Page 1

VOLUME 2, NUMBER 8

MAGAZINE JUNE 2013

TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM

Bridal

Section

SIMPLY SUMMER

Father’s Day Gift Ideas Easy Herb

Gardening

JUNE 2013 SCAN FOR ONLINE ISSUE


june

2013 |

3


A PRODUCT OF HORIZON OF MISSISSIPPI P.O. Box 1068 | Starkville, MS 39760 www.townandgownmagazine.com

{

STAFF

}

{

DON NORMAN | PUBLISHER

LOREN GAMBRELL LIZZIE SMITH CATHERINE STUKENBORG

sdnpub@starkvilledaily news.com

{

CLAIRE MASSEY | EDITOR

LINDSEY JOHNSON SR. ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

{

lindsey@ townandgown magazine.com PHOTOGRAPHERS

DIVIAN CONNER ASHLEY COVIN LAURA DANIELS ASHLEY MASSEY

{

PAGE DESIGN

CLAIRE MASSEY

}

WRITERS

}

JOE LEE SUSAN O’BYRAN RICHELLE PUTNAM CLAIRE TADLOCK

claire@townandgown magazine.com

{

}

INTERNS

ADVERTISING DESIGN

}

CHRIS MCMILLEN

}

{

CONTRIBUTORS

}

ABBY HATHORN LISA LAFONTAINE BYNUM RUSSELL HAMILTON CHRISTINA LUCAS AMY TAYLOR LINDSAY JO WILKINSON

Reproductions in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, articles or photographs. We reserve the right to edit submissions before publication. Town & Gown is a free magazine published monthly and distributed in and around Starkville and the Golden Triangle area. Subscriptions are available for mail customers. For subscriptions or inquiries, write Town & Gown Magazine, P.O. Box 1068, Starkville, MS, 39760, or call 662-323-1642.

6

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


Get to know our

Staff

Joe Lee Lee has a background in radio, television, and journalism which includes many years as a television weatherman and a classic rock disc jockey. A graduate of Mississippi State University, he is a published author and the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Dogwood Press, a small but traditional publishing company headquartered in Brandon, Miss. He and his family live in Brandon.

What is your favorite part of working for Town & Gown?

I love meeting so many locals and learning more about the business in the town where I’ve lived my whole life.

Contributors Amy Taylor Taylor, Petal native and Starkville resident, is a Southern Mississippi graduate where she earned a bachelor degree in broadcast journalism and obtained a master’s degree in Agricultural and Extension Education from Mississippi State University. She is an avid do-it-yourself crafter, artist and has passion for home design and projects.

What have you learned from working with Town & Gown?

I have learned to sharpen my photography skills and the importance of adjusting focus points and lighting.

JUNE

2013 |

7


8

| townandgownmagazine.com


Editor

Letter from the

“I

t’s the time of the year when the sun is out, veggies are ripe and the wedding season begins again. This year when we began working on the Bridal Issue for January, we knew it would be the best issue our readers would pick up. We were right! So, we brought you a summer issue along with a Bridal Section just for weddingseason lovers. Whether planning a wedding of your own or throwing a shower, this section is overflowing with monthly planning tips, to a twist on a bridal shower but for the groom (page 45). Starkville might be bare in the summer time but local organizations such as the Starkville Mainstreet Association brings the crowd to the Starkville Community Market each Saturday from 7:30-10:30 a.m. for the early birds and veggie lovers (page 13). June is the month for Father’s Day, National Boating and Fishing Month and National Dairy Month. To me, the hardest people in my family to buy for are always the men! They have everything known to man and leave us ladies with nothing left to buy! Well, we have thought of great gift ideas from right here in Starkville (page 34). The memories are the most important with your father as Bo Bell, our Meet The Local for this month, agrees and continues making memories through fishing with long-time friends and his son (page 30). And turn to page 21 to see the success that students have after graduating with an Animal Dairy Science degree from Mississippi State University. Ladies, I know you think shopping in Starkville is not a cup of tea, but it CAN be with the right clothes. Turn to page 39 to see local ladies show off appropriate, stylish, summer ensembles from right here in Starkville. Enjoy your summer with Town & Gown! Left: Lindsey Johnson; senior account executive, Lizzie Smith; intern and I at the Cotton District Festival.

Claire Massey Editor

JUNE

2013 |

9


Visit Starkville Academy Plaza Starr Avenue Starkville

june

2013 |

5


THE LATEST ON INSTAGRAM:

Comment or like our post to let us know you’re there! May 2013 TO SUBSCRIBE: Call 662.323.1642

MISS AN ISSUE? Visit townandgownmagazine.com

12 ISSUES - $48 6 ISSUES - $24 1 ISSUE - $4

HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email us at info@townandgownmagazine.com LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! Town and Gown Mag See post about events, magazine content, contest and more. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! @townandgownmag Follow us for quick view of our magazine’s happenings around town! FOLLOW US ON PINTEREST AND INSTAGRAM! READ THIS YEAR’S & PAST ISSUES ALL ONLINE Read issues as they appear in print at townandgownmagazine.com

THE LATEST ON FACBOOK:

Post and see here!

THE LATEST ON PINTEREST:

Repin to let us know you are there!

Amy Hall Sorrell Super Bulldog Weekend fun... — at Little Dooey's BBQ Starkville,MS.

Shannon Cochran Stoker Jet Gilreath and Charley Stoker entertaining each other(and everyone else) during the Cotton District Arts Festival. #sweetpeppersconeheads

THE LATEST ON TWITTER:

Tweet us and see here! @Music_Maker: Shout out to @CampusTrails, @21Apartments, and @townandgownmag1 for helping us out this year! Old Main 2013 starts in 2.5 hours!!

Strange Brew 10

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM

Harmonie


Table of

Contents On the Cover MAGAZINE JUNE 2013

Bridal

Section

Father’s Day Gift Ideas Easy Herb

Gardening SCAN FOR ONLINE ISSUE

Russell Hamilton, nursery manager for Oktibbeha County Coop, creates an DIY herb garden in mason jars. Photography by Divian Conner.

IN EVERY ISSUE 6 Staff 9 Letter From the Editor 10 Social Media 34 T&G Wish List 73 Literature 74 Events 81 Calendar 82 Advertisers

HOME AND GARDEN 13 Starkville Community Market 18 Jartastic Herbs 21 DIY with Amy Taylor TASTE AND TOAST 24 Leading the Future of Agriculture 27 Healthy Father’s Favorites LIFE AND STYLE 30 Meet the Locals: Loren “Bo” Bell 36 Vision for the Perfect Design 39 Summer Style on the Fairway BRIDAL SECTION 45 Intro 46 Announcements 48 Knowing the Turf 52 Budget-Chic Wedding 54 It’s a Southern Thing 57 Do It Yourself Wedding Hair 61 Wedding Planner 64 Groom’s Wedding Planner 65 Bridal Shower Groom’s Style 69 Bridesmaid Gifts 70 Lindsay Jo: Wedding Essentials 72 Mother-of-the-Bride Gifts JUNE

2013 |

11


12

| townandgownmagazine.com


Every Saturday This Summer 7:30 - 10:30 a.m. Corner of Jackson & Lampkin

june

2013 |

13


H

S t or y b y Ri c helle Putnam l Pho t og r aph y b y Ashle y Co vin

ow would you like to stimulate the local economy, help locals keep their jobs, improve your environment and promote your community…all in one day? The Starkville Community Market (The Market), which kicked off Saturday, May 4th, supports local farmers, cooks, artisans and artists while encouraging people to buy local. “All vendors must be local,” said Jennifer Prather, Special Events and Projects Coordinator for the Greater Starkville Development Partnership (GSDP), with “local” being defined as anyone located within 150 mile radius. Eric and Anna Lancaster, owners of Lancaster Farms, and residents of Starkville since 1999, have been vendors at the Market for three years. “It’s very important for local businesses to support one another,” said Eric. “Markets like the Starkville Community Market are a major source of income for us.” The Lancaster Booth offers an array of fresh vegetables like tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, green beans and more, all of which are field grown. They also specialize in hydroponically 14

| townandgownmagazine.com

grown lettuce. Local restaurants such as The Veranda, Restaurant Tyler and Harvey’s have used produce from Lancaster Farms. Research shows that for every $100 spent in a chain store, a mere $13 is redistributed into the local economy. In contrast, for every $100 spent at a local, independent store, approximately $45 goes back into the local economy to benefit the community. Buying locally grown food also benefits the environment because small farmers keep their farms operational rather than having to sell their land to developers. Ty Thames is Chef/Owner of Restaurant Tyler, Zorba’s and BIN 612 and also a Market board member. He recommends buying local to increase the community infrastructure and keeping the money local, which means more money for local education, the local police & fire department, and city workers. “It allows us to be less dependent on outside sources and to be more sustainable as a community,” he said. “That means we are more stable in an unstable economy.”


Locally grown food tastes and looks better because crops are picked at their peak. Local food is better for you because the shorter time between the field and your table means fewer nutrients are lost. Local food is safer because local farmers aren't anonymous! Buying local supports local families because by selling directly to the consumer the middleman is eliminated. Local produce keeps taxes down. The American Farmland Trust reports that local farms contribute more in taxes than they require in services. Local food benefits the environment by providing ecosystems and habitats for wildlife. Local food is an investment because supporting today’s farmers ensures the farmers of tomorrow.

And that’s not all! Market vendors enjoy communicating with their patrons and don’t mind answering questions about their merchandise. “Ask the growers about their products, how they were made, the best use for the product, and get advice on cooking techniques,” said Ty. “Get to know the people in the community and you’ll find some amazing things going on right under your nose.” The Market, once run by volunteers, is now a Starkville Main Street Association project. At each weekly market, they expect about 20 vendors, explained Jennifer. “We are very excited to add this to our list of programs and events and look forward to making the market a downtown destination and an experience for everyone.” Before becoming a Market vendor, potential artists and crafts vendors must submit jpeg images of their work (all handcrafted items) to be reviewed and approved by the Market Board. No wholesale items are accepted. Produce vendors at The Market must grow 100% of what they sell. After the Market Advisory Board reviews prospective products, they place them into four categories. Categories 1, 2 and 3 target food products and they are measured by the risk factor of food-borne illness to the consumer. To assure that the consumer receives the best possible products, the Market Manager and/or Market Advisory Board inspect every facility before approving an application. The Market also has the authority to conduct random visits of any facility making application. Food vendor booths must provide signage that june

2013 |

15


includes the name and contact information of the farm and the production facility where the produce was grown. All food items are required to be properly packaged and labeled. “We work with all food vendors to help them understand the current regulations of the MS Dept of Health and stay up to date on any food policy which is important to their business and also the operation of our market,” said Jennifer Category 4 targets original fine arts and craft items, such as photography, painting, drawing, collage, sculpture and crafts of glass, metal, wood and fiber. These products must be of exceptional quality. Activities for children are painting classes, hands-on gardening activities and educational opportunities offered through Extension Services. The Oktibbeha County Co-op offers hands-on gardening classes. Several local chefs present culinary demonstrations. The “Farm to Table” concept was developed when Ty teamed up with Gaining Grounds organization to better educate and bring awareness to local farmers about sustainability farming in the community. “I take locally farmed produce, meats, and locally made products, such as honey and sauerkraut, and create dishes out of them in many unique ways.” Ty’s restaurants use the Eat Local Starkville campaign, which means that they purchase nothing that is processed. Over 90 percent of their food is made from scratch. At the Market,

