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Volume 2 Issue 4 Winter 2018

EAT OR BE EATEN

HOW SMALL PRINTERS ARE STAYING COMPETITIVE

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VOL. 2, ISSUE 4 n WINTER 2018

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IN THIS ISSUE 01 THE NEXT CHAPTER A letter from Todd Zimmerman

02 SUSTAINED SUCCESS How to adapt and win, regardless of your size

06 SCENE STEALER How the Acuity Select 28 is helping give Full Frame Signs’ customers the star treatment

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08 GENERATION NEXT

SUSTAINED SUCCESS HOW TO ADAPT AND WIN, REGARDLESS OF YOUR SIZE

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Wrapping our arms around today’s graphic communications nation

12 CARRYING A NEW TUNE

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How the Onset X3 is changing the way Southern Carton does business

14 THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER Fujifilm’s J Press 750S delivers unsurpassed level of productivity

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16 EYE ON ’19 What industry thought leaders are saying about the road ahead

18 COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE A look at the FUJIFILM Manufacturing U.S.A. facility

20 THE PEERS HAVE IT Survey shows the power of recommendations in B2B buying

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THE NEXT CHAPTER A LETTER FROM TODD ZIMMERMAN

A

s we embark on a new year, we tend to think of what lies ahead. Change continues to occur everywhere, and in many ways the change is driven by technological innovation. Breakthroughs in technology often come from changing customer needs, but sometimes it’s the technology itself that helps us think differently about new and different possibilities. In our print world we’ve seen new developments in digital inkjet, imprinting, and robotic material handling. These new technologies are enabling print service providers to better respond to the challenge of producing shorter runs, multiple versions, prototypes, and variable data jobs. We’ve also seen new developments in workflow, cloud-based solutions, and web-to-print software that boost productivity and increase output while utilizing less specialized labor. These innovations help make print more competitive and in turn help fuel more demand.

print illustrated. Our cover story, “Sustained Success,” provides advice for your lasting legacy. The story is heavy on ideas about how to succeed and lead in the New Year. And speaking of legacy, our second feature, “Generation Next,” taps into the needs and wants of the next generation of graphic communications professionals. All the best for a wonderful New Year. Warmest wishes,

TODD ZIMMERMAN

We are incredibly proud of our technology, but that’s not what makes an organization like Fujifilm tick. We want our technology to deliver real value for our clients. So we continually look for new and better ways to collaborate with our customers to implement and integrate new products and services into their service offerings.

Technology clearly brings new growth opportunities to the printing industry, but we have always believed that technology which is aligned with our customers’ current and future plans can generate real value—delivering a lasting legacy. Please enjoy the latest issue of

Division President, FUJIFILM North America Corporation, Graphic Systems Division Corporate Vice President, FUJIFILM Global Graphic Systems

William Rongey

EMBRACING INKJET TECHNOLOGIES Digital inkjet printing impacts all print production disciplines. New levels of operational excellence are now possible for inkjet without having to make trade-offs between print quality and production speed thanks to impressive ongoing technological advances. Fujifilm is deeply committed to advancing the industry and your business while delivering the broadest array of products and services to the graphic communications industry. Fujifilm’s innovative line-up of solutions offers a wide variety of applications meeting the evolving needs of print service providers within packaging, point-of-purchase, commercial signage, display graphics and industrial print markets. Inkjet technology is now capable of the highest quality, at remarkable speeds, creating a broad range of profitable finished pieces within short and long production runs. Additionally, Fujifilm’s commitment and dedication to environmental responsibility has been recognized as more than 20 inks in its Uvijet UV brand have achieved GREENGUARD Certification. The criteria to obtain this widely-recognized accreditation are among the most stringent product emissions standards in the world. Fujifilm’s GREENGUARD certified products are well established and scientifically proven to meet the world’s most rigorous, third-party chemical emissions standards, creating healthier indoor environments. STEVE LYNN Director of Inkjet Sales FUJIFILM North America Corporation, Graphic Systems Division

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF wrongey@fujifilm.com print illustrated is published quarterly by FUJIFILM North America Corporation, Graphic Systems Division Copyright 2018 All rights reserved

Press Komori lS 840

Plates Fujifilm SUPERIA LH-PL thermal plates

Screening Fujifilm Co-Res Screening

Coating/Varnish Outside covers: Gloss UV Coating Reticulating UV Varnish Inside covers and body: Satin AQ Coating

Inks Outside covers: UV Chrome silver & UV 4/c process Inside covers & body: UV 4/c process www.FujifilmGraphics.com print illustrated

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SUS TAI NED SUC CESS

“OUR BASIC GOALS ARE TO MINIMIZE WASTE AND OPTIMIZE YIELDS WHILE DELIGHTING THE CUSTOMER. THIS REQUIRES A MODERN PLATFORM, BUT MORE IMPORTANT, IT REQUIRES A DEDICATED AND SKILLED WORKFORCE.”

