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Table of

Contents IN EVERY ISSUE

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Staff Letter From the Editor Trends Calendar Literature Events Advertisers

FEATURES

16 Generations of Success 21 A Path of Service

HOME AND GARDEN 26 Easy Homesteading 30 With these Hands

APRIL 2014

TASTE AND TOAST

32 Gourmet Easter Treats 36 Gardening with Russell Hamilton

HEALTH AND BEAUTY 40 Here and Now

LIFE AND STYLE

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On the Cover

It’s a Southern Thing Helping One Child at a Time A Cup of Lindsay Jo Blog Meet the Locals A Pearl in the Rough Catching Dreams Travel Street Chic

Just in time for crawfish season, we bring new ideas and tips for the perfect crawfish party. See more on page 44. Photography by Divian Conner. Correction: March (Volume 3, Number 5): Page 24, “prohibited.”


A PRODUCT OF HORIZON OF MISSISSIPPI P.O. Box 1068 | Starkville, MS 39760 www.townandgownmagazine.com

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STAFF

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DON NORMAN | PUBLISHER - sdnpub@starkvilledailynews.com CLAIRE MASSEY | EDITOR - claire@townandgownmagazine.com

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BECCA HORTON SARAH CARPENTER LOREN GAMBRELL LINDSEY NORMAN CATHERINE STUKENBORG

{CONTRIBUTORS} LISA LAFONTAINE BYNUM RUSSELL HAMILTON MANDI SANDERS AMY TAYLOR TREY TEMPLETON LINDSAY JO WILKINSON

{WRITERS} JOE LEE SUSAN O’BRYAN RICHELLE PUTNAM LIZZIE SMITH

{PHOTOGRAPHERS} DIVIAN CONNER ASHLEY COVIN LAURA DANIELS

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NATALIE PHILLIPS

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CLAIRE MASSEY

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CHRIS MCMILLEN Reproductions in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or photographs. We reserve the right to edit submissions before publication. Town & Gown is a free magazine published monthly and distributed in and around Starkville and the Golden Triangle area. Subscriptions are available for mail customers. For subscriptions or inquiries, write Town & Gown Magazine, P.O. Box 1068, Starkville, MS, 39760, or call 662-323-1642. 6

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Editor

Letter from the

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osting a party is one of those things you love or grow to love. Last year, I was the maid of honor for one of my best friends. From the moment she asked, I started to think, how I could host the perfect bridal party for her. She deserved a party that was catered to her style and taste, but also ran smoothly with the right beverages, hors d’oeuvres, and decorations. When I took on this challenge, I first thought about location, then who to invite and last, the theme. Your theme will determine the decorations, invitations, party entertainment and refreshments. This will take time to get together but have a notebook handy for all your ideas and then go from there by looking at resources online to complete your party planning – you will be well on way to hosting the perfect party for friends or family. Saying all this, April is one of those months that is perfect to host a party, whether it is a Super Bulldog Weekend family get-together, crawfish boil, Easter lunch or a girls day out! This month we meet a unique band made from Mississippi State students and alumni that are keeping the rhythm of bluegrass and folk in the South, performing Super Bulldog Weekend. April is also in the heart of crawfish season and we have some untraditional, elegant party ideas and tips to make you a pro at throwing a crawfish boil. Then, turn to page 32 for a gourmet take on Easter treats. Your guests might think you’ve hired a chef and you won’t have to hire a personal trainer after eating these delights. Instead, try out our list of trending workouts, from plyometrics to yoga. You will never turn back to your traditional workouts and gym routines again. There is a reason why April is such a happy month and we show you why in this month’s issue. Let us know how your April goes and whether or not you try some of our recipes to happiness. Last month we worked to get you to your NEW YOU and now you are ready to understand what makes you thrive and happy! We hope you enjoy this month and don’t forget to turn to page 14 for our monthly calendar to experience all the activities and events April has to offer. Happy Reading.

Claire Massey Editor

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Town and Gown Magazine would love to be at your next event. If your organization or business is having an event please email info@townandgownmagazine.com a month before event date. We cannot promise we will be at all events, but we will try!

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lower FGardens Town and Gown Magazine invites you to participate in our first-ever Flower Gardens 2014. To enter see guidelines below. Open to the Golden Triangle area and winners will be presented in the June issue.

Deadline to enter: May 5th Criteria Creation and Utilization of Space Principles and Elements Originality Materials and Structures Entry Form: Name:

Last Name:

Address: City:

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Zip:

Phone: Email:

Participants will be called after submission. Please do not call. Send all information to P.O. Box 1068, Starkville, MS 39760 fax to 662-323-6586 email info@townandgownmagazine.com.

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By Lindse y Nor man l Pho t og r aph y b y MSU Media R elations and Dead R ed Hitting

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onnor Powers, an alumni of Mississippi State and the Bulldog’s baseball team has found a new way to impact the game. Powers was a Mississippi State infielder in 2007-2009 playing first and third base positions. He has played with teams like the San Diego Padres, Eugene Emeralds, and the Lake Elsinore Storm after his career at Mississippi State. “I started playing baseball between the ages 4 and 5. My dad was and still is an inspiration to me for playing baseball,” Powers stated. Dead Red Hitting System is a product Powers has created for baseball players to help them work on different aspects of their game. The system offers diet plans, rhythm hitting drills, direction hitting drills, bat path drills, and power hitting drills. Powers has also created a hitting philosophy and feedback system for players. This feedback system will let the players see how productive their swings were on each drive.

Coaches, players, or parents of baseball kids can check out Dead Red Hitting products online at www.deadredhitting. com. The website allows you to create a personal profile and start working on your game as soon as you sign up. The Dead Red Hitting products can all be downloaded instantly on your computer. “I think this product helps players gain more confidence in their game. Players can learn at their own time and pace instead of always relying on someone else,” Powers commented 12

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on his product. There are players using the Dead Red Hitting product on all levels. Coaches of high school teams, parents of young, developing baseball players, and even professional level athletes use Dead Red Hitting. “I hope that I can expand my product in future years to come,” Powers said. Dead Red Hitting products can be purchased directly online and digitally download on your computer. Go to his website at www.deadredhitting.com and check it out!


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Easter Goodies

Merle Norman Luna Bella: RAZ natural bunny, tray and Easter eggs.

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Thyme: A Very Naughty Rabbit children’s book and Beeswax candle sticks.

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Penny Bowen Designs and Bella Interiors: Imax garden stool and Pomeroy condiment tray.

The University Florist: Rock. Flower.Paper. kitchen towels and makeup.

Purple Elephant: Linen kitchen towel and Easter bunny rabbit ears headband.

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Susan’s Hallmark: Chick decoration and Easterinspired candy.

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April Starkville Community Theatre

The Starkville Community Theatre presents “Don’t Dress for Dinner” in April and May by Jack Sharkey and directed by Gabe Smith. For tickets and more information visit stc-online.org. Date: April 24-27 and April 29-May 3, 2014

2014 Annual Crawfish Boil Come join MSU Ducks Unlimited at their 4th annual crawfish boil. This year’s event will be bigger than ever. They have teamed up with Banded Outdoors and will have country music star Drake White as their entertainment. Chad Belding from Fowl Life will also make a guest appearance. Location: Rick’s Cafe’: Outdoor Patio Date: April 5, 2014 Time: 1-10 p.m.

Artisans Alley

Presented as part of the Columbus Spring Pilgrimage - handcrafted period articles and homemade food items at the Tennessee Williams Home, 300 Main Street. Date: April 5, 2014 Time: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Held each April in the historic Cotton District in Starkville, the festival blends incredible art, music, and food into a showcase event. The festival is host to over 125 artisans, as well as a Juried Art competition and show, Writer’s Village, Taste of Starkville restaurant competition, 5K and 1 mile runs, Pet Parade, Student Art Competition, and much more. Visit starkvillearts.org for more information. Date: April 12, 2014

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King Cotton Crawfish Boil The Starkville Main Street will have a crawfish boil in the Cotton District. Tickets will be available for purchase prior to event. For tickets and more information visit starkville.org. Date: April 26, 2014 Time: from 11-2 p.m.

10K RUN, ANNUAL SPRING PILGRIMAGE

Run through the historic Columbus, Miss. in the annual Spring Pilgrimage 10K Run. For more information call 662-329-1191. Date: April 5, 2014 Time: 8 a.m.

Sally Kate Winters Spring into Action 5K & Family Fun Night 2014 Join Sally Kate Winters Family Services for their 5th annual Spring Into Action 5K and 1 mile fun run for children 10 and under. The 5K route begins in the Sally Kate Winters Memorial Park in downtown West Point and continues through the Kitty Bryan Dill Memorial Parkway. There will be entertainment, music, jumpers and great food from local restaurants. The event is held in conjunction with National Child Abuse Prevention Month and all proceeds benefit services offered to families and victims of child abuse through Sally Kate Winters Family Services. Date: April 5, 2014 Time: Onsite registration for the 5K ends at 5:30 p.m.; 1 mile fun run for children 10 and under begins at 5:30 p.m.; 5K begins at 6 p.m.

Facebook @ Town and Gown Mag; Instagram @townandgown; Twitter @townandgownmag1


Submit calendar events to be in our monthly calendar. Email info@townandgownmagazine.com with event information. Sunday

Monday

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Starkville Symphony Chorus’ Spring Concert, ”What’s Baroque… Doesn’t Need Fixing?” at 3 p.m. First United Methodist Church, Starkville.

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Baseball Game: MSU vs. Texas A&M 1:30 p.m.

Spring Styles and Shades at Merle Norman Luna Bella and R.Tabb from 3-7 p.m. Glo4Haiti at 8 p.m. at MSU Research Park

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Friday

Delta Gamma Lectureship: 7:30 p.m. at Humphrey Coliseum featuring Bethany Hamilton from “Soul Surfer.”

MSU Riley Center in Meridian present Southern Soul Assembly at 7:30 p.m.

Gravy performs at Dave’s Dark Horse Tavern at 10 p.m. and Jason Miller at Rick’s Cafe’ at 10 p.m.

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Volunteer Starkville is hosting their 2nd Annual Touch-A-Truck from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Starkville Sportsplex.

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For a list of events visit hailstate.edu and starkville.org. Law of Nature performs at Rick's Cafe at 10 a.m.

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Jeffery Rupp and Bill Cook perform at Jackson Square Grill and Stephanie Jackson at Central Station Grill at 7-11 p.m.

Starkville Young Professionals April Social from 5:30-7:30 p.m. For location visit their Facebook.

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Honeyboy and Boots performs at Jackson Square Grill; Faze3 at Central Station Grill at 7-11 p.m. and Mustache The Band performs at Rick's Cafe’ at 10 p.m.

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Frank Foster performs at Rick’s Cafe’ at 10 p.m.

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Honeyboy & Boots performs at Anthonthy’s Good Food Market at 6 p.m.

Apollo performs Baseball Game: at Dave’s Dark MSU vs. Texas Horse Tavern at A&M 6:30 p.m. 10 p.m. and Backroad U.S. performs Anthem at Rick’s at Rick’s Cafe’ Cafe’ at 10 p.m. at 10 p.m. and Honeyboy & Boots performs at Hucks’s Place at 5:30 p.m.

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COLUMBUS ANNUAL SPRING PILGRIMAGE Annual tour of historic homes with daily tours, candlelight tours, carriage rides of historic Southside Columbus and double decker bus rides. More information: Columbus Cultural Heritage Foundation; 662-329-1191. Date: April 28-May 12, 2014 Time: 9:00 a.m.

