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Folklife West Journal, Nº 4, Dec. 2009 Web edition note: INDEX ON PAGE 2

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 “Two Songs to the Same Tune”

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‘Vesta Tilley Society’ formed

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Folklife Organisations & Folklife Studies News Conferences and Workshops

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  The Roots of    Welsh Border Morris:      Bromsberrow Heath            !" The Ballad Printers of Worcester !"  Folklife West  Members’ a series of articles by Roy Palmer   Contact Listings   # 4. - R. Houghton # • Folklife   Organisations    • Folklife Studies   Local Celebrations   Listings & Photos         Worcester Gaol    (demolished 1922)   contributed by     Doc Rowe     Cover illustrations   are from articles,   © contributors &   Folklife West 2009 Rev. Baring-Gould      


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RESEARCHED ARTICLES 1/4 ….…..…. max h 124, max w 91.5 mono £ 13 / £ 17 across … max h 124, “Two max w 188 to mono ● 1/2 Song, tune, & notes Songs the Same Willikins and his Dinah, The Back-to-front Song, contributed £ 24Tune: / £ 28 or 1 column max h 251, max w 91.5 by Charles Menteith p3 -- PRINT ONLY A4 º….…..…. max h 275 º, max w 188 …… mono £ 44 / £ 48 £150 / £154 • The Roots Of Welsh Border Morris.colour ‘Bromsberrow Heath: Stick Dance, Step Dance, two Bromsberrow Heath º A4 height is to top of this page’s top box; 1/4 size as on right-> tunes, plus illustrations, by the late Dave Jones p.4-6 -- PRINT ONLY OTHER STANDARD SIZESof ABOVE • ‘TheTHAN Ballad Printers Worcester. 4. Richard Houghton, from Roy Palmer. Includes song: The Lamentation of • SPECIAL POSITIONS back covers & inside-covers, middle pages James & Joseph Carter, for map, illustrations. can be requested A4, colour only, for nop7-9 extra charge

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The Ballad Printers of Worcester. 4: Richard Houghton. By Roy Palmer

Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 7

!" The Ballad Printers of Worcester !" # a series of articles by Roy Palmer # Under this heading in 1990-91 I published a series of five articles in what was then the Somers Journal. These have now been revised and re-written in the light of further information, some of which is published in my book, The Folklore of Worcestershire (Logaston Press, 2005). • See FWJ Nº1, 2, 3 for 1: John Butler; 2: Samuel Gamidge; 3: James and John Grundy, George and Thomas Lewis, Thomas Hayes

4: Richard Houghton

H

oughton was in business from 1824 until 1835 at the General Printing office, 5 Merry Vale (see map below) now that part of Deansway which is close to All Saints’ Church), where he advertised: ‘Hawkers & Shopkeepers supplied on moderate terms’. Over thirty of his ballad sheets survive, most with two items. Very little of the material is topical or local. There are popular lyrics like ‘Away to the Mountain’s Brow’ (written by George Alexander Lee, who was also widely known as a tenor singer), ‘The Soldier’s Tear’ (tune also by Lee, to words by the society poet, T. H. Bayly) and ‘Pilgrim of Love’ (tune by Sir Henry Bishop, better known as the composer of ‘Home, sweet home’). However, Houghton – or his customers – apparently preferred traditional material, which provides a large number of titles including ‘Bonny Blue Handkerchief’, ‘Dame Durden’, ‘The Female Drummer’, ‘Gosport Beach’ and many more (see below).

Lists All items are in the Madden Collection at Cambridge University Library; copy in the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library at Cecil Sharp House. Other references show additional copies: BL indicates a collection of broadsides in the British Library with the reference 1876 e 3. Numbers in square brackets […] refer to Steve Roud’s Folk Song Index, which is available online at http://library.efdss.org/archives • • •

All round my hat [567] Answer to the Inneskillen dragoon / Pilgrim of love Away to the mountain’s brow / The glasses sparkle BL

Part of map of 1884, showing Merry Vale.


Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 8

The Ballad Printers of Worcester. 4: Richard Houghton. By Roy Palmer

The Ballad Printers of Worcester, by Roy Palmer 4: Richard Houghton continued • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Bonny blue handkerchief [378] / London town [914] By the sweet silver light bonny moon [906] / The rose of England Chapter of cheats / Marriage day Dame Durden [1209] / Hurrah for the bonnets of blue [819] / True lovers, or, the king’s command [1445] Dandy husband / Young William of the royal waggon train [1354] Fair Phoebe and her dark-eyed sailor [265] / Adieu, my native land The gay old man / The Indian lass [2326] The lamentation of James & Joseph Carter (see words, music, illustrations pp8-9) / The blind beggar’s daughter [132] The lamentation of James & Joseph Carter / My village fair Little Mary, the sailor’s bride / Gosport beach Old Mr December / The female drummer [226] BL The petticoat king of the islands Philadelphia lass / Cottage beauty / He’s the man to win Poor Caroline of Edinburgh town [398] / Blue-ey’d boy BL The poor little fisherman’s girl / Lord Marlborough [233] A pretty little dear / The banks of doon The pretty ploughboy [151] / Fate of young Henry The rose of Ardee / Buy a broom The servant boy / Blue eyed maid The soldier’s tear / The mariners (‘Ye gentlemen of England’) Thorney Moor woods [222] / Plato’s advice [Van] Dieman’s Land [519] / Lord Marlborough [233] The wealthy farmer’s son [1061] / The wanderer / The miller What a shocking bad bonnet / The flowing bowl Worcester Gaol (demolished 1922) William and Dina [271] / My own blue bell Young Bill, the female sailor Young Edward the gallant hussar [1146] / Artichokes and cauliflowers [2456] The young sailor bold / The maid of Llangollen / Never marry a Charley

O

ne ballad, ‘The Lamentation of James & Joseph Carter’, was issued twice, presumably because it sold well, dealing as it did with a local crime. On 7 February 1833 a farmer called Jones from the village of Rock went to the market at Kidderminster and on the way home spent the evening in public houses at Bewdley. In the last of these, the Union, he was spotted by James Carter, aged 22, and his brother, Joseph, 30. When Jones left at about 10 p.m. to walk home the Carters followed. Outside the town they knocked him into a ditch and took his money, just a few shillings. He was not seriously hurt but the Carters’ smock frocks (standard gear at the time for farm labourers) were spattered with blood. The brothers bought new smocks in Worcester, leaving the old with the shopkeeper, who handed them to the police a day or two later. The Carters further drew attention to themselves by booking a night’s lodging and failing to turn up. They were arrested, and after a trial in Worcester found guilty of robbing Jones and also of stealing on the same day a Kidderminster £5 note. Despite previously having a good record, they were sentenced to death and hanged in front of Worcester Gaol (illustration above) on 22 March 1833. According to a contemporary account:

B

oth men met death with firmness, but without bravado; and Joseph Carter addressed the populace from the scaffolding, warning them to avoid Sabbath breaking, drunkenness, and bad women. The crowd on this occasion behaved with unusual decorum, and seem really to have been impressed with a feeling of sadness at seeing two persons hurried out of life so early.