— CHRIS CARPENTER, OWNER & PRESIDENT OF ROYAL PRINTING

HOW TO ADAPT AND WIN, REGARDLESS OF YOUR SIZE

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STANDING TALL in the face of an everchanging, complex print industry climate requires staying laser focused, driven and flexible. And commercial industry print sales are growing, so maintaining an ability to adapt as the climate evolves has never been more important. Total commercial printing industry sales increased in 2018 to roughly 1.7 percent, or $85.3 billion, according to research by the Specialty Graphic Imaging Association (SGIA). Sales are up, but not high enough to relieve the intense pressure on margins. The sources of that pressure include rising paper prices and supply shortages; a lack of sales and excess capacity; rising healthcare benefits and wages; labor shortages that force the hiring of less skilled, less productive personnel; and increased tariffs. “Our SGIA Commercial Printing Panel reports that clients increasingly require faster turn times and shorter, more targeted runs,” says Andrew D. Paparozzi, chief economist for the SGIA. “They also want a broader range of services, special finishing and creative design to create distinctive print—the ‘wow’ factor—as one member of our panel puts it. Lastly, they require help maximizing the return on their communications dollar.” Chris Carpenter agrees that the marketplace is an active one. As owner and president of Royal Printing, a mid-sized publication and catalog printer in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, Carpenter has seen a great deal of change on all fronts, including suppliers, printers and distribution. “Call it consolidation or evolution, change presents opportunities for companies who are well positioned to provide meaningful solutions to print customers,” he says. “This activity will continue, and for firms who’ve kept pace with investing in their people, technology and operating platforms, it should present an opportunity for growth.” As customers demand and expect more from printers of all sizes, companies are faced with bettering pricing, ramping up service, and delivering high-quality products, faster. While you may have a handle on delivery, service and quality, the cost containment piece could be more of a challenge due to material price increases. John Hoopingarner, VP of Seneca Label in North Royalton, Ohio, believes those price increases will continue into next year. “Trying to find qualified, trainable press operators is a challenge,” he says. “It’s not as though they were ever plentiful, but it simply seems as though there are fewer of them applying.” ADAPTATION Adapting to current trends and challenges

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will allow managers to lead companies to see future success. It’s not easy, and frankly, not everyone is doing it. “Companies that are adapting regularly invest in productivity—and speed-enhancing technology,” Paparozzi says. “They are automating, smoothing workflow to minimize steps and touches, and eliminating processes that no longer add value.” Paparozzi says adapting isn’t just about producing a vanilla job faster anymore. Instead, it’s about quickly coordinating services, from database management and support personalized communication, to the design of standout direct mail and the creation of multimedia communications programs. All of this must be done while also minimizing the friction that can be caused by all those moving parts. Regular investment in employee recruitment, retention and development can make a big difference in the long run. Cultivating engaged employees at all levels to actually think, rather than just act, will mean clients are better served. To monitor trends before they are in place, keep an eye on shifting consumer behavior. This enables you to provide valuable and timely solutions for your clients. “We’ve done poorly a time or two by being behind, and had some pricey lessons,” Hoopingarner says. “It’s not expensive to pay attention to what is happening.” Carpenter says you also should set goals for your company’s basic operations. “Our basic goals are to minimize waste and optimize yields while delighting the customer. This requires a modern platform, but more important, it requires a dedicated and skilled workforce. Somehow, someway, the notion of having a rewarding career as a ‘printer’ has been lost. The printing industry needs more people.” Hoopingarner works with suppliers to find solutions that will either help keep customers’ costs the same or reduce the amount of the increase. He also plans to work with local vocational schools to possibly generate interest in the opportunities available in printing. In a leadership role, it’s significant to also think of yourself as being in the communications business. “You’re in the business of helping clients communicate more effectively with their clients,” Paparozzi says. “Understand how communication needs, options and preferences are changing and are likely to change.” Paparozzi believes that if you can show clients exactly how much value you create for them in the way of time and money saved, increased response rates, and decreased message-to-market time, you can

5 WAYS

EVERY PRINTER CAN STAY COMPETITIVE

The fundamentals of business remain unchanged says John Hoopingarner, VP, Seneca Label. “They may become repackaged, labeled as new, and so on, but the essentials of honesty and integrity are always important.” Hoopingarner and SGIA’s Andrew Paparozzi offer the following steps printers can follow to stay competitive: Deliver on time, even when it hurts Remember the Einstein Principle: Keep it simple Analyze decision-making as much as possible, but not to the point at which you can’t decide; otherwise known as “paralysis of analysis” Build sticky relationships that make it painful for the customer to leave, by providing value that can’t be readily found elsewhere Regularly ask questions to learn what you could be doing better and what you are doing well

“WE WORK VERY HARD AT EDUCATING OUR CUSTOMERS ABOUT WHY WE ASK SO MANY QUESTIONS, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY JUST WANT THE ORDER OFF OF THEIR DESK.” — JOHN HOOPINGARNER, VP, SENECA LABEL affirm their need for your services. Never assume they already know. RETAINING YOUR CLIENTS Understanding and working closely with customers isn’t a new trend. Printers should always focus on becoming resources for customers by keeping them abreast of changes in the marketplace, says Carpenter. That requires customer engagement, even when the customer is reluctant to participate in the process. “We work very hard at educating our customers about why we ask so many questions, especially when they just want the order off of their desk,”

Hoopingarner says. “All they see is a white label with some printing on it. We see it as much more and want it to perform well for their application without over-specifying it and, thereby, making it less cost-effective for them.” In the end, Paparozzi says it’s important to remember that if it affects how people communicate, it will eventually affect print. Not everything boils down to technology. “Sustained success in the increasingly competitive, complex commercial printing industry also requires advanced leadership and management skills,” he says. “The companies that cultivate those skills will be the big winners.”