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GRILLING ON THE RIVER The Kansas City Barbeque Society’s Magnolia State BBQ Championship and Food Fair offers children’s activities and live music. Date: April 11-12, 2014 Time: 9:00 a.m. Location: Columbus Riverwalk

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By Joe Lee Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

ay back in 1890, two friends from northeast Miss., W.N. Puckett and W.S. Lindamood, started Columbus Brick Company. In those days there were over 100 brick companies in Mississippi. Today, Columbus Brick is the only manufacturer of brick in the state. “My father grew up in the brick business, as did I,” said A.B. Puckett, part of the fifth generation of the family to be part of the business. “My grandfather was from a very different generation than we know today – he was more or less expected to work at the company. Fortunately, he was successful at it.” Puckett, who works in sales, marketing, manufacturing and accounting, grew up in Columbus and graduated from Furman University in 2003 with a degree in political science. It was almost a decade before he returned home to work with his family – he was a financial advisor after college, and he spent four years living in Kenya.

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“In 2005 all of my immediate family went on a service trip to Kenya, where we worked with an orphanage and helped with a few other humanitarian aid projects,” he said. “We created a non-profit called Global Connections (www.globalconnectionsonline.us), and I was there from the beginning of 2007 through most of 2010. I serve as president of the organization and still travel to Kenya once a year. But at the end of 2010 – even though there was no pressure from the family – I decided I wanted to become involved in the brick company.” There are two manufacturing facilities at Columbus Brick. Puckett said that until the early 1970s, the product was essentially made the way the Egyptians made them in the old days. “The only difference was how we moved them and fired them,” he said. “By the 1970s we were using the railroad, and we have always used coal to fire them instead of the sun. Even today, it’s the same basic process. It’s just like making a clay pot. You mold the pot (brick) out of clay. During this process if you want to add any texture or color to the pot you can. Since it is soft, you can put dents in it and then glaze it with a dye. You will need to Above: A.B. Pucklet it dry, and then you put it in a kiln to fire it and ett and his father, make it hard.” Allen. That facility is still in operation today. The brick Right: An old is unloaded from the car by hand, placed on a photo of Columbus Brick conveyor belt, and then packaged by machines. In Company when 2000, Puckett’s father, Allen (the company presibricks were dent), built a completely new facility next to the handmade. original one. It’s completely automated with robots that load and unload the cars upon which the brick is set, and it features computers that automatically move the cars and control the temperature of the kiln. In the new facility, a human hand does not touch the brick until it is laid in the wall.

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“Brick making was extremely labor-intensive when my father was a child,” A.B. Puckett said. “It was made by hand, loaded by hand, moved by hand. Brick was used for the structural support of a building so the aesthetic quality of the brick was not as important as the strength. Since no one cared how they looked, nearly every small town had a brick maker. “Today, wood or steel is used for the structural support of a building. Brick serves a purpose in adding protection from the environment, for energy efficiency and, of course, a lot of people just want a brick home. A home with brick will be much better protection from storms and tornadoes. The brick will last for hundreds of years. They are fire resistant and will stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Columbus Brick can almost make any brick of any color and size; however, we are currently focusing on about 40 colors or products.” The company ships over 140 million bricks a year throughout the mid-west and southern United States. About thirty percent of their product sold in Mississippi, which includes a long-term relationship with Old South Brick of Jackson. “We’ve been doing business with Columbus Brick as long as I’ve known them (30 years in August). It has been a good relationship,” said Woody Nance, vice-president of sales at Old South Brick. “They’ve stayed up on the trends over the years and keep up with what people want. They have a good price and a good product. It makes sales so much easier – they need people to buy brick, and we need to sell brick.” “They are second to none in customer service and are still run like a mom-and-pop store. They know the customer is always the boss. We represent a lot of companies and brick manufacturers, and Columbus Brick is a big part of our program. We use them a lot for commercial and residential projects, and we’ve used them on the MSU and Ole Miss campuses.” 18

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“In the Golden Triangle, builders and home owners who would like to use brick come to our showroom where we sell them the brick they choose,” Puckett said. “Locally, we will also sell natural stone, thin brick, pavers, block, and brick from other manufacturers who may have a brick that looks different than the ones we manufacture. “The Mill: Home + Design, is a division of Columbus Brick that operates in The Shops at Brickerton. This is a retail shopping center next door to Columbus Brick. Currently, The Mill operates as a home furnishing and accessories boutique. In the fall, we will expand The Mill with a brick showroom, design center, and designers who will help you choose brick and other products for the exterior and interior of your home.” “They treat you like family,” said Stuart Davis, a Starkville home builder who has designed homes for John Cohen, Sylvester Croom, Dr. Roy Ruby, and Dr. Jimmy Abraham among others. “Al Puckett, the owner, is a good Christian man. I know they stay on the cutting edge of anything that has to do with brick, and I’ve enjoyed working with them because they have good sales reps and good service. A.B. is on the cutting


edge with the products he carries, and I like being on the cutting edge when I talk to my customers and tell them what’s available. “They have anything you would need in the masonry world. I remember Dad ordering through Columbus Brick back in 1976. All he ordered was brick and mortar. Now, I get into stone, wall ties, face brick – they have everything you would need plus an interior design specialist. Ninety-five percent of the building I do is custom builds, and if a homeowner picks out a brick they don’t have, they order it and get it in.” “There are many stories of family businesses in which there becomes a disconnection in the family because of the business,” Puckett said. “I find it an honor to work and learn almost daily with my father and other family members. I hope I’m able to continue the traditions that my father and other generations have started and add to the success they’ve created.” Visit online at www.columbusbrick.com and www.themilldesignandhome.com.

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A Path of Service By Ric helle Putnam Pho t og r aph y submitt ed

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ifteen years ago, when Liz Johnstone’s husband brought her to Starkville, she didn’t know anyone. Originally from Scotland and a resident of Canada for 27 years, Johnstone had hoped to attend Mississippi State University, but didn’t want to pay international fees. Because she hadn’t obtained her work permit, employment wasn’t an option for her either. “So I joined some service organizations,” said Johnstone. “It was a wonderful way to meet people. The Pilot Club became my favorite organization.” In two years, when Johnstone was able to attend MSU, she took a hiatus from the Club. After

graduation, she returned to being an active Pilot Club member and currently serves as president of the organization. Formed as a non-profit organization in 1947, the Pilot Club of Starkville has 35 members and two honorary members and is the parent organization of the Anchor Club of Starkville, which has 90 members. A chapter of Pilot International, the Club’s mission is to serve by furthering international humanitarian efforts through charitable, educational and research programs in communities throughout the world, and its vision is to achieve universal awareness and prevention of brain related disorders and disabilities.

Liz Johnstone, president of Starkville’s Pilot Club

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Back row L-R: Wanda Hubbard, Ginnie Weathersby, Ann Chiles, Ann Sansing, Ellen Mauldin, Kay Parker, Bonnie Carew, Karol Peyton, Mitzi Johnson Mills, Tricia Daniel, Audrey Scales Front row L-R: Molly Howard, Cattie Taylor, Liz Johnstone, Allyson Leitner, Jan McReynolds, Cayla Clayton.

“For me, the [Pilot Club] gives me the opportunity to help ever,” said Boles. That Pilot Club project ran for many years people,” said Johnstone. “It’s a real satisfaction to share your until changes in federal guidelines forced them to stop the time and expertise to help others and support the situations program. Boles then became involved in the distribution of they might be in.” childcare videos to prospective parents through OBGYNs When Molly Howard arrived in Starkville in 1993, she had who distributed the videos to patients. “These videos taught no friends. She looked up the Pilot Club them how to take care of themselves and and immediately became a member. how to take care of babies.” “They became my family,” she said. Her Another project of the Starkville Pilot introduction to the Pilot organization Club is the Brain Minders puppet show, had been in 1960 when she became an which teaches brain safety and is perBrain Minders Anchor in Monroe, Ga. The Starkville formed in elementary schools. Parker House Holiday Anchor Club consists of high school “Martin Monkey plays on the monkey Celebration students and is the youth division of the bars and he talks about being careful,” Adopt-A-Family Pilot Club, explained Howard. Anchors said Boles. “Gerald Giraffe tells everyone Salvation Army Bell Ringing have the opportunity to go out into the to be sure and wear a seatbelt when in the C. T. K. Martin Center community and serve others. “They are car and to stay in their car seat if they’re Holiday Mail for Heroes rewarded for it in many different ways, younger.” Boles explained that groups can Music Trail Events whether in service hours or learning request the puppet show for preschool or Traumatic Brain Injury Group lessons they take with them all of their for other groups and community events. lives,” said Howard. “When they become Together, the Pilot Club and Starkville adults, they become a Pilot Club member Anchor Club facilitate and host the Parker with the experience of knowing what it is to be of service House parties, which are usually twice a year,” said Johnto others.” The Anchors do numerous things, like workstone. “We did one last Halloween and this year we did a ing with people in nursing homes, reading to children and Valentine’s party. ” Johnstone also started a brain recovery tutoring them. “The projects are unbelievable and this is all support group in Starkville that has been going for about 18 over the world.” Howard became a Pilot in 1971 in Monroe. months. Starkville is her fifth Pilot Club. Fundraising events for the Pilot Club include Breakfast with Kansas native, Ellen Boles, had her first experience with Santa and this year’s Breakfast with the Easter Bunny. Pilot the Pilot Club when she moved to Starkville. “The signature members are encouraged to volunteer for events, Johnstone project then was the Pilot Mini Bus, which gave free transexplained. The Club sponsors the Adopt-a-Family and each portation to the elderly and the handicapped if they needed member’s contributions help buy gifts for families at Christto go shopping or to the grocery store or the doctor, whatmas. “During Christmas, the Pilot takes a whole day to ring

PILOT ACTIVITIES:

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Right: Back row L-R: Ellen Goodman, Marie Cayson (former member), Ann Chiles, Jacquie Deeds (former member), Ann Sansing, Barb Adkins, Jorja Turnipseed, Bonnie Carew Front row: (Peggy Norman, Janie Cirlot-New, Molly Howard. Below: A member of the Starkville Academy Anchor Club painting a child’s face at the Music Trail.

Officers:

Liz Johnstone - President Allyson Leitner - President-elect Stephanie Taylor - Vice President Molly Howard - Secretary Linda Faver - Treasurer the bell for the Salvation Army,” said Johnstone. Another project is Holiday Mail for Heroes. “The Pilots purchase greeting cards, write messages on them and send them to soldiers who are deployed,” Johnstone said. One of Howard’s favorite projects has been the Music Trail. Since Howard is confined to a wheel chair, she wanted to make sure the Music Trail was handicap accessible. “When the trail first started, there was something like pea gravel on the trails.” Howard went to the park, but couldn’t maneuver her chair through the gravel. “I knew a child in a wheelchair would never make it.” She followed up with Ellen Boles and a rubber surface was later added to make the Music Trail more handicap accessible. “I feel one of the biggest things that we’ve accomplished is the Music Trail," said Howard.

Announce your engagement or wedding with Town & Gown Magazine. Call 662-323-1642 townandgownmagazine.com

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Music Trail Instruments:

Tenor marimba Soprano marimba Amadinda Bass metallophone Alligator drum Rain wheel Kalimba (thumb piano) Palm pipe drum Pre-school music station - includes marimba, metallophone, rain wheel, and tongue drum

Collaborating partners for the Music Trail: Starkville Parks and Recreation MSU Landscape Architecture MSU Music Education

Partnerships

Grants and Donations: Healthy Starkville Committee Junior Auxiliary Crown Club 2010-2011 Starkville Kiwanis Club Pilot International Foundation Starkville Area Arts Council Starkville Civic League Starkville Rotary Club East Mississippi Lumber Co. Cadence Bank Landscape Architecture students from MSU place plants at the Music Trail.

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Ellen Boles explains one of the Music Trail Instruments to a group of children.