T

he ballad, which repeated these conventional warnings, would no doubt have found purchasers both in the crowd and further afield. Its opening of ‘Come all you wild and wicked youths’ would no doubt have suggested to those who wished to sing it a number of tunes, including that of ‘Young Henry the poacher’. The Carter brothers were buried at Ribbesford (illustration opposite), just down the River Severn from Bewdley. After a time the rumour began to circulate that their coffins were full of stones and that their bodies for some reason were elsewhere, having possibly been sold to a medical school for dissection. Local feeling eventually grew so strong that the rector, Rev. John Walcot (incumbent 1854-76) obtained the permission to open the graves, and found that the unhappy Carters had been duly buried. The tune is reproduced from the original article in Somers Journal, Apr 1991, when the tune was typeset by Cresby Brown.


The Ballad Printers of Worcester. 4: Richard Houghton. By Roy Palmer

Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 9

The Lamentation of James & Joseph Carter Printed by R. Houghton, General Printing Office, 5, Merry Vale, Worcester

Come

ev-

you

all

er

have

you

to

all

your

live,

all,

Then

wild

may

time

frain from

ways,

you

you’ll

think

wick

be,

an

shun bad

be

blest

days.

of

our

ex-

pa

sins, re-

with

- ed

youths,

ample

com

form -er

and see hap - py

and

and

sweet

Take ad -

take

ny,

wher

whi-lst

Re-

form and take good

con-

tent

vice,

[to]

young Men

down - fall.

C

ome all you wild and wicked youths, wherever you may be, An example take whilst you have time to shun bad company, Refrain from all your former sins, reform & take good ways, Then you'll be blest with sweet content, live and see happy days.

Now with strong bars we are confin'd in a dismal cell, And soon upon the fatal drop must bid this world farewell, Ah young men all we little thought of this any more than you, That we should meet our fate so soon & bid this world adieu.

Chorus Take advice young men all, And think of our downfall.

So all young men a warning take who hath sweet liberty And for two dying sinners sake, shun harlots company. For they will soon your pleasures blast. and prove your overthrow, And then like us you will get launch'd into a gulph of woe.

We was brought up near Bewdley town, all in fair Worcestershire, Where our parents now reside in sorrow, grief, & care, When from them last we took our leave, the tears flow'd from their eyes, Desiring to take good ways, we heeded not their cries. Soon after we left our parents dear, employment we did gain, But being prone to wretched vice, not long we did remain. For in lewd harlots company, we spent each night and day, And to maintain this wretched set we robbed on the highway.

Ballad sheet: Cambridge University Library, Madden Collection. Tune: 'Henry’s Downfall', noted by Cecil Sharp in 1909 from a Mr Gibbs of Evesham, Worcs; published in Roy Palmer (ed.), Songs of the Midlands (East Ardsley, 1972), p.73.

Roy Palmer.

In eighteen hundred & thirty three, Feb.' the 7th day. We did attack one Mr. Jones, all on the king's highway We robbed him of his property, and also beat him sore, Dispersed and left him on the ground weltering in his gore. But soon we apprehended were & unto Worcester sent, Within strong prison walls to dwell in grief and discontent, And at the last assizes we were guilty found and cast, And then the awful sentence of the law was on us past.

Ribbesford Church


Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 10

Folklife Organisations: featuring the new Vesta Tilley Society

Folklife Organisations

A new “Vesta Tilley Society” to celebrate Music Hall Legend V

esta Tilley was one of the greatest stars of Music Hall - she had a hugely successful career on both side of the Atlantic. When she retired, nearly 2 million people signed the People’s Tribute to Vesta Tilley, including Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini and Charlie Chaplin. Vesta was born in Worcester, the second of thirteen children, and many people feel that we [in Worcester] do not do enough as a City to claim her as our own and to champion her as one of the biggest stars this country has ever seen. The Vesta Tilley Society has been formed to increase the profile of Vesta Tilley and to celebrate her life. We have plans to help launch a one-woman Vesta Tilley show, to try to raise the money to erect a statue in Worcester, to found a national Music Hall weekend based around Worcester and the Swan Theatre, and much, much more. Vesta Tilley was born Matilda Alice Powles in Commandery Street in the Blockhouse in Worcester on 13th May 1864. In her autobiography she describes Worcester as “the poor, proud and pretty city”. Her father gave up his trade to work as a comedy actor and performer under the stage name of Harry Ball, Tramp Musician, with his performing dog. He became a theatre manager and in 1867 was Chairman of the Theatre Royal in Gloucester where Tilley first appeared on stage aged three and a half. At first she was chaperoned by a neighbour but later his father gave up his job as manager of St George’s Hall in Nottingham to travel with her, acting as her manager while they appeared on the same bill. The family moved to Nottingham and it was Tilley’s permanent home until her marriage. Her first appearance as a male impersonator was in 1872 at the age of 6 at Day’s Concert Hall in Birmingham as “The Great Little Tilley, the Pocket Sims Reeves” in a parody of the opera singer Sims Reeves. She then became “The Great Little Tilley” and at the age of eleven at Canterbury Hall in London she first used the name she made famous, Vesta Tilley, adding the name of Vesta to her own nickname. In 1897 at the age of 13 she first appeared in pantomime as Robinson Crusoe at the Royal in Portsmouth and she continued to perform in both pantomime and music hall. Her father acted as her manager until his death in 1889 when she was 24 and she became famous for such songs as “Burlington Bertie” and “Following in Father’s footsteps”. She married the eldest son of theatre owner Henry de Frece who had once been proprietor of the Worcester Alhambra. Walter was a successful manager and by 1909 owned or controlled about fifteen theatres. Vesta’s characters were carefully researched and costumed and she sang original songs, many of them composed by her husband, who also wrote


Folklife Organisations: featuring the new Vesta Tilley Society

Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 11

songs for many other top music hall performers, including Dan Leno. She was very popular with men and women, the latter seeing her as a symbol of independence and she was the highest earning woman in Britain in the 1890s. Her popularity in Britain led to her visiting the United States for a six week vaudeville tour in 1894 and she made six American trips in all. Also in 1894 she was invited to perform at a private party attended by the Prince and Princess of Wales. She appeared at the first Royal Variety Performance, for which Walter was one of the organisers, on 1st of July 1912 at the Palace Theatre as “The Piccadilly Johnny with little glass eye”. She made use of new technology, making a substantial number of records towards the end of the century, of which few survive as the soft wax used was very fragile and making a short silent film based on her “The Girl who loves a Soldier”. In 1913 Vesta revisited Worcester for the first time in 25 years, opening a fete for Worcester Women’s Conservative Party and later giving a concert at the Public Hall in the Cornmarket. The hall had opened as a music hall in 1850 and was eventually demolished in 1966. continues over page


Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 12 Folklife Organisations

A new “Vesta Tilley Society” to celebrate Music Hall Legend

Folklife Organisations: featuring the new Vesta Tilley Society

country and Vesta became Lady Matilda de Frece. Vesta’s farewell tour began in 1919 and she last performed at the London Coliseum on 5th June 1920 at the age of 56. When she retired Dame Ellen Terry presented her with “The People’s Tribute”, a set of albums containing the signatures of two million fans including Harry Houdini and Arthur Conan Doyle. When her husband retired they moved to Monte Carlo where Walter died in 1935. She published “Recollections of Vesta Tilley” in 1934. The Covent Garden flower sellers sent her violets on her birthday each year until her death in London in 1952 aged 88. She was buried beside her husband in Putney Vale Cemetery. Vesta Tilley Court off St Paul’s Street in Worcester is named in her honour. The Worcester County Record Office has a collection of Vesta Tilley letters, press cuttings and programmes, many in her own scrapbooks, and some of her costumes, which are kept at the Record Office at County Hall. The Vesta Tilley Society, based at the Swan Theatre in Worcester has recently been formed to celebrate Vesta Tilley’s life and to raise her profile. It is hoped to erect a permanent memorial to Vesta Tilley in Worcester and as a beginning the Society unveiled a plaque near her birthplace on 12th May 2009. More information from www.vestatilleysociety.net or from Chris Jaeger, 01905 726969 chris@worcesterlive.co.uk The Vesta Tilley Society, The Swan Theatre, The Moors, Worcester, WR1 3ED 01905 726969 info@vestatilleysociety.net www.vestatilleysociety

from page 11 On 9th June 1916 she appeared as part of an all-star cast in “The Admirable Crichton” at the London Coliseum, a performance later repeated at the London Opera House before King George and Queen Mary. Her career reached an all-time high during World War I during which she and her husband became active in recruiting men for the armed forces. She became known as “England’s Greatest (or Best) Recruiting Sergeant” with songs such as “The Army of today’s all right”. She also performed in hospitals and sold war bonds, while Walter organised theatre and cinema entertainment for the troops. In 1919 Walter was knighted for wartime services to his

FOLKLIFE WEST JOURNAL: INTERNATIONAL We are pleased to announce that we will be able to offer overseas institutions the opportunity to subscribe or be invoiced in their own currency via the internet. This will be via the website of Aspect Design, who are internet booksellers (and our printers). We have asked them to provide this service as we are amateurs who would rather spend our time developing the Journal! In the first instance, please contact the Editors by email (details page 2); information will later be placed on our website.


Folklife Organisations: featuring Wren Music’s new ‘Devon Tradition’ project

Folklife Organisations

Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 13 Wren Music:

‘Devon Tradition’ project comes alive Devon's folk and community arts development charity Wren Music is undertaking an exciting new project to bring alive the county's folk music past. The Devon Tradition project will enable access to the works of two folksong collectors, spanning two centuries and the songs of local people, by digitising and making them available on the internet. The Sabine Baring-Gould collection has become increasingly well known, especially since the discovery in 1993 of previously unknown manuscripts containing hundreds of songs. Baring-Gould’s collection was called the “first serious and sustained attempt to collect the songs of the English working people” by Cecil Sharp, and by his own admission was the most important work he undertook. The Paul Wilson collection spans the past thirty-five years of Paul Wilson’s career - a mass of music and oral testimony from Devon and beyond, including a large collection of reel-to-reel tapes from the 1970s and 1980s. The project will digitise the collections and build an online catalogue fully available to the public. Embedded within the catalogue will be digital images of the Baring-Gould manuscripts, making it possible for the first time for folk-song enthusiasts and professionals to search the collection from their own home. The project will also seek to engage with the communities Wilson and Baring-Gould collected from, encouraging people of all ages to rediscover their heritage. Through residencies in schools and local concerts, the project aims to bring to the fore the rich history of Devon and the stories of local people. The project is working closely with EFDSS to ensure the work complements the Take6 project, an already live, searchable database of the archives of six of the UK's most prominent folksong collectors (see FWJ 3, pp16-18). The Devon Tradition project will add to this already considerable wealth of work, utilising a standardized format to ensure compatibility and ease of use, and encourage further projects like this one to collaborate with existing work. The Devon Tradition project continues the work started by Marilyn Tucker, Paul Wilson and Martin Graebe through the Baring-Gould Heritage Project, when the Baring-Gould folk song collection was micro-filmed and distributed to Devon libraries on microfiche. Marilyn Tucker, Artistic Director of Wren Music, is Project Manager, and has made the project a reality by securing an award of £42,300 from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Marilyn sees her role as holder of the vision, making sure that the songs and tunes from the collection are made available to as wide a public as possible. Paul Wilson has been working with folk song professionally for over 35 years as a performer, educator, arranger and folk song collector. Paul is particularly keen not only to bring old songs forward into new contexts in schools, music groups and community settings, but to create new pieces inspired by the older ones. He has been awarded an honorary MA for his work in music education. Martin Graebe is an internationally renowned Baring-Gould scholar, who has brought the work of the nineteenth century figure back into the public eye. Currently working on a book about the Baring-Gould collection, Martin’s role in the project as Chair of the Steering Group and mentor is unique and invaluable.

Rev. Baring-Gould


Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 14

Folklife Organisations: featuring ‘Devon Tradition’ and Cecil Sharp Diaries online

Folklife Organisations

Wren Music: ‘Devon Tradition’ project comes alive continued from page 13

Melanie Smith has been appointed as Project Co-ordinator, and her work will be advised by an expert steering group consisting of Martin Graebe (chair), Paul Wilson (Wren Music), John Draisey (Devon County Archivist), Jenny Lloyd (education advisor), Steve Roud (creator of the internationally recognised Roud Index), and Ian Maxted (former Devon County Local Studies librarian). For more information on the project or to get involved, contact Melanie Smith at Wren Music on 01837 53754 or visit the website www.devontradition.org

Wrey Tucker & family: Paul Wilson collecting (1980s). Photo: Doc Rowe.