16

| townandgownmagazine.com

Ty teaches this same concept to the public. “We try to show the guest that we have the sources right here in our own community to provide them with all the products they need and some different ways they might want to try to cook with them,” said Ty.“There is nothing more exciting than to take something from the earth in its purity and create a dish from it; the process in doing that really humbles me and makes me grateful to live here in Mississippi.” Being part of our community is everyone's responsibility to better the place where we all live, said Ty.“I'm just trying to do my part.” The Market is held every Saturday through the summer at the market site on the corner of Jackson and Lampkin Streets in Starkville. For more information about The Market, see the GSDP website at www.starkville.org or visit The Market website at visit.starkville.org/market. Lancaster Farms 2700 Hickory Grove Road Starkville, MS 662-312-5154 – 662-312-4994 Every Saturday at the Starkville Community Market Every Thursday at the West Point Market


june

2013 |

17


Jartastic Herbs

Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

Russell Hamilton Russell has been the Nursery Manager for Oktibbeha County Coop for 17 years since graduating from Mississippi State University with a major in horticulture. Email: rhamilton@oktcoop.com

18

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


T

here are just too many uses for herbs to list them all in this article. I will point out a few of my favorites and what you can do with those. The newest herb to my collection is Stevia. Stevia is used as an artificial sweetener. My stevia plants tend to look like they have been attacked by rabbits because I can’t seem to walk by without plucking a leaf to eat. The leaves actually taste just like sugar. Another one of my favorite herbs is Dill. I mean, come on, the crushed up leaves smell just like dill pickles. It isn’t hard to imagine what Dill is used for but it is easy to grow and smells great. Mint is another great herb for fragrance. You can use the leaves to make tea but keep in mind mints are fast growers and can easily take over if not well maintained. Fennel is another cool herb to grow. Fennel is a great host to caterpillars and therefore increases your butterfly presence in your yard. You might even get to see one form a cocoon and transform into a butterfly. That makes growing Fennel a good projects to do with kids as well. It is amazing what all you can learn from gardening. Garlic chives are another good herb to grow. If eaten it can be used to boost your immune system. That is if you can get past its distinct odor. It is important you can do a lot more with herbs than just eat them; although, that is my favorite part.

Medicinal Herbs Can you imagine what we do if we didn’t have aspirin or Tylenol to take for a toothache? Chamomile is definitely an alternative. Chamomile has properties that sooths nerves and toothaches as well as can help with muscle pain. How about using Stinging Nettle for sinus congestion as a great alternative to over the counter medicine. Another very popular herb is Lavender. It is used a lot in bath soaps or lotions commercially. It helps to relax you in a hot bath or makes a great skin care product. There are many many other uses for many other herbs. Check out www.msucares. com for other great ideas. Also there are a lot of cool ideas for herb uses scattered all through the web. You will be amazed at what all you can use them for and how well they work.

On to ourProject

Growing your own herbs is easy to do and it can be a lot of fun. This project shows you how to take some materials that you probably already have lying around the house and turn them into great window planters. You want to start off by finding some Mason jars or Mason jar-like containers to grow your herbs in. Mason jars worked well because we are able to boil them to sterilize them before we actually plant anything. The larger the jar the larger your herbs can grow. I would suggest using a quart sized Mason jar. Next put an inch or so of gravel in the bottom. Then fill the jar with potting mix all the way to about ¼ - ½ inch from the top of the jar. Next plant your seeds or your transplants and water them in. Now here is where it gets a little bit tricky. Notice anything different about the mason jars than your other flower pots? That’s right mason jars don’t have holes in the bottom for drainage. Since there aren’t any holes in the bottom you will have to be extra careful not to over water your herbs. They will definitely not like to sit in a puddle of water. The good thing about mason jars is that you can see through them so you can see how much water you need to put in. Also without holes you don’t have to worry about water running all over you window sill. However, if you find it difficult to not over water you can always substitute the Mason jars with a plastic container and a saucer. The gravel will also help you water just the right amount as it will help to hold a small amount of excess water away from the root system. Now all you have to do is put them in the window and watch them grow. As they start to fill your window foliage you can start harvesting them for your own use in the kitchen. Get the kids involved and make a butterfly sanctuary outside in or around the garden. You can also let them do their own jars and pick their own herbs to add their own little touch. Let us know what you have come up with to use your herbs for or share your recipes by emailing me at rhamilton@okt.coop.com. Most of all have fun with it and success is sure to follow!

What you’ll need:

Mason Jar Graval Rocks

Water

Potting Mix

Herbs JUNE

2013 |

19


20

| townandgownmagazine.com


DIY with Amy Taylor Taylor, Petal native and Starkville resident, is a Southern Mississippi graduate where she earned a bachelor degree in broadcast journalism and obtained a master’s degree in Agricultural and Extension Education from Mississippi State University. She is an avid do-it-yourself crafter, artist and has passion for home design and projects.

june

2013 |

21


Sipping from the traditional teacup may be a thing of the past, but with its elegant shape and beautiful design, teacups can serve dual purposes for art and functionality. Whether used as whimsical garden pieces, party décor or bird feeders, you’re sure to create the wow factor with this unique project!

Materials:

Instructions:

Teacups (can mix colors, styles) Dinner plate or platter (deep enough to hold water) Heavy duty glue (F-26 or fast-drying super glue/adhesive) Wooden rods (2.5 to 3ft tall), painted Bird seed, optional Tea light candles (or LED tea lights), optional

1. Using a hammer, drive wooden rods into the ground until they stand securely. 2. Apply a generous amount of glue (fast-drying is best) to the end of the rod. Place a teacup saucer on top, let dry. Glue the teacup to the center of the saucer, let dry. These are beautiful holding birdseed, or even tea light candles. They also make great party or landscape décor!

Step 1

Additional Tips: For TEMPORARY use as garden/party art, you can spray paint the cups! This is not recommended for permanent or birdfeeder use, because the paint will eventually chip, which is hazardous to birds and other animals. Also, don’t accidentally paint over any valuable or fine China. Enjoy your project!

Step 2

22

| townandgownmagazine.com

Final


june

2013 |

23


Leading the Future of

D

Agriculture S t or y b y Joe Lee l Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

r. Stephanie Ward, Assistant Professor of Dairy Nutrition and Management at Mississippi State University, scoffed at a Yahoo.net story in 2012 that ranked Animal Sciences as the fourth-worst college major out there (and ranked Agriculture number one). “The article only considered farming and a handful of other jobs as career options for Animal Dairy Sciences students, and that’s just plain wrong,” said Ward, who earned undergraduate and Master’s degrees in Animal Science at North Carolina State University and her Doctorate in Dairy Nutrition at Virginia Tech. “The reality is that we have over seven billion people to feed, and the process of doing that creates thousands of jobs for all of which our students are well-suited, primarily because they understand the role that animals and crops have in the food

24

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM

chain and learn the science behind making food production more healthy and efficient.” Ward said that career opportunities for ADS grads include feed sales, feed/forage testing labs, horse trainers, genetics/semen sales, research laboratories (focused on anything biologyrelated), product development (tied to feed, health, and reproduction), crop/seed sales, and many more. “Animal health service technicians work for companies like Pfizer, Arm & Hammer, Monsanto, Alltech, and Elanco/Eli Lilly,” Ward said. “And for media and popular press like Progressive Dairyman, Hoard’s Dairyman, and other agriculture magazines and publications. And that's just the animal agriculture sector – not even touching the small or companion animal sector (dealing with pet food companies, pet products, and pet care).


“An ADS degree is not just farming, but if that is what a student wants to do, then we encourage and train them for it. If we don’t start creating more farmers, we’re all going to be in trouble where food production is concerned.” Synonymous with dairy, of course is this age-old question: Have you ever milked a cow? Many people might assume that everyone – male and female – who arrives at MSU ready to tackle the ADS curriculum is a veteran of getting up each morning before dawn and heading for the barn. And that certainly isn’t always the case. “Most of our students have not, but they giggle like school kids when they do,” Ward said. “Before the end of their freshman year they have hands-on experience on our farms: milking, feeding, and working cows. That's really all we need. Sometimes, just spending an afternoon at our dairy will change a student's major (to ADS) and we’re okay with that. “The biggest challenge we face as a department is that many of our students come from an urban background and don't believe – until they try it in ADS 1114: Intro to Animal Science – that they can work with large animals. It’s a confidence booster for these kids when they learn to halter-break a calf and lead it in a show ring. That’s what keeps them coming.” Dr. John Blanton, the new ADS department head and a professor of Animal Dairy Science at MSU, joined the university in December 2012. He received his Doctorate in Animal Science from Purdue University, served on the faculty at Texas Tech in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences, and worked in the pharmaceutical development and product development industries.

Kaitlyn Hardin, graduate from MSU, Dr. Stephanie Ward, Assistant Professor of Dairy Nutrition and Management; Dr. John Blanton, professor and deptartment head of Animal and Dairy Sciences and Kenneth Graves, dairy herder.

JUNE

2013 |

25


“There are many challenges facing the animal and dairy agriculture industries,” Blanton said. “Primarily, the development and implementation of strategies that enable us to sustainably produce the dairy and meat products required to meet the nutritional needs of a rapidly growing world population. “We are working to develop robust educational programs that will give our graduates the tools to address these challenges. We believe that these educational programs and the many opportunities for careers in animal agriculture are what continue to attract students to our programs.” Pontotoc native Kaitlyn Hardin just graduated from MSU with degrees in Animal Dairy Science and Biological Science. She’s headed to Ward’s alma mater, Virginia Tech, for a Master’s in Dairy Science. “My time spent in the ADS department at MSU has been wonderful,” Hardin said. “I have a unique point of view being a double major in two different colleges, and I can say beyond the shadow of a doubt that the faculty within the ADS department makes your time as a student worthwhile. They are very approachable and willing to help in whatever way they can – it’s just a great environment for students. I could not have asked for a better undergraduate career.” Hardin spearheaded a video competition that led to a sendup of a popular Shania Twain song, “Any Man of Mine” (which they turned into “Any Cow of Mine”) and, ultimately, a YouTube video that has been viewed over 30,000 times. It began when MSU hosted the 2013 Southern Region ADS Association Student Affiliate Division Meeting early this year. “The goal was to make funny videos for people that don’t have the opportunity to wake up every morning and see where their food comes from,” Hardin said. “And also inspire others in the Agriculture community to reach out and teach consumers about the farmers and ranchers that provide food for them every day. “Chelsea Meyer thought of using ‘Any Man of Mine’ to base the parody on, and we started rolling from there. We purchased the instrumental version from iTunes and wrote the lyrics in

26

| townandgownmagazine.com

about 45 minutes. We met at the University Dairy the next day to film the video, and that evening Becca Broome and Stephanie Opp pieced together the video fragments and laid the shots over the recording of the song. This was the most tedious portion of producing the film. “The contest didn't have very many schools participate, but after seeing the videos that were submitted there was a lot of interest in having the contest again next year,” Hardin said. “There will also be a similar video competition, for the first time, held at the National ADSA-SAD meeting in Indianapolis this summer.” Ward said that approximately three quarters of ADS students are female, with about 30 percent off all ADS majors coming from out of state. “That number is reflective of the demographics of (Vet School) students, and the majority of our students arrive on campus as Pre-Vet,” Ward said. “However, admission to the College of Veterinary Medicine is limited and competitive, so most of those students will not get in. “We have just finished a faculty retreat to discuss how we can make our curriculum more suitable to those students, and help them identify alternative careers by the sophomore year. The other goal we hope to achieve with our new curriculum is to attract more production or Ag Industry students. There are so many jobs available to Animal Science students, it tends to be shocking when they realize it. “We have a commitment to growing and improving animal agriculture in Mississippi, and an increase in numbers of farms will increase the job market for our students,” Ward said. “In 2008 the dairy industry in California created over 430,000 new jobs; roughly for every one job on the farm, 22 off-the-farm jobs were created, which contributed to their $63 billion in economic stimulus. I don’t know of another industry that can do that.” “Our biggest challenge is making certain that we give our students the learning opportunities and experience that continue to make them competitive in the job market,” Blanton said. “And ensure that they become the agriculture leaders of the future.”