“Ellen Boles was really instrumental in the Music Trail – no pun intended,” said Johnstone, with a touch of laughter. A retired music teacher, Ellen Boles suggested the Music Trail as the signature project. “I had read about a musical instrument playground at a school in Florida,” said Boles. “Research has shown that music plays a vital role in the development of the brain, so I thought this would fit and would be a great thing for children to play on and develop their brain at the same time.” The club voted to do the trail. They talked with Parks and Recreation Director Matthew Rye about where the Trail should be located and decided on McKee Park. Landscape architect Pete Melby gave the design of the trail as a project to his architecture graduate class at MSU. Each came up with a design as to how to arrange the instruments. Also enlisted was Bob Damm, musical director at MSU. “He verified the choice of instruments selected for the trail

and which ones would be best to put in first.” The trail was completed in three stages and three instruments were installed during each phase and is located next to the Junior Auxiliary Playplex. “We see a lot of kids running back and forth from place to place, sliding one minute, playing an instrument the next,” said Boles. The instruments are built to withstand the elements and require very low maintenance. Being a Pilot has made Boles more aware of brain injuries and how important it is to take care of the brain and make the community more aware to promote brain development. “There is no question that the results have been far-reaching, especially the education Pilots do in the schools,” said Johnstone. Currently, there are 18 Pilot Clubs in Mississippi. The district government includes a Governor, a Governor-Elect, and LieutenantGovernor, Treasurer and Secretary. “The district reports to Pilot International, which


Ann Chiles rings Salvation Army Bells.

ranks. Starkville Pilot Club member Janie Cirlot-New moved up in the ranks and became governor. “She does what she can to promote other members.” Pilot International is committed to “Do More, Care More, and Be More.” To the Pilot Club of Starkville this sometimes means more than reaching out to community. When Howard had cancer surgery, her Pilot Club rallied around her. Plus, being confined to a wheelchair makes it difficult for Howard to drive back and forth to Atlanta to visit family. “When my sister passed away, I didn’t know how I was going to get to Atlanta,” said Howard. Some Pilots volunteered to take her and one ended up driving Howard to Atlanta, staying with her and bringing her back. “They are family to me,” said Howard. “I know that I can do more and assist someone else in the community. But then I also know my Pilot friends are there for me when I’m in need. We can do more, care more for other people, but we also do more, care more for each other.” Counting her three years as an Anchor, Howard has been a Pilot 46 years! “Friendship and service has always been our motto,” said Howard. “We live that.”

is worldwide,” said Johnstone. An International convention is held once a year. Johnstone and four others from the Starkville district attended last year’s convention in New Orleans, along with 800 people from around the world. Howard, who serves on the Membership Committee, would like for Pilot Members to rise within the organization. “I’ve been a proponent in helping get members into the club and, once Back row L-R: Barb Adkins, Peggy Norman Front row L-R: Allyson Leitner, Liz Johnstone, they’re in, to move them up in the Stacey Curry Chapman (Pilot International Director, from Pilot Club of Houston, Miss.)

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Homesteading

By Mandi Sander s Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

Mandi Sanders co-owns Sweet Gum Springs Apothecary in Starkville. Sanders and her family enjoy living a natural lifestyle in an effort to reduce their ecological footprint while saving money as well as reduce their exposure to toxins. She is a community herbalist and teaches workshops at the Mississippi Modern Homestead Center on health & wellness, natural family living and on utilizing native herbs & edible plants. She also recreates her Homemade Cleaners & Natural Personal Care workshops for ladies' night, church groups and other events wherein, you can bring her to teach your group of friends. You can find out about her local workshops and more information at www.sweetgumapoth.com 26

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Natural Beauty Prducts Facial Cleansing Grains via Rosemary Gladstar 2 cups clay (Kaolin, French Green, Bentonite) 1 cup of oats (finely ground) ¼ cup of finely ground almonds 1/8 cup of ground lavender buds 1/8 cup of finely ground rose petals 1-3 drops of essential oils (lavender, tto, rose etc) *optional: poppy seeds for added exfoliation Combine ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Store in glass jars. To use: mix one teaspoon of your grains in the palm of your hand with water and rub all over your dampened face. Can be used daily, weekly or as needed. *Optional: Moist Miracle Grains-mix a small amount of grains with just enough honey (and a splash of rose water or distilled water) to form a paste. Store in a jar for up to two weeks.

Simple, Effective Homemade Deodorant 6-8 Tbsp. Coconut oil (in it’s solid state) ¼ cup Baking Soda ¼ cup Corn Starch or Arrowroot Powder *optional: 5-10 drops of lavender essential oil Combine baking soda and your starch of choice. Begin mixing in the coconut oil until the texture is firm, but pliable & similar to the texture of commercial deodorant. You can store in a clean jar or scoop it into an old deodorant container and use in the typical fashion.

Herbal Shampoo 1 cup distilled water 1 ounce dried herbs (nettles, calendula, chamomile, rosemary, etc) 6 Tbsp. of liquid Castile soap ¼ tsp. of jojoba oil (or similar light oil) 25 drops of essential oils of your choice Bring water to a boil, add the herbs, cover and let simmer 15-20 min. Strain & allow to cool. Slowly add the Castile soap to the cooled herbal tea, then follow with the remaining ingredients. Store in a plastic flip top bottle and shake before using. april

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Vinegar:

Can be used a s a su bst it u t e f or m o s t h ou seh old c lea nin g produ c t s and is more ec o- f riend l y.

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Natural Cleaners Homemade Laundry Detergent 1 bar Dr. Bronners Castille Soap (you can choose to sub with Fels Naptha, but it isn’t completely allnatural) 1 cup Borax 1 cup Washing Soda 1 1/2 cups Baking Soda Grate bar of soap and add to the powders. Store in a closed container and use 1-2 tablespoons per load.

All Purpose Cleaning Spray 2 cups of Distilled Water 1/2 cups of white vinegar 1 tsp. liquid Castile soap or all natural dish detergent Mix ingredients into a clean, empty spray bottle. Makes a great all purpose cleaners for counter tops and surfaces especially in the kitchen and bathroom. Spray on & wipe off with a cleaning cloth.

Anti-Microbial Herbal Cleaner Concentrate Using herbs commonly found in your garden, you can take your cleaners “up a notch”. Infusing white vinegar with aromatic anti-microbial herbs power packs your homemade cleaner Mix & Match to your taste: Rosemary, Mint, Lavender, Thyme, Oregano, Sage Fill a glass jar with your herbs and cover with white vinegar. Cover the top with a little plastic wrap and then secure the lid. Let sit a minimum of 2 weeks. After 2-6 weeks, strain out the plant material and compost. The remaining vinegar is a potent concentrate you can use in the above cleaning spray recipe in place of plain white vinegar. april

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WITH THESE HANDS

Easter Egg Tree

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DIY

Amy Taylor Taylor, a Petal native and Starkville resident, is a Southern Mississippi graduate where she earned a Bachelor degree in broadcast journalism and obtained a Master’s degree in Agricultural and Extension Education from Mississippi State University. She is an avid do-it-yourself crafter, artist and has a passion for home design and projects.

CRAFTS

Many of us remember seeing “Easter egg trees” at our grandparents’ homes! Here’s a way to honor that tradition, and give it a little something extra. Now that new versions of Easter eggs are available, like glittered or sports-themed eggs, you can be as creative as you want!

Materials: Branches for the yard (spray painted is optional) Fishing line Easter eggs Vase Decorative ribbon, optional 1. Cut the fishing line to your desired length, pull it through the hole that should already be in the egg, and tie a slip-knot on the inside, as shown. 2. Tie the egg to a tree branch. Continue this with the rest of the eggs until you’re happy with how your egg tree looks! You can add ribbon to the vase, or dress the tree up any way you wish. Happy Easter!

Send us your finished projects to Town and Gown Magazine’s Instagram. Follow us and tag us @townandgown #DIY april

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TASTE AND TOAST By Lisa LaFont aine Bynum

food GOURMET EASTER TREATS

Rich Orange Sorbet

More Color? Use Blood O ran ges in st ead of ju ic e for more rich c olor.

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>Page 32

Pastiera Napoletana

3 cups blood orange juice, divided ¾ cup granulated sugar 2 tsp. white wine, optional Zest of 1 blood orange In a small saucepan, heat 1 cup orange juice and sugar over medium heat. Stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Remove pan from heat. Add the remaining orange juice, white wine, and orange zest. Pour mixture into an airtight container and chill in the refrigerator for several hours. One the mixture is chilled, process according to your ice cream maker’s instructions. Once churned, place sorbet into the freezer and allow it to freeze overnight. Serves 6

2 eggs (reserve 1 teaspoon to brush on strips) ½ tsp. vanilla extract

>Above

For the pastry: 4.4 oz. butter 2 cups all purpose flour 1 large egg, plus 1 egg yolk 3.5 ounces granulated sugar ½ tsp. vanilla extract For the filling: 1 Tbsp. orange blossom water (or orange extract if you cannot find) ½ cup candied orange peels, chopped 1 tablespoon unsalted butter ½ tsp. cinnamon ½ pre-cooked durum wheat kernels or cooked barley ½ cup milk Zest of ½ lemon 10.5 ounces ricotta cheese 10.5 ounces granulated sugar

Put all the pastry ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer or a food processor. Blend until ingredients are combined. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for one minute until dough is smooth. Form a ball, then wrap dough in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for 40 minutes. In the meantime, add the pre-cooked durum wheat kernels or barley into a medium sauce pan. Add the milk, butter and lemon zest. Heat over medium heat, then reduce the heat to low and let simmer until mixture thickens and becomes custard-like, stirring often. Remove pan from heat, transfer mixture to a large bowl, and let it cool to room temperature. Combine the ricotta, eggs, sugar, orange blossom water or orange extract, vanilla, and cinnamon in a mixer and blend well. Once the durum wheat kernel cream has

cooled, combine it with the ricotta mixture. Add the chopped orange peels. Remove the pastry from the fridge. Cut about ¼ of the pastry and reserve for making the strips for the top. Roll the remaining pastry into a 1/8-inch thick round sheet. Gently place pastry into the bottom of an 8-inch spring form pan. Make sure to leave a border of about 2 ½ inches to contain the filling. Pour the filling mixture into the pan. Roll out the remaining dough to the same thickness, cut several strips, about ½-inch wide and layer them on the top of the cake to make a diamond pattern. Gently brush the strips with the reserved egg. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake for 1 hour. If the crust starts to brown too quickly, loosely cover with foil. Remove cake from oven and allow to cool completely before unmolding. Let cake rest for at least 24 hours before serving. Serves 8 Continued > april

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TASTE AND TOAST

> Continued

Candied orange peels: 3 navel oranges 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar, plus extra for rolling ž cup water Cut tops and bottoms off of the oranges and score the orange into quarters, cutting down only into the peel and not into the fruit. Gently peel the skin off the orange in large pieces. Reserve the orange for another use. Cut the peel into 1/4-inch wide strips. Place the peel in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil over high heat, then pour off the water. Repeat this process twice. Remove the orange peels from the pan. Whisk the sugar with 1 1/2 cups water. Bring to a simmer and cook for 8 to 9 minutes, or when the temperature when measured with a candy thermometer reaches 230

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food

to 234 degrees. Add the peels and simmer gently. Cook until the peels become translucent, about 45 minutes. Do not stir the peels during this time. If necessary, swirl the pan to move the peels around. Drain the peels. Place additional sugar in a deep dish. Roll the peels in sugar, remove peels and reserve sugar, Dry peels on a rack for 4 to 5 hours. Return to the sugar to store. Makes about 2 ½ cups orange peels

Fun for KIDS And still elegant

> Page 35

2 eggs 1/4 cup sugar 2 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream, divided 6 ounces semisweet chocolate A few chocolate cookies, crushed (optional) Beat eggs with an electric mixer on high about 3 minutes until eggs are light in color. Gradually beat in sugar until sugar is dissolved. Meanwhile, heat 1 cup of whipping cream in a medium saucepan over medium heat just until hot. Do not bring to a boil. Slowly add half of the hot cream into the egg mixture. Stir gently to combine, then add egg/ cream mixture back to the saucepan. Cook mixture over low heat about 5 minutes, stirring constantly, until mixture

thickens. Again, do not boil let the mixture come to a boil. Remove pan from heat and add the chocolate. Stir until chocolate is completely melted. Pour mixture into an airtight container. Cover and refrigerate about 2 hours, stirring occasionally. When chocolate mixture has chilled, beat the remaining 1-1/2 cups whipping cream in a chilled bowl with an electric mixer. Beat on high until stiff peaks form. Gently fold the chocolate mixture into whipping cream. Pipe or spoon mixture into cups. Serve mousse immediately or refrigerate until ready to serve. Top with crushed chocolate cookie crumbs, if desired. Makes 8 servings


Chocolate Mousse

Crumbles

Try c ookie crumbs on top fo r t ext u re.