Folklife Organisations

English Folk Dance & Song Society (EFDSS):

Cecil Sharp Diaries Available Online Cecil James Sharp (1859 - 1924) was England's most prolific folk music and dance collector. The 22nd November will mark his birthdate and Sesquicentennial (150th Anniversary). In celebration of his achievements and the impact he continues to have on folk music to this day, EFDSS announced the launch of his only surviving personal diaries. Written between 1915 – 1918, they include descriptions of his collecting experiences in the Appalachian Mountains of North America. Between the time of his first serious collecting experience in a vicarage garden in August 1903, until his death on Midsummer Eve 1924, he amassed a total of 4,977 tunes in England and North America, many of which were published in various forms in order to promote and revive what was perceived to be a fading part of traditional culture. He was not alone by any means, following as he did the likes of Lucy Broadwood, Frank Kidson and Sabine BaringGould to name a few. However, his mission to revive the music placed him very much at the forefront of a movement which has attracted a great deal of attention over the past thirty years, but for which many primary sources have been difficult to access . How on earth did this asthmatic, 56 year-old vegetarian survive in the heat and altitudes of North Carolina, Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee and West Virginia, along with his young assistant, Maud Karpeles? How did he feel when he heard the news of the death of many of the young men of his English Folk Dance Society demonstration team in the trenches of the Great War? And what did it mean to collect 1,600 tunes from people he considered direct descendants and carriers of British cultural traditions? The diary for 1915 is currently available to access on-line. The 1916 diary will appear on New Year's Day, 2010; and 1917 and 1918 in March, 2010. Thanks to Cecil Sharp's grandchildren, Briony Jose and Richard Sharp, for allowing EFDSS to host the diaries online; to the managers of his estate, Bird & Bird, for helping us find them; to Chris Roche and The Shanty Crew for sponsoring this project. For further information, please contact Nick Hallam, Marketing Director at EFDSS nick.hallam@efdss.org or tel: 0207 485 2206 ext. 39.


News: EFDSS. Conferences, Talks,Workshops, & Schools: various in date order

Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 15

Folklife Organisations: News

For further information, please contact EFDSS Marketing Director, Nick Hallam, at nick.hallam@efdss.org.

• Contact details for Members of Folklife West, for FOLKLIFE ORGANISATIONS Members and FOLKLIFE STUDIES Members are listed on page 17. • We welcome news and general information for appropriate º folklife organisations / folklife studies, whether Members or not. º “appropriate” refers to non-profit folklife organisations or charities

As we go to press, Gwilym Davies is moving and temporarily off email, so for further information, check out the website - http://www.glosfolk.org.uk (see our UPDATES for new address)

not including activities covered by Folk West quarterly folk festivals, folk performers, folk clubs, folk shops & services: only Folklife West Members are publicised in Folk West.

• Exceptionally, regional folk organisations’ news may be in both FWJ and, if Members, in Folk West. • We thank Members for their support, without you, there’d be no Journal! If you would like to support us by joining, details are on page 2 - it’s only £10 for 2 years!

EFDSS:

Arts Council Funding Heralds New Era

EFDSS is delighted to announce that it has become one of Arts Council’s Regularly Funded Organisations and will receive £400,000 of funding over two years. This will enable EFDSS to become a national development agency for folk music and set up a number of exciting new initiatives that will benefit the folk sector. EFDSS was founded in 1932 following the amalgamation of The Folk Song Society (founded 1898) and The English Folk Dance Society (founded in 1911) and is based at Cecil Sharp House in London, a centre of excellence for the study, practice and dissemination of traditional English song, dance and music, and home to the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library, the most important collection of traditional song, dance and music material in the country. EFDSS is also a membership organisation with around 4,000 members and affiliated clubs. EFDSS Chief Executive, Katy Spicer, welcomed the news, saying: “this money will allow us to be proactive in how we support English folk arts. We will shortly be announcing a range of schemes to support artists through showcases and partnerships, as well as developing our existing education strategy. We will also be working towards creating the definitive online resource for both our members and the general public, creating a new website that will make even more of our library and archive collections available." Susanna Eastburn, Director of Music Strategy, Arts Council England said: "We are delighted to be investing in EFDSS over the next two years to support its ambitions to be a national development organisation. This is a very exciting time for folk music with a generation of world class artists influencing a new set of young performers who are challenging perceptions and attracting wide audiences and media interest. Our investment will build on the EFDSS's iconic status to create a national programme of artist and audience development, industry networking, training and increased opportunities for children and young people."

Glosfolk

Folklife Conferences, Talks, Workshops, & Schools from January 2010 • not: Folk Festival workshops, for which please see Folk West

JANUARY, Sat 23 Talk: traditional Welsh love customs

St Fagans: National History Museum Talk on St Dwynwen's Day, 23rd Jan, 11.30am - 12.15pm. An opportunity to learn more about the traditional Welsh love customs; in Oriel 1. Free. Simultaneous translation available. www.museumwales.ac.uk/en/stfagans

FEBRUARY, Mon 15 and subsequent Monday evenings Classes: “Folk Song in England”

EFDSS [see above] and the Traditional Song Form [see below] are jointly organising a series of six evening classes, to be led by Steve Roud. Intended for newcomers to folk song, the classes will explore the history and development of English traditional song over the last 200 years. The classes will run from 7pm to 9pm on Monday evenings, starting on 15 Feb 2010. To find out more, contact Steve Roud [see Fs.1, Researchers, p17]. To book places, contact EFDSS, 0207 485 2206 extension 25.

MARCH, Fri 26 - Sun 28 Folklore Society AGM Conference

The Folklore Society AGM Conference 2010: "The Supernatural," in collaboration with the Association for Research in Popular Fiction, at Leeds Trinity and All Saints University College, Horsforth, Leeds. The conference fee will be about £90 including meals but excluding accommodation and breakfast. For more details, contact: juliette.wood@btinternet.com The Folklore Society, c/o The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB, tel. 020 7862 8564. The Folklore Society Library and Archives are stored at University College London Library, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT. www.folklore-society.com

MARCH, Sat 6

Traditional Song Forum meeting

In Newcastle upon Tyne as guests of the University of Newcastle. Details to follow on www.tradsong.org


Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 16 Review PLEASE CONTACT US BEFORE SENDING MATERIAL books, manuals, periodicals, CDs - as we only review a limited range of material in this Journal. For example: we will review CDs of traditional singers, rather than CDs of folk club/concert/festival performers.

