Page 1

ART WALK | NOCHE DE GALA | POSSUM CREEK SKATEPARK & MORE!

Autumn 2010

FR REE E TA TAKE K ONE KE

Margaret

Tolbert ACCESS TO INSPIRATION IS ALWAYS CLOSE AT HAND WHEN YOUR EASEL IS A KAYAK

SISTERS BORN AGAIN

WHY DON’T YOU GET LOST?

GHOSTS AND SPIRITS

Raleigh Faust builds a home with recycled materials from Gainesville’s Sad Sisters

Annual Corn Maze hosted at Coon Hollow Farm in Micanopy is perfect autumn fun

Two intrepid writers are tasked with spending one night each in two haunted inns


The real winners here are

our patients.

A E North Florida Regional Medical Center ranks in the Top 10% in the Nation for General Surgery. When Kinnon Thomas and Pat Klaus needed surgery, they chose North Florida Regional. Each year, thousands of other surgery patients do the same. What they receive is award winning care. We’re proud of this because it means we’re making a difference in people’s lives. As Gainesville’s only community hospital, it means everyone in the area who needs surgery is a winner, just like Pat and Kinnon. And that is the biggest reward of all. šJef'&_dj^[DWj_ed\eh=[d[hWbIkh][ho šH[Y_f_[dje\=[d[hWbIkh][ho;nY[bb[dY[ Award™ for 4 consecutive years šHWda[Z8[ij_dj^[=W_d[il_bb[H[]_ed\eh =[d[hWbIkh][ho_d(&'& Log on to www.NFRMC.com to learn more ehYWbb.&&#,''#,/')\ehWf^oi_Y_Wdh[\[hhWb$ *Region is Gainesville, FL of CBSA/ Division as deďŹ ned by the federal government’s OfďŹ ce of Management and Budget

2 | Autumn 2010

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Al ch

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ded al. ents

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Alachua Learning Center Elementary and Middle School located just North of the town of Alachua on State Road 235, serves students from all parts of Alachua and neighboring counties.

Charter Schools are part of the Florida Alternative System of Public School Choice and charge no tuition. While having the benefits of a “small-school” environment the Alachua Learning Center provides a challenging and fulfilling academic, cultural and physical educational program for students from kindergarten through eighth grade.

on.

][ho

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eh The Alachua Learning Center has consistently been rated an “A” school by the State of Florida. Our varied physical education curriculum includes on-campus rock climbing and subscribes to the “President’s Fitness Program”.

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The Alachua Learning Center offers inspiring classes on a variety of subjects: Science, Social Studies, Language Arts, Math, P.E. Sports, Rock Climbing, Drama, Music, Clay Sculpting, Computer Graphics, individual Student Book Publishing (writing, design, illustrating), Drawing, Painting, Crafts, Community Service Display Projects, and exciting Field Trips.

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8 | Autumn 2010


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Autumn 2010 | 9


CONTENTS AUTUMN 2010 • VOL. 01 ISSUE 03 >> ROLLER DERBY

40

By Jason E. Hodges

Roller Derby

With a Rebel Yell The Gainesville Roller Rebels Lend New Meaning to Rock ‘n’ Roll BY JASON E. HODGES

B

y now, many folks may have heard of the Gainesville Roller Rebels (GRR), the roller derby team that has taken Gainesville by storm. With stage names like Grizzly Madams, Suzie Bonebreaker, Stocky Balboa and Zelda Shagnasty, most would

assume plenty of excitement with the roller derby sport. And they would not be disappointed. Although roller derby has been around for many years, for Gainesville it is relatively new. Members agree the GRR has had an impact on the community by

empowering women through the sport. At the same time, the GRR women

PHOTOS BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

The Gainesville Roller Rebels

have been great role models for their younger fans by simply showing that you can be a star by being yourself.

Back row (from left): Ryan “Wisconsin Ref Trip” Tanay, Amber “Block Buster” Delmas, Jennifer “Lava Tramp” Black,

GRR Media relations manager Adrienne “Rage-rienne” Filardo sees the sport as more than physical. She sees

Adrienne “Rage-rienne” Filardo, Sarah “Sara Leethal” Purcell, Carrie

it as an opportunity for women to acquire leadership skills. “We are a business for women, by women. As a non-profit we have a lot of work to do, and everyone volunteers beyond just skating at practice and playing bouts,” Filardo said. “GRR offers personal development in organizing fundraisers, negotiating contracts, landing sponsorships, bookkeeping, merchandising and just about any other business task you can think of. We do it all ourselves.” The Roller Rebels’ fan base is extremely loyal to their beloved hometown team. Scores of diverse fans from all walks of life turn out for their events, yet a large portion are deeply rooted in the Gainesville music and art scene. continued on page 43

“Beretta Vendetta” Shoemaker, Kathryn “Demonomia” Ross, Kerri “Suzie Bonebreaker” Duffi eld, Nandy “Zelda Shagnasty” Ferguson, Laurie “Girzzly Madams” Frierson, Miriam “Stocky Balboa” Hill, Sarah “Loose Seal Bluthe” Trainor, Robin “Patsy Clothesline” Morris, Melanie Devlin, Mark “Markus Akillius” Dykes.