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SCENE ST HOW THE ACUITY SELECT 28 IS HELPING GIVE FULL FRAME SIGNS’ CUSTOMERS THE STAR TREATMENT IN THE FAST-PACED, glamorous world of

film and TV production, finding the perfect shot is critical. In movie shoots, camera operators are constantly focusing on meaningful elements in the scene in front of them. When it comes to TV production, they must meticulously capture scenes that

are carefully planned in advance. Regardless of the project, cinematic artists in highly specialized roles must get every detail perfect. As veterans of the Toronto film and TV industry, Full Frame Signs knows how the game is played—and won. That’s why when it was looking to

PRIOR TO ACQUIRING THE ACUITY SELECT 28, WE LOOKED AT OTHER FLATBEDS. NONE OF THEM WERE AT THE SAME CAPACITY, OR EVEN IN THE SAME BALLPARK AS THE ACUITY SELECT 28.” — SEAN VIZSY, OWNER & PRESIDENT, FULL FRAME SIGNS

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expand its print capabilities to service that market, it turned to Fujifilm. Certainly familiar with the film and TV industry, Fujifilm entered the movie camera market in 2002. As it began to build its reputation, Fujifilm engineers quickly understood the importance of accommodating the different needs and culture of the motion picture industry. Sean Vizsy, owner and president of Full Frame Signs, saw the positive impression the film and TV industry had of the Fujifilm brand, so he reached out. Vizsy sought to strengthen his existing partnership by


STEALER acquiring the Fujifilm Acuity Select 28, a versatile and economic UV inkjet press capable of handling a wide range of creative print applications. “As a part of the film and television industry out of Toronto, our finished product

will appear on camera,” Vizsy says. “The high quality output from the Acuity Select 28 is much more impressive compared to any other press in this category. It also appeals to our other clients within various industries and markets.”

The flatbed Acuity Select 20 Series features up to eight color channels, including options to run white, varnish and now light inks, showcasing Fujifilm’s Uvijet KN ink, making it an ideal solution for a variety of output. The versatility of printing high quality, 1200 dpi (or greater) graphics on rigid, flexible and even roll media gives printers new, additional opportunities to expand their offerings and ultimately, their business. The combination of inks, varnishes, and media options provide a myriad of solutions for sign and display customers. Full Frame Signs is a short-run or prototype-business, so the equipment they use needs to align with the type of jobs they run. Because it produces short run work efficiently, the Acuity Select 28 will help save upwards of 30 percent on labor costs. “That’s reapplied labor, not labor we’ve eliminated, as we’ve re-allocated efforts to other areas, boosting productivity all around,” Vizsy says. Full Frame Signs outputs on a variety of rigid substrates for indoor and outdoor use, including acrylic, PVC board, styrene, plastic sheets and corrugated. “We are using the Acuity Select 28 for all of our rigid substrate output, and white corrugated prints beautifully,” Vizsy says. “Oftentimes, our film and television clients provide their own substrates to print on, flexible or rigid, depending on their needs at any particular moment while on-set.” In addition, Full Frame Signs is utilizing Fujifilm’s edition of Caldera’s Grand RIP. Featuring an easy-to-use interface along with the addition of the Adobe PDF Print Engine (APPE), the RIP can help interpret the native PDF file to increase speed and eliminate problems with transparencies and layers. Full Frame Signs is also running Caldera on two existing eco-solvent presses, for more streamlined staff on-boarding and project management. “Prior to acquiring the Acuity Select 28, we looked at other flatbeds,” Vizsy says. “None of them were at the same capacity, or even in the same ballpark as the Acuity Select 28.”

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NE XT GENERATION

ing Wrapp round ms a our ar graphic today’s nications u comm tion na

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IN TODAY’S EMERGING CREATIVE WORKFORCE, A JOB THAT’S JUST A JOB WON’T CUT IT ANYMORE. PEOPLE WANT TO BELIEVE IN YOUR COMPANY.

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A lot has changed in the graphic arts and communications world over the past 10 years. New technology, new educational opportunities and new consumer demands have molded the industry—like many others—into a modern version of its decadeold self. Today, companies all need fast and user-friendly websites because the way people shop has changed. Ten years ago, a website was more of a luxury, instead of the necessity it is now. But these are not surprising revelations.