T

O

W

N

&

G

O

W

N

TASTE AND TOAST Lisa LaFontaine Bynum is a freelance writer from Grenada. Her work has appeared in several publications in Mississippi. She is a graduate of Delta State University where she received a B.A. in Marketing and her M.B.A. In her free time, she enjoys food writing and photography and documents her culinary happenings on her blog The Cooking Bride. She currently resides in Brandon with her husband and son. Recipes and photography by Lisa LaFontaine Bynum

Healthy Father’s Favorites Southwestern Turkey and Black Bean Crispy Oven Baked Burger French Fries JUNE

2013 |

27


Serves 4

Southwestern Turkey and Black Bean Burger 28

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM

1 lb. 90 percent lean ground turkey 1 cup cooked black beans 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1 tsp. cumin 1 Tbsp. chili powder ½ tsp. garlic powder ½ tsp. onion powder 1 slice whole wheat bread, torn into smaller pieces ¼ tsp. red chili flakes ½ tsp. oregano 4 slices pepper jack cheese 4 whole wheat hamburger buns Place first 10 ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Using your hands, work the mixture just until it is uniform throughout. Divide into four equal portions and form into patties. Prepare a charcoal or gas grill. Grill for approximately 5-7 minutes. Flip burger and place a slice of pepper jack cheese over each burger. Continue to grill for an additional 5-7 minutes or until the burger is no longer pink in the center. Serve on whole wheat buns and garnish with lettuce and tomato if desired.


Serves 4

Crispy Oven Baked French Fries

3 russet potatoes peeled and cut lengthwise into even sized wedges 3 Tbsp. vegetable oil ž tsp. kosher salt, plus more to taste Ÿ tsp. freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste Place potato wedges in a large bowl. Cover with water and allow to soak for at least 20 minutes. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 475 degrees. Drain the potatoes. Spread them out on a single layer of paper towels or a kitchen towel. Using a second towel, blot the potatoes dry. Pour drizzle oil over a heavy rimmed baking sheet. Spread potato wedges over the sheet. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, then either using your hands or a pair of tong, toss the wedges until they are evenly coated with the oil. Then arrange in a single layer on the baking sheet. Bake potato wedges for about 20 minutes. Flip the wedges over, then return to the oven and back for an additional 10-15 minutes until wedges are golden brown. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.

JUNE

2013 |

29


T

O

W

N

&

G

O

W

N

LIFE AND STYLE

Meet the Locals...

Loren “Bo” Bell 30

| townandgownmagazine.com


S t or y b y Bo Bell Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner

In the fishing world, there may not be a better phrase to utter to your fishing partner than “get the net”. The thought of needing the net to haul in the “big one” is a fisherman’s dream. As National Boating and Fishing Month, I think there are loads of life lessons that can get caught in the net. ... It’s 3:20 a.m. and I’m lying at a friend’s camp house on the river already planning my route for today’s tournament. In just a few short hours, we will blast off in our bass boats in search of the proverbial “big one”. I realize I should be getting my rest, but I can’t help to be a little anxious about one of the biggest tournament’s of the year. Or maybe it was Michael Wolfe’s famous “poor house chicken”, beans, corn salad, cake and homemade ice cream from last night. Needless to say, it was all delicious, and the ice cream may have been the best I have ever had. It’s weekends like this that make you realize what special memories you make fishing with friends and family, and have me wondering what this tournament really means to me. ... Today marks the 8th Annual Garry Jackson Memorial Bass Tournament. Even though this is one of our monthly tournaments within the Starkville Bass Club, this particular day brings a little special incentive and meaning to our friendly competition. Garry was a lifelong sportsman and member of our club who passed away several years ago. His son, John, and grandson, Drew, who are also club members, host this special tournament each year at Aliceville Lake on the Tennessee Tombigbee River. Those who knew Garry knew the competitive, funny, well-rounded fisherman that he was. As you look around his river house and see all the mounted fish, you will instantly know what a great fisherman he was. This particular tournament comes with a special plaque that hangs in the camp house displaying the names of each year’s winners. To have your name placed on this special plaque gives you the extra incentive you need to catch the biggest and best fish. Past winners include Mickey Aldridge, Bill Kellum, Davis Kelly, Wesley Westbrook and yes, I have my name on that plaque too. I am honored to say that in 2010, I won this tournament with my son, Brandon, and his friend, Will Miller, fishing by my side. Garry’s time spent fishing with his son and grandson is exactly what this tournament is about. Spending time with children while learning lifelong lessons is how John promotes the very thing his father loved to do with him, and he now is able to promote taking a kid fishing with his son, Drew. Nearly every boat on the water today will have at least one or two kids in it! ... My son, Brandon, now 12, has been my tournament fishing partner going on 6 or 7 years. Even though he has been told a few fish tails (or should I say fish tales) over the years, he is one of the greatest partners anyone could ask for. Now, don’t get me wrong, we are fishing against one another and sometimes it gets pretty competitive, but it is so much more than just catching fish. It’s about the life lessons and memories that you walk away with that last a lifetime. I certainly hope he will always remember the times we have spent and will spend on the water, and the lessons we have learned together over the years.

june

2013 |

31


Memories and lessons throughout the years: Some of my first and favorite fishing memories are of me, my dad and my brother at Bluff Lake and Lok o’foma on the refuge each summer. A devils horse, baby torpedo and a dying flutter dancing under the willow trees was a pretty deadly combination to those largemouths that were fooled into biting them. I never knew there was any other way to catch them and still believe there isn’t a more fun way. I also remember fishing with my friend Dr. Wayne Shelton on the Tenn-Tom River. Somehow he tossed a rod-n-reel overboard, and one of us had to get into the water to retrieve it and somehow I looked to be the best candidate. Let me tell you, if you have to enter the water in early March, you might want to make sure to have yourself some dry clothes on the boat for when you exit the water. 32

| townandgownmagazine.com


Experience...My

fraternity advisor and friend, Ed Montgomery was taking me to Louisiana for my first red fish trip. Man do those suckers pull hard. “Big E”, as he was referred to at the Sigma Chi house, educated me on the importance of the use of your drag when fighting fish like that. After breaking fish off and re-tying five or six times, you learn to listen to those with experience beyond your years.

Perseverance…As my friends, Michael Wolfe and John

L. Smith, can tell you, when you sail fish in Costa Rica, you can’t give up. Fishing on what many may have thought resembled the SS MINNOW from the television show Gilligan’s Island, we battled rough winds and seas to boat eight or nine big fish, all without being able to speak to the captain and two deck hands and the language barrier.

Commitment…As we planned to fish recently, my broth-

er who was visiting for the weekend considered postponing the trip due to high winds and cold weather. After deciding to stick it out, we ended up catching a huge number of fish. We did filet many of those small fish and even took a couple of bags to a friend of mine who is battling cancer.

Timing…In fishing, timing is everything. The right bait,

at the right place, at the right time can mean all the difference in the world. While fishing for salmon in Alaska, my two children now know that timing can be important. Brandon and my daughter, Kathryn, were up front with the guide when he hooked a pretty good fish. It just so happened that a large brown bear (or as we call them in the lower states, a grizzly bear) came running into the water to fish with us. My wife yelled for Kathryn to move so she could video the bear while the guide had Brandon running for the net and the timing of the video looks like someone yelled…BEAR…RUN! It’s re-

ally funny, but what a trip. If you remotely like the outdoors this is definitely something that should be on your “bucket list”.

Success…

Fishing is no different than any other sport. We have some pretty good fisherman in our club and in the other tournaments I have fished in. With that being said you must learn how to deal with the successful days of winning and how to handle the good days on the water.

Humility… possibly even more important than learn-

ing success, is learning to deal with the opposite. Coming to weigh in with no fish can be a humbling experience and can bring you back to reality and remind you why you have a day job. Like many other sports, you have to be prepared for the days that you may not be your best, which is much tougher than the days that you do well.

Pride…It is very rewarding when you see your son’s hard

work and success pay off even at your own expense. I remember at Bay Springs Lake last May when he beat me in a tournament for the very first time. I was disappointed in my lack of fish, but certainly proud of his. Only thing is, he’s beaten me since as well. Last month at Eutaw, Ala., he had four fish that weighed a little over 10 pounds and won the junior event. His weight actually beat me and all but two of the other adults fishing that tournament. Thanks to Wesley Westbrook for allowing him to fish with him! It is really an awesome experience to holler “get the net” and knowing the best thing that the net can encompass is you, your family, your friends and the great outdoors! It doesn’t matter if you are pond hopping for bluegills, jug fishing for catfish, or bass fishing on the river always remember to embrace what God has given us. A slight breeze, a peaceful morning or afternoon, a little downtime away from work, quality time with family and friends, and the lifelong memories we have made. Thank you to my family and friends for letting me be a part of your life and for sharing all of these beautiful moments. I have learned some important lessons and made some lifelong memories. So the next time you hear someone yell, “get the net,” don’t hesitate! It may be an experience you may never forget.

june

2013 |

33


T

O

W

N

&

G

O

W

WISH LIST

N

Photography by Lizzie Smith and Loren Gambrell

FATHER’S DAY 1. Relaxation: Waldrop Chiropractic and Wellness Gift Card, www.waldropchiropractic.com 2. Grillin’ Out: Big Green Egg Grill. Thyme, 662-323-5979 3. Writing at its Best: Cross pen. Sullivans, www.sullivansoffice.com. 4. Notes: Mississippi State notebook, $79. www.sullivansoffice.com 5. Yum Yum: Newk’s Eatery Gift Card, www.newks.com 6. Tools: Weber Originals grilling tools. Thyme, 662-323-5979 7. Game Time: Mississippi State University athletic tickets. www.hailstate.com 8. The “Tech” Man: Mississippi State jump drive, $21.95. www.sullivansoffice.com 9. Get Fit: Snap Fitness Gift Card. www.snapfitness.com 10. Mix it Up: Bar10der drink tools. Thyme, 662-323-5979 11. Keep it Cool: Yeti Cooler. Reed’s, www.reedsms.com

1.

3.

2.

4.

5.

6.

34

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


7. 11.

8.

9.

10.

JUNE

2013 |

35


Vision for the Perfect Design

36

| townandgownmagazine.com


S t or y b y Clair e Tadloc k Pho t og r aph y b y Cat her ine S tuk enbor g

“M

ississippi State University” and “fashion design” are words that are not often spoken in the same sentence together. The university, which is known for its agricultural academics, is also making large strides in its design program. Ashley Gunkel, a MSU graduate, is a product of this program, and she has helped place Mississippi on the map in the fashion world. “Sometimes people think that Mississippi is a small place and that you can’t really learn about fashion” says Dr. Miller, a professor from MSU’s School of Human Sciences of Apparel, Textiles, and Merchandising. “We try to see to it that the students get a broad experience as possible. “Gunkel has definitely proved to everyone that a Mississippi girl can compete and succeed in the world of fashion. Recently, she won New Orleans Fashion Week’s as the top designer. Since she was a young girl, Gunkel has always been interested in design; when she was young she would dress her friends as a hobby. Then while Gunkel was attending Gulfport High School she learned how to do her basic sewing. As prom rounded the corner, Gunkel says she wanted to look different from her peers and decided to design her own prom dress. She used ideas from different dresses that she liked and collaborated to make a personalized dress especially for herself. From then on, Gunkel fell in love with design and so her journey began in the world of fashion.