Front Row (from left): Jessica Wyneken, Sarah “Jamburglar” Steele, Miranda “Matriarch” Ryan, Dawne “Coldwell Spanker” Nuri, Sara “Dr. PopHer” Williams, Amanda “Enola Slay” McCrary, Jessica “Grenade O’Conner” Windberg, Lena “Trick James” Lantinen, Jennifer “Aurora Nox” Wallace and Katie Wimmer.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

40 | Autumn 2010

Autumn 2010 | 41

Gainesville is home to the Roller Rebels, a group of enthusiastic roller derby women that entertains their fans with fast moves and bonecrushing hits. However, the members of this non-profit go beyond just skating at practice and playing bouts; they run their operation and also organize fundraisers.

>> AQUIFERious

Painting the Springs BY DENISE TRUNK KRIGBAUM

A

searing, icy blue swirls, bubbles and collides with swathes of sapphire. The vibrant shades mingle and dance across the canvas with all the energy of the Florida springs they represent. Here and there the crystalline images are clouded with tea-colored tannin, or streaked with twining eelgrass or sparked by a silver grey flicker of fin and fish. Gainesville artist Margaret Tolbert has captured the energy and essence of Florida’s springs in her paintings for more than 25 years. Tolbert’s paintings, which are often created on canvases nearly as large as the springhead she paints, invite the viewer into an underwater oasis of cool, gushing water. In her most recent endeavor,

a 160-page book named “AQUIFERious,” Tolbert takes a morethan-refreshing dip into the subject of the springs. Conceived initially as an art book to coincide with a New Orleans exhibit of her work, the project expanded to include science as it delved into the artistic, poetic, environmental, historical and geological depths of what makes the springs so vital to Florida. Because Tolbert photographs, swims and kayaks in the spring water as part of her painting process, she has witnessed changes to the springs’ pure, ageless water. Subsequently, she has recorded the water’s increased cloudiness and algae growth in her paintings. Tolbert learned that many of the ecosystem’s

subtle changes, such as species die-off, were occurring because of increasingly high concentrations of unseen pollutants and chemicals like nitrates in the water. “I see that information and history is presented in a science museum, but in an art museum what is presented are these objects that increase in value,” Tolbert said. “I want the springs to be seen as that — something that have increasing value.” Tolbert said she became interested in doing something more direct by combining science and art to bring the threats to the springs into peoples’ awareness. In 1998, she began a website that featured scientists, artists or anyone involved continued on next page

PHOTO BY TJM STUDIOS PHOTOGRAPHY

Artist Margaret Tolbert, paintbrushes in hand, stands waist-deep in the cool, clear water of Blue Springs. As part of her process, Tolbert photographs, kayaks and swims in the spring water that she paints.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

80 | Autumn 2010

Autumn 2010 | 81

80

By Denise Trunk Krigbaum

Margaret Tolbert Artist Margaret Tolbert has been capturing the beauty of the Florida’s springs for more than 25 years. “AQUIFERious” is her most recent effort, an art book that includes science as it delves into the artistic, poetic, environmental, historical and geological depths of what makes the springs so vital to Florida.

>> CARVE. GRIND. SLASH.

110

By Malika Wright

Carve. Grind. Slash. Possum Creek’s Skate Park

SKATEBOARDERS’

NEW HOME

BY MALIKA WRIGHT

T

110 | Autumn 2010

10 | Autumn 2010

park that charged skateboarders $5 per visit. But most skateboarders were students who tried to get the

a skateboard on the street as if it was a motor vehicle, skateboarding on prohibited property or gliding

do not have a basketball court or a football field to enjoy their craft. It was as if the sport for which

here is not a special lane in the road for skateboarders. Unlike other sports, they

cheapest skating deal possible, said Jordin Frazier, a 16-year-old skateboarder who practices his

down wax-covered rails meant Frazier was breaking the law. To work on their skills, he and

Gainesville resident Chris Baucom made the Florida Hall of Fame was not even recognized in our town.

sport every day. The public skate parks with a few little ramps were not any fun

other skateboarders risked getting in trouble with the police when rolling down streets and other

Sure, there were a few basic public skate parks and a private

for Frazier, a self-proclaimed rail and stairway skating expert. Riding

areas where skateboarding was not allowed. continued on next page

www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2010 | 111

It was not long ago when skateboarders would have to take to the streets to hone their skills. But now Gainesville has a skate park, providing enthusiasts the opportunity to enjoy their sport and learn new tricks.


PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

>> FEATURES

ON THE COVER

22

Margaret Tolbert with the tools of her trade - canvas, paints, brushes and kayak. Tolbert and photographer T.J. Morrissey met at Blue Springs on a recent Monday morning to snap the cover shot for this edition of Our Town Magazine.