Alternatively, for publication in Folk West: • Folklife West Members can send in reviews of eg CDs of club/concert/festival performers • Folklife West Member-performers can publicise their releases free under Performers’ News and/or by paid ads

Phonofossils 1, 2, 3 and 5

The nearest bracket for the 4 CD’s would be Music Hall. These are from old recordings on various media: cylinder, shellac and even Bakelite 78’s. Adrian Tuddenham, the restorer, is so good at recovering much of the original aura of the first half of the 20th century’s fare that august museums commission him. The technical expertise would astound the digital electronics world so firmly wed with computers. As is your reviewer (C.Eng M.I.E.E.)! The quality is remarkable given the age of the original material. Cylinder machines had to be constructed that were more gentle than the originals. The tracks cover a broad swathe and chronology: 1898-1933, hits from the shows to risqué songs that could only be sold under the counter in their day, not by modern standards! But there we have a tangible folklore aspect – just how prudish were those times? And you try telling young people today! Occasional comic sketches, thriller/drama and there is even a reconstruction of a disaster. A technique that survives today on programmes like Crimewatch. Plus ça change. Some names that we recognise today are: Nelly Wallace, Tommy Handley before ITMA, Randolf Sutton of Mother Kelly’s Doorstep though he is on Jollity Farm this time,

Review: Phonofossils 1,2,3,5 Announced: Fallibroome Coll’n Folklife Trad. Directory: Updates

George Robey ministering his prime mirth, Burns and Allen – Gracie at her dotty best, Sonny Hale and Mabel Constanduros. There are compositions from Leslie Sarony, Weston & Lee, Ravel, Katèlby (sans Monastery Garden) and names that have never reached my cognisance till now but they are a cornucopia of serendipity. These are tracks not found elsewhere on commercial CD’s. Each CD (at least one more is planned) is accompanied with a booklet outlining just enough biographical detail to whet the appetite in case you want to pursue one of the references cited. These CD’s are the 21st century equivalent of a collection of chapbook and broadsheet reprints. But given the nearer proximity to our time and being audio – they seem all the more er um – well you will just have to sample it, and you will see what I mean. Cresby Brown £9 each. Poppy Records, 88 Mount Rd, Southdown, Bath BA2 1LH. www.poppyrecords.co.uk MP3 samples are available on website.

Announced

The Fallibroome Collection

Edited by Nicolas Broadbridge A new edition of a classic collection of English country dances. Originally selected by Bernard Bentley, the 102 dances in this new edition include all the dances from the original set of 6 books, published in the 1960s and 70s and long out-of-print. The dances are selected from the 18th century collections of Playford, Thompson, Young, Johnson and Rutherford. In addition, the new edition includes 12 dances by Bernard Bentley entitled The Fallibroome Garden. Sponsored by Lichfield Folk Festival and English Miscellany. Published by The English Folk Dance & Song Society. ISBN: 9780-85418-205-3. £18 + £2.50 p&p.

v FOLKLIFE TRADITIONS DIRECTORY ~ LISTINGS UPDATES v Updates may also appear in FOLK WEST quarterly, if from Members 1) JULY-AUGUST: since the last Journal, we welcome new Members Eddie Cass and Steve Roud; full details of their many activities are in the Folklife Traditions Directory (August 2009). 2) SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER: the following are changes since the Directory was published.

A.2

Folk Music, Song & Dance org’s - REGIONAL/LOCAL

(b) East Midlands; and (g) West Midlands. • TRADITIONAL ARTS TEAM new contact phone and address ✆ 0121 247 3856 * 19 Springfield Road, Kings Heath, Birmingham B14 7DU

C

SEASONAL LOCAL CELEBRATIONS

another one

• FOOTBALL IN THE RIVER Bourton-on-the-Water Glos August Bank Holiday Monday Bill Pullen writes: for over 100 years, on [what is now] August Bank Holiday Monday, Bourton-on-the-Water, Glos., had “Football In The River (Windrush)” - not mass participation but organised by Bourton Rovers Football Club (1st play 2nds or 2 mixed teams) : www.soglos.com/ sport-outdoor/28383/Bourton-Football-in-the-River-2009

FS.1

Folklife Researchers

and

FS.2

• GWILYM DAVIES new contact phone, 01242-603094 (to be connected); * 11a Greet Rd, Winchcombe, CHELTENHAM, Glos GL54 5JT

Folklife Lecturers / Speakers and new address


Folklife Traditions Directory: 1-line summaries of Members’ entries

Folklife West Journal, Nº 4. Page 17

Folklife West Members’ Listings [A.]

Also on our website: www.folklife-west.org.uk This has late news and listings updates.

FOLKLIFE ORGANISATIONS Associations, Societies, Trusts

(not including those set up solely for 1 folk festival or club/venue or dance series) A.1 NATIONAL ORGANISATIONS ENGLISH FOLK SONG & DANCE SOCIETY (EFDSS) 020 7485 2206 www.efdss.org A.2 ENGLAND, REGIONAL & LOCAL ORGANISATIONS • A.2b East Midlands TRADITIONAL ARTS TEAM Pam Bishop 0121 247 3856 www.tradartsteam.co.uk • A.2d North-West FOLKUS Alan Bell 01253 872317 www.folkus.co.uk/ TAMESIDE FOLK ASSOCIATION (TFA) Mike Riley 0161 366 7326 (no website) • A.2f West Country DEVON FOLK Colin Andrews 01363 877216 www.devonfolk.co.uk FOLKLIFE WEST Sam & Eleanor Simmons 01684 575704 www.folklife-west.org.uk/ GLOSFOLK Gwilym Davies 01242 235662 www.glosfolk.org.uk/ WILTSHIRE FOLK ARTS Bob Berry 07714 550990 www.wiltshirefolkarts.org.uk/ WREN Paul Wilson 01837 53754 www.wrenmusic.co.uk • A.2g West Midlands FOLKLIFE WEST Sam & Eleanor Simmons 01684 575704 www.folklife-west.org.uk/ TRADITIONAL ARTS TEAM Pam Bishop 0121 247 3856 www.tradartsteam.co.uk A.4 FOLK SONG ORGANISATIONS TRADITIONAL SONG FORUM Secretary: Martin Graebe 01452 523861 www.tradsong.org PEDLARS PACK Moderator: Steve Roud http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Pedlars_Pack A.9 FOLKLORE ORGANISATIONS TALKING FOLKLORE Moderator: Steve Roud http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TalkingFolklore Other categories: no Member entries (see Directory in print or or our website for other categories)

[Fs.] FOLKLIFE STUDIES Fs.1 FOLKLIFE RESEARCHERS DOC ROWE 07747 687734 EDDIE CASS

www.docrowe.org.uk/

FOR MORE DETAILED INFORMATION • up to 40 word description, contact details: address, tel, fax, mobile, web [not email] see our Folklife Traditions Directory (‘FTD’) listing Folklife West Members & non-Members