Invitation/poster for the MSU Senior Showcase and Ashley Gunkel, guest speaker on April 19, 2013.

june

2013 |

37


Ashley Gunkel’s collection shown at the MSU Senior Showcase.

High school prom dresses designed by Gunkel.

Mississippi State offered many opportunities for Gunkel to travel and experience fashion outside of Mississippi. The university gave Gunkel the opportunity to travel to London and stay for a month in order to study London’s Victorian design. Gunkel really enjoyed and felt that she learned much from the historical Bath Collection. She was able to handle clothing that was made and worn hundreds of years ago. While there, she was also able to see the restoration process of these ancient clothes that kept the fabric from decaying over time. Gunkel says one of her favorite things about this trip was comparing European style to American style. Gunkel also had the opportunity to travel to New York City with Mississippi State. Gunkel interned with Donna Caryn in New York and with Jodi Arnold’s Mint Collection. The Mint Collection was very new when Gunkel interned. Therefore, she had the chance to watch a new designer grow. Donna Caryn, a larger collection, allowed Gunkel to see how a designer works on a large scale corporate company. Gunkel’s success in design includes being a 2007 finalist in the Emerging Young Designer Competition in St. Louis. Dr. Miller says that then she knew Gunkel had “potential to be great.” After graduating from Mississippi State, Gunkel began working with Dillard’s Department Store in Little Rock, Arkansas. Preparing for the New Orleans Fashion Week was somewhat a challenge for Gunkel. She did not have as much fabric to choose from as other designers and 38

| townandgownmagazine.com

searched for the “perfect design.” It was in Austin, Texas that she found this fabric and began her design. She formed the designed the collection that she had envisioned and that vision paid off in the long run. Gunkle won the fashion week and received a gift card, a photo shoot with a photographer based out of New Orleans, a fashion spread in a national magazine, and a business consultation. But Gunkel’s favorite reward for winning New Orleans Fashion Week is the chance for her clothing to be displayed in boutiques. She says this is her favorite because this will be the first time that people will actually be able to buy her clothing and wear it. Winning New Orleans Fashion Week has opened many doors for Gunkel in the fashion industry. Now that her name is known, she can begin a personal collection of design. Dr. Miller, who taught Gunkel, says about Gunkel, “She really came in with goals that she had set these goals and what she wanted to do and she really worked to learn what she could to fulfill those goals. And I think she had a very clear idea of what she wanted to do, and she really took every opportunity that she could to learn as much as she could.” Gunkel says about achieving goals,“If you’re passionate about it, never give up. You want to make sure you keep trying because in the end you want to make sure you’re happy with what you’re doing. My dad says ‘it’s all about the effort’. If you’re going to put the effort into it you’re going to get the outcome you’re looking for.”


Summeron theStyle Fairway S ty led b y A bb y Hat hor n Pho t og r aph y b y Divian Conner V endor s: Deep Sout h P out L.A . Gr een Boutiq ue Sis t er s F ine Clo t hing R.Tabb & Co. R eed’s

june2013

|

39


Left: Cathy Johnson in a Sharon Young top ($119), Erin London tee ($42), and jewelry ($40) from Sisters Fine Clothing. Right: Debby Bland in a Jade dress ($136), and locally-handmade jewelry ($24) from R. Tabb & Co. 40

| townandgownmagazine.com


Marianne Ulmer in a Pink Owl dress ($46.95) and Deep South Pout jewelry, ($38.95) from Deep South Pout.

june2013

|

41


Jennifer Blackbourn in a Radzoli top ($90) with a black Tribal cardigan ($79) from Sisters Fine Clothing.

Melita Tomlinson in a Piko top ($29), LaFixsun jacket, ($79), Match Point capris, ($69 )and Reed’s scarf, ($19) from Reed’s . 42

| townandgownmagazine.com


Nancy Miles in a Simple Joys top ($38), Comme Toi pants ($46), and scarf ($16) from L.A. Green Boutique. june

2013 |

43


44

| townandgownmagazine.com


Announce your engagement or wedding with Town & Gown Magazine.

..

For more information on submitting your wedding for a Wedding Feature visit townandgownmagazine.com

Available monthly. Call 662.323.1642 or email info@townandgownmagazine.com

1/3 - $50 1/2 - $100 Full Page - $150 Two Page - $210 Photography by Divian Conner

Bridal

Section

46 Bridal Announcements 48 Knowing the Turf 52 Budget-Chic Wedding 54 Its a Southern Thing 57 DIY Wedding Hair 61 Wedding Planner

64 Groom’s Wedding Planner 65 Bridal Shower Groom’s Style 69 Bridesmaid Gifts 70 Lindsay Jo’s:Wedding Essentials 72 Mother-of-the-Bride Gifts JUNE

2013 |

45


Bridal Announcements

Senter & Vrocher

Hilary Elise Senter and Diamond Vrocher, III were united in marriage on December 15, 2012 at beautiful Magen’s Bay on St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Hilary is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Don Senter of Tupelo, Miss., formerly of Starkville. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mathis of Tupelo and the late Mr. and Mrs. George Senter. Diamond is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Rex Stanley of Montgomery, Alabama and the late Diamond Vrocher, II. He is the grandson of Mrs. Frank Gomez of Mobile, Alabama and the late Diamond Vrocher and the late Mr. and Mrs. Howard Jarrett. Given in marriage by her father, the bride was escorted down an island flower and shell-lined aisle to the accompaniment of violinist Chris Robberts. Reverend Harvard Stephens led the couple in exchanging marriage vows just before sunset. Attending her sister as maid of honor was Meghan Senter. Hailey Hardin was the bridesmaid. Junior bridesmaids were Emma, Tess, and Anna Vrocher. The best man was Michael Todd. Aiden Vrocher served as ring bearer. Hailey Hardin was also the photographer for the event. A wedding dinner was held at Coral Gardens Beach Estate, where the wedding party stayed. A reception was held on February 5, 2013 at the historic Alabama Theater in Birmingham, Alabama. Guests were entertained by the band Vintage Gray, and the event was catered by Yellow Bicycle. The couple is at home in Trussville, Alabama, where the groom is a physician at Trinity Medical Center and the bride is a nursing instructor at Samford University.

46

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


Mary Kathryn Brooks

Mr. and Mrs. William Stuart Reagan of Oxford, and Mr. and Mrs. William Michael Brooks, Senior, of Starkville announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Kathryn Brooks, to Stephen Andrew Nichols, son of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Lee Padgett, of Olive Branch, Miss. and the late Mr. Harold Stephen Nichols and Ms. Cindy Nichols of Olive Branch. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Ms. Suretha Sandiford Brooks of Maben and the late Mr. Joe Fred Brooks of Mathiston, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Green of Monroe, Louisiana, and Mr. and Mrs. Larry Dillard of McDonough, Ga. Miss Brooks is a 2004 graduate of Starkville Academy and a 2008 graduate of Mississippi State University, where she received a Bachelor of Science in Biology. She was a member of Kappa Delta sorority. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Mississippi Medical Center in May 2011. Miss Brooks is currently employed as a pediatric nurse at Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children in Jackson. The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Louie Harold Nichols of Olive Branch and the late Mr. and Mrs. Milford “Doc� Gill of Olive Branch, Miss. Mr. Nichols is a 2001 graduate of Olive Branch High School. He earned his Bachelor of Business Administration in Insurance and Risk Management from Delta State University. He was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. Mr. Nichols is currently employed as the Assistant Vice President for Community Bank in Hernando. The couple will exchange vows November 2, 2013 at 11 a.m. at Fairview Inn in Jackson. JUNE

2013 |

47


Knowing the Turf By L yne tt e McDoug ald Pho t og r aph y Submitt ed

When you don't have the home field advantage, working offsite oraway from your hometown, can be challenging if you don't do your homework and organize everything step-by-step.

48

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


Learn for Experience: Held in New Orleans, La., my daughters wedding taught me what we should be doing in the Starkville market and at The University Florist on the Mississippi State University campus. Every detail needs to be recorded. A professional assigned; a plan made and followed. I learned to use some southern charm to get to know them. They were like family at the wedding! We had tastings, walk throughs, complementary spaces. They made us feel very special. As a retailer, and as an instructor, I’ll be working to fine tune those crafts.

Know the turf

Navigating through New Orleans, La. was the most difficult thing we experienced. Know the streets; know what’s happening in the city. Even in Starkville, we need to know what’s happening in our town. Ballgame weekends influence delivery and guest parking. Find out the delivery zones for buildings. Know when they are open and accessible.

Find workspace

Hotels aren’t really open to ‘wet’ product. Flowers can be messy business when they are being processed and conditioned. Identify the space for fresh flowers; set up delivery time. Ask for what you need. Hotels, events spaces have carts, freight elevators, trash receptacles. Ask, be neat, and be attentive to their busy spaces. Try to be invisible.

Ask for help

Do it yourself designer families are always of concern to me, and I experience what they do. You are pulled away from festivities and family to work! I missed the rehearsal; I have an hour and 15 minutes to get ready for the wedding. Ask and you will receive! My counterpart, Jim DelPrince, AIFD, PFCI, was there every step. My dear friends got tagged the ‘Shiloh angels’; they are friends of mine from Rankin County, Miss. You have to ask for help and empower helpers with a detailed plan. Your friends want to help. It’s priceless.

june

2013 |

49


Embrace the culture Let the professionals tell you what is available to you. We had a Second Line Parade that I had heard of but had no idea we could do. After the wedding, the bride and groom, lead by our Smokin’ Jazz Club Band, took our guests into the streets of the French Quarter for a parade.  It was perhaps the highlight of the wedding.  Everyone on the streets cheered, clapped, and even threw beads from the balconies.  We had bicycle carriages for those that couldn’t make the walk; everyone was able to participate.  Since I’ve experienced this, I’ve arranged a Second Line for a local wedding on May 11, 2013.  Everyone loves a parade; it’s just another tribute to the couple.  We so could do these at MSU and in Starkville.  I’d love to coordinate these.  A few handkerchiefs and beads along with fun music, a Second Line could become a MSU tradition.

50

| townandgownmagazine.com


Budget

Rules

Guests

Players

You can’t allocate a budget until you researched the market. Setting budgets are very important; consider looking into all options for venue, catering, flowers and everything, so, you can make a budget based on the market. Resort areas have minimums or base fees. They can also have maximums on numbers according to spaces. Ask questions and shop around. Tourist bureaus are more than happy to provide lists for hotels, catering, music, flowers, attire. Narrow the field based on numbers of persons you expect to participate and be guests.

Follow the law! Marriage license requirement vary from place to place. Certain permits through the city you are in might be required for parades, music, fireworks, etc. Check months before where you will not have a headache when arriving.

Consider your guests. When choosing a destination wedding, carefully check for all the expenses your guest will incur. Airfare, hotel rooms, meals, taxis. You can price yourself out of guests. Make a reasonable assessment on what you think guests can pay.

Get to know the players. You are reliant on the professionals in the destination market. You have to look and listen to everything. The space may be beautiful, but if the event manager is vague or seemingly uninterested, this won't get better. They have to be knowledgeable, able to communicate and listen, and be accessible.

Weather Before you set a date for your wedding day, look at archived weather reports. Certain months are not the best choices in some areas. Ask wedding professionals in the area you plan to have your wedding. They know the area better than you do.