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Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

Gardening with

Russell Hamilton

Veggie Bucket List I Russell Hamilton graduated from Mississippi State University with a major in horticulture and he has been the owner of Deep Roots Nursery for over 13 years.

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t would be difficult to believe that not everyone preferred fresh vegetables over store bought ones. A requirement that often restricts us from having the garden we want is space. Yards are smaller. Careers often require people to live in apartments and small shared condos. Students that live in dorms or shared apartments don’t have a lot of space. So what can you do? I’ll tell you. Start a bucket garden. Bucket gardens, I like to call them, are not gardens that produce buckets over time. Rather they are a vegetable garden that consists of growing vegetables in buckets instead of directly in the soil. This method allows you to produce vegetables in small spaces. Even if it is just one plant in one bucket, growing your own food is fun and educational.


Tomatoes

Tomatoes are probably the biggest hitter in our area. I love to pull them right off the vine and slice them up to eat. They are also the most common vegetable grown in a bucket. There are a lot of varieties that are suitable to grow using this method. Bush varieties are good to start with. I suggest using five gallon or larger buckets if you have them. You can get away with smaller ones but you will have to really manage your water to make sure they get enough. Use one plant per five gallon bucket and be sure to cage them or stake them. The other biggie here is to add lime to the soil you are planting them in. Tomatoes will require calcium to keep from rotting on the end and to help reduce splitting. Spraying the plants weekly with a liquid calcium formulation may be better than adding lime to the soil but it is a little more expensive and time consuming. Certainly worth a shot for a first time bucket farmer, if you like tomatoes give them a try this year.

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Squash

Squash probably wasn’t the first vegetable you thought of when contemplating a bucket farm but it is very possible. The trick here is to use bush varieties rather than the traditional ones. The squash may be a bit smaller in size but they taste great and produce a good bit. Still I would just put one plant per five gallon container and make sure they get enough water without soaking the leaves if you can. Be sure to stake them or tie them up if you are trying a vining type of squash. Watch for squash bugs and other pesky insects. In no time your boiled/casserole squash dreams will have come true.

Tips and Tricks for Bucket Farming The buckets you choose have to be clean. Clean them with a light bleach and water solution. Rinse them out very well before planting. Make sure that your buckets have drainage holes. If they don’t, pop some one-inch holes in the bottom with a drill. Don’t let your plants them dry out too much. Try watering in the morning and then checking when you are home in the afternoon to see if they need more. Make sure your plants get plenty of sun. Deeply shaded areas or under carports will not provide you with enough light for nice healthy plants. There are organic alternatives to fertilizers and insecticides to help make your garden grow to its full potential. Either way you go be sure to scout for insects and disease often and treat appropriately. Follow those tips and a bucket farmer you will be. 38

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Peppers

Pickled peppers are one of my favorites. They are also easy to grow in a pot. In a seven gallon pot you can plant up to two plants if you are able to keep up with watering. Otherwise I would stick to one plant. You can plant just about any of the peppers in containers. Some pepper varieties will require caging or staking so be prepared for that. Peppers are more cold sensitive than some other vegetable so be sure the chance for frost is gone when you plant these guys or be ready to move them to a protected area. By the end of summer you will be making homemade salsa and pepper sauce just the way you like it.

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Here & Now

Triangle Trailing

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xercise is my hunting and fishing. It is something I look forward to every day. I can remember being a teenager and getting my first gym membership. I was hooked! Since then I have always enjoyed some sort of physical activity. Exercise is not only a joy to me, but it’s also a priority. I try to do something every day whether it is lifting weights, running or more recently swimming. Over the past three years I have developed a love for running and without a doubt believe in a “runner’s high.” I have completed six half-marathons and plan to do more. While most of my running has consisted of pounding the pavement of Starkville, I’m always open to a change of scenery, which brings me to the idea of trails. I have spent the past couple of Sunday afternoons exploring different trails in the Golden Triangle area. Being a Starkville native, I never realized how many off-road trails were so close to home. When I first began thinking about exploring different territory, a few trails came to mind. What I didn’t realize is that I would have to narrow down my options to fit this article. My knowledge of trails in the golden triangle has definitely been broadened! There are all different types of trails. Some are paved with concrete sidewalks. Others are just dirt and gravel. Better yet, there are no two trail landscapes alike. Each trail represents a different part of nature, and you will leave them with different experiences. There are lots of activities that one can do on trails such as running, walking, walking your dog, or if you have a dog like mine, it might be walking you, and biking just to name

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a few. Each trail experience I had DID have one thing in common. They are beautiful, peaceful, and all worth going back to. I have chosen four unique trails within a 30 mile radius of Starkville that I would highly suggest visiting. They include Chadwick Lake, Columbus Riverwalk, Choctaw Lake (Noxubee Trails), and the Noxubee Refuge.

Trey Templeton is a fifth generation Starkville native. He is a 2003 Graduate of Mississippi State University and serves on the boards of the Starkville Area Arts Council and the Charles Templeton Ragtime Jazz Festival planning committee. He is passionate about his career in men’s clothing and is an exercise enthusiast.


Chadwick Lake The first trail I recommend you check out surrounds Chadwick Lake. The simplicity of this trail makes it appealing. Just one year old, the Chadwick Lake Trail is a one-mile loop on the Mississippi State campus. This trail is situated between the Sanderson Center and Bryan Building. The entrance walkway begins in the parking lot between the two buildings. This trail is super easy to get to and great place for a walk or run alone or with friends. The Chadwick Lake trail is very well lit to walk in the early morning or late evening hours. It is a dog friendly trail as well. I took our dog for a loop, and she loved it! Other great features of this trail are that it’s stroller friendly and a great place for little ones who might want to check out the ducks. You’ll find metal benches in several spots along the trail; they are a great place to take a break and enjoy the view. The Chadwick Lake trail is a fun and easy trail for all ages!

Columbus River Walk Established in 2005, the Columbus Riverwalk, located in Columbus, Miss., is a paved trail that has a lot to offer. I was pleasantly surprised to find out about this trail which begins along the Tombigbee River, then proceeds into a wooded area with great views. You’ll find all sorts of people on the Riverwalk doing all sorts of activities from running and biking, to just taking a leisurely walk and soaking up the day. I even noticed people taking engagement pictures which speaks to the beauty of this trail! The Riverwalk has a big city park feel but at the same time gives you respite from the day-to-day grind. There are park benches, water fountains, and restrooms along the way. The distance of this trail is about 2 ¼ miles one way. If you are ever in Columbus or just feel like taking a drive that way, go by and check out the Columbus Riverwalk. It is part of downtown Columbus and parking is very accessible.

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Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee Wildlife Refuge If you live in Starkville, chances are you have visited the Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge, as it has been referred to for over sixty years, offers all sorts of trails. I’ll just mention two of my favorites: the Woodpecker Trail and Beaver Dam Trail. The Woodpecker Trail is a short half mile trail across from Goose Overlook. This loop trail, which only takes about 30 minutes to complete (if walking at a leisurely pace) offers open views of the forest. You may spot a few animals if you are lucky. There is also a great view of Bluff Lake while on the trail. There is a wooden bench on the path where you can stop and take in the experience of the outdoors. The sounds of nature are very soothing. I even heard a woodpecker during my last visit to this trail. Guess that’s why it’s called the Woodpecker Trail! The Beaver Dam Trail is another trail located next to spillway across the road from Bluff Lake. The Beaver Dam Trail, which is just over two miles in total distance (about a mile to the end), is a great hiking trail. Other than the somewhat steep beginning of the Beaver Dam Trail, it has a fairly level walking path. You will see lots of different types of trees and plants. While I did not see an actual “beaver dam” on the trail, I did hear the sounds of animals in the woods. This is a very peaceful trail and a great source of exercise! The Refuge trails are open during daylight hours and are dog friendly. Check out www.fws.gov to learn more about what the Noxubee Refuge has to offer!

Pho t og r aph y b y Laur a Dainels

Choctaw Lake Trails If you are looking for a place that has a variety of recreation activities, the Choctaw Lake Trails might be for you. The Choctaw Trails in Ackerman, Miss. are part of the Tombigbee National Forest. In addition to off-road trails, this area offers campgrounds, allows fishing and swimming, and has picnic tables. There are great nature trails around the Choctaw Lake. The Lakeside Trail is a 2 ½ mile trail just a short distance from the Choctaw Lake. There is also the Chata Trail which is a short 1 ½ mile trail through the forest. Being in this environment gives you the full effect of being outdoors. These two trails, as well as many others in the area, are a wonderful place to hike, walk, and run. There are also many other trails for running and biking in the Noxubee Hills which are close by. You can go to their website, www.fs.usda.gov, to see the map of the many trails in this area. The mixture of recreation at Choctaw Lake can’t be beat!

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I hope that each of these examples has given you some insight on what trails are in our area. You don’t have to be in top physical condition to enjoy these trails. Also, there is no age requirement. All that you need to do is find a pair of comfy shoes and set aside some time to explore. The Golden Triangle has so many wonderful places and things to offer. These trails are just a few more places you can add to your list of local attractions. If you are looking for a new place to exercise, or just something relaxing to do on a Sunday afternoon, go check out one of these trails. I promise you will be glad you did!

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IT’S A SOUTHERN THING By Lor en Gambr ell l Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner and Ashle y Masse y

A Twist on Traditional Crawfish Boils

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hat kind of party gets understandably messy? I mean so messy that all your guests, no matter the age, may need a bib. The answer: any party with crawfish as the

main dish. Here in the south, we are not afraid of getting our faces a little dirty or fingers sticky for the sake of some good food. As if fried chicken was not enough, we now have parties where the crawfish are our highlighted guests and our fingers are the classy silverware of the night. What may have started out as a crawfish boil has transformed into any type of gathering one can imagine. Crawfish is invited into birthday parties, engagement parties, couple showers, even rehearsal dinners before the big day. While some of these parties may be more classy and sophisticated, as much as one could possibly get including crawfish, and others done with more of the traditional, southern, laid-back fashion. Either way, crawfish get torn in half, crawfish heads get sucked, faces get dirty, and fingers get sticky. Oh, and all the guests enjoy the food.

HOW TO EAT A CRAWFISH 1. Pick a nice crawfish with a big tail (that's where all the meat is!) 2. Hold the body and grab the tail. 3. Twist the tail to loosen it from the body. 4. Pull the tail away from the body. 5. Pinch the tail just above the fans. 6. This makes the meat pop out from the shell. 7. Pull the tail meat out and enjoy. 8. Suck the head if you want - the spicy juices are great.

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5-7 TYPES OF PARTIES Crawfish boil Engagement party Birthday party Baby shower Couples shower Rehearsal dinner Grooms Shower Summer get-together

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TIPS 1. There is no wrong way to eat crawfish. 2. Oh, and a word on so-called “straight tails.” Old pros will tell you to avoid eating boiled crawfish whose tails are stretched out straight. 3. They boil for a while, until their shells are bright red. 4. Plan on ordering about 2-3 pounds of crawfish per person or 4-5 pounds for a heavier crawfish eater. 5. Throw away all crawfish that have already died (the dead crawfish should float to the top). You DO NOT want dead crawfish in your boil.


Crawfish Party Goodies The University Florist: Veggies /Dirt tray.

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Thyme: Galvanized Alvarado buckets.

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The Mill Home+Design: Pickles Pigs & Whiskey coobook.

Merele Norman Luna Bella: Lolita tumbler.

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> Susan’s Hallmark: Country beverage dispenser.

Purple Elephant: “What’s Cooking” board.

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Penny Bowen Interior Design and Bella Interiors: Telescope patio furniture.