The surprising ones are found in the path the graphics industry is headed because of these updates. And, spoiler alert: Print is still very much alive in the future. Nona Woolbright, Ed.D, and Dr. Ken Macro, Ph.D., are professors of graphic communication at Clemson University and California Polytechnic State University, respectively. Interestingly, both professors say that their graphic communications classes, which focus on design for printing and technology, are predominantly female.

MORE THAN JUST

A JOB With the option to go freelance becoming more common among creative professionals, it is no doubt a stressful thought for companies looking to secure top talent. And unfortunately, in a world that is dominated by a few megalith “cool” brands, it can be tough to make your legacy printing company seem shiny and trendy. Even if a student is not getting offers from Google or Facebook, he or she is still much more likely to seek a job with a marketing company complete with perks versus a production job at a company with no culture. “I conduct exit interviews with our graduates every year,” says Dr. Macro, who chairs the Cal Polytechnic’s Graphic Communication Department. “I did 85 in the spring. Every one of them that come through have an appreciation for print, but all of them see themselves going into marketing or design or getting involved with brands that make a difference, and not so much production. They’re extremely bright and brilliant and wanting to get involved in those areas.” In today’s emerging creative workforce, a job that’s just a job won’t cut it anymore. People want to believe in your company. So how do you do that? “All of the reports are environmentally focused,” Dr. Macro says. “Students are looking for positions with companies that have a social cause.” That could mean your company volunteers occasionally for a local charity or your packaging materials are strictly recyclable.

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Having a greater awareness that ties into your company foundation will help new grads connect with your company. Another way to get a jump is to embrace innovation and show students that you walk the walk. “The younger generation is extremely technology driven,” Dr. Woolbright says. “The more a company incorporates innovation, the more involved and excited and engaged students will become.” And students want to be valued. “They need to value the education and experience through internships and offer competitive salaries to meet the talent of people going into the workforce. We really do know a lot about the industry.” Dr. Woolbright says. “With any graphic arts major or program, students need to be taught about print, even if it’s just a small primer. Learning about color, bleeds, and the technical side of print. They need to be more open to people coming out of college.”

MAKING PRINT SEXY Embrace the incoming workforce by offering some things the new workforce cares about. In Dr. Macro’s words, make your company “sexy” to potential employees. “What is it that employees find sexy about Google and Apple?” he asks. “They get a month off at the beginning; they have micro-kitchens; a bus picks them up. How does a printing company compete with that?” There are other benefits that can be afforded. Dr. Marco describes the owner

of a printing company in California who is shaking things up. “He pays 100 percent of healthcare. That’s a phenomenal benefit. And every Friday, there are food trucks and music. He’s doing all he can do to ‘Google-ize’ this production environment.” Of course, Dr. Macro is realistic, noting it’s “a hard ship to turn.” But with an eye on the future and attention to what younger workers value, today’s print companies can overcome the challenges of tomorrow. Dr. Macro predicts the industry will continue to move further into digital and


The Cal Polytechnic’s Graphic Communication Department is 75 percent female. That’s a big departure from the way the graphic design industry once was—dominated by males. Another recent shift in the norms? Graphic communication students of today are passionate about eco-friendly initiatives and social impact. A degree in graphic communications awards college students the luxury of choosing many different career paths, thus making them attractive prospects. From marketing to design to print, there are a variety of ways that graphic comm students can use their skills. And this degree doesn’t seem to be losing popularity. “I have noticed that students from other majors switch to graphic communications,” says Dr. Woolbright, a graduate coordinator for Clemson University’s Graphic Communication Department. “They are not just in a classroom listening or just reading but because they are learners who thrive by making, doing or building something.” Graphic communications students can help print companies thrive well into the future, but Dr. Woolbright says that’s just the issue. “There is a big push to figure out how to bring in young people.” Dr. Macro shares similar sentiments. But how does an industry previously dominated by older men attract the talent of younger women? Analyzing trends in data and listening to the students can help.

specialty graphics and 3D printing. There is also no ignoring the stats. Macro says 69 percent of Cal Polytechnic graphic communication students that have graduated within the last four to five years now have positions with UX or UI design in the name. To recruit top talent, there is advice you can follow. Above all else, you have to be there, Dr. Macro says. At career fairs, on social media, wherever students are looking for jobs. “These companies need to be showing this constituency, ‘We’re here; we’re in business; we’re still a $400-billion entity, and we need you to help us,’” he says. And while people say “print is dead,”

Dr. Woolbright emphasizes that direct mailing, packaging and even books will never go extinct. “I think companies are going to have to take a hard look at company culture, pay scales, career pathing, and overall flexibility, or the workforce shortage is going to get dramatically worse.” The solution? “Show new graduates the different paths that their careers can take because there isn’t only one,” Dr. Woolbright says. “Help them see long-term possibilities. The wide variety of things we have the potential to do is the best part about the industry.”

