well meaning initiatives. one month ago

 3 Agree

The Neighborhood Greenway Network for Haw Creek does not include the proposed greenway between Arco Rd and Beverly Rd along the creek. This proposal was submitted nearly two years ago. one month ago

 3 Agree

The number 1 unaddressed need of our community for over 20 plus years..... one month ago

It seems like the connectivity of the proposed greenway is low. I would like to see more continues protected paths where you do not share the paths with the autos. It seems from the map many gaps. one month ago

 3 Agree

I support this work. And look forward to how the new New Neighborhood Greenways work in practice. I am a little nervous about safety. one month ago

 3 Agree

I am commenting specifically about the proposed path along Lakeshore Rd since that is my neighborhood. Desperately need a safe walking path from I26 to Merrimon on Lakeshore. one month ago

 3 Agree

REPAIR THE ROADS FIRST! STOP WASTING MONEY ON LEFTIST BULLSCHIFF! one month ago

 3 Agree

walking and biking make you leftist? and wHo aRe YoU yeLLiNg aT? one month ago

 1 Agree

If completed, this would dramatically increase the livability of Asheville one month ago

https://publicinput.com/report?id=13616

 3 Agree

7/35


4/20/22, 8:50 PM

City of Asheville, NC - Report Creation Numerous and far reaching, connected greenways of all kinds are valuable and supported one month ago

 3 Agree

Our roads should not be used as playgrounds for children or for recreational bicycling. one month ago

 3 Agree

I fully support this and hope it acutally happens. As an Asheville native I'm utterly disgusted and embarrassed at our city's initiatives for true pedestrian infrastructure. DO BETTER ASHEVILE one month ago

 3 Agree

They don't really connect to each other. This is like the sidewalks that just stop and leave you hanging one month ago

 3 Agree

It would be nice to have some water fountains and also the possibility for safety stations like on college campuses. one month ago

 3 Agree

I would like to see an expansion down Mills Gap Rd of the smaller routes. Mills Gap is a super busy road and the neighborhoods and community would greatly benefit from an expansion that includes