Art Walk Gainesville’s Art Walk Offers Plenty of Reasons to Paint the Town. BY LARRY BEHNKE

28

Faust Haus Gainesville’s Sad Sisters Are Reborn On The Tuscawilla Prairie BY JANICE C. KAPLAN

50

Lake Alice Wildlife Sanctuary and Real World Laboratory BY ALBERT ISAAC

60

Wing on Out to the ButterflyFest Event Provides a Peak into the World of Butterflies BY DEBBIE M. DELOACH

72

Sebastian Ferrero Foundation Progressing Toward a Gainesville Children’s Hospital BY CHRIS WILSON

78

A Village of Art Within the City The 26th Annual Thornebrook Art Festival BY LARRY BEHNKE

90

Ghosts and Spirits Nearby Haunted Inns Offer Guests an Opportunity for the Unforgettable BY JESSICA CHAPMAN AND NICOLE GREINER

COLUMNISTS 46 Crystal Henry NAKED SALSA 68 Albert Isaac DIFFERENT NOTE 132 Brian “Krash” Kruger GATE CRASHING

INFORMATION 36 88 98 105

2010 Fall Festivals Gator Sports Schedule Community Calendar Alachua County Public 2010 School Calendar 162 Advertiser Index

The articles printed in Our Town Magazine™ do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Tower Publications, Inc. or their editorial staff. Our Town Magazine endeavors to accept reliable advertising; however, we can not be held responsible by the public for advertising claims. Our Town Magazine reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisement. All rights reserved. © 2010 Tower Publications, Inc.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2010 | 11


60 Published quarterly by Tower Publications, Inc. www.towerpublications.com

PUBLISHER Charlie Delatorre charlie@towerpublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Albert Isaac editor@towerpublications.com fax: 1-800-967-7382 OFFICE MANAGER Bonita Delatorre bonita@towerpublications.com PHOTO BY MARY WARRICK

A child proudly shows off her hand decorated mask made in the kids activities area at Butterfly Fest.

>> FEATURES 94

Haunted Inn(terview) Our Writers Discuss Thier Assignment to Document Things that Go Bump in the Night BY ALBERT ISAAC

122 Be a Mazed Micanopy Family Farm’s Annual Corn Maze BY TARA MASSAGEE-STANLEY

130 Boo at the Zoo A Halloween Festival Coming Soon To A Zoo Near You

ART DIRECTOR Hank McAfee hank@towerpublications.com SENIOR DESIGNER Tom Reno tom@towerpublications.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Larry Behnke Debbie M. DeLoach Nicole Greiner Kate Heller Crystal Henry Jason Hodges Janice Kaplan Allysen Kerr Denise Trunk Krigbaum Brian “Krash” Kruger Tara Massagee Stanley Chris Wilson Malika Wright INTERNS Jessica Chapman

BY KATE HELLER

136 Downtown Festival and Art Show Thousands of Visitors Descend Upon Gainesville BY ALBERT ISAAC

142 Civilization Restaurant A Unique Dining Cooperative BY CHRIS WILSON

145 True or False! Chomping Down on Florida Myths BY CRYSTAL HENRY

150 Underwater Hockey

ADVERTISING SALES Jenni Bennett 352-416-0210 jenni@towerpublications.com Amanda Skadhauge 352-416-0196 amanda@towerpublications.com Pam Slaven 352-416-0213 pam@towerpublications.com Helen Stalnaker 352-416-0209 helen@towerpublications.com Kayla Stump 352-416-0212 kayla@towerpublications.com Annie Waite 352-416-0204 annie@towerpublications.com

UF Team Takes National Title BY CHRIS WILSON

156 Seasonal Hummingbirds In North Florida? BY DEBBIE M. DELOACH

12 | Autumn 2010

ADVERTISING OFFICE 4400 NW 36th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax


Weddings

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352-332-1484 Autumn 2010 | 13


PHOTO BY TREVOR ISAAC

MESSAGE >> FROM THE EDITOR

Fall is in the air, which brings to mind getting my kids back to school. Frankly, I’ve enjoyed sleeping in during the summer months, but now school beckons and I will have to be up before the crack of dawn to get my youngest son to class. Our oldest boy will be starting college, and so my wife has been diligently orchestrating everything needed to get him off to a good start. I’m lucky she is so well organized and not the natural procrastinator I tend to be. I well remember leaving home to attend the University of Florida, driving down University Avenue with my friends for the very first time, my future wide-open and awaiting exploration. I immediately fell in love with Gainesville, with its trees and lakes and fields and girls — I mean academic opportunity. I immediately knew I would not be returning to live in Miami.