WHAT IS IT THAT EMPLOYEES FIND SEXY ABOUT GOOGLE AND APPLE? THEY GET A MONTH OFF AT THE BEGINNING; THEY HAVE MICRO-KITCHENS; A BUS PICKS THEM UP. HOW DOES A PRINTING COMPANY COMPETE WITH THAT?” — KEN MACRO, CAL POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY’S GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION DEPARTMENT

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CARRYING A HOW THE ONSET X3 IS CHANGING THE WAY SOUTHERN CARTON DOES BUSINESS LOCATED JUST 50 MILES south of Nashville sits Lewisburg, Tennessee—a small town

defined as much by its quaint backyards and front porches as it is its industries and farmland. And not unlike any town in any other part of the country, Lewisburg is changing. Being a short drive from the country music capital of the world has its privileges. Music halls. Wineries. Craft breweries and distilleries. Each has created a number of new opportunities for companies like Southern Carton, a solutions company that specializes in packaging. Founded in 1977 by Jim Kennedy, Southern Carton has evolved into a highly recognized company with a state-of-the-art facility. In a time when things can change on a dime, the family owned and operated, third generation business continues to find new ways to serve its community. Today, Southern Carton is led by Jim’s son, Dave, CEO, and grandson, Conner. One of the resources helping take Southern Carton in a new direction is the recently purchased Onset X3, with white ink chan-

nels, which is capable of printing in excess of 9,600 square feet per hour (180 beds/ hour). The Onset X3 features 3 x CMYK ink channels, plus the choice of white or orange. “We’re looking for more and more and more opportunities because the Onset X3 is so versatile,” Dave says. “It’s a great selling feature in that we can print white and our competitors cannot.” Part of the Onset X3’s allure are the FUJIFILM Dimatix drop-on-demand printheads that are perfect for the production of high volume, quality images onto a wide variety of media. Jetting a 14 picoliter drop size, the printheads provide a good balance of quality and volume to meet client demands. And to ensure maximum throughput, it is compatible with Inca’s flexible auto-

mation system, which offers Southern Carton the choice to operate in manual or semi-automated handling from the same configuration. The Onset X3’s intangibles are helping Southern Carton get to where it couldn’t before. “We’re trying to hit the country music industry,” Dave says. “We’re also looking at wineries and craft breweries. We are targeting people who traditionally don’t want to order 1,000 of this and 2,000 of that; they want 50 of this and 100 of that. The Onset X3 is a game changer for us.” UP TO SPEED, AND BEYOND... One of the biggest fans of the Onset X3 is digital coordinator Eugene Peek, who Dave says eats, sleeps and breathes everything surrounding the flatbed printer. “He had to get up to speed quickly, so he ran with it,” Dave says. “He needed to learn it, and he did. We picked the right man for the job.” Right now, Southern Carton is printing on glass and a lot of acrylic. And right in line with its company mantra: “We don’t just want your order, we want your business,” Southern Carton now can give its customers what they want. “We can take an order today and finish it in one day, provided we have the material/ substrate on-site,” Peek says. Take a recent job it completed for a client that wanted to put images on a fiberboard. The job originally was riding an eight-week production timeline with a vendor in China.

WE’RE LOOKING FOR MORE AND MORE OPPORTUNITIES BECAUSE THE ONSET X3 IS SO VERSATILE. IT’S A GREAT SELLING FEATURE IN THAT WE CAN PRINT WHITE AND OUR COMPETITORS CANNOT.” — DAVE KENNEDY, CEO, SOUTHERN CARTON

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A NEW TUNE Unfortunately, the job was continually put on backorder. But when the client turned to Southern Carton, they stepped up. Thanks to the Onset X3, Southern Carton turned the job around in a week, and with much better

quality. “The client paid the same price it paid its vendor in China, so it was a win/ win/win.” The Onset X3 also has helped Southern Carton grow from its regional base. “That has been a great selling feature for us,”

Dave says. “[For example] somebody in San Francisco could ask us to run a job that might typically be done 150 to 200 miles from its plant. With the high speed output from the Onset, we can ship to clients anywhere and everywhere.” Southern Carton recently completed a rush order—200 corrugated sheets printed in the same day. “Our customers have now come to expect quick turns,” Dave says. “It’s now a precedent. That’s the way we built our business. Our clients know what we can deliver on the box side, so they expect us to deliver on other output, too.” Dave Kennedy alongside his Onset X3 UV flatbed press with three-quarter robotic automation, in Lewisburg, Tennessee.

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THE BEST GOT BETT FUJIFILM’S J PRESS 750S DELIVERS UNSURPASSED LEVEL OF PRODUCTIVITY

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THE ALL-NEW third generation J Press 750S

is here. With an unsurpassed level of productivity, the 750S can generate 3,600 B2 sheets per hour, for both static and variable jobs. Known as the “Jet Press” outside North America, Fujifilm began offering the J Press digital inkjet series (the first press of its kind for

this segment) for the commercial printing field worldwide in 2011. Thanks to the 750S, which made its global debut at Japan’s IGAS 2018 International Graphic Arts Show this past July, the innovation continues to be widely adopted in Japan, Europe and North America, with more than 150 J Press installs worldwide.


T JUST TER Fujifilm’s new flagship digital inkjet press has taken core technologies from the 720S and raised the bar with a series of innovations, productivity and environmental enhancements, including being able to reduce the overall footprint by 15 percent and reduce energy consumption by 23 percent.