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LIFE AND STYLE

Helping One Child at a Time:Sally Kate Winters

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By Lizzie Smit h Pho t og r aph y submitt ed

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eginning in 1988, local citizens saw that they needed a place for children in need; a place where children who were victimized could find shelter and protection through their crises. That place became Sally Kate Winters Memorial Children’s Home. Over the past 23 years, many programs have been added to service the needs of the children that pass through, programs that target each facet of childhood. The most prominent one is the Emergency Shelter for kids that range from newborns to 17 year-olds. The program holds 12-13 kids and can provide shelter for 45 days, while supplying their basic human needs such as food and safety. Heather Usry, Outreach Coordinator since 2012, said “It’s a positive place with positivity being injected into each child’s life that comes there in small ways and big ways; daily routines such as bedtime, guidance and enriching with volunteers that come in and spend time and community efforts that have been contributed.” Another program that targets helping young children is Children’s Advocacy Center. It promotes receiving appropriate therapeutic care for victimized children. It also helps a child to tell their story one time in front of all the entities involved in a child abuse case, police, doctor, counselors, and have them present under one roof rather than shifting a child from place to place to recant a harrowing story. “If they’ve been victimized or been abused, they give them (the child) a chance to address the incident. They really talk to them, that age group, in a way that lets them have a voice. It really gives them a chance to tell their story, a way to start the recovery process if they’ve experienced that, “ Usry said. Sally Kate Winters also has a program that they are hoping will give another perspective on the definition of what it means to be homeless. Runaway & Homeless Youth Program is helping children by giving them a safe place to sleep, reconnecting and strengthen the bond between the family, providing educational support, therapy, and job placement with relevant skills. “A homeless, literally classifiable homeless, child is not on the streets or in a car or under a bridge or pushing around a shopping cart. Its just kids that don’t have a reliable home to go to – they are going from their friend to friend to friend and it’s a slippery slope.” april

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Not only does Sally Kate Winters have those three programs, they recently started a new program beginning in October called the Transitional Living Program. It’s an eligibility-required program that helps 17-21 year olds learn to become self-sufficient adults. The kids, who can be there up to 18 months, learn how to budget, learn business etiquette, how to buy and cook healthy food, how to write a resume, apply for FAFSA, financial aid, jobs, college or anything else they feel they need help with. “There are people that you can tell their life experiences have led them down an unfortunate path and it does feel good to see the improvements they’re making and really see them take advantages of the opportunities they’re being given through that program.” Usry said that some of these things that they are teaching may seem like common sense but simply aren’t because there hasn’t been the proper exposure or teaching previously. Hoping to help differentiate between what’s a good idea and what’s a bad idea is really the primary goal and foundation they want to build the program around.

With all the programs and activities that Sally Kate Winters does, it takes a lot to keep things running. The programs themselves are funded through grants, financial awards, and federal and charitable organizations that fund non-profits. Each program has it’s own grant funding and is also supported by United Way fundraisers and private donations from individuals and businesses. Usry said they really do rely on the fundraisers to generate financial support for an array of other needs. “The programs themselves, what the program needs in or-

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der to function, are being met by the grants but the fundraisers are providing opportunities to supplement the needs of each program.” These needs include clothing, sheets, and laundry detergent. It helps to give the children more of an experience and provide personal hygiene supplies for 12-13 children at a time. “They come in with their clothes sometimes in a trash bag and no toothbrush and we provide them with personal needs. We tailor what we can provide for each personal child.”


One of their biggest fundraisers is the Spring Into Action 5k on April 5th. The idea was first introduced by a group of Mississippi State University marketing students who were working on a class project. The students were assigned to develop a marketing strategy for a non-profit, with some of the best strategies presented to Sally Kate Winters complete with brochures and billboards. Executive Director Sheila Brand said from there, one of the board members, Elizabeth Ketchum, expanded the idea to include other activities in April as part of their Child Abuse Prevention Month. There will be jumpers, food and entertainment present to help fuel the good vibes and spirit and make sure everyone is having a great time. Usry said you can walk or run, it doesn’t matter because the overall message is still the same. “It’s a way to be supportive of a cause and an agency that’s meeting the needs of vulnerable people. It’s a way to be involved with your family and being at a fun event for a reason.” The 5k route will start in West Point and finishes through the Kitty Dill Memorial Parkway. Event sponsors are displayed through the run. Brand said they are hoping for at least 100 5k participants. If you can’t make the 5k, there are plenty of ways to help Sally Kate Winters. “Event sponsors and donations for awards are a big part of the overall success of the event. Our program also has lots of needs throughout the year that can be addressed through in kind donations that help to reduce the overall costs - paper products, school supplies, personal hygiene items. Volunteering is also a great way of being involved.” Brand said. For volunteer opportunities or more information, go online at sallykatewinters.org. The Sally Kate Winters Spring Into Action 5K will be April 5th starting at 6 p.m. with the Family Fun Run for Children 10 & under beginning at 5:30 p.m.

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A CUP OF LINSAY JO Pho t og r aph y b y Cat her ine S tuk enbor g, MSU R elations and submitt ed Lindsay is an online lifestyle blogger. Her blog, www.acupoflindsayjo.com, has a primary focus on fashion. Lindsay is a member of the Independent Fashion Bloggers (IFB) and attends various conferences and workshops with other fashion bloggers regularly.

What’s in your bag? with Coach Vann Stuedeman

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n June of 2011, Vann Stuedeman was announced as the new softball coach of Mississippi State. In two seasons, Coach Stuedeman has led her team to consecutive NCAA Tournament trips and 33 wins. In the spring of 2012, she became the first coach to win more games in the first year as head coach in the University’s history. Known as a pitching guru, she guided the Bulldogs to two no-hitters during the 2013 season while Mississippi State was named an Easton Team of the Year. So, what does a successful coach like Vann carry in her bag on game day? This month, Coach Stuedeman is sharing with us the contents of her bag:

Q&A with Coach Studedeman What do you wear on game day? I wear the designated coaching staff ensemble - The top is usually a contrasting color of the players uniform jersey. However, I am sometimes not in the loop, as I am the head coach, and I often don't match the rest of the coaching staff. I ALWAYS wear pants. It hs to be really hot for me to wear shorts. Yoga pants are the best! Most comfortable yet appropriate for coaching attire. If softball ever changes to what the baseball coaches wear (the player uniform) I will retire. What does your game day schedule look like? My game day routine varies with the game time but always includes: film sessions with the players, studying tendencies of the opponent, organization of my game bag and 50

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game charts, sending some positive affirmations to some of the players and, of course, food. How do the contents of your bag help you? Coke zero is the obvious stress reliever! Since we are outside year round - I worry about my skin as I age - thus the need for sunscreen, chap-stick and sunglasses. During a game there is ALWAYS a need for the softball rule book as well as the umpire manual. What is your favorite sporting event to watch besides softball? College football and college baseball – post season. What is your favorite healthy meal? And meal when you want to splurge? Harvey's lemon pepper chicken with vegetable skewers!!! ANY KIND OF PASTA for the splurge!

Essentials: Coke Zero Chap Stick Sunglasses Sunscreen Umpire Rule Book NCAA Softball Rule Book


Trending

As summer and swimsuit season is quickly approaching, many of us are in full swing in our own workout regimens. There are many different types of alternative exercise studios now available instead of just going to a gym. For those who haven’t found the right program for themselves, below are five of the latest trends in exercise and where to find them in the area. All of them are offered in a more personalized, class settings.

Yoga

Plyometrics

What is it? Exercise regimen based around having muscles exert maximum force in as short amount of time as possible in order to increase speed and strength. What will I do? Jumping squats, pushups, medicine ball slams, lunges, mountain climbers. Why is it trending? It's a lot of short, quick movements that burn tons of calories in a small amount of time. Where do I sign up? Starkville: Rice Fitness; Columbus: YMCA.

What is it? Exercise that focuses on breath control, simple meditation and specific body postures that is practiced for both health and relaxation. What will I do? Downward dog, childs, warrior, cat, and crow poses; inversions and meditation. Why is it trending? It's a great well to relax and exercise!. Where do I sign up? Starkville: Firefly Yoga Studio, Starkville Parks and Recreation, Chakra Yoga Studio; Columbus: Bliss Yoga, YMCA.

Pilates

What is it? Form of exercise that emphasizes the balanced development of the body through core strength, flexibility, and awareness. What will I do? Reformer, chair, mat, Cadillac, tower work. Why is it trending? If you've never been on a reformer, it's fun. The exercises specifically elongate muscles to create a lean look. Where do I sign up? Starkville: Midtown Pilates, Starkville Parks and Recreation; Columbus: The Pilates Factor, YMCA.

Crossfit

Barre

What is it? A combination of ballet barre, yoga, and pilates that focuses on dynamic movement with isometric holds. What will I do? Plie’, Releve’, Planks, Extensions Why is it trending? So many have a background in dance from their childhood, and this program incorporates the same techniques. Where do I sign up? Columbus: The Fitness Factor, YMCA.

What is it? High intensity and impact varied exercise program that incorporates Olympic lifts while also using nontraditional weight lifting elements such as kettle bells, climbing ropes, sleds, and jump ropes. What will I do? Dead lift, overhead squat, snatch, box jumps, burpees, pull-ups, handstand pushups, muscleups, rope climbs, kettle bell swings. Why is it trending? It is highly competitive and gaining popularity since its main sporting even, The Games, is aired on television. Athletes have the opportunity to compete in local and regional competitions as well. Where do I sign up? Starkville: Crossfit Starkville, Crossfit Max; Columbus: Forged Training Center Cross Fit 24/7, Iron Heart Gym.

*Businesses listed are from our research. For more options please contact specific city business lists. april

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By Sar ah Car pent er l Pho t og r aph y Lor en Gambr ell

The Tombigbees

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ith a passion for American folk music, the Tombigbees started in 2013 by Hayden Ellis, John Ford Harrison, Brent Varner, and Tre Watts. The Tombigbees is a string band based right here in Starkville and their performances range through a variety of genres including Bluegrass, Country-Blues, Folkpunk, and Ragtime. The band initially formed with the mindset of the project just being a hobby. The members collaborated during their free time to polish the act and perform at open mic nights. Locals bands like The Cedar Creek Ramblers and Parralax further promoted the band by offering slots at their show. This was a great help to the Tombigbees as a group of friends got together just to play music and now starting getting the opportunity to share it with other people. Charlie Culpepper, Taylor Morgan, and Anna Coker later joined the group and they continued to expand their reach through Mississippi and beyond. Overtime, the Tombigbees began playing at venues and events throughout Starkville and Jackson. With support of a loyal following and their repertoire continually expanding, they kept true to folk and bluegrass roots to influence their style. While also loving to see folks have a good time, the Tombigbees are proud to give us all a piece of our own cultural heritage. They hope that

their audience walks away not only thrilled from having an enjoyable experience, but also with an appreciation of Southern-roots music! The current lineup of the group is Taylor Morgan, Charlie Culpepper, Hayden Ellis, Brent Varner, and Anna Coker. Taylor Morgan is from Brandon, Miss. and is working towards a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine. Morgan is on percussion and vocals. Charlie Culpepper is from Valdosta, Ga. and getting a masters degree in Agricultural Science. Culpepper plays banjo, guitar, harmonica, and vocals. Hayden Ellis is from Madison, Miss. and working towards a bachelors degree in Business Information Systems and Ellis plays mandolin, guitar, and vocals. Brent Varner is also from Madison and working towards a masters degree in Student Affairs. He plays upright bass, guitar, harmonica, and vocals. Anna Coker is the last member and sings vocals and Coker is from Madison, Miss. and studying Educational Psychology. Along with performing several shows in the area, the Tombigbees will be playing April 12 at Old Venice and at the Cotton District Festival during Super Bulldog Weekend. Come show your support for the Tombigbees and enjoy a night of music, food, and fun! For updates on future shoes follow the band on twitter @tombigbees and make sure to find them on Facebook!