14 | Autumn 2010

Some of my first impressions of Gainesville include Century Tower, Paynes Prairie and, of course, Lake Alice. Recently, I talked with some people who know quite a lot about the lake. You can read all about it in this edition of Our Town. Gainesville is well known for its sports programs, but I’m thinking a lot of people may not be aware of UF’s underwater hockey team. Yes, hockey, played underwater. I, for one, was surprised to hear about it. Chris Wilson shares what he learned about this aquatic adventure. Speaking of sports, I should mention that there is now a new skate park in town. Enthusiasts no longer need to skate down streets (or public stair-rails) in order to perfect their skills. Malika Wright shares what she learned about the new park. Gainesville is also home to a roller derby team. Jason Hodges provides us with a story on the Gainesville Roller Rebels, along with some great photography by Tom (T.J.) Morrissey. We have been keeping T.J. busy with a variety of photo shoots, ranging from the Roller Rebels to soaring

skateboarders, as well as the cover shot of artist Margaret Tolbert, who can be seen painting the springs from the comfort of her kayak. With Halloween approaching, we decided to try something a little different for this edition: a story on paranormal phenomenon. We sent two writers out to spend the night in haunted houses — or more specifically a pair of bed and breakfast inns that are reportedly haunted. Both the Grady House in High Springs and the Herlong Mansion in Micanopy welcomed our writers to spend the night in these historic buildings. With stories ranging from roller derby to underwater hockey, from artists to festivals, from butterflies to hummingbirds, we strive to bring you some of the best Gainesville has to offer. s


Florida Parks 75th Anniversary To help celebrate its 75th Anniversary, the Florida State Park System is holding events at different parks throughout the state. For more information on Florida’s state parks, visit www.floridastateparks.org. SATURDAY, AUGUST 7 National Lighthouse Day Celebration at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, Key Biscayne.

SATURDAY, AUG. 28 - SUNDAY, AUG. 29 Former Mermaid Show at Weeki Wachee Springs State Park, Weeki Wachee Springs.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 9 State Park Literacy Month, Butterfly Story Time event at Washington Oaks Gardens State Park, Palm Coast.

BACK 2 SCHOOL

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SATURDAY, SEPT. 18 - SUNDAY, SEPT. 19 Spanish American War Event at Fort Clinch State Park, Fernandina Beach.

OCTOBER (ALL MONTH) Fall Harvest Days at Dudley Farm Historic State Park, Newberry.

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Autumn 2010 | 17


STAFF >> CONTRIBUTORS Jason E. Hodges

Jessica Chapman

has been a freelance writer in the Gainesville community since 1994. He enjoys sciencefiction, drawing, painting and being with friends.

is a student in UF’s College of Journalism and Communications. When she’s not writing, she enjoys volunteering, playing the piano and reading.

hodges@bellsouth.net

jessicalorriane@gmail.com

Janice Kaplan

Nicole Greiner

has been a freelance writer for five years. In her spare time Janice loves cooking, Gator sports, Jimmy Buffett anything and spending time with her husband and kids.

is a freelance writer and sophomore at UF’s College of Journalism. She loves hanging out with friends, watching football and reading. She hopes to work for the National Football League one day.

kaplan_ janice@yahoo.com

journ1453@ufl.edu

Crystal Henry

Denise Trunk Krigbaum

is a freelance writer and columnist born and raised in West Texas. She received her B.S. in Journalism in 2006 from the University of Florida. She is in love with the Florida landscape.

is a freelance writer, adjunct professor at UF, wife and a mom. She has lived in Gainesville for eons and has managed to turn over a few stones while here. She has found many hidden gems. More remain to be discovered.

ces03k@gmail.com

dtrunk@ufl.edu

Tara Massagee Stanley

Chris Wilson

is a freelance writer and journalism senior with aspirations of becoming a lawyer. She enjoys spending quality time with her family and friends.

has been a professional editor and writer for community publications in Gainesville and Tampa for more than 10 years. He also has a passion for history and sports. Chris and his family live in Newberry.

t.massagee.stanley@gmail.com

cwilson5000@msn.com

18 | Autumn 2010

Malika A. Wright

Kate Heller

is a freelance writer and student in UF’s College of Journalism and Communications. She enjoys singing, listening to music and writing and is the president of SingerSongwriter Society at UF.

is a freelance writer and recent graduate of UF’s College of Journalism. She enjoys reading, watching and playing sports and driving in her Jeep Wrangler with the top down.

mawright@ufl.edu

Kcheller@comcast.net

Larry Behnke

Debbie M. DeLoach, Ph.D.

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>> CULTURAL EVENTS

Art Walk Gainesville’s Art Walk Offers Plenty of Reasons to Paint the Town. BY LARRY BEHNKE ood, drink, happy conversations with creative people... oh, and plenty of artwork. What is not to like about Gainesville’s Art Walk? On the final Friday of each month, the downtown area blossoms in colorful creations at several shops and galleries. From 7 until 10 p.m. the public is invited into venues large and small to meet the artists and see their work. Maps are available, but stumbling upon the art is also possible. Just look for the lights and groups of people in shops that are not usually open late. In February, live music from the Bo Diddley Plaza echoed off the buildings. Bars and restaurants were busier than usual. All ages in all styles of dress, from New York hip to student casual could be observed. Leslie Peebles makes prints. She explained the workings of a press to a group gathered around the print she recently made of a river scene. The studio of Sweetwater Print Co-op is open for inspection.