DIY Destination Wedding Tools

Pack a tool and supply kit. Make sure a seam ripper, sewing kit, sissors, double faced tape, safty pins, hairpins, blotting sheets, deodorant, baby wipes, Tide pen, first aid kit, asprin, and more.

Stay Couples who elect to combine the celebration and the getaway can save a significant of cash (and put it aside for a down payment on a new home or even a child’s college fund). Be smart about your wedding.

Vendors Vendors are very competitive. Once you find a space that accommodates your party, the prices and services between vendors could be very similar. Read reviews online or call around. Schedule tastings to confirm food ahead of time. Record how quickly they return worksheets or even your phone calls. Check how thorough are they in their notes when you receive your quotes back. Vendors need to be reliable before and on your wedding day, to make your day stress-free.

JUEN

2013 |

51


Budget-Chic

Wedding

For the kids

Trending lately for wedding receptions are candy bars. Candy bars can be affordable for any budget. This table is fun the for kids and some adults will love it as well. Select candies from your childhood and label the candy as “Groom’s Skittles” or “Her Pixy Stixs” to make the table significant to the wedding. Find a personalized paper bag company such as on Esty.com and have candy bags personalized to your wedding theme.

52

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM

By Clair e Masse y Pho t og r aph y b y Ashle y Masse y & Ang el Speak s Pho t og r aph y


Honeymoon Jar Most-likely you and your significant other will want to have a fabulous wedding followed by a relaxing honeymoon. Honeymoons can be the largest portion of your budget. Make a honeymoon fund jar for guest to add loose change to - if your lucky, you might get more than a little loose change. Make it into a game with two jars - one for the bride and one for the groom. Have a dance off to see who receives the most money - a guest will pay to dance with either the bride or groom. Have fun!

Venue

Dress

Using your surroundings can be intimate and inviting for guests. Venues seem to take over most budgets when planning a wedding. If you plan to use a venue, ask about in-house catering or think of restaurants for rehearsal dinners to cut back on food costs. A backyard would be perfect for a small wedding with close friends and family. Barns or old stables can be cleaned to make a vintage setting or rustic feel without going over budget. Think outside the box when deciding on the location of your wedding.

Your mother’s wedding dress might not be your dream wedding dress, but imagine how she would feel if you wore something that meant so much to her on her BIG day. If you cannot repurpose her dress, there are plenty of vintage dresses around for $200 or less. Dresses can always be taken up or reconstruct. Find one you like or if your mother does not mind, reconstruct a dress to fit you and make it a modern dress but with a vintage feel. There is always a solution for old finds.

Garter Save a few dollars and make a custom garter. If you do not know how to sew, I bet your grandmother or mother could help you. It will be something new - made by you! Make the colors match the theme of the wedding and add a silk flower for detail.

Centerpieces Bring our your crafty side and tie in your centerpieces into your wedding scheme. Incorporate same flowers from bouquets or add candles in mason jars or colored glass containers. Stay on budget also by requesting older flowers that still look fresh. june

2013 |

53


It’s a

Southern Thing

By Lizzie Smit h Pho t og r aph y b y Lor en Gambr ell

Wedding Attire Formal

Deep South Pout

Black Mambo It’s definitely OK to wear black to a wedding as long as the dress isn’t something that resembles a funeral. Black usually connotes mourning and death and something you definitely don’t want to wear to a wedding even if it’s your best friend’s wedding, I’m looking at you Julia Roberts! The little black dress that is fun and light should be fine and you can even brighten it up with accessories.

54

| townandgownmagazine.com

R. Tabb & Co.

Cocktail “That’s a cocktail dress?” is the expression we women always use when a lady walks in with something daringly short. Showing off a little leg at times is fine but those times never take place at a wedding.  Watch your hemlines and practice sitting down and picking something up – if its something only a celebrity socialite would show, change into something just a wee bit longer.  Stay classy, not brassy.

Sister Fine Clothing

Pantsuit I’m not against the occasional pantsuit and I know a lot of older women wear them. My mother will probably wear a pantsuit at my own wedding in 12 odd years from now.  The only requirement for this is to not make it look so businesslike that the wedding looks like a board meeting you are forced to go to. Dress it up!  Try a variety of colors for jacket/skirt/ pants and maybe a bright shirt to pair it with.

L.A. Green Boutique

White There can only be one! White is the signature, classic look reserved for brides only. However, you can wear something close if it’s a beige or off white color. White skirts are fine as well as pants and if you are going to wear a dress of a similar tone, try to take a peek at the bride’s dress. If her dress is simple, than you shouldn’t have a similar simple dress. You don’t want to have the wrath of the bridesmaids on you.

Reed’s

Suit Every man should have a nice suit in their closet. A navy or black suit are the perfect colors for any occasion - church, wedding or funeral. If you do not know your size, check with a suit shop and they can measure you in no time at all. When wearing a suit to a formal occasion such as a wedding be sure to wear a tie or a bow tie to finish off your look. Only when it is a causal wedding do you wear a button-up and jacket.


Casual

Sundress

Harmonie Boutique

Sundresses can be great for a casual wedding as long as the pattern fits both your age and the wedding you are attending. Pay attention to the invitation. If it is a beach wedding, the invite might say flip flops are appropriate but in general avoid wearing flip flops.

Khakis and Button-up Reed’s

For a casual wedding men can wear a nice pair of slack or khakis. Depending on the shirt that you select, shoes are always to be polished and can be either brown or black - most occasions brown with a casual look. Any color shirt can be worn. Choose from a button-up or a polo and go without a tie when dressing for a wedding.

Don’t Forget : Check the weather. Never wear t-shirts and jeans. Pay attention to the invitation. Never wear white. Choose wedges over flip flops. Try on short dresses for length.

Short dress The Style Loft

Casual wedding can almost seem trickier than a formal wedding to dress for. You can wear dress pants and a top if that is your style or you can try a short dress. Bring a light cardigan or wrap if the weather is unpredictable or if you wish to pair it with something else. Footwear can also set off how casual a dress is, so find out why the wedding party requested a casual setting – if the terrain is bumpy or if perhaps you are boarding a bat, don’t wear heels. Instead Try a small wedge or flats. Another way to dress up or down an outfit is by using a small clutch instead of your regular purse.

june

2013 |

55


Wedding and Anniversary Gifts Wedding gifts can be a nuisance sometimes. What to get them really depends on their personality and how much they already have. If you can, find out these things and what they really need. The registry is great because they already know what they want and all you have to do is buy it. The following are some unique ideas that they might not have asked but still will appreciate.

Give them a gift certificate to a spa or a trip to a golfing course. Perhaps give them lessons they mentioned they always wanted to do; wine making 101 anyone? They can have dates already planned for the future. However, make sure this is within their personality. If they don’t seem the adventurous type, stay away from giving them a cave exploring excursion, and stick with gift certificates and cards. Many couples will appreciate a good gift card any day of the week.

Anniversaries

Money

Kitchen Fun

Experiences

This can be tricky because many couples will already have a coffee pot or a set of bowls shaped like kittens. Most couples, however, can deal with an upgrade. Stores that sell cookware like Thyme, have plenty of options to choose from that would satisfy most couple’s needs. New spatulas, rubber chopping board and proper herb cutting scissors can all be fun ideas that both satisfy the baking and grilling side that is sure to meet their kitchen. This also is great option depending on your budget and how much you are willing to spend.

Money makes the world go round: If you can’t think of a proper gift to give them, you can always give them money. Everyone, and I do mean everyone loves receiving money. How much to give them is always a grey area but that is really up to you and how much you can. If your funds are limited, you can give money in a fun way. Look up money origami and shape the money like an elephant or a flower or you can get a little happy and hide the money within it. Or you can just put it in a sleek envelope and call it a day because we all know what those envelopes contain.

Thank You Thank you, and you, and you: Personalized Thank You Notes are both a thoughtful and realistic gift. Months after the wedding, the couple will probably still be sending out thank you notes and they may run out or they may need them for the future. You can go Purple Elephant, Gigglewick or Hallmark and personalize it how you think their style is.

25th anniversary is the silver year. You can celebrate this by giving silver jewelry, silverware, champagne glasses with silver monogram or silver picture frames. 50th anniversary is the “golden wedding anniversary.” This one should definitely be celebrated with gold jewelry, neckties or clips. You can also have golden champagne or wine served, poetry written in gold lettering or a golden photo frames with a photo of them now using professional photography. The possibilities are endless with silver and gold just as long as you make the couple feel fantastic on celebrating their marriage. 56

| townandgownmagazine.com

The Jewel Shoppe

Giggleswick

Traditional Anniversary Gifts 5th year of marriage: Wood 10th year of marriage: Tin/Aluminum 15th year of marriage: Crystal 20th year of marriage: China 25th year of marriage: Silver 30th year of marriage: Pearl 35th year of marriage: Coral/Jade

40th year of marriage: Ruby 45th year of marriage: Sapphire 50th year of marriage: Gold 55th year of marriage: Emerald 60th year of marriage: Diamond


Do It Yourself

Wedding Hair Styled by Salon 28 Photography by Divian Conner

1.

2.

3. JUNE

2013 |

57


Bride Updo 1. Curl hair with one-inch or larger curling iron. Tease hair at roots and form hair into a side ponytail. Use any color ponytail holder. 2. Split hair into two separate parts above secured ponytail holder and loop ponytail through the bottom of split. 3. Form a loop with hair and secure with bobby pins. Do this with smaller loops until hair is fully secured into an updo.

1.

2.

3.3.

4.4.

4. Spray hair with hairspray and pull down two pieces of hair in front of ear and curl to finish hairstyle.

Try a bridal hair piece like this from Christine’s Couture. 58

| townandgownmagazine.com


Bridesmaid Updo

1.

2.

1. Braid hair into a fishtail braid. How to braid a fishtail: Divide your hair into two large sections, parting straight down the middle. For a sharper look, you can use a comb to part your hair evenly. Pull a thin strand of hair from the outside of the left section. Pull it over the top of the left section, and grasp it under the right section. In other words, the strand of hair has gone over the left section and finishes under the right section. Repeat step 2 on the other side. Pull a skinny strand of hair from the outside of the right section, pull it over the right section, then weave it under the left section. Keep alternating sides, weaving over and under, until you reach the bottom of the braid. Secure with a ponytail holder. 2. Loosen braid by pulling apart braid with both hand. 3. Twist fishtail braid over to form a bun and secure with bobby pins.

3.

4.

4. Pin the end of the braid with bobby pins to finish hairstyle and spray with hairspray.

june

2013 |

59


Bridesmaid Half-up or updo 1. Curl hair with a one-inch or larger curling iron. Tease hair at the root and smooth on top after. Section off a small section of hair at the crown of head and secure with bobby pins running parallel. 2. Loosely grab a section of hair on one side of head and pull over secure bobby pins and pin on the side under the hair not to show pin. Do the same on the other side. 3. Swirl the hair still down into a circle, hold in place with one hand and secure with bobby pins around circle. Spray with hairstyle to finish hairstyle.

1.

2.

Tip

Stop at step two and spray to have a half-up hairstyle for any age.

Try a bridal hair piece like this from Christine’s Couture. 60

| townandgownmagazine.com

3.


Wedding Planner By The Br ide and Gr oom in Columbus, Miss.

12 Months Before

Announce Your Engagement:

Visit and call family and friends. Place an engagement announcement in your local newspaper(s). Have an engagement party or dinner.

Set the Wedding Budget!:

This step is essential. All planning will be based on this amount. Discuss the budget with your family, fiancé, and other parties that might be contributing financially to the wedding. Remember to leave wiggle room in the budget. Unexpected changes to the guest list, weather, and/or date can cause a change in cost.