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LIFE AND STYLE

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By Becca Hor t on l Pho t og r aph y Be t h W ynn and WMS V Ar c hiv e

MEET THE LOCALS

WMSV Above: Former MSU News Director Krista Vowell and former Program Director Daniel Morgan present an MSU student with a prize package. Right: First WMSV Student Directors Robby Stanley, Jay Houts, Mike Bianca, April Smith and James Martin with Station Manager Steve Ellis and former Television Center Director David Hutto. This picture was taken on March 21, 1994, the day WMSV went on the air.

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icture this scenario: you’re driving in Starkville, you’ve set your radio to SCAN and you decide to stop it on the first song that pleasantly catches your ear, possibly an awesome alternative song like Matt Nathanson’s “Kinks Shirt.” (Do you know this catchy tune? If not, check it out). The radio station you’ve selected is 91.1 WMSV, Mississippi State University’s campus radio station. You think the song is pretty swell and decide to stick around for another, and another, and another with limited breaks. You’re not alone. WMSV has been catching ears and keeping them for 20 years. While WMSV was not the first radio station to broadcast from the Mississippi State University campus - the communication department ran a station called WMSB in the mid-80s that was shut down – it is the first to have 14,000 watts and a 70-mile broadcasting radius. A group of students in the early ‘90s petitioned to open a new station and got a referendum passed. The university then applied for another license from the Federal Communication Commission. Steve Ellis, general manager of WMSV, has been at the helm ever since. After having experience with both MSU – he was the Broadcast Coordinator in University Relations at the time – and radio, Ellis was a natural choice and perfect fit. The university came to him with a question: Can you build it from scratch? He said yes, and he’s been in the same office for the past two decades.

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Paul Thorn and his daughter, Kit, on stage February. 8, 2014 during the first of three concerts held at Rick’s Café Americain in Starkville in celebration of WMSV's 20th Anniversary.

Ellis has been purely focused on teaching and training students interested in radio, running a radio station to the best of his ability since 1994, and was then focused on planning the 20th anniversary celebrations. A typical day for him includes addressing possible problems from the previous day, checking the virtual world, responding to emails from artists and picking the music on Wednesdays. He happily admits that music is always on his mind, and his leadership explains why WMSV seems to always hit the right note. WMSV is a professionally run, student-staffed radio station. Ellis and Anthony Craven, the News and Public Affairs Director, oversee the groups of student workers that the radio station employs: DJs, a news staff, an IT guy and a volunteer street team. Although many students make an appearance at the station and inquire about DJ openings, Ellis encourages them to return about a month before a semester ends. Provided an opening makes itself known then, the students interested are trained for two weeks and are then asked to perform an onair audition. The lucky trainee that performs the best in his or her audition is given the opportunity to fill the position. Ellis notes that the things to look for in a worthy DJ candidate are intelligence, an entertaining personality, trustworthiness, punctuality, good articulation and just a person that is genuinely fun to be around.

Like anything with a long life, WMSV has seen many changes in its 20 years. When it started, the now-paid DJ staff was made up of only unpaid volunteers. The technology has improved significantly and provides an easier outlet of music outreach. And the station changed its original alternative music format to an adult alternative music format. The original format of alternative was chosen because it was a sound not typically offered in the market but, after other radio stations started to catch on to WMSV’s unique idea, that changed. The station then “eased into” the adult alternative genre. Despite this, the station remains steadfast to stick to its roots and plays a happy blend of the two. “I think it’s our sound. WMSV just kind of has a groove that is our groove. I can’t tell you what it is,” said Ellis. “I just know it when I hear it. I can put something in the CD player when I’m listening to music every week and go, ‘No, that’s not our sound.’” It is added to the format if it sounds just right, and then it’s played for your enjoyment as it has been for the past 20 years. While he says that he can’t speak about how much WMSV’s 20th anniversary means to all others involved, Ellis is beyond proud of the station and all it’s accomplished. It particularly means a lot that the student-run station is still successful after its two-decade run because many people weren’t so faithful in the idea at the start.

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Left: Bill Cooke And Kannawermz at the first concert celebrating the 20th anniversary of 91.1 WMSV featuring Paul Thorne at Rick’s on February 8, 2014. Below: “Former MSU student DJ Eric Fritzius, better known as “Juice S. Aaron” working a shift at WMSV in 1994.

“When they decided to make it a big station,” Ellis said, “a lot of people didn’t think it’d go. ‘Oh, you can’t have students running a station that big.’ Well, yeah we could. And we did,” he laughs. “And we have, and we continue to do it.” What really makes it special is the fact that talented, creative and interested students helped start and continue to help run WMSV. Despite many of the students not being broadcasting or communications majors, they are simply talented individuals who worked really hard and continue to do so. Lizzie Smith, a former DJ for WMSV from 2012-2013 and former writer for Town and Gown Magazine, loved working the Monday and Wednesday night shift from 6-10 p.m. One of her favorite parts about the DJ position was getting to listen to music – great music and new artists – she might not otherwise have been exposed to. I was new to Starkville and was listening to 91.1,” Smith said. “I loved the music, and I contacted Steve Ellis to see if they had any job openings. I just knew I wanted to work there.” Smith is proud of the work done at WMSV and excited to have been asked to join the staff. WMSV’s 20th anniversary celebrations kicked off with a concert in February with Paul Thorn, Bill Cooke, and Kannawermz at Rick’s Café. After having featured Paul Thorn several times in 56

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the past, WMSV was excited to bring him around again. The continued celebration and reunion for former and current staff members took place the weekend of March 21st, the official 20th anniversary of the station. The weekend featured concerts by The Weeks, Big Country’s Empty Bottle, Los Colognes and John & Jacob, also at Rick’s. After seeing John & Jacob and Los Colognes at their sold-out concert in Nashville this past January, Steve Ellis knew the two bands would be the perfect fit for the reunion concert. The Birmingham-based John & Jacob are quickly gaining popularity – having toured with the Band Perry and the Wildfeathers. One of their songs, “Be My Girl” was also recently featured on an episode of the television series Nashville. Former DJs came from all over to attend the concerts, see old friends and colleagues and say hello to the mentor they’ll never forget: Ellis. Though many former staff could not attend the reunion, a WMSV Alumni Facebook page was started to help members keep in touch and keep informed about future happenings. WMSV’s mission was and continues to be to provide music and information for and about MSU. Organizations on campus or even in the community can rely on the station to get that information out and inform the community. The station really wants to let people

know – any department or student group or anything – that if they’ve got an event coming up and need some publicity, WMSV has got their backs. Despite their excellent job of this for the last two decades, some are still unaware of WMSV and many aren’t sure what faces go with the radio voices. “Not all the time do people know who you are when you’re in radio,” said Ellis. “It’s neat when someone comes in here and says, ‘someone in my literature class found out I was on WMSV and we got some great comments from some kids.’ It’s great to hear stuff like that.” It is also humbling for Ellis to hear his favorite radio station airing at all hours in the Colvard Student Union. It is clear that, since its beginning and well into its future, the station has a great relationship with our favorite university. Ellis encourages any and all music lovers to start or continue to listen to 91.1 WMSV. While he desires WMSV’s success to continue for another 20 years, he mentions that he will continue to sit in the same office he sat in from the start. He has no plans to change offices and enjoys the history that comes with it. “This office doesn’t mean a thing,” he said. “This building doesn’t mean a thing. It’s what comes out of it that matters.”


A Pearl Rough in the

By Lizzie Smit h Pho t og r aph y sumbitt ed

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otswana is known as the “Pearl of Africa,” because of the political peace and steady, economic development. Despite the economic development, Botswana is impacted by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Approximately 1 in 6 people is HIV positive, giving them the second highest rate of HIV/AIDS in the world. Because of the economic stability, the government is able to provide welfare packages to surviving family members who take in orphaned children. Botswana has more children orphaned by AIDS than any other country in the world. Although the system works great in some cases, often the appointed caretakers take the resources given and leave the children in dire need, apart from basic needs. Allison Barnhill first went to Africa for five months in Spring 2009 with a group of people, including her future husband, Brett, as part of an International Missionary Board called Hands-On. She went back to Botswana the next summer for two months where she became best friends with another missionary, Kasey Ambrose. Both girls were studying education at Mississippi College and both agreed that Botswana, as well as the children, had a place in their hearts. They wanted to do more. They wanted to open up a care center “where the children can come receive love, be a part of a family, learn life-skills they need to be successful in the world, learn the love of Christ, receive educational tutoring, and eat a nutritious meal each day.” “We spent our senior year of college praying about how to return to Botswana and use our teaching skills to impact the children. We wanted to do something that would be sustainable even after we left, and knew that would only be possible if we partnered with the Batswana in a local church.” The Lobatse Baptist Church is where they decided the care center should be. For the past two years, they’ve been training with the Batswana, a term for the citizens of Botswana, from the church to run the care center. “The biggest challenge we faced was how to make the center sustainable. We played with a lot of different ideas, and eventually we started making headbands after traditional African wedding fabric.” The Batswana sewed hundreds of headbands and were able to buy materials for a kitchen, and other materials needed for the center with the sales from the headbands.

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The ladies are fulltime volunteers, usually from the church, and are head of the center and use the money from the headbands and with help from the tithe of the church, keep the center going. They are not supported by outside donations and it’s what Barnhill believes is the key to long-term sustainability. The center first started with 10 children because they wanted to have a “big impact in a small group of children, treating the center like a family.” The center now hosts 20

and once they knew they had this opportunity, began raising money for their travel expenses. Both graduated college in May of 2013, then two months later, they kissed their loved ones goodbye and boarded a plane to begin their journey first in Botswana. They trained intensively for the first four months learning about culture, language and orphan care. At the center in Lobatse, which runs similarly to an after school program in the States, the girls would work with the children ranging from the 6-12 years old. “The children come for two hours a day, and their time is filled with activities to help teach them Bible stories and verses in English, as this is the primary language now used in the school system in Botswana. We teach them through learning activities such as flash cards and reading, communicating personally during ”family circle”, and during playtime. We also teach them about health, daily hygiene, and manners. Each day the children are provided a nutritional meal which will often be their only meal of the day.”

Rachel and Kaitlyn making coffee cozies with the ladies who volunteer in Molepolole, Botswana.

children each day, which not all are orphans. Some have parents but are living in destitute poverty so they accept both orphaned and vulnerable children. About a year into Barnhill’s term, Reclaimed Project contacted the pair about partnering up with them because they had been looking for sustainable international orphan care projects. Eventually, reclaimed project went to Africa to see what they were doing. During Reclaimed Project’s visit to Africa, they asked Barnhill to be fulltime when she returned to the states. She agreed but asked if they would be willing to send more girls to open up a second care center. Kaitlyn Gary and Rachel Thibodeaux are those two girls who, after an interview process, were chosen to go to Africa and set up a second care center in a village in Molepolole with the Molopolole Baptist Church. Kaitlyn had a vision of working in Africa since she was fortunate enough to receive a new heart at 18. She saw that she wanted to put more meaning into life versus materialistic desires she once had to “desires that would outlive her.” She worked towards receiving a Bachelors Degree in Biology from Mississippi College. Rachel is not new to international mission trips since taking her first trip in the spring of 2011. She went to Central and South America but at the beginning of her senior year of college, started to wonder what her next step would be with her love of caring oversees. The girls credit their faith in guiding them to this mission 58

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After their training had commenced, they began to set out to try to open up the orphan care in Molepolole. “The process of opening an orphan care center in a traditional village is unlike anything I can explain in words, but I will try to paint a picture for you.  As outsiders coming into the village, we had to have approval from the village chief. Molepolole (Mole-ee-po-low-lee), Botswana is the largest village in Botswana, but to the eye it appears to be a slowly emerging town. So on one side of the road, we can see a


man driving a cart pulled by donkeys, and on the other side, we see a person driving a car talking on a wireless headset. Somewhere along the beaten path, we wait under a small shade tree to meet with the village council beside the ladies of Molepolole Baptist Church who will be the leaders of the next orphan care center.” Both Rachel and Kaitlyn have been in a waiting phase for the past two months. They’ve made some progress as the village council has approved a proposal on terms that they build some form of kitchen on church property and ensure the grounds are safe for children. They have also met with the village social worker and discussed requirements for the registered children. Much like Barnhill and Ambrose, they are continuing with the desire of a miniscule group at first so they can be successful with few to be successful with many later on. They want a small group around ten of the vulnerable children in the village who can walk to the care center. The two ladies have taught the volunteer women how to crochet in January and now they are able to provide financial means for the care center and themselves by crocheting various items. “We showed them how to make coffee cozies, and now they are showing us how to crochet different items.” Rachel will be returning to America in July and Kaitlyn will return at the end of 2014. They say their time in Botswana has been the most challenging yet fruitful experience. “Our heart forever will be between two oceans. We love our family and friends in America, but we now have a new set of family, friends, and lovely children in Africa. The daily struggles of different cultures are surpassed by the rewarding rest we receive after a long African day. We have been in Botswana for eight months, and it feels like home away from home now.” If you want to support Rachel and Kaitlyn by donations, buy any of the items the Batswana have made or information on the Reclaimed Project can be found at reclaimedproject.org

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Catching Dreams By Joe Lee Pho t og r aph y: Catc h a Dr eam Foundation

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Brian Chisholm, project manager; Suzanne Brown, administrative assistant; Tatum Freeman, family relations coordinator; Megan Whittington, graphic design and media; and Marty Brunson, chief executive officer.