F

This night it was transformed into a reception area with humus and pita bread slices, crackers and guacamole, pretzels and spinach dip and little cups of wine. In January, the co-op featured photography by Pat Wolfe and sculptures by Edwin Anderson. In March, six artist friends showed work created from found objects traded among them. Upstairs in the Tench building, above the Co-op, are six artist studios. Octogenarian Lenny Kessel keeps one. A common area displayed photos by Larry Santucci in March. Judge Benmont Tench donated the building to artists on the condition that the building continues to be used as an art space. At the studio next door, Eleanor Blair presented a video showing her doing a large painting behind the Gainesville Chamber Orchestra. She works in rapid brush strokes near the musicians; the whole work was done in an hour. There is no food or drink in Blair’s studio. “I stopped serving food and wine

and my sales actually went up,” she said. “I had more time to spend with customers and it was less crowded. If you come in any other time, I’ll serve you,” she added with a smile. In January, Blair invited four friends to show their work in her studio. During the March Art Walk, Blair let artists Annie Seraphine and Stan Kitching show Florida landscape paintings along one wall. Blair recalled the decades of Art Walks in which she has participated, going back to the 1970s. “Volunteers would work on various Art Walks over the years, then get burned out,” she said. “This version has lasted ten years. Each artist contributes to a fund for advertising the event and printing maps.” The map not only shows where the Art is located, but also tells something about each artist on the walk. Danny Zabowski describes his work showing at the Civic Media Center as “the beauty of this wonderful planet we live in and the beautiful continued on page 25

PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

Julie Amspach and Kathryn Ziewitz of Gainesville at the Eleanor Blair Studio during a recent Art Walk.

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o continued from page 22 creatures we exist with.” Ruth Whiting describes her artwork as exploring “the connective tissue of our technologies, giving them their own mythology.” In one of her paintings butterflies have circuit board wings with clothespin antennas. Whiting is also a teacher and has illustrated a children’s book. “The best path to technical prowess is your own passion,” she states. Whiting’s show at the Batista Gallery in February was replaced in March with a show called “Into the Aquifer.” It featured watery-looking lenticular photos (similar to large “wiggle pictures”) as well as massive, seven-foot-square, underwater imaged canvasses priced at $17,000. Andrew Maben had his February show at the gallery inside the Hippodrome Theater. Huge, bright “found photos of candid scenes” filled the walls. Maben calls himself an “artist-traveler-writer-poetmusician-seeker” who trained in Sussex, England, and has also been a house painter and cab driver. “My real apprenticeship has been life’s journey,” he said during his first show in Florida. The Hipp also showed photography in January; 20 images by the winners of the first annual Gainesville Photography Contest — photos culled from 289 submissions. The March Art Walk theme was Environmental Awareness Month. That night at the Hipp featured cast-off and found objects in

PHOTOS BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

Top Left: Artwork by Emmett Williams. Top Right: Artist Cynthia Pagel stands in front of some of her work in the Tench Building Artist Studios. Above: Visitors and artists mingle in the Tench Building Artist Studios during an Art Walk in June.

surprising and magical combinations of beauty. One work by Lorelei Esser featured a doll top attached to a washing machine agitator on a lazy Susan. Hundreds of tiny objects swirled down the vanes from the doll in colorful, symbolic waves. In the same gallery Susan Nash echoed Esser’s theme. “Using everyday objects allows me to see everything as potential art and provides me with a constant flow of ideas and

challenges,” she explained. Sidsel Moreb showed her work in an intimate little beauty salon in the Sun Center in February. She shared the area with two other artists, but had plenty of room. Her intricate tapestry weavings, mostly of English scenes, are only 3 inches square. Next door, the following month, Carol Barber displayed colorful fantasy images, while both of her young sons did their own drawings. She does continued on next page

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“painting for the love of color, the joyous process of layering paint and the inspiration of the wonderful world around us.” Nearby, George DeLoach displayed his nature photography and answered viewer’s questions about his stunning digital images. Valerie Rosencrantz displayed her fabric, jewelry and “art play” at Southeast 2 Place. “I had an urge to make them for myself, then my sister and a friend wanted some,” she said. “Then I was making them for strangers on my Web site.” Rosencrantz uses vintage beads, gemstones and found objects such as dice and Scrabble pieces to craft her unique, wearable art. Emmett Williams paints swirling representations of singers and jazz musicians. One can almost “hear” the paintings. His studio is small and the paintings large, but the atmosphere is cozy. Natalie Richardson is the coordinator of Gainesville’s Art Walks. In

her second year of bringing them to life, she still exudes a passion for the monthly event. “We have different artists featured each month,” she said. “Most are local, but we have some from around Florida.” Richardson spoke of an Art Walk “public,” longtime attendees of the event. “Some people appreciate the goodies, the wine and food, and there is something for everyone to see.” Before the March Art Walk, she described its theme of environmental awareness, appropriately preceding April’s Earth Day. “We’ll have art made from recyclables,” she said. “And there will be natural Florida landscape art, reminding people what we need to preserve.” February’s Walk featured Andrew Ma Ben, who would have also fit the March theme. He stated, “My mission as an artist is to express joy in the beauty to be found all around us here on our long-suffering,