“The uptime on J Press is reported by customers to be near 95 percent—or greater, making the J Press the most productive production inkjet press in its class,” says Ed Pierce, product marketing manager, FUJIFILM North America Corporation, Graphic Systems Division.

THE J PRESS 750S DELIVERS WITH A SERIES OF INNOVATIVE ADVANCEMENTS, INCLUDING: OUTSTANDING IMAGE QUALITY COMPARABLE TO OFFSET PRINTING The 750S features the newest generation ultra-high density/high-precision FUJIFILM Dimatix Samba™ printheads, along with Fujifilm’s aqueous pigment VIVIDIA ink; the J Press 750S prints output that exceeds the quality of offset printing platforms. The 750S delivers exceptional flat tints, ultra-smooth gradients, perfect black tints, pin sharp text, ultra-fine line work and amazingly smooth flesh tones, and has an extensive color gamut reaching upwards of 90 percent of the Pantone® library. HIGH-SPEED OUTPUT AND LARGER SHEET SIZE The J Press 750S prints both static and variable jobs at an industry leading 3,600 sheets per hour, which is 33 percent faster than the current J Press 720S, without any compromise to quality. With the larger sheet size of 23 inches x 29.5 inches (585mm x 750mm), the capacity from a four to six letter page imposition is a 50 percent increase in sellable output over the previous generation. HIGHLY PRECISE INLINE QUALITY INSPECTION Much like the J Press 720S, the 750S incorporates an inline scanning procedure of each sheet to insure quality throughout each print run. Further enhancing this capability, Fujifilm has introduced an optional full sheet scanning function which ensures that each printed sheet matches a pre-approved image quality standard. FLEXIBILITY FOR A WIDE RANGE OF STOCKS The J Press 750S exhibits great flexibility for the widest array of growing print segments. Available standard from the factory as a commercial printing platform, it can be field configured to print up to 24 pt. board stock. A variety of current J Press customers change their own configuration back and forth to gain the maximum flexibility and value from their J Press investments.

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EYE ON ’19 WHAT INDUSTRY THOUGHT LEADERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD

IT’S OUT THERE. The future. And while we can never be quite sure what’s lurking around the corner, we can plan. We can set a course that keeps our products and services in front of our respective audiences. When you look at 2019, what trends and challenges do you see looming for the commercial print industry? It’s a fair enough question. That’s why we decided to reach out to a cross-section of industry thought leaders for their insights on what to expect. Our roundtable panel includes: Todd Meissner, president, Color Ink; Steve Iwanickim, U.S. sales manager, Friesens; Mark Turk, president and CEO, International Label & Printing Co.; and Billy Mitchell, president, MLT Creative. WHAT TRENDS AND CHALLENGES ARE YOU EXPECTING TO TAKE HOLD ACROSS THE INDUSTRY IN 2019? TODD MEISSNER, COLOR INK: We A do a terrible job of recruiting young people to join our industry. With a low unemployment rate, an aging labor force and increasing wages, it will be difficult to Q

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attract new, young faces when there are so many other opportunities in a wide variety of industries. STEVE IWANICKIM, FRIESENS: Continuation of longer paper lead times will be an ongoing challenge for the foreseeable future—particularly in uncoated freesheet

and GW grades. Tight labor markets may result in upward pressure on wages and make hiring more challenging. Lastly, further M&A activity involving smaller and mid-size firms on the heels of Quad’s acquisition of LSC. MARK TURK, INTERNATIONAL LABEL & PRINTING: The trends and challenges ap-

pear to be brand recognition and differentiation, along with speed-to-market timing. Customers are becoming more astute to technology that can allow for faster deliveries, more versioning and improved quality. We must strive to stay ahead of those and so many other fast-paced challenges, and be ready to respond, if and when possible. BILLY MITCHELL, MLT CREATIVE: I believe

we’ll see more innovative ways for marketers to invest in print media in 2019 for several reasons. Print has been an overlooked media for some time now and as email, digital display, and online content exposure via social and websites becomes more cluttered, the opportunities with


direct mail and other forms of print may be the secret sauce for targeted campaigns in 2019. This is especially true for Account Based Marketing (ABM) campaigns. WHAT TECHNOLOGIES AND INNOVATIONS DO YOU EXPECT TO TAKE HOLD? MEISSNER: Exponential growth of A inkjet printing. As inkjet technology continues to improve and cost of consumables/ownership continues to come down, digital inkjet equipment will be able to compete with conventional print processes on a much broader scale. Q