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lover of the outdoors and a man who wrote beautifully about his surroundings, the late Bruce Brady didn’t live to see his dream come true, which was a way for terminally ill children to enjoy a once-in-a-lifetime outdoors experience with their families and escape their hardship for several days. But the seed that Brady, who died of cancer in 2000 at the age of 66, planted with his friends around the Golden Triangle led to the creation of the Starkville-based Catch-ADream Foundation that year. CADF now has volunteers and supporters across the country, and there are many locations where families with a terminally ill child can spend a few days hunting, fishing, and enjoying the miracle of nature. “I met Bruce when I was vice-president of marketing for Mossy Oak in West Point,” said Darrell Daigre, an original CADF board member who now lives in Raleigh, N.C. “He wrote for Outdoor Life Magazine and other publications, and I got to know him fairly well. “He wanted the family to be able to escape the problems for four or five days and enjoy the outdoor experience. That was his mission, to provide the family a little bit of hop, and felt the great outdoors was a phenomenal way to do that. There’s a level of comfort you take from the outdoors, and if you have that gene – which Bruce did – you understand how refreshing and rehabilitating that can be.” Dr. Marty Brunson, CEO of Catch-A-Dream Foundation and a retired professor of Fisheries at MSU, didn’t have the opportunity to meet Brady before his death. However, plans were already being made at the university by then to help Brady’s dream become a reality. “After his passing I met with his wife and family to discuss his rudimentary idea, determine if the idea had merit, and to discuss how a program might be structured,” Brunson said. “Thus, the concept was born through those discussions. I was fortunate to be the person ‘called’ to provide point leadership in developing the concept and then designing the framework for the program.


“Through my involvement I became very close to his widow, Peggy, and to his three grown children. Consequently, I came to ‘know’ Bruce in many ways, despite having never spoken with him face to face. It is safe to say that he was a man of great faith and truly an inspiration to many through the years via his outdoor writing and sculpture.” Jimmy Bullock, another original CADF board member, grew up in southwest Mississippi and attended MSU from 1977-1982. He met Brady while Brady worked for Outdoor Life Magazine. “Like a lot of kids growing up in the south, I spent a lot of time in the woods hunting and fishing,” he said. “I read most everything I could get my hands on relative to hunting and fishing. One article in Outdoor Life talked about squirrel hunting in Mississippi, and mentioned a place I was familiar with. The author was Bruce Brady. “Most of his stories were about places and hunting I could only dream about, but he made those dreams seem like pos-

sibilities. As I became involved with the Mississippi Wildlife Federation in the early ‘80s, I had the honor of meeting Mr. Bruce. We kept in touch over the years. When Mr. Bruce was starting his fight with cancer and several of us were visiting with him, he talked about his vision for helping children with life-threatening illnesses be able to experience their hunting and fishing dream of a lifetime. And the program grew from there.” Today, an average of average of 55-60 applications are received each year; Brunson estimates that 80-90 percent meet the Foundation’s eligibility criteria and are accepted (eligibility is restricted to U.S. and Canadian citizens). To date, CADF has served children from 45 states and three Canadian provinces. They’ve been the beneficiary of Sigma Chi’s Derby Day philanthropic efforts since 2006. “Derby Day involves a week-long series of events culminating with a rally at the MSU Amphitheater, usually on the first Saturday in April,” Brunson said. “Sigma Chi includes the six largest sororities on campus in the Derby Day activities. In recent years they have generated over $60,000 annually for us.” “The unique thing about the dreams that Catch-A-Dream fulfills, whether as simple as bream fishing from a pier or as complicated as fishing in Alaska (or elk hunting our west), is that they create lifelong memories for the whole care-giving family and important moments of hope and faith for the youngster,” said Bill Sugg, president of Mossy Oak. He’s a lifelong resident of West Point and was a Sigma Chi while at MSU. “The sad reality is that these memories for some of the youngsters are tragically short-lived. But because of the dedicated commitment of Catch-A-Dream and those who charitably support their mission – like Sigma Chi – the remaining family will always be able to cherish the memories created by their loved one’s outdoor adventure.” Kane Overstreet grew up in Columbus, but his family is a known quantity in Starkville – the old Overstreet Elementary School on Jackson Street was named for his great-grandfather and superintendent of schools, John William Overstreet. Kane was a Sigma Chi at MSU from 1995-1999 and became the chapter advisor in 2004.

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“Derby Day started at MSU in 1959,” Overstreet said. “There were a lot of different organizations the chapter gave to through the years, and the last before Catch-A-Dream was Make a Wish. Then some local Sigma Chi’s from Mossy Oak (including Bill Sugg) talked to us about Catch-A-Dream. The chapter loved the idea of giving to an organization that had Mississippi and MSU ties. “We’re able to see firsthand how the money is put to use. By getting to know Marty Brunson, Brian Chisholm, and the families of Catch-A-Dream, we saw that it was a very solid organization that focuses not only on the outdoors but on sharing the love of Christ.” CADF partners with many corporate entities, including Whitetails Unlimited, Bass Pro Shops, and Drury Outdoors. The bass tournament at the Ross Barnett Reservoir each May is a popular fundraiser. The Pickwick Lake Catch-A-Dream

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Team Challenge is in its second year, and the annual Mississippi Sportsmen for Catch-A-Dream Banquet each November in Eupora has been very successful. And Friends of CatchA-Dream, at www.catchadream.org, allows for local groups across the country to conduct their own fundraisers. “We have an amazing group of volunteers, and the small staff in Starkville works so hard,” Daigre said. “We have hunters, fishermen, and outfitters in a network all over the country that provide for this organization. Once they get involved, they keep coming back. It’s an absolute blessing. “We have a core group of people we work with, but new people each year are volunteering their land, lakes, and homes. All are vetted very carefully. There’s always a Catch-ADream ambassador on the trips. And I’ve never heard – even one time – anyone not getting what they expected. That includes volunteers, family members, and the children themselves.” “Catch-A-Dream is an idea that really represents who Mr. Bruce was to me: a larger than life southern gentleman with vision, and the ability to turn vision into reality,” Bullock said. “And a man with a good heart and compassion for others – at a time when he could have been focusing on his own mortality, he was thinking how he could help children make their dreams come true.” Catch a Dream Foundation PO Box 6280, Mississippi State, MS 39762 Phone: (662) 324-5700 Website: catchadream.com


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Susan’s pick for April ... The Rented Mule B y Susan O’ Br y an P ho t o g r aph y s ubm it t ed

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ave you ever read a book and found it so fascinating that you began to mentally picture who will star in the film version? That’s happens with The Rented Mule, a Southernframed novel by West Point, Miss., resident Bobby Cole. The novel is his third work, following The Dummy Line and Moon Underfoot, and it’s been a big seller on Amazon and other online sites. Bradley Cooper comes to mind for the role of Cooper Dixon, a 36-year-old frustrated ad agency co-owner who dreams of trading the rat race for the outdoors. The dia, splashing his name and photo across Tower Agency is up for sale, but Cooper’s tabloids and TVs. partner, and majority stockholder, has Cooper is determined to get to the plans to weasel more than his share of truth of his wife’s disappearance while the profits with the help of a local banker at the same time evading police and ar(perhaps John Lithgow?) and his associate Author Bobby Cole rest. It’s not easy - the hunter becomes (perhaps Joaquin Phoenix?). Long ago cut the hunted. Helping him is his wannabe off from his family’s fortune, Gates Balmistress Brooke, who’s desperately trying to keep herself and lenger (Ryan Gosling?) desperately needs the cash to pay off her young son one step ahead of her abusive ex-husband. gambling and drug debts. Cooper, however, is unaware of the The person behind the kidnapping comes as a surprise. string pulling. Instead, he has a strong sense of family, right Readers won’t see this one coming! Just know that he’s and wrong – and honesty. Born to hunt and fish, Cooper insane, possessing a drug-addled false sense of grandeur and wants to buy pristine acreage from his family’s longtime the knowledge of his family’s deep and dark past. “Deep” housekeeper, Millie Brown, to build a hunter’s paradise and “dark” are key to the Client’s plans for Kelly and Cooper retreat. (The novel’s title references one of Millie’s old-time as well as Brooke and her son. sayings.) The Rented Mule is not a quick read, coming in at 500 Cooper’s biggest vices are Mexican Coca-Colas and a growpages. It takes space to flesh out details, little nuggets that ing infatuation with a colleague named Brooke Layton (Keira keep readers entertained – and fascinated. However, it is an Knightley?). His love of the land comes naturally considering easy read, totally drawing you into the story. Its Southern that author Cook is an avid hunter and wildlife manager. background lets readers identify with the characters, the setUnfortunately, Cooper’s wife is all about money and the tings and even the criminal mastermind’s back story. Here in social status that she thinks dollars can provide. Picture the South, anything is possible. actress Reese Witherspoon in the role of a materialistic, yet Cook pays tribute to his roots in his story as well as in his determined Southern blonde named Kelly, who hails from a thanks. His acknowledgement includes shout-outs to Mossy small town in Alabama. As Cook writes, Cooper is “stuck at Oak BioLogic, West Point and fellow Mississippians – agent work. Stuck with an unhappy wife.” Kyle Jennings and wife Jill Conner Browne, the original Their lives go awry when a motley criminal crew, includSweet Potato Queen. “(They) like what I had to say from ing a former football star aka Mad Dog (Lance Gross?), early on and encouraged me to write before anyone was a computer whiz, a female accomplice and a Larry King willing to read the stories,” Cook writes. “Kyle is an excellent wannabe addicted to teeth-whitening strips, is hired by “the editor and business manager and, thankfully, he handles all Client” to kidnap Kelly and implicate Cooper. He becomes the gritty details, allowing me to concentrate on storytelling.” more than “a person of interest” as he’s hounded by the me-

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Aberdeen Aberdeen Pilgrimage Pilgrimage

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A b er deen P ilg r im ag e Apr il 4- 6, 2 0 1 4 www.ab er deen pi lg r im ag e. com O THER P I L GR IM A G E S IN M IS S IS SI P P I : Co lu m bus P il g r i m ag e M ar c h 2 8–Apr il N atc hez P il g r i m ag e Mar c h 8–Apr il 8 Ho ll y S pr ings P i lg r im ag e Apr il 1 1 - 1 3 Ta p e s tr y: The P ilg r im ag e t o V i c k s b u r g Apr il 3 –5

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By Ric helle Putnam Pho t og r aph y b y A ber deen Pilg r imag e

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berdeen, Miss. is one those incredible gems hidden far away from Interstates and bustling city lights. Situated on a hill next to the Tombigbee River, the town was founded in 1835 and grew to be the second largest city in Mississippi, the county seat of Monroe County and the largest port on the Tombigbee. Aberdeen attracted wealthy merchants and plantation owners who built grand mansions featuring distinct architectural styles from three periods: Antebellum, Victorian, and early twentieth century styles that include Prairie, Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival, Neoclassical, Craftsman and Airplane Bungalow. “Main Street used to face the river,” said Faith West, lifetime resident of Monroe County and President of the Aberdeen Pilgrimage Board. “But because the river flooded, the town moved up the hill.” The courthouse, she said, still stands on the original street. Aberdeen began as a farming town and many of the houses were by built plantation owners out in the Prairie area, just west of Aberdeen. Faith was born in Prairie and graduated from Aberdeen school. “We have a very friendly town,” she said, “but some of the very old Aberdeen families still consider anyone who moved into Aberdeen 50 years ago as newcomers.” The Aberdeen Garden Club started the Pilgrimage in 1939, but due to World War II it was suspended after only a few events. In 1962 the city enjoyed a tour of homes called Bon Accord and a brief return of the Pilgrimage in 1976. Nevertheless, it wasn’t until 1980 the Pilgrimage gained momentum and in 1990 the Aberdeen Pilgrimage Association was formed. This year Aberdeen celebrates its 39th official pilgrimage and expects between 500 and 700 visitors to join the festivities.