generous planet Earth.” Richardson described a younger crowd, those who gravitate toward the Civic Media Center. “They have more alternative and interactive art there,” she said, and described one piece that shot flames from metal pipes while someone played its keyboard. At the CMC in January, images of the Virgin Mary were shown by Jacob Adams. Dave Mockaitus salvaged and re-imagined “coercive images of advertising,” and Charles Chase’s work “expanded beyond the picture plane ... creating confusing, silly connections.” The CMC’s March show displayed photos and art by Eastside High School students. From youth to the curious to the well-heeled, a variety of people enjoy coming downtown for the Gainesville Art Walk. And each month holds surprising new art, “a little bit of everything,” Richardson said. s For more information, contact Natalie Richardson at 352-328-5927 or artwalkgville@gmail.com.

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>> TWISTED SISTER

Faust Haus Gainesville’s Sad Sisters Are Reborn On The Tuscawilla Prairie BY JANICE C. KAPLAN n the peaceful Tuscawilla Prairie just outside of Micanopy, sits a picturesque home of historic value. Although it was completed in 2006, its roots go back greater than 100 years to 1905, to the construction of some very famous sisters - the Gainesville Sad Sisters, four historic Gainesville homes that were demolished years ago. The house belongs to Raleigh Faust, an Indiana native who came to the University of Florida on a swimming scholarship in 1993. An environmentally-conscious man, Faust has always preferred recycling old materials to make something new and beautiful. “I wanted a cracker-style home, and I love to reuse materials,” Faust said. “I’ve always used crushed concrete for driveways and I like

O

to conserve. I can’t stand cutting down trees, so there’s a lot of wood [in the house] that’s recycled.” In the late 1990s, Faust was the owner of Chain Reaction Bicycles when he fell in love with heart pine wood. Upon the closing of Babalou’s Records in Gainesville, Faust claimed the heart pine floor joists from that store and built a heavy-duty bed from them. So when the largely-pine Sad Sisters came to their fittingly sad end, he realized there was an opportunity to create something truly special. Built sometime around 1905 for working class renters, the Sad Sisters were located near SE 2nd Place for 80 years before they were moved to East University Avenue to make room for Arlington Square apartments. The houses sat vacant and were continued on page 30

PHOTO BY JANICE KAPLAN

Raleigh Faust lives at this home with his daughters Ruby, 3, and Jade, 6.

28 | Autumn 2010


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Autumn 2010 | 29


PHOTOS BY JANICE KAPLAN

CLOCKWISE from LEFT: The open staircase and loft take advantage of the two-story living room. Faust’s master bedroom, including the

Raleigh Faust’s home sits on over 30 scenic acres of the Tuscawilla Prairie.

heart pine bed made with fl oor joists from Babalou’s Records. Heart

o continued from page 28

pine wood from the Sad Sisters

ultimately acquired in 1994 by area developer and bed and breakfast owner Giovanna Holbrook, who had hoped to renovate them. Her original intent was to incorporate them into a retail, office and bedand-breakfast complex, but the $2.2 million project was denied a federal loan. Her subsequent plan to overhaul and sell or rent them as single family homes never came to fruition. According to Faust, Holbrook had a carpenter go into the homes to see if they were worth remodeling.

was used for the upstairs fl ooring. The combination of old and new is a recurring theme throughout the house. The Sad Sisters wood in Faust’s custom mantle is set next to newer wood; the finish is similar, but Faust points out the difference in the distance between tree rings (the Sad Sisters wood is on the right). In the cupola, trim made of old Sad Sisters wood (background) and newer wood crossbeams (foreground) bathe in the sunshine streaming through the windows.

30 | Autumn 2010

“He walked up the first set of stairs and fell through them, and he told her, ‘the last thing you want to do is remodel the homes,’” Faust said. In November 2003 the City of Gainesville moved forward with demolition plans. The homes were dismantled as carefully as possible, saving wood, door and window trim, baseboards and any other reusable fixtures in the house. Despite the dilapidated condition of the buildings there was much to be salvaged, including an entire staircase made of heart continued on page 33


The kitchen includes wood from the Sad Sisters as well as from the old Evinston, FL post ofďŹ ce. Floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room bring the outside indoors. Photo (far left) courtesy of Joy Glanzer.

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o continued from page 30 pine which was still in good shape. Faust hauled four trailers full of materials from the site and spent the next several months working with the wood to make it suitable for building his own home.