GWILYM DAVIES 01242 603094 www.cmarge.demon.co.uk/gwilym THESE 1-LINE SUMMARIES MARTIN GRAEBE 01452 523861 www.sbgsongs.org are based on our FTD plus Updates ROY PALMER • for Folklife Organisations and Folklife Studies, STEVE ROUD 01825 766751 / 07739 901998 (no site, email from ed) only members are listed in this Journal. Mike Riley 0161 366 7326 (no website, no email) • Updates will be listed in this Journal. Fs.2 FOLKLIFE LECTURERS / SPEAKERS DOC ROWE 07747 687734 www.docrowe.org.uk/ Other categories: suggestions always welcome. GWILYM DAVIES 01242 603094 www.cmarge.demon.co.uk/gwilym See FOLK WEST & the FOLK WEST DIRECTORY MARTIN GRAEBE 01452 523861 www.sbgsongs.org for Clubs, Performers, Festivals, Media, Services ROY PALMER > • Workshop leaders: listed in Folk West Directory, Performers: Pf.5c Fs.3 FOLKLIFE ARCHIVES (in specialist folklife or general archives) Access: please see note on website www.docrowe.org.uk/ FOLKTRAX (Peter Kennedy's 'folktrax' website) www.folktrax-archive.org The MORRIS RING FOLK PLAYS ARCHIVE: The RON SHUTTLEWORTH COLLECTION Ron Shuttleworth 024 7667 6721 www.folkplay.info/Ron/Index.htm The ROUD FOLKSONG INDEX Steve Roud http://library.efdss.org/cgi-bin/query.cgi?query= Fs.4 FOLKLIFE MUSEUMS no Member-entries Fs.5 FOLKLIFE LIBRARIES (in specialist folklife or general libraries) VAUGHAN WILLIAMS MEMORIAL LIBRARY (EFDSS) The Librarian 020 7485 2206 http://library.efdss.org Fs.6 FOLKLIFE STUDIES: ACADEMIC COURSES & RESEARCH (undergraduate or higher level) no Member-entries Fs.7 FOLKLIFE STUDIES: BOOKSELLERS & PUBLISHERS • folk directories, local folk magazines, folk radio: listed under Folk Media in our Folk West Directory • Fs.7a Folklife Publishers ~ Booksellers no Member-entries • Fs.7b Folklife Publishers ~ Books, Journals & Recordings ENGLISH FOLK SONG & DANCE SOCIETY (EFDSS) 020 7485 2206 www.efdss.org ‘The ROOTS OF WELSH BORDER MORRIS’ from Mrs. A. J. Jones 01885 490323 (no website) SAYDISC RECORDS Gef Lucena ………………… www.saydisc.com • Fs.7c Folklife Publishers ~ Internet > With articles and/or detailed information re Folklife resources, not already listed above under Organisations • sites for folk club etc listings not included; see Folk West Directory SABINE BARING-GOULD WEBSITE Martin Graebe 01452 523861 http://www.sbgsongs.org


SEASONAL LOCAL CELEBRATIONS

C: SEASONAL

A LIST BY DOC ROWE

CHINESE NEW YEAR

A

LIST

BY

DOC ROWE

LOCAL CELEBRATIONS

February

UP-HELLY-AA MIDGLEY PACE EGG PLAY

Good Friday

Last Tue in Jan

JANUARY

All entries from Doc except any in italics MARI LWYD different places - different days S.E. Wales before Christmas to New Year’s Day Wassailing Combe in Teignhead Devon January Wassailing Churchstanton Somerset January Darkey Day Padstow Cornwall 1st January Haxey Hood Game Haxey Lincs 6th January Bodmin Wassailers Bodmin Cornwall 6th January Twelfth Night Revels Southwark London near 6th January GOATHLAND PLOUGH STOTS Goathland North Yorks 1st Sat after Plough Mon STRAW BEAR DAY Whittlesea Cambs Sat nr 6 Jan Apple Tree Wassail Whimple Devon 17th January Wassailing Carhampton Somerset 17th January Dicing For Maids Money Guildford Surrey 29th January or near UP-HELLY-AA photo above Lerwick Shetland Last Tue in Jan

FEBRUARY, MARCH, INCLUDING Shrove Tuesday (16 Feb 2010), Ash Wed. (day after)

Carlows Charity Woodbridge Suffolk Cradle Rocking Blidworth Notts Chinese New Year photo on left various UK Quit Rents Ceremony Royal Courts of Justice London Trial Of Pyx Goldsmiths Hall London Red Feather Day: Sir John Cass Service Aldgate London Westminster Greaze Westminster School London HARE PIE SCRAMBLE & BOTTLE KICKING Sedgefield Ball Game Easter Monday (p19) Football Alnwick Northumberland Atherstone Warks Below: PADSTOW May (p19) Football Ashbourne Royal Football Ashbourne Derbys

2nd February Sunday near 2nd February February February February (and May) Friday near 20th February Shrove Tuesday

Shrove Tuesday Shrove Tuesday Shrove Tuesday and Wednesday Hurling the Silver Ball St Columb Major Cornwall Shrove Tuesday and Saturday following ❖ Unique in being a Shrovetide football where the ball is hurled, not thrown. Hundreds of hurlers turn up, the two teams being the Townsmen and the Countrymen. Goals are about two miles apart, but a goal can also be scored by being carried over the parish boundary. There is an afternoon and an evening game. Youngsters get ‘silver cocoa’ and the silver ball goes round the pubs being submerged in beer to provide ‘silver beer’. Based on information from ® Chris Ridley. Ref: Hurling at St Columb, Ivan Rabey (Lodenek Press, Padstow: 1972). Cakes And Ale Ceremony St Pauls London Ash Wednesday Dame Elizabeth Marvyn Charity Ufton Nervet Berks Mid Lent Kiplingcotes Derby Market Weighton Yorks Third Thursday in March Tichborne Dole Tichborne Hants 25th March

APRIL, and MAUNDY THURSDAY, PALM SUNDAY, GOOD FRIDAY, EASTER Sir John Stow Quill Pen Palm Sunday Cakes HENRY TRAVICE CHARITY Skipping Uppies And Doonies

St Andrew Undershaft London various (esp. Herefordshire) Leigh Manchester Alciston Sussex Workington Cumbria

Midgley Pace Egg Play photo on left Calder Valley Widow’s Bun Ceremony Bow Britannia Coconut Dancers Bacup Brighouse Pace Egg Play Brighouse Easter Parade Battersea Park

Yorks London Lancs W. Yorks London

5th April or near Palm Sunday Maundy Thur Good Friday Good Friday/Tuesday & following Saturday Good Friday Good Friday Easter Saturday Easter Saturday Easter Sunday


APRIL, and MAUNDY THURSDAY, PALM SUNDAY, GOOD FRIDAY, EASTER Church Clippyng Radley Maypole Lowering Barwick-in-Elmet Harness Horse Parade Regents Park Egg Rolling Preston Orange Rolling Dunstable Down Chulkhurst Charity Dole Biddenden HARE PIE SCRAMBLE & BOTTLE KICKING photo p18 Hallaton Tupenny Starvers St Michaels Maidservants Charity St Mary’s Church House Hungerford Hocktide Hungerford St Georges Court

Oxon W Yorks London Lancs Beds Kent Leics Bristol Reading Berks

Page 19

CONT’D

Easter Sunday Easter every 3 years Easter Monday Easter Monday Easter Monday Easter Monday Easter Mon Tuesday after Easter Thursday after Easter 2nd Tuesday after Easter

Listings: • Local Celebrations (contributed by Doc Rowe)