IWANICKIM: LED printing brings meaning-

ful benefits to production operations and publishers alike. We installed an eight-unit LED press in 2018 and are considering further investment in the technology in 2019. Digital solutions continue to improve and eat into the short-run end of the offset market. We see increasing demand for eye-catching, compelling cover decoration techniques such as spot UV, unusual foils, and the like. TURK: We’re presently seeing inkjet technology play a major role in this endeavor. This should become more widespread as developments creating faster speeds and more versatility become more prevalent. MITCHELL: We are very excited and opti-

mistic about all the technology advances in digital print. The innovations include all kinds of opportunities for data-driven versioning in both imagery, texture, and text. And the ability to better integrate digital print into multi-stage lead-nurturing campaigns presents all kinds of new opportunities. WHAT TRENDS HAPPENING OUTSIDE THE PRINT MARKET SHOULD INDUSTRY LEADERS PAY ATTENTION TO? MEISSNER: Rising interest rates, A tariffs, increased shipping costs and labor rates. There is no doubt that we will need to increase our estimating and billing rates over the next few months in order to maintain our margins. Q

IWANICKIM: Areas to keep an eye on include: macro-economic conditions, interest rates and cost of capital. Marketers use of non-print media to drive business growth, which in turn informs how print positioning can be adjusted if needed. Lastly, and importantly, the work force. The good news is young people—millennial’s and Gen Z—are reading printed books, but interest in the

printing industry as a career choice among these same cohorts is low. We would do well as an industry to position print as an attractive, dynamic, applied-tech career choice with a variety of customer-facing and internal operation opportunities. TURK: Customer branding has become an important issue and we, as producers of packaging, must become more aware of creative, innovative ways to help customers successfully get their products to market. MITCHELL: Print providers need to keep

learning like the rest of us in marketing. The crowded marketing automation software space continues to evolve and print needs to keep up. In fact, it’s changing so often and so fast that if a print provider doesn’t have the internal team and bandwidth to keep up with everything, they should look

I BELIEVE WE’LL SEE MORE INNOVATIVE WAYS FOR MARKETERS TO INVEST IN PRINT MEDIA IN 2019 FOR SEVERAL REASONS. PRINT HAS BEEN AN OVERLOOKED MEDIA FOR SOME TIME NOW.” — BILLY MITCHELL, MLT CREATIVE to building partnerships with the marketing agencies in their market. It’s a never-quitlearning world from here on out. ABM, for example, continues to gain traction and print is a vital component of most ABM strategies. IS THERE ANY ADVICE YOU CAN OFFER TO HELP KEEP PRINT SHOPS IN FRONT OF THEIR MARKET PLACES? MEISSNER: Two key components we A have embraced really account for our growth the last couple of years. The first is differentiation: We’ve identified some new vertical markets that are well-aligned with our very unique capabilities and technologies. There is very little competition in these niche markets because of the commitment we have made on the technology side. Oftentimes, our customers are amazed that we are able to execute on a complex project simply because they are told so many times by incumbent vendors that “it’s not posQ

sible.” We take pride in making the impossible become possible. This approach has helped us to grow profits and sales. The second is: Don’t sell printing—sell solutions. Often, the solution can involve new printing technology, finishing processes, improved workflows, batch processing/automation of files. In short, it simply means not accepting the status quo, but finding a better way to do things. IWANICKIM: Understand what your offering looks like from the customer side and seek ways to further enhance the experience. TURK: Producers of print must become more a part of their customers’ daily routine. The word “partner” is often overused, but nonetheless critical if a company intends to remain ahead in their marketplace. We must somehow become almost like an actual additional “department” in our customers’ businesses. MITCHELL: Just as I see plenty of opportu-

nity for marketers to add more print media into their otherwise digital marketing investment, I recommend that print providers invest in marketing automation platforms for their own marketing programs. Even smaller printers should be using and learning from this. Some solutions that come to mind include HubSpot, Marketo, Pardot, Vbout, Sharp Spring, and there are plenty more at a variety of price ranges to consider. WHAT’S THE ONE THING YOU WILL CHANGE IN 2019 BASED ON WHAT HAPPENED LAST YEAR? MEISSNER: Outsource the things we A can’t do well and focus on the things that we can do profitably with opportunity for growth. Q

IWANICKIM: We’re looking at how we can best expand, utilize and allocate our binding capacity in order to build upon strong 2018 performance. TURK: We will become more involved in the recruiting and training process of folks entering and coming out of high schools and colleges/universities to the exciting field of graphic communications—primarily enhanced by the emergence of digital technology to the industry. MITCHELL: I plan to practice more of what

I preach about print and be more proactive in convincing our clients to include print in their strategies and budgeting for 2019. And that includes my own agency’s marketing efforts.

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COMMITMENT TO

EXCELLENCE A LOOK AT THE FUJIFILM MANUFACTURING U.S.A. FACILITY

THE PRESTIGIOUS ISO-14001:2015 registration is one of the more striking features of the FUJIFILM Manufacturing U.S.A. facility in Greenwood, South Carolina, a city defined by a recent influx of new businesses, artisans, retail shops, and locally owned restaurants. Established in 1988, the South Carolina complex sits in one of Fujifilm’s global manufacturing hubs, serving as its North American Manufacturing headquarters. The facility serves customers throughout the United States, Canada and more than

Above, the sprawling 500 acre FUJIFILM Manufacturing U.S.A. complex in Greenwood, South Carolina. Below, once printing plates are manufactured within Fujifilm’s 2.5 million square foot facility, they are stored in an on-site distribution center with dedicated inventories to meet plate customer needs in a timely manner.