The house is on pilings to minimize impact to the land and the animals around it. Faust designed the new house himself and built it over 18 months with help from several friends and professionals. Materials from the Sad Sisters can now be found throughout the three bedroom, three bathroom 2600-square-foot structure, and they are complemented by new materials in a seamless blend

of antique and contemporary. The highlight of the downstairs is the two-story-high living room with wood floors, a stone fireplace, and a mantle built with Sad Sisters wood. The room is framed by an entirely windowed back wall that overlooks a stone-trimmed pool, the prairie and the conservation area behind it. The kitchen features custom cabinets made from the Sad Sisters pine by Kip Wood out of Micanopy. “He does amazing cabinetry,” Faust said, “a style where all the faces of the doors and drawers are notched out and then pressed together and plugged.” The dining room adjacent to the kitchen includes a unique decoration - an original mantle from one of the old houses that Faust chemically treated, pressure washed and then sanded. It now hangs on the wall, creating an elegant focal point in the room. A twisting stairway leads to a loft overlooking the living room, followed by a hallway that

continues to the master suite. The 2x4 and 2x6 heart pine planks used for the floor were the floor joists of the Sad Sisters. The simply furnished master bedroom includes the heart pine bed Faust made years ago, as well as a cathedralstyle window and doorways trimmed with molding from the old homes. The trim continues into the master bath, which is finished with marble floors and countertops. Faust kept the environment in mind, not only while selecting his materials, but when choosing his site and situating the house as well. “The house is on pilings to minimize impact to the land and the animals around it,” Faust said. “The land behind it is now a nature preserve that belongs to the Alachua Conservation Trust and there’s no hunting around it.” In creating his labor of love, Raleigh Faust has taken a part of Gainesville’s history and made it into a unique and beautiful home worthy of its own story. s

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FALL FESTIVALS If there is one thing certain about seasons, it is that fall is the time for festivals. As Florida slowly (very slowly) slips into winter and the weather gets cooler, festivals abound in the surrounding areas.

High Springs RiverFest Downtown High Springs October 1-3 All Day With all the water sports and activities in the local High Springs area, the High Springs Main Street Program will host the first River Festival, featuring live music concerts downtown and conservation efforts, as well as presentations by world-renown photographer and cave diver Jill Heinerth. highspringsriverfest.com

Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk The Village at Haile Plantation, Gainesville October 2 8 a.m. (registration), 9 a.m. (walk) The Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer care, support and research. Although there are no fees to walk, people are encouraged to raise money to help support research and care for Alzheimer’s Disease. One mile and three mile courses are available for the walk, and people usually register in teams. Registration is available online. www.alz.org

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22nd Annual Central Florida Harvest and Peanut Festival Linear Park, Williston October 2 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This festival is held each year on the first Saturday in October. Games, food, crafts and other entertainment will take place all day, including a reverse drawing raffle with a $2,000 prize. The Peanut Industry Showcase will have a wide variety of peanuts and peanut products available, too. willistonfl.com

ButterflyFest

Eighth Annual Harvest Festival Main Street, Alachua October 17 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The downtown Alachua festival features shopping, strolling and dining along Main Street. Local musicians entertain while visitor check out local arts and crafts vendors lining the street. Vendors for the festival are still needed and can contact the Alachua Business League for more information. alachuabusiness.com/festivals.html

Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville October 23 - 24 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The ButterflyFest will feature tours, presentations, a Monarch Watch, workshops, as well as other displays and contests. The ButterflyFest is designed to raise awareness about butterflies and offer a call to action for the conservation and preservation of backyard wildlife and habitats. flmnh.ufl.edu/butterflyfest

36th Annual Micanopy Fall Harvest Festival

Thornebrook Village, Gainesville October 2-3 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The two-day festival will feature fine arts and crafts from local artists in the area. Visitors can stroll through Thornebrook Village and enjoy the local art. Wisitors will also be able to attend a preview show on October 1, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., with jazz music, wine and cheese.

McIntosh 1890s Festival McIntosh October 23 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Each year this festival raises money for community projects, including scholarships and city beautification projects. The residents dress up in 1890s clothing, and vendors surround the traditional Victorian and Florida cracker-style houses.

Cholokka Boulevard, Micanopy October 30 - 31 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For one of Micanopy’s biggest events of the year, visitors can stroll down Cholokka Boulevard and enjoy the local artists and musicians during Micanopy’s Fall Festival. About 200 arts and crafts will fill the streets along will a variety of other attractions. All of the proceeds from the festival go to non-profit groups that have helped support the festival.

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Downtown Gainesville November 6 - 7 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Enjoy art, jewelry, ceramics and photography from more than 250 of the country’s most talented artists. The festival will feature arts of all kinds - including culinary arts, children’s art and performance art. For the past three years, Sunshine Artist magazine has recognized the festival as one of the top 30 fairs and festivals in the country, naming it No. 27 in 2009. Greg Lawler’s Art Fair SourceBook also ranked the festival as one of the top 100 fine art festivals in the nation.

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Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, North Lawn, Gainesville November 18 6 p.m. The evening walk and fundraising event for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society helps raise money for research and educational programs. There is no deadline to sign up, but participants are encouraged to sign up early. Although there is no cost to participate, if walkers would like a T-shirt and balloon, a minimum $100 donation is suggested. Walkers can register online.