To left: Magnolias of the Aberdeen Pilgrimage. Aberdeen Pilgrimage Board - Faith West, president, Susan Evans, 1st vice-president; Beverly Weber, 2nd vice-president; Lynda Cole, secretary; Lana Marsicano, treasurer; Dan Barnett serves as past-president.

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Ab P “The Pilgrimage begins on Thursday night with the Gala at the Magnolia,” said Faith. This historical home was deeded to the city and is open every weekday for tours. It’s also rented for parties, weddings and wedding receptions. “The kick-off gala will include heavy hors d’oeuvres and tours of the house. There is no charge be donations are greatly appreciated.” Friday, the Riverview Garden Club hosts an “In the Gardens” luncheon at First United Methodist Church. Friday evening, the Shadows, one of the Victorian homes on tour, holds a turn of the century formal candlelight dinner of authentic menu items from the late 1800s and early 1900s served in Victorian elegance. Dinner reservations are required. On Friday night and Sunday afternoon the play, “Life in a Small Southern Town” will be performed at the Elkin Theatre, said Faith. In the 1930s, after the old opera house owned by the Elkins burned down, instead of building another opera house, they built a theater. “About ten years ago a group of citizens bought the building and have slowly refurbished it,” said Faith. On weekends, the theatre has first-run movies for only five dollars. “We have a full concession and every item is only a dollar.” The Elkin Theater’s beautifully lit marquee and huge lobby space make it a perfect space for weddings, plays and art shows. “We’ll have carriage rides through the historical districts, which are free as long as you have a Pilgrimage ticket.” On Friday and Saturday morning, there will be a tour by van of burial sites in the area. According to Faye, during the Civil War there was a skirmish in Aberdeen and a pretty important battle fought at Prairie and close to Okolona. “The Confederates were trying to keep the Yankees from the railroad,” she said. “One of our historians said there are about 800 Confederate soldiers buried here, but the graves are not marked.” Come Saturday, be ready to eat! The Boy Scouts Pancake Breakfast will be, “complete with bacon, sausage, scrambled eggs, grits and everything you can imagine,” said Faith. Plus, the Lion’s Club cooks and sells barbeque all day. At First Presbyterian Church, the Culinary Workshop of Aberdeen provides another exquisite Pilgrimage luncheon. “You can eat inside the church or go into the garden,” said Faith. “Or you can also order meals to go.” You can also take meals to the grounds of Three Goats Cottage where the Party Room offers restroom facilities that are open at no charge on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

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berdeen Pilgrimage

An antique and classic car show will be on the courthouse grounds on Saturday. That afternoon acclaimed storyteller Jane Owen Cunningham, who was born in Aberdeen and is now better known as “Miss Jane,” joins First United Methodist Church Pastor Keith Williams in an afternoon of storytelling at the historic James Creek Missionary Baptist Church. Built in 1905, the James Creek Missionary Baptist church was an African American church and school located about five miles south of Aberdeen. Abandoned for years, the last members of the church gave the building to Dwight Stevens who moved the one-room church to its present location and restored it. “Saturday night we have the Lives and the Legends of the Old Aberdeen Cemetery,” said Faith. On this candlelight tour, high school juniors and seniors dress in costume and perform an interpretation of the person buried in a certain spot. “You are amazed at how the kids memorized their parts and dressed in costume.” There is no available history on a lot of the graves so the stories are not historically accurate. Even so, the youth do an amazing job using their imagination. “There is a lady buried in a rocking chair, which makes for an interesting sideline.” Lives and Legends is one of Faith’s favorite events during the Pilgrimage. Saturday night, the Cottage Tea Room serves a Taste of Mississippi, a sampler of Southern cuisine. Reservations for the Taste are preferred. “Tradition has it that the Cottage Tea Room was originally a prefab house bought from Sears & Roebuck many years ago,” said Faith. Faith is compiling a list of the antebellum and Victorian homes in Aberdeen and thus far she has about 40. Some have not been refurnished, according to Faith, but have the opportunity for preservation. Many homes had been torn down before the realization set in that Aberdeen needed to preserve them. Aberdeen’s Billy Brasfield, an internationally renowned makeup artist, and other volunteers have contributed greatly to the preservation of homes with the Save Aberdeen Landmarks Group, Inc., a non-profit organization that recovers and refurbishes local buildings and landmarks in the downtown area. One such building is the 150-year-old Kimmel Bakery, which is now home to a full-service hair salon and apartments. A favorite on the Tour of Homes, Sunset Hill, had not been on pilgrimage in 17 years. “Last year they opened for the first time and will be open again this year.” Most homes on the tour are antebellum or Victorian. “Some say we need to forget because of all of that was involved with the Civil War and bringing up old memories,” said Faith. “But it is a part of history.” The pilgrimage allows Aberdeen to showcase its historical homes and their architectural timeline. Yet, pilgrimages do more than showcase; they help teach the history, what it was like in an era gone by. “There are always hidden treasures that people find on the Pilgrimage.”

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L ef t t o Right: Clo t hes: L.A . Gr een Boutiq ue, Clo t he s: Pink Tang er ine and sh oe s: D e e p Sou t h P ou t , D e e p Sou t h P ou t .


Street Chic S ty le d b y N at al ie P hi llips P ho t o g r aph y b y D iv ian Co n n e r Clo t hes pr o vided b y D eep So u t h P o u t, L . A . Gr e e n B o u tiq u e an d P i nk Tang er i ne Bout iq u e Hair b y S alon 2 8 Mak e u p b y M er le Nor m an L u n a B e l la

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L ef t: Clo t he s and je w e lr y: P ink Tang er ine Boutiq ue and shoe: Dee p Sout h P ou t . R igh t; L.A . Gr e e n B ou t iq u e .


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Right; Deep Sout h P out


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MSU Student Association Banquet

The Mississippi State University Student Association held their annual banquet on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at the Colvard Student Union celebrating a successful year of the Student Association. Photography Laura Daniels

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1. Genni Brown, Tyler Camp, Michael Hogan (SA President), Nash Tucker, JoJo Dodd and Maura Trochessett 2. Lauren Sledge and Emilie Cravens 3. Deirdre Edwards and Brett Harris (incoming SA President) 4. Peter Hogan, Bit Ritten and Michael Mogan 5. Amy Hogan and Sarah Austin 6. Kaeley Gemmill and Lauren Iupe april

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St. Patrick’s Day Celebration

Oby’s celebrated St. Patrick’s Day and the Crowning of the Irish Rose, Lauren-Colby Lindley, by Mayor Parker Wiseman on Monday, March 17, 2014. Festivities began with bagipies, live music, dancing and “carrying on.” Then, “The Party Blarney” continued at Buffalo Wild Wings. Photography Laura Daniels

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1. Les Lindley, Lauren-Colby Lindley and Suzanne Lindley 2. Brenda and John O’Bannon 3. Linda Jackson, Jack Forbus and Lynda Forbus 4. Brian Anderson and Kelly Marsh 5. Mike and Johanna Goree 6. Lori Gillis, Beverly Joyce and Gail Gillis

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136th Anniversary Celebration

Fellow Bulldogs and the MSU Alumni Association celebrated the 136th anniversary of its creation on Friday, February 28, 2014. The campus celebration took place at the Bull Ring near Colvard Student Union. Complimentary cake slices, ice cream and drinks were served. Photography Ashley Covin

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Head to Toe Health and Wellness Fair The Junior Auxiliary of Starkville held their 2nd Annual Head to Toe Health and Wellness Fair on Saturday, February 22, 2014 at the Starkville Sportplex to educate parents about the benefits of keeping kids active. Photography by Ashley Covin

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1. Janae Owens, Hannah Howell and Ashley Allen 2. Kristen Skinner and Betsy Luke 3. Nick Wright and Jeremy Baugh 4. Nikki and Carson Reeves 5. Dr. Crigler and Dr. Fratesi 6. Shaina Earle, Emile Creel, Catherine Feng, Victoria Wardrop and Frank Chandler

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‘ Southern Soiree ‘ Palmer Home for Children of Starkville hosted their 2nd Annual Southern Soriee at The Stables on Saturday, March 1, 2014 benefitting Palmer Home for Children. Photography Ashley Covin.

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1. Thomas and Jana Berkery 2. Emily and Michael Ferrill 3. James and Valerie Hicks 4. Katherine Hewlett and Drake Bassett 5. Katie Iglay Iglay and Stacey George 6. Paul Ammerman and Mary McDavid

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Move. Sip. Shop. Midtown Pilates, Juva Juice and L.A. Green Boutique hosted an event at L.A. Green Boutique in Starkville on February 26, 2014 for the attendees to “Move. Sip. Shop.�. Photography by Ashley Covin

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1. Ann Hamilton Dogan, Dana Marx and Kaitlin Crepps 2. Chelsea Dillard and Savannah White 3. Karen Persons and Sarah Speelman 4. Lauren Ann Cooper and Arma de la Cruz 5. Shelby Marsh and Kat Garrard 6. Shelby Williams, Jamie Smith, Olivia Haskins, Daniel Bergeron, Shelby Randall, Baylie Winston, Maegan Bedells and Jodie McGuff

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Lessons From Little Rock

Ernest Green, one of the “Little Rock Nine�, discussed his experiences as one of the nine first African-American students to integrate Little Rock, Ark. schools at the Colvard Student Union in Foster Ballroom at MSU on February, 27, 2014. Photography by Laura Daniels

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1. Walter Diehl and Gregory Dunaway 2. Yaharra Wright and Tyesha Summerville 3. Caroline Lowell and Karis Hicks 4. Rob Mellen and Parker Wiseman 5. John Ford, Emily Damm and Kyle Steward 6. Angela Thomas and Ernest Green - Key note speaker

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Glow Run

Mississippi State University held a 5K and 1-mile fun run benefiting Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children on February 27, 2014 sponsored by the Student Association. Photography by Laura Daniels

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1. Mallory Holder, Bailey Folkes and AJ Frazier 2. Morgan McKee and Kelsey McArthur 3. Perceus Mody and Tam Vo 4. Jarett Rubin and Gabe Posadas 5. Miranda Washington, Katie Culpepper and Shelby Coleman 6. Audrey Aldridge and Ashley Kosturock 7. Sarah and Doug Story 8. Jud Roberts, Catherine Phillips and Raychal Reed 9. Brittany Caldwell and Dillon Newell 10. Alan Black and Austin Bond 80

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Happy April Readers For your loyal support, we would like to give anyone that mentions this advertisement 10% off a regular price ad. Only applies to new contracted ads. Not valid after May 14, 2014.

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