May, & whit, & ASCENSIONTIDE (Ascension Day is 40 days after Easter) May-Pole Raising Barwick In Elmet Padstow May Day photos p18 & on right Padstow Minehead Hobby Horse Minehead Jack In The Green Hastings

Whit/May 1st May 1st-3rd May May Bank Holiday & weekend WELL DRESSING Malvern Worcs May Day weekend [Eds] RANDWICK CHEESE-ROLLING Randwick Glos 1st Sun in May RANDWICK WAP Randwick Glos Sat after Cheese-rolling ❖ Audrey Smith reported: Cheese-rolling, 1st Sunday in May. The Wap (a fair),the following Saturday Knutsford Royal May Day Knutsford Cheshire First Saturday in May Ickwell Green May Day Ickwell Beds Saturday / Monday Helston Flora Dance Helston Cornwall 8th May Abbotsbury Garland Day Abbotsbury Dorset 13th May Etwell Well Dressing Etwell Derbys 2nd week in May May Festival Hayes Common Kent 2nd Saturday in May Dunting The Freeholder Newbiggin by the Sea Northumberland Wed near 18th May Cyclists Memorial Service Meriden West Midland Sunday near to 21st May Mayoring Day/Hot Pennies Rye E. Sussex 23rd May Blessing The Sea Hastings E. Sussex End of May Castleton Garland Day photo on right Castleton Derbys 29th May Grovely Rights Wishford Magna Wilts 29th May Founders Day Chelsea Royal Hospital London 29th May Arbor Tree Aston on Clun Salops 29th May Bampton Morris Dancing Bampton Oxon Spring Bank Holiday Headington Quarry Morris Headington Oxon Spring Bank Holiday Hunting The Earl Of Rone Combe Martin N Devon Spring Bank Holiday ❖ Custom reintroduced in 1974, which includes Hobby Horse and Fool, 'Grenadiers', music, drums and dancers and the Earl of Rone character. Processions take place throughout the weekend, culminating in full pageant on the Monday evening. ❖ Tom & Barbara Brown : www.earl-of-rone.org.uk Cheese Rolling Cooper’s Hill, Birdlip Glos Spring Bank Holiday Maypole Raising Barwick-in-Elmet W. Yorks Spring Bank Holiday every 3 years (next is 2011) Dovers Games Chipping Campden Glos Friday after Bank Holiday Scuttlebrook Wake Chipping Campden Glos Sat. after Bank Holiday PLANTING THE PENNY HEDGE Whitby Yorks Ascension Eve Well Dressing various Derbyshire From Ascensiontide - Sept Beating The Bounds Tower Of London London Ascension Day every 3 yrs 2011 BISLEY WELL-DRESSING Bisley Glos Ascension Day ❖ Wicken Love Feast Wicken Northants Ascension Day Well Dressing Tissington Derbys Ascension Day St Mary Redcliffe Rush Sunday St Mary Redcliffe Bristol Whit Sunday Bread & Cheese Throwing St Briavels Glos Whit Sunday Dicing For Bibles St Ives Cambs Whit Monday

JUNE

Yorks Cornwall Somerset Sussex

Thaxted Morris Festival Thaxted Blessing the Boats Whitby Appleby Fair Appleby Border Riding Hawick Borders Election Of Mayor Of Ock Street Abingdon Selkirk Ridings Selkirk Midsummer Fires various Youlgreave Well Dressing Youlgreave Tideswell Well Dressing Tideswell Winster Wakes Winster

Essex N. Yorks Cumbria Friday after Berks Borders Cornwall Derbys Derbys Derbys

Cakes And Ale Ceremony Rushbearing Walking Day

Bury St Edmunds Warcup Warrington

Suffolk Cumbria Cheshire

Ripon Tower of London Winchester Bow Woodbridge

N. Yorks London Hants London Suffolk

Daily or weekly

Ripon Hornblower Ceremony Of The Keys Wayfarers Dole Farthing Bundles John Sayer Charity

June / July June 2nd week June 2nd Monday in June Saturday near 19th June Third week in month 23rd June Saturday near 24th June Saturday near 24th June Saturday following Sunday after 24th June Last Thursday in June 28th June Friday near 30th June Daily Daily Daily Rarely held Every Saturday

PADSTOW MAY DAY

May 1st

All listings & photos © Doc Rowe unless stated otherwise. We are very grateful to Doc for generously providing such detailed listings & photos. More entries welcome (not restricted to Folklife West Members), including further details / detailed reports, contact details, and photos. All subject to consent of the event’s organisers, please - smaller ones may not want publicity. This Journal is twice yearly. June issue: July-December listings. December issue: Jan.-June listings.

• our ‘FOLKLIFE TRADITIONS DIRECTORY’ (see back cover) has the complete list plus photos, some in colour.

The Doc Rowe Collection Support Group has been set up to support the Archive of Doc’s unique collection. See: www.docrowe.org.uk

D EADLINE : 1 M AY for FWJ 5, J UNE 2010 CASTLETON GARLAND DAY 29th May


Worcestershire Folklife Folklife West Journal

by post : uk £3 eu

© 2008, Folklife West and Contributors

£4, usa £6

ISSN { applied for }

Nº. 1, September 2006

£1.50, POSTED £2.50 • FREE IN WORCESTERSHIRE for local community groups, venues, folk clubs listed in our WORCESTERSHIRE FOLKLIFE DIRECTORY, also free to Worcs Tourist Offices and libraries

RESEARCHED ARTICLES & SONGS • •

This new Journal starts with a special issue for Worcestershire

Worcestershire Songs collected by Charles Menteith: “Bill The Weaver” and “Now on that hill …” Worcestershire Articles ‘The Welsh Border Morris Dances’ and ‘The Evesham Morris Dances’: Dave Jones ‘The Ballad Printers of Worcester. 1. John Butler’: Roy Palmer ‘Cecil Sharp at Evesham’: Roy Palmer “Mud, Dust and Noise”: Whitman’s Hill Quarry: Eric Payne ‘Worcestershire Memories: A Worcestershire Coronation Pageant’: Robert Wimbury ‘A Worcestershire Folk Club: Somers Traditional Folk Club’, by its Members ‘Worcestershire Folklife’s Recording Facilities’ Review ‘The Folklore of Worcestershire’, by Roy Palmer And other contributions ‘Romany Road’, ‘Holly & Mistletoe Auctions’, ‘Worcestershire Chinese Association’, ‘Just Latin Salsa’, ‘Food & Folk’ ends, ‘Dampiers Round’, ‘Appleyard Dancers’

• • •

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS • • •

40 YEARS OF BODMIN FOLK CLUB from Christopher Ridley CD REVIEWS: CDs from Veteran by Paul Burgess BOOK REVIEWS: Traveller’s Joy (book/CD); The Folklore of Discworld; The Folklore of the Black Country LISTINGS: • FOLKLIFE ORGANISATIONS • FOLKLIFE STUDIES • • LOCAL CELEBRATIONS LISTINGS (contributed by Doc Rowe) •