James Paul Park, High Springs October 2 10 p.m. to 4 p.m. The annual festival, sponsored by the High Springs Chamber of Commerce, will include food, arts and crafts and a concert. Many local business will be partipating in the event, and the Chamber is still looking for vendors. Interested vendors should contact the High Springs Chamber of Commerce. Highsprings.com

18th Annual High Springs Car Show High Springs October 30 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Car enthusiast can gather in High Springs for the High Springs Rotary Club’s annual car show. The will feature 100 cars, including antique cars and hot rods. Breakfast will be served and sausage hotdogs will be served for lunch. There will also be a cruise-in on Friday, October 29, at 3 p.m. beginning at the Civic Center to the home of Dr. Robert Cade, inventor of Gatorade. Prizes such as People’s Choice and Best of Show will be awarded to the antique, modified and street-rod vehicles. highspringsrotary.org s

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Area Families Get a “Clean Start” ADVERTISEMENT

and the difference it makes. “Even though my life is chaotic with all the children’s therapies, it makes me feel better when the house is clean and stuff is in order.” Truth be told, according to Doak, the event was just as rewarding for the Mini Maid team as it was for the families they served. “You read a little bit about these people’s stories ahead of time, talk to

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ife comes at you fast and we can all end up with more than we can handle now and then. Whether dealing with illness, family struggles or just the frenetic pace of everyday life, the last thing you have time for is mopping the floor. That’s why Mini Maid of Alachua County created Clean Start Day. Clean Start Day is Mini Maid’s way of giving back to deserving families in our community by thoroughly cleaning their homes from top to bottom at no charge - windows, floors, dishes, dusting, bathrooms – you name it, they cleaned it. “We wanted to find families whose lives we could genuinely impact by doing what we do best, making their homes cleaner, healthier, happier,” says Mini Maid owner, Carol Doak. Mini Maid opened online nominations in May and selected two families whose stories were perfectly in-line with the mission of the initiative. The Mancusos of Starke were first to receive a Clean Start. Busy mother, Beth, and husband, Anthony, are blessed with two beautiful sons and one more on the way, but last year, her youngest, Ezra, was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, a form of cancer. “Hearing that is a parent’s worst nightmare,” shared Beth. Ezra is one-third of the way though a three-year chemotherapy regimen so

a clean environment is crucial to lessen the risk of infection while his immune system rebuilds. For Beth, the best part about Clean Start Day is the time it frees up to focus on more important things. “Being pregnant makes it hard to get everything clean and this gives me more time to play with the boys. We’re so grateful that Mini Maid’s able to come and help us out.” The next stop on Clean Start Day was the VonBehren home in Gainesville. Jessica has five adopted children, the three youngest of which each cope with various developmental disabilities, having been born to mothers with similar conditions. Naturally, Jessica spends a substantial portion of her days driving kids to and from doctor appointments and therapy sessions, limiting the time available to scrub baseboards. Mini Maids made the VonBehren home shine, vacuuming carpets, dusting ceiling fans, wiping down cabinets and much more and Jessica couldn’t thank the crew enough for all their hard work

them briefly on the phone,” says Doak, “but then you get into their homes and you see the kids’ faces and you get to know the people and everyone’s just so appreciative. It moves you.” This was the first year for Mini Maid’s Clean Start Day, but certainly not the last, with plans to expand the project to include even more families next year. Cleaning someone’s home may seem like a small thing, but it can make a huge impact. According to Jessica VonBehren, “when your house is neat and clean, it just makes everything else seem a little more manageable.”

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Autumn 2010 | 39


>> ROLLER DERBY

With a Rebel Yell The Gainesville Roller Rebels Lend New Meaning to Rock ‘n’ Roll BY JASON E. HODGES y now, many folks may have heard of the Gainesville Roller Rebels (GRR), the roller derby team that has taken Gainesville by storm. With stage names like Grizzly Madams, Suzie Bonebreaker, Stocky Balboa and Zelda Shagnasty, most would

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40 | Autumn 2010

assume plenty of excitement with the roller derby sport. And they would not be disappointed. Although roller derby has been around for many years, for Gainesville it is relatively new. Members agree the GRR has had an impact on the community by


empowering women through the sport. At the same time, the GRR women have been great role models for their younger fans by simply showing that you can be a star by being yourself. GRR Media relations manager Adrienne “Rage-rienne” Filardo sees the sport as more than physical. She sees it as an opportunity for women to acquire leadership skills. “We are a business for women, by women. As a non-profit we have a lot of work to do, and everyone volunteers beyond just skating at practice and playing bouts,” Filardo said. “GRR offers personal development in organizing fundraisers, negotiating contracts, landing sponsorships, bookkeeping, merchandising and just about any other business task you can think of. We do it all ourselves.” The Roller Rebels’ fan base is extremely loyal to their beloved hometown team. Scores of diverse fans from all walks of life turn out for their events, yet a large portion are deeply rooted in the Gainesville music and art