Dress, Date, and Venue:

Talk with your fiancé and decide which of the following is most important: when you will be married, where you will be married, or the style of your wedding itself. It is important to select a date, venue, and attire that is most compatible. Three of the most important corner-stones of the planning process are date, venue, and attire. Invitations, guest list, menu, bridal party attire, and more will be based around these selections.

Date:

Take note of holidays and sporting events. Avoid football season if you are hoping college friends will be able to attend or consider a holiday if you are hoping to have lots of out-oftown family guests.

Venue (both ceremony and reception sites):

Wedding venues can be booked over a year in advance. Do not wait to reserve your dream wedding venue. Remember that the venue will play a key role in how many guests will be able to attend.

Attire:

What vision do you have for your bridal dress? What does the groom like? What do you see the rest of the wedding party wearing? The answers to these questions might determine the time of year to be married or even where you want to be married.

Guest List:

Begin with a rough draft and start compiling mailing addresses.

Bridal Party:

Select attendants, including your Maid of Honor and Best Man. Inform them of your date, or tentative date if it is not yet finalized.

The Dress:

Begin the hunt for the bridal gown.

Planning and Inspiration:

Purchase a wedding organizer, attend bridal shows, start a board on pinterest with your favorite ideas, and consider hiring a wedding planner.

6-9 Months Before

Bridal Registry:

Begin your bridal registry.

Bridal Gown:

Order your wedding gown and buy undergarments that you will wear with it (bring these to all fittings). Remember that if you are not buying off rack, then special order bridal gowns can take up to 6 months to complete. Be sure to allow ample time to select your dress, order the dress, and complete alterations once it arrives. Be sure to remember other special events, like bridal portraits, when ordering and scheduling alterations.

Bridal Accessories:

Order other bridal accessories as necessary, such as shoes, jewelry, and veil.

Bridesmaids’ Dresses:

Select and order bridesmaids’ dresses. These gowns can take 2-4 months to complete. Remind your maids of things that could influence the fit of the dress such as height or pregnancies. Remember to communicate those things with the store ordering the dress, if applicable.

Officiant:

Select who will perform your ceremony.

Book it!:

Research vendor websites and schedule appointments to book ceremony musicians, a wedding band or DJ, photographer, videographer, caterer, and florist.

The Cake:

Research wedding cake pictures and local bakeries for ideas. june

2013 |

61


4-6 Months Before Invitations:

Select and order your wedding invitations, envelopes, and thank-you cards. Be sure to add directions to the ceremony and reception site(s). Hire a calligrapher, if desired. Take one invitation to the Post Office to be weighed for appropriate postage. Non-traditional envelopes may require additional postage. (Ex: Square envelopes may require additional postage.)

Wedding Favors:

Select and purchase wedding favors.

Additional Decorations:

Purchase any desired ceremony and reception decorations that might not be included with your florist or wedding designer concepts. These items may include unity candles, aisle runners, etc.

Honeymoon:

Book your trip and verify that you have any necessary travel documents, including passports and visas. Order/renew passports if necessary. Book a room for your wedding night if you will be leaving for your honeymoon the next morning.

Accommodations:

Book hotel rooms or arrange other accommodations for outof-town guests

Guest List:

Finalize your guest list and send out save-the-date cards if using them.

Transportation:

Reserve transportation for you and your wedding party to and from the wedding, as well as a bus or trolley for your guests, if desired.

2-4 Months Before Marriage License:

Find out what your state’s requirements are for obtaining a marriage license and get blood tests done, if required.

Tuxedos:

Select and order tuxedos for the groom, groomsmen, fathers, and any other members of the wedding party, if desired.

Caterer:

Meet with the caterer to plan the menu.

Rehearsal:

Finalize the rehearsal dinner details, such as venue, guest list, and menu.

62

| townandgownmagazine.com

Ceremony:

Discuss ceremony details with the officiant, such as wording and wedding vows. Select and purchase wedding bands.

Reception:

Order your wedding cake. Book any other specialty services, such as ice sculptures and photo booths.

Gifts:

Buy thank-you gifts for your attendants. Rentals/Services: Secure rentals for tents, tables, arches, etc.

1-2 Months Before Invitations:

Mail invitations eight weeks prior to the wedding date and send accommodation information to your out-of-town guests.

Important Documents to Complete:

Compile and complete name change documents as necessary (Ex: Social Security Card and Driver’s License). Fill out a change of address form at the Post Office, if necessary. Pick up your marriage license from the courthouse. Review insurance information with your fiancé and check with employers to see what documents need to be updated once you are legally married (car, home, medical, etc.).

Ceremony:

Print ceremony programs. Purchase a guest book, pen, and other wedding accessories, including toasting glasses, cake knife, flower girl basket, and ring pillow as necessary.

Bride:

Choose your hair and makeup stylists and schedule a trial for both; also, book appointments to have your hair, make-up, and nails done on or before the day of the wedding.

1 Month 2 Weeks Before Ceremony:

Finalize your ceremony music and song lists.

Reception:

Create a seating chart for the reception, if necessary. Contact your caterer with a final guest count. Finalize your reception music and song lists for your wedding band or DJ.


2 Weeks Before

Photographer:

Provide the photographer with a list of any must-have photos.

Florist:

Contact your florist to confirm your final flower order (bouquets, boutonnieres, centerpieces, etc.) and go over any decor details or venue logistics for the big day.

Accommodations:

Confirm lodging reservations for out-of-town guests.

Miscellaneous:

Print out a timeline of events for your wedding party and vendors. Be sure to include any necessary contact information and cell phone numbers. Place a wedding announcement in your local newspaper. Plan a bridal luncheon or dinner with your bridesmaids. Pick up the wedding bands and make sure they fit correctly. Schedule a final wedding dress fitting. Write rehearsal dinner toasts.

Miscellaneous:

Make sure the driving company has the correct address if necessary. Do a final walk-through at the reception site for a final check. Check the weather for the wedding day. Make any preparations or changes as necessary.

The Wedding Day

Bride:

Eat a healthy breakfast and snack throughout the day. You will need your energy for the big day ahead! Be sure to drink some water as well! Enjoy everything; it is finally here and everything will be wonderful. Congratulations!!

1 Week Before

Bride:

Pick up your wedding gown. Pack for your honeymoon and confirm all travel arrangements. Treat yourself to a spa day; you deserve it!

Miscellaneous:

Write final checks to your wedding vendors (each organized in an envelope) and assign your wedding coordinator or one of your attendants to distribute at the wedding. Confirm limo or other transportation reservations. Arrange for your local Post Office to hold your mail, if necessary, while you are on your honeymoon.

The Day Before

Bride:

Get your dress and veil out of the bag and hang it up. Be sure to press or steam the dress and veil if necessary. Wear jewelry with your entire outfit/outfits for a final check. Make a list of all things you need for the rehearsal night, the wedding day, and the honeymoon. Then, pack your bags accordingly. Have an emergency bag ready for the wedding day. Include items such as extra bra, pins, undies, make-up, and other essentials. Attend the rehearsal and enjoy the rehearsal dinner! june

2013 |

63


Groom’sWedding Planner The Question

Yes! Every guy wants a yes when you pop the question. Before popping the questions talk to your girlfriend about the possibility of getting married, how she feels about your relationship and if you two are ready for marriage. Be confident in yourself when discussing marriage with your girlfriend. Let her know you are serious and when you decide to pop the question, make it the best day of her life.

The Engagement Ring Of course it signifies the love your partner has for you but all ladies have dreamed about their engagement ring since they were a small child. Your girlfriend usually does have rings in mind - size, gold or silver and setting. Talk with your girlfriend by hinting about your friend’s ring or you could ask her best friend’s advice. Be sure they can keep a secret. You would hate for you girlfriend to find out before you even propose. The engagement can be dramatic or intimate. You might even go to the first place you met or had your first date. When choosing a ring select a size according to her ring finger size. Take a ring of hers you know she normally wears with you or if you select a ring not according to her size, it can always be adjusted later. Choose carefully!

Budget Before planning a wedding a budget needs to be made between both families. In some cases one family might take more of one part than another, but compromise on budgets on who will take care of what. There are traditions of the brides family and the grooms family paying for separate parts of the wedding rehearsal, wedding, reception and honeymoon - but budget still needs to be set and separated. Remember the real reason for the BIG day and know spending money on one day does not need to put you in debt.

The Big Day The date can be hard to select, but choose a date not interfering with ballgames like a MSU Football game or holidays. You want as many guests you invite to be at your wedding rather than other events happening the same day.

64

| townandgownmagazine.com

Guests

Of course your family will be invited, plus all your closest friends. On the other hand, there are those you have not spoke to in a while and those who do not need to be invited for certain reasons. Be smart about who you invite to your wedding. Think about how much food you will need to feed them, the location and how many it will hold and what size wedding you would like to have - small or large. When inviting guests and choosing invitations, working with a calligrapher or a printing company, it is the easiest and quickest way to go. Calligraphy can be more pricey, so check pricing before.

Clothing

The BIG day is for the groom as much as it is for the bride. When choosing clothing for your ceremony select material and style to go with the theme of wedding. Some grooms like to select the clothing for their groomsmen and some let their fiancées do all the planning. Beach, vintage and outdoor weddings usually go under the category of casual/dressy suits or khakis and white linen shirts. For an inside wedding, go for a tux according the theme and colors of the wedding. Black is a color you cannot go wrong with when selecting a tux. Be sure to check the weather months ahead with the almnac to see what type of weather could possibly happen on your BIG day. And never forget to polish your shoes before the ceremony dressy or casual!

The Dance

The first dance can be the worst and nerve-racking part to the reception. If you have two left feet, to ease your nerves, take classes before your wedding day and practice with your fiancee. You will feel more comfortable when the time comes and will look like you know what you are doing on the dance floor.

Speeches

On top of the dance, speeches could easily go wrong by only a short sentence. Before everyone has a drink and might get out of hand with the length or memories your best man might have, be sure to start when everyone sits down or right after you have finished your meal. Speeches can get lengthy so decide the best time to start.


Bridal Shower

Groom’s Style Christina Lucas Christina Lucas, Louisiana native and Starkville resident, has degrees from LSU (B.S.) and The University of Memphis (M.S. - Leadership and Policy Studies). She enjoys cooking and creating simple, easy to follow recipes. She is also a yoga enthusiast, artist, and has a passion for keeping life simple and enjoyable. You can follow her on Pinterest at www. pinterest.com/christinalucas/.

When I set out to prepare this Groom's Grill Out menu, I wanted delicious recipes that guys would actually make. Most men I know like to keep their cooking and grilling out simple; they don't like to fuss with too many ingredients or countless steps in the process. So, fire up the grill and get the tin foil ready! Here are my ideas for a meat and potatoes grill out menu with a simple twist that will make a Groom's event special.

june

2013 |

65


Chimichurri Sauce Yield: Serves 4 -6. 1 cup firmly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley, trimmed of thick stems 1/2 cup fresh tarragon (can sub 3 Tbsp. of dried tarragon leaves) 1 Tbsp. minced garlic 2 Tbsp. fresh oregano leaves (can sub 2 tsp. dried oregano) 2 Tbsp. white sugar 1/2 cup olive oil 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 tsp. sea salt 1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes Finely chop the parsley, tarragon, fresh oregano, and garlic (or process in a food processor several pulses). Place in a small bowl. Stir in the sugar, olive oil, vinegar, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. Adjust seasonings to taste. Serve immediately on top of grilled meats or refrigerate. If chilled, return to room temperature before serving. Can keep in the refrigerator for up to two days.