RE VI

© 2006 Published by

Folklife

‘The WITHY TREE CAROL’ (Evesham version) from Charles Menteith ‘WELSH BORDER MORRIS’: ‘THE VILLAGE TEAMS’ including a map, and illustrations, by the late Dave Jones “NOT THE GOOD OLD TIMES”, George Swinford’s narrative of rural life a century and more ago, with photos: from Roy Palmer ‘THE BALLAD PRINTERS OF WORCESTER. 2: SAMUEL GAMIDGE’ from Roy Palmer. Includes ‘THE STAFFORDSHIRE MAID’, and illustrations of ‘SIR JOHN BARLEY-CORN’ and ‘THE COUNTRYMAN’S GARLAND’ ‘THE MORRIS RING FOLK PLAY ARCHIVE’: RON SHUTTLEWORTH COLLECTION WHAT IS FOLK? from Geoff Davies

W E

S

inc

e lud

THE

FOLKLORE OF DIS C

WO R

LD

...

Gamidge illustration from Roy Palmer © Chetham's Library, Manchester See back cover for a full reproduction of this illustration

Nº 2, December 2008

West

Journal -Membership: 2 years, £10 see page 2 (overseas, see p12) 4 issues of FWJ and 1 Folklife Traditions Directory.

Back issues special rate when taking out membership: FWJ 1,2,3, and Folklife Traditions Directory 2009, each add £1.50

£2uk

Folklife West Journal

by post : uk £3

£4, usa £6

eu

© 2009 Folklife West and Contributors



 

  

v FOLKLIFE WEST’S FOLKLIFE TRADITIONS DIRECTORY 2009 v ISBN 978-1-905795-26-0 v £2 v



FOLKLIFE TRADITIONS DIRECTORY

 

FOLKLIFE ORGANISATIONS & FOLKLIFE STUDIES

NEWS • THE FOLKLORE SOCIETY; TRADITIONAL ARTS TEAM; GLOSFOLK; EFDSS ‘TAKE 6’ ARCHIVE WEBSITE; FOLK SOUTH WEST CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS & SCHOOLS • EFDSS ‘New Wave’; The Folklore Society; ‘Transatlantic Routes’ conference, Worcester University; Society for Folk Life Studies; The Traditional Arts Team; Baring-Gould Folk Song School PUBLICATIONS by Paul Burgess • CONTACT LISTINGS • FOLKLIFE ORGANISATIONS • FOLKLIFE STUDIES LOCAL CELEBRATIONS LISTINGS contributed by Doc Rowe Cover illustrations are from above articles, © contributors & Folklife West 2009

                     

• published August 2009 • available printed or as a free PDF download from

THE BRIMFIELD STICK DANCE Single line of four dancers facing in pairs thus: 1-2 3-4 Step Single step throughout (4/1 step was also noted)

://jo

urn

Napping 2 and 3 hold sticks in both hands, resting their hands on the midriff. Keep the sticks steady. 1 and 4 strike from side to side in time with the music for eight bars. Start from right to left. xxx- for a polka.

olk

Ho

updates welcome

life

1

EFDSS ‘TAKE 6’ ARCHIVE WEBSITE

http://ftdir. folklife-west. org.uk

Sticks Short, described as 6"-8" but appear rather longer in the photograph.

al.f

• articles (please contact us first) • adverts (see p 2) • news from folklife organisations & re folklife studies • dates (exhibitions, workshops, etc)

deadline : 1st May (reviews earlier)

  

• ‘THE BALLAD PRINTERS OF WORCESTER. 3: JAMES AND JOHN GRUNDY, GEORGE AND THOMAS LEWIS, THOMAS HAYES’ from Roy Palmer. Includes songs ‘Jump Jim Crow’ and ‘Jack Tar’s Frolic’, and illustrations • ‘DOWN AT THE SUICIDE ARMS’ song from Charles Menteith • ‘WELSH BORDER MORRIS’: ‘THE BRIMFIELD MORRIS DANCE’ including , plus illustrations, by the late Dave Jones • WINCHCOMBE MUMMERS PLAY and WINCHCOMBE MORRIS from ‘Winchcombe Cavalcade’ by Eleanor Adlard (1939), from Bill Pullen

http

We welcome:

 

RESEARCHED ARTICLES & SONGS

FWJ 5 • June 2009

2

-we

featuring

LOCAL SEASONAL CELEBRATIONS Listings and Photos by Doc Rowe

left:

Padstow

FOLKLIFE ORGANISATIONS FOLKLIFE STUDIES

£2; Posted £3

FOLKLIFE TRADITIONS

Free to FOLKLIFE WEST MEMBERS

DIRECTORY 2009

3

st.o

Nº 3, June 2009

rg.u

• PUBLISHED • BY • • Folklife • West • • © • AUG • 2009 •

k

£2

Besides Doc’s listings, about 160 Folklife Organisations, Researchers & Speakers, such as DOC ROWE • CHRIS COE • DAVID HERRON • EDDIE CASS • GWILYM DAVIES • MARTIN GRAEBE • ROY PALMER • STEVE GARDHAM • STEVE ROUD • JOHN ADAMS & CHRIS PARTINGTON • SID CALDERBANK • TOM BROWN • ENGLISH FOLK SONG & DANCE SOCIETY • CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR TRADITIONAL MUSIC • NONSUCH DULCIMER CLUB • FOLKWORKS • TRADITIONAL ARTS TEAM • CONRADH NA GAEILGE • The MORRIS RING • TRADITIONAL SONG FORUM • PEARLY SOCIETY • SOCIETY for STORYTELLING • CHARLES PARKER ARCHIVE • NORTHUMBRIAN LANGUAGE SOCIETY • PEDLARS PACK yahoo group • The ROUD FOLKSONG INDEX • CAMBRIDGE & COUNTY FOLK MUSEUM • VAUGHAN WILLIAMS MEMORIAL LIBRARY (EFDSS) • COLLECTORS’ FOLK BOOKS • DAVID HERRON PUBLISHING • HALLAMSHIRE TRADITIONS • and a whole lot more …

© DOC ROWE & OTHER CONTRIBUTORS, AND © FOLKLIFE WEST, PUBLISHERS,

AUGUST 2009

☞ all in all, a most eclectic collection of listings

Folklife West Journal Nº 4, December 2009

£2uk

Folklife West Journal

“Worcestershire Folklife”: Folklife West Journal, Vol. 1, Nº 1. Page 1

04 - 2009 Dec - FWJ 04  

04 ● www.folklife.org.uk/ft.html ● 20 A4 pp (mono) ● Charles Menteith, Two Songs to the Same Tune: ~ Willikins and his Dinah ~ The Back-to-...

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