FUJIFILM IS DEDICATED TO RESEARCH, AND DEVELOPMENT, AND WITHIN OUR THERMAL, PROCESSLESS, AND VIOLET PLATE OFFERINGS, OUR COLLEAGUES MANUFACTURE A TOTAL OF 13 DIFFERENT PLATES.” – TODD CROKER, PRESIDENT, FUJIFILM MANUFACTURING U.S.A., INC.

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40 other countries. The facilities on the Greenwood campus received their ISO9001 Registration for quality systems in 1994, and the ISO-14001 Registration was achieved in April 1999. Since then, the site has achieved both the ISO-9001:2015 and ISO-14001:2015 registrations meeting the current quality and environmental management systems’ standards. Over the years, Fujifilm has remained a committed corporate citizen in South Carolina and the Greenwood community. The company and its associates are involved in many award-winning civic and charitable activities, enhancing the quality of life in their local community. In 2010, Fujifilm began utilizing landfill gas from the Greenwood County Landfill to provide steam for the color photographic paper factory. The move to this renewable fuel helped reduce the amount of methane gas emitted into the environment and the consumption of natural gas. Today, more than 1,000 people work at the Greenwood site, which has more than 2.5 million square feet of manufacturing space (more than 40 football fields) under roof. The 500 acre complex features five

state-of-the-art manufacturing facilities for the production of QuickSnap™ recyclable cameras, inkjet photographic paper, color photographic paper and digital printing plates for the Graphic Arts industry. The South Carolina complex is also home to Fujifilm’s largest distribution center in the world. AMERICAN STRONG One of the attributes of the Greenwood facility is its continued support of Americanmade printing plates. More than 210 Fujifilm associates contribute to the overall plate manufacturing process, from original coils of aluminum alloy, through coating and final packaging. “Fujifilm is dedicated to research and development, and within our Thermal, Processless, and Violet plate offerings, the Greenwood, South Carolina colleagues manufacture a total of 13 different plates to satisfy customer expectations. Our group is especially proud of the SUPERIA ZD offset plate technology, a highly regarded addition to the processless plate portfolio for the commercial and newspaper markets,” said Todd Croker, president, FUJIFILM Manu-

facturing U.S.A., Inc. “As a true no-process thermal plate, with no effluent to dispose of, and no additional consumables to contend with, SUPERIA ZD is an environmentally friendly option, and also allows for improved run length,” continued Croker. Once plates are manufactured within the facility, they are stored in an on-site distribution center with dedicated inventories to meet plate customer needs in a timely manner. The nationwide warehouse distribution system utilized by Fujifilm minimizes handling to avoid potential damage that can be caused by using overseas container shipments. The two newest additions on the Greenwood campus include an inkjet photo paper factory and digital photo print services and fulfillment facility. This has become the largest photo products fulfillment organization in the country. Fujifilm Printing Services supports many of the country’s leading retail stores and online photo websites. Adding these new products to the South Carolina product lineup further underscores the company’s commitment to its customers and the U.S. market.

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THE POWER OF PEER REVIEWS

THE PEERS HAVE IT SURVEY SHOWS THE POWER OF RECOMMENDATIONS IN B2B BUYING When it comes to the service you provide, the equipment you use and the way you interact with your customers, everything matters these days. And people talk—about everything. According to the “2018 Benchmark Report: The Impact of Reviews on B2B Buyers and Sellers,” 92 percent of buyers said they were more likely to purchase a product or service after reading a trusted review. The report, by G2 Crowd

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and Heinz Marketing, queried 548 business professionals from a range of different industries, ranging from SMB to large enterprises. But here’s the thing, according to the report, only 43 percent are using reviews as part of their marketing strategies. So, what are you waiting for? To get you started, here’s a look at the best practices when it comes to using reviews to improve your product and services:

Monitor customer feedback and respond to issues and challenges Personally reach out and reply to those providing feedback—both positive and negative When a problem is resolved, reach out to the customer and politely ask if they would update their review Encourage long-term relationships with your customers to request reviews


Our spirit of is just getting started.

HAPPY 10TH BIRTHDAY, ENDURANCE! For samples and product information, visit veritivcorp.com/endurance Availability of product, sizes, basis weights and finishes may vary by location. Š2018 Veritiv Corporation. All rights reserved. Veritiv, the Veritiv logo, Endurance, and the Endurance logo are registered trademarks of Veritiv or its affiliates.


ACUITY ULTRA: THE NEW SUPERWIDE STANDARD Unlike anything currently available, the Acuity Ultra produces almost photographic quality at unprecedented speeds of up to 2,540 sq. ft. per hour, ideal for high-end interior graphics. And with a new low film weight and high-density UV ink, running costs are impressively low. Capable of printing on up to three 63� rolls simultaneously, as well as graphics up to 197� wide, the Acuity Ultra is set to become the new superwide standard.

To learn more visit FujifilmInkjet.com/AcuityUltra

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