66

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM

This versatile sauce originates from Argentina and compliments grilled steak, chicken, sausage, and even fish. It is a great way to use the abundant herbs from our local gardens. My version of Chimichurri includes tarragon and a little sugar to balance out the slight bitterness in the parsley. You can use the herbs that you enjoy to make it your own.


These potatoes grill up easy in a tin foil packet with very little effort and are a great alternative to potato salad.

Lemon Pesto Red Potatoes Red potatoes, diced, skins on (2 -3 small red potatoes per person as a side dish) 1 lemon, sliced 1 jar store bought pesto sauce heavy duty tin foil Dice potatoes, leaving skins on, and slice lemon. Using heavy duty tin foil, lightly spray one side of the foil with cooking spray, then add the potatoes and lemon slices. Create a packet with the foil, rolling up the sides to keep the steam inside. Place on grill, away from direct heat for 20-25 minutes until tender. Remove the lemon slices. Transfer potatoes to a bowl, adding spoonfuls of pesto sauce and stir until all the potatoes are lightly covered. Best served warm.

Beer Pairings The Veranda suggested the following beers (both are available at The Veranda): Yazoo Gerst http://www.yazoobrew.com Lazy Magnolia http://lazymagnolia.com

JUNE

2013 |

67


Grilled S’more Bananas The heat from the grill caramelizes the bananas and melts the chocolate chips and marshmallows into a sweet, gooey, concoction. 1 banana per person chocolate chips mini marshmallows heavy duty tin foil Leave the bananas in their skins, make one slit down the length of the banana (don't slice the banana in half). Stuff the banana with chocolate chips and mini marshmallows. Wrap the bananas in foil and place on grill, away from direct heat for 5 -8 minutes. Remove from heat. Serve warm and enjoy.

Tomato Avocado Salad This salad is perfect for eating on a hot summer night.

2 avocados, prepared and diced the juice of 2 medium lemons 1 container grape tomatoes, halfed 1 can whole kernal corn, drained 1/4 cup diced red onion (optional) salt and pepper to taste Prepare and dice the avocado, add to a medium bowl, then juice lemons directly on top of the diced avocado. Add the sliced tomatoes, corn, and diced red onion (optional), salt and pepper. Stir well, then refrigerate until serving. 68

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


Bridesmaid Gifts 1

Vintage Heart Bracelet R. Tabb & Co.

Pho t og r aph y b y Lor en Gambr ell and Lizzie Smit h

2

4

Moon & Lola Necklace L.A Green Boutique

3

Sid Dickens Friendship Stone Bella Interiors

Arabella kitchen towels The University Florist

5

Zabella Loofah Slippers Bella Interiors

june

2013 |

69


A Cup of Lindsay Jo

Lindsay is an online lifestyle blogger. Her blog, www.acupoflindsayjo.com, has a primary focus on fashion. Lindsay is a member of the Independent Fashion Bloggers (IFB) and attends various conferences and workshops with other fashion bloggers regularly.

Wedding Essentials Having recently found myself a guest at a wedding and scrambling for last minute this and that, I'm too familiar with the stress of forgetting to pack something in your purse for a wedding. Whether you are a member of the bridal party or simply a guest, there is a shared list of summer staples you should always carry to wedding.

Sandals

Wear heels to the ceremony, but slip a pair of sandals in your bag for the reception and dancing.

Sunscreen If the wedding is outdoors and during the day, apply sunscreen beforehand and throughout the event.

Mints

Lipstick

With a wedding comes wonderful eats and drinks! Be sure to pack your lipcolor and gloss to touch-up between the cake and champagne. Alternatively, try a lip stain. It will last all day and won't require reapplication. Found at Merle Norman Starkville, Miss.

Stick with mints at weddings. You don't want to be caught on the wedding video chewing gum!

Blotting Sheets

For those hot outdoor summer weddings, be sure to slip blotting sheets in your purse! They are perfect to blot your face with and maintain your makeup. If you have enough room, pack a finishing powder also. Found at L.A. Green Boutique.

70

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


Camera

Forego your digital camera and use your phone in the interest of space. In the age of smartphones, they are just as good as most cameras.  There will likely be a wedding photographer at the event also.

Fragrance

Particularly if the wedding is outside, always bring your perfume in your bag. I like to pack the small fragrance samples to save space.  A light, airy fragrance is ideal for an outdoor wedding. Found at Bella Interiors.

Hair product

Bring a travel-size hair spray and a few extra bobby pins in case a few strands fall. For curls, pack a spray-in smoothing serum to reapply.  Because of TSA requirements at airports, it is easy to find smaller packaging of your favorite products.

Double-sided tape

I always bring double-sided tape in lieu of a sewing kit to wedding. It can fix most wardrobe malfunctions quickly and easily.  Is your bridesmaid's dress too long?  Did the hem fall out of your dress? One or two pieces of tape will solve these problems. Found at L.A. Green Boutique.

Nail polish

Try to wear a nude or light pink polish. In the event that you chip or smudge your polish, it will be less noticeable.  If you wear a brighter hue, bring the polish with you.  You can always fix them in the restroom. Found at Merle Norman, Starkville, Miss. june

2013 |

71


Mother-of-the-Bride Gifts Pho t og r aph y b y Lizzie Smit h

1

Gold Meriana bracelet Purple Elephant

2 4

3

Madonna Angel The University Florist

14k Yellow South Sea Pearl Earrings The Jewel Shoppe

Volusspa candles The Univeristy Florist

5

Turquoise and Quartz, Diamond Earrings in 18K White by Dove The Jewel Shoppe

72

| townandgownmagazine.com


T

O

W

N

&

G O

W

N

LITERATURE

S

Book R e vie w b y Susan O’Br y an

ummer is the perfect time to kick back and catch up on your reading. You finally have time that you can call your own, whether you’re at the beach, the baseball field or at home, alone for a few hours while the kids are at one camp or another. With limited time and so many literary choices, how do you choose what to read? Here are a few suggestions for summer 2013 – and beyond. One of the South’s most anticipated novels is Matthew Guinn’s The Resurrectionist, due to be published July 8. For his debut novel, Guinn, who lives in the Jackson area, has combined fact and fiction to create an engrossing tale that weaves past actions with present circumstances. Dr. Jack Thacker is working in a South Carolina academic medical center’s PR department as he goes through counseling for drug use. When bodies are discovered in the basement during an expansion project, he learns that the school once owned a slave, Nemo Johnston, who had the task of providing the school with cadavers for its students. The bodies were stolen from the nearby African-American graveyard. Guinn’s novel alternates chapters between the lives of Thacker and Nemo, emphasizing that few things are as they seem. It raises moral and revenge questions as well as those of who knew what and when they knew it. In many ways, the author leaves the final answer to readers’ consciences. Longer days and more sunlight are important if you pick up The Darkling by R.B Chesterton, the pseudonym of Carolyn Haines. In my opinion, she was one of the most fascinating female Southern authors of our day. Beware that “The Darkling” is a Southern gothic tale, much darker and sinister than Haines’ popular “Bones” series. A California family has moved to the small town of Coden, Ala., to renovate a Southern mansion – Belle Fleur – and the nearly Plantation Inn, once a bustling recreation hotspot in the 1940s. Mimi Bosarge is the live-in governess for the Henderson children – Donald, Erin and Margo. All is well until Annie, a 16-year-old with no memory of her past, is taken in by the family. Tragedy descends on the family, and only Mimi seems able to see the role Annie is playing in the horror tale. Everyone, including Mimi’s grandmother, seems to be under Annie’s spell. But it Annie tossing the net of evil, or has she simply been caught up in it herself? “The Darkling,” with its 346 pages, is not a novel you want to start late in the day – the enemy waits in the dark. When the temperatures start rising, take a step back to Vacationland, set across many years at Naledi Lodge, a rundown resort on the Minnesota-Canada border. The novel by Sarah Stonich links fascinating characters, whose colorful lives are in sharp con-

trast to the long Minnesota winters, across distance and time. Meg is the last of her family – she was raised by her grandfather and resort owner after her parents died in a plane crash. With everyone gone, Meg is faced with the decision to sell Naledi. But how can you get rid of a place that has so many memories? For so many generations? The winters are long, and the summers are brief. Yet, people thrive in the remote area, learning to live off the land as well as their own internal, emo tional strength. The novel starts with Meg, a waterthemed artist whose part-wolf dog has brought home a severed hand. From there, Stonich takes her readers back and forth between characters and they form a life line, though somewhat rusty and dented, for each other. As each character develops, there is always a tie back to the resort. As a setting, Minesotta is different from Mississippi as it can be, yet its remoteness adds to the depth of characters inhabiting the area. Vacationland is perfect for an escape to another place and other lives. If you still need more ideas to fill your beach book bag, here are some suggestions: 1. 101 Frugal Family Activities for the Busy Parent – Kaylee Cole has put together suggestions to encourage families to play – without fancy electronics or gadgets. Great ideas for parents whose children are out of school for the summer. 2. Fireflies – P.S. Bartlett has written a fascinating story about an Irish immigrant family learning to cope with a special gift. It’s a testament to the strength of family and faith. 3. The Longings of Wayward Girls – Karen Brown’s novel illustrates what happens when a seemingly harmless prank goes wrong. Sadie is now a grown woman who seems to have put the past behind her. When a boy from her past creeps into her present, she realizes – perhaps too late – that it’s time from the truth. 4. Island Girls – Three sisters are forced to spend a summer together in Nancy Thayer’s novel. If the women can’t learn the meaning of family, they will lose out on their father’s last – and best - gift. 5. The Second Chance Café – Alison Kent’s warm, often humorous novel follows Kaylie Flynn, who returns to Hope Springs to open a café. She quickly learns, though, that the best-made plans don’t always work out and that second chances should never be overlooked. And if you still come up blank regarding your summer reading, check with your local book store or library. june

2013 |

73


Cotton District Festival On Saturday, April 20, 2013 the Starkville Area Arts Council held their annual Cotton District Festival in the Cotton District in Starkville, Miss. Craft, food and art vendor lined the street as attendees enjoyed the day. Photography by Ashley Covin.

74

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


june

2013 |

75


Open House Drayer Physical Therapy held their open house on May 2, 2013. Drayer is located on 513 Academy Rd. in Starkville, Miss. Drayer center specializes in orthopedics, spine stabilization and core strengthening, pre- and post-operative rehabilitation and sports medicine. Photography by Ashley Covin.

1

2

3

4

5 6 1.Anna and Brandon Frazier, Jamie and Ben Carver 2. Thea and Crystal Blair . Paul Kosko, Damien Kinard, Shannon Skelton and Brian Kirby 4. Larry Mullins and Hardy Mitchell 5. Cadi Thompson, Debby Thomas and Anne Claire Craig 6. Anna and Brandon Frazier. 76

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


JA Kentucky Derby The Starkville Junior Auxiliary held their 3rd annual Kentucky Derby at the Stables in Starkville, Miss. This annual fundraiser benefits the children of Oktibbeha County. Photography by Ashley Covin.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1. Laura Templeton and Katie Aldridge 2. Ann Bell and Kristen Fyke 3. Stephen Mercer and Bubba Bland 4. Edward Kemp and Brad McKenzie 5. Ashley Covin and Anna Chaney 6. Lauren Marconi, Mary Martha Edwards, Katherine Byrum, Hannah Stewart, Lindsey Wiseman and Laura Rackley 7. Mamie Kosko and Lindsey Wiseman JUNE

2013 |

77


Open House Magnolia Manor opened its door with a warm welcome on April 23, 2013. Guest enjoyed the renovations of the building and refreshments. Magnolia Manor is located on North Jackson Street in Starkville, Miss. Photography by Lizzie Smith.

1

2

3

4

5

6 7 1. Mayor Parker Wiseman, Gloria Bagwell-Rowland and Lindsey Wiseman 2.Ruth De la Cruz, Farrel Summer and Gloria Bagwell-Rowland 3. Hamp and Kim Beatty 4. Angela Shine and Midred Smith 5. Margret Johnson, Jo Ann Cohen and Patty Spivey 6. Rita McReynolds and Dorothy Watson Hindrick 7. Jim and Cathleen Gaffod 78

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


MSYP Summit The Mississippi Develop Authority held the first Mississippi Young Professionals Summit in Meridian, Miss. at the Riley Center on April 25-26, 2013. The MSYP 2013 Summit, Rethink Mississippi: No Suits, No PowerPoints, No Bull, engaged young professionals in the state and get them involved in the future of Mississippi. Photography by Claire Massey.

1

2 3

4 5

6

7

1 Dyana Valen and Fredie Carmichael 2. Meredith Rea and Jennifer Kassinger 3. Brandon Pratt and Brice Richardson 4. JR Robinson and Derron Radcliff 5. Ashley Grant and Liz Radley 6. Mallory Rutledge and Carol Ann Padgett 7. Mary Kathryn Allen, Lisa Nothstine, Amie Whitington, Ted Watson, Ben Hester and Deanna White JUNE

2013 |

79


Soriee Sociale Town & Gown Magazine and R.Tabb & Co. hosted a reveal party for the May issue of Town & Gown on May 2, 2013 at R. Tabb & Co. Guest enjoyed giveaways, refreshments from our May issue and shopping. Photography by Lizzie Smith.

1

2 3

80

4

5

6

7

1. Claire Massey, editor of Town & Gown Magazine; Rebecca Tabb, owner of R.Tabb & Co. and Christina Lucas, contributor for Town & Gown Magazine. 2.Loren Gambrell, Amanda Rhea and Lindsey Johnson, Sr. account executive for Town & Gown Magazine 3.Abby Hathorn, stylist for Town & Gown Magazine and Stan Hathorn4. Brigiette Martin and Christy Laughlin 5. Rebecca Tabb and Laura McKee 6. Ashley Massey, Charlotte Massey and Claire Massey 7. Misty Bailey and Ann Bailey

| TOWNANDGOWNMAGAZINE.COM


T

O

W

N

&

G

O

W

N

CALENDAR

June 1

Fresh Produce

The Starkville Area Arts Council’s Art in Public Places invite you to visit the Greater Starkville Development Partnership’s Welcome Center Gallery to see artwork depicting or inspired by fresh farm-produced crops. Fresh Produce will be shown through the month of June. For more information visit www. starkvillearts.org.

June Fest

The Choctaw County Chamber of Commerce will host the 6th Annual JuneFest in Downtown Ackerman. JuneFest will include a 5K run/walk, antique car show, Bingo at Pap’s, arts and crafts and flea market vendors along with all your favorite food vendors. Feature entertainment includes: Terry Blackwood, Southern Flair Bluegrass Gospel and Full Circle Party Band. For more information contact the Chamber of Commerce at 662285-3778.

Starkville Community Theater

“Love, Loss and What I Wore” will be performed at the Starkville Community Theatre at 6:30 p.m. For more information call 662-323-6855 or visit www.sct-online.org.

Starkville Community Market

This weekly farmer’s market will continue all summer long where locally grown and crafted foods and products, live plants, baked goods and various arts will be for sale. Join the excitement every Saturday starting at 7:30-10:30 a.m. For more information visit www.visit.starkville.org.

Columbus Hitching Lot

June 7

Keb’ Mo’

The multi-talented Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds is a singer, songwriter and producer that has ten grammys to prove it. Expect to hear “Everytime I Close My Eyes” at the event on June 7 at the Riley Center in downtown Meridian. Tickets are $63 and $69 and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. with the pre-show at 6 p.m.

Columbus will host their farmer’s market at the Hitching Lot in downtown Columbus from 7-10 a.m. The farmer’s market will be held every Monday, Thursday and Saturday mornings and the Sounds of Summer will be held on June 6 and 20. For more information visit www.columbusmainstreet.com.

The three time grammy award winner will be playing an array of music from his three decade career. He will be playing at the Riley Center in downtown Meridian, starting at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $36 and $42.

June 6-9

Tupelo Elvis Festival

This fun festival in downtown Tupelo is sure to bring fun to all as the festival centers on music that influenced Elvis as a child and will feature some talented performers. For more information call 662.841.6598.

Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds

June 15

Midsummer Eve

Celebrate the old Celtic summer solstice festival with a 4-course dinner at Magnolia Manor and Three Generations on 215 North Jackson Street, Starkville, Miss. at 7 p.m. Reservations only; call 662-324-1507 for more information.

JUNE

2013 |

81


T

O

W

N

&

G

O

W

N

ADVERTISERS

ALFA I n su ran ce - J as on B ailey 1 00 Star r Ave . St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 323- 2537 al fains. com Al lure Salon 1 00 Star r Ave . Sui t e . D St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 323-7799

Ha r m oni e Bout iq u e 1 1 2 S . La fa ye t t e S t . S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 0 - 8 0 8 1

B e ll Bulidin g Su pp l y 402 Lampkin St. St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 323- 4632

Hom e t o w n He a lth c a re 1 0 1 Doc t or s Pa r k S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P, 6 6 2 - 3 2 4 - 8 3 3 8

B e lla I nte r ior s 5 15 Colle ge St. C olu mbus, MS 39 7 0 1 P. 662- 241-7017 be llapbd. com

Ka y ’s Kre a t i ons 1 6 2 6 N . Ve t e ran s B lvd . Tupe l o, MS 3 8 8 04 P. 6 6 2 - 8 4 4 -1 7 0 4 ka y s - kre at i ons . n e t

B on e an d Join t 1 01 Wilbu r n Way St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 323- 9908

L.A . Gre e n 5 0 0 Ru s s e l l S t . S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 4 - 6 2 8 0 l ag re e nj e we l r y. c o m

C h r istine’s Cou tu re 2 01 E. Main St. St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 324- 8488 ch r istine scoutu re .c om C roslan d We alth 1 00 Star r Ave . Starkville, MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 338- 0023 D ee p Sou th Pou t 3 29 Unive r sity Dr. St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 324- 6055 de e psou th pou t. com Express Employment Profe ssionals 1 00 Star r Ave . Sui t e A St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 323- 4070 Wesley M. Fe rgus on, D M D 4 05 Acade my Rd. St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 323- 2876 we sleyfe rguson . c om G iggle swick 2 00 HW Y 12 St ar kville , MS 397 5 9 P. 662- 323- 4438 gi ggle swick . com

82

G re a t e r S t a r kv i l l e Deve l opm e nt Pa r tn e r s h ip 2 0 0 E . Ma i n S t re e t S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 3 - 3 3 2 2 s t a r kv i l l e .org

| townandgownmagazine.com

M & F Bank 3 1 5 U n i ve r s i t y D r. 8 0 6 Hi g hwa y 1 2 We s t S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 3 - 3 9 5 0 P. 6 6 2 - 3 3 8 -1 1 3 1 m f b a nkt e a m .co m Ba fe s S al e s S t o re 9 2 5 S t one Bl vd . S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 5 -2 3 3 8 m s uche e s e .com M a r t i n O M S & M a x i l l o fa c i a l S urg e r y 9 7 6 HWY 1 2 E S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 3 - 3 8 0 1 m a r t i nom s .com Me r l e N or m an 2 0 2 S . Wa s h i n g t o n S t . S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 3 -5 2 5 5 Mississippi Modern Hom e s t e ad Ce n te r 4 0 2 Lake Va l l ey D r. S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 6 6 2 - 6 9 4 - 0 1 2 4 MS U Bul l dog C lu b 1 1 5 8 Br ya n Build in g MS S t at e , MS 39762 P. 6 6 2 - 3 2 5 -1 2 4 4 hai l s t a t e .c om

M S U Fo u n d a tio n 100 H u n te r H e n r y B lvd . M S S ta te , M S 39762 P. 662- 325-7000 m s u fo u n d a tio n . c o m M S U Re la tio n s M is s is s ip p i S ta te Un ive r s ity, M S 39762 662- 325- 5753 m s s ta te . e d u North Mississippi Medical C e n te r 830 S o u th G lo s te r S t. Tu p e lo , M S 38804 P. 662- 377- 3000 nmhs.net Ne w k ’s Ex p re s s C a fe 132 HWY 12 S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 6395 OC H Re g io n a l M e d ic a l C tr. 400 H o s p ita l Rd . S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 9355 o c h . o rg Pu r p le Ele p h a n t 401B E. La m p k in S tre e t S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 324- 4008 R . Ta b b & C o . 210 E. M a in S t. S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 4300 Re e d ’s 3 0 2 U n i ve r s i t y D r. S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 2684 2013 U.S. 45 C o lu m b u s , M S 39705 P. 662- 327- 2684 re e d s m s . c o m Ro s e’s C o r n e r B o u tiq u e 515 Main St. C o lu m b u s , M S 39701 P. 662- 328- 2234 S a lo n 28 500 Ru s s e ll S t. , S u ite 28 S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 324- 6900 S im p ly H o m e 306 La m p k in S tre e t S ta r kville , M S 39759 P. 662- 323- 4323

S is te r s F in e C l o th i n g 402 E. La m pki n St. S ta r kville , MS 3 9 7 5 9 P. 662- 323- 09 9 5 S n a p F itn e ss 100 S ta r r Ave. S ta r kville , MS 3 9 7 5 9 P. 662- 323- 56 1 1 s n a p f itn e s s .c o m S u lliva n’s Offi c e Su ppl y 204 E. M a in Street S ta r kville , MS 3 9 7 5 9 P. 662- 323- 52 2 2 s u lliva n s o ffi c e.c o m Swa n k On Mai n 736 2n d Ave. Maben, MS 39750 P. 662- 263- 4 0 0 4 Th e B r id e a n d Gro o m 120 5th S t. S C o lu m b u s , MS 3 9 7 0 1 P. 662- 327- 4 3 3 2 th e b r id e a n dgro o mms.c o m Th e G ro w th A l l i an c e o f We s t Po in t 5 1 0 E B ro a d St. We s t Po in t, MS 3 9 7 3 P. 662- 494- 5 1 2 1 we s tp o in tms.o rg Th e J e we l S h o ppe 215 W. M a i n Street Lo u isville , MS 3 9 3 3 9 P. 662-773- 3 3 2 0 th e je we ls ho ppe.c o m Th e S tyle Lo ft 221 E. M a in St. S t a r kv i l l e , MS 39759 P. 662- 324- 50 0 4 Th e Un ive rsi ty F l o ri st M in i M a ll on Lee B l vd. S ta r kville , MS 3 9 7 5 9 P. 662- 325- 3 5 8 5 th e u n ive r s i ty fl o ri st.c o m Wa ld ro p C h i ro prac ti c 100 S ta r r Ave. S ta r kville , MS 3 9 7 5 9 P. 662- 546- 4 4 0 0 wa ld ro p c hri ro prac ti c .c o m ... To Ad ve r tise: To w n & G o wn Magazi n e P. 662- 323-16 4 2 F. 662- 323- 65 8 6 to w n a n d g o wn magazi n e. com


Profile for Town & Gown Magazine

June 2013  

June Issue 2013

June 2013  

June Issue 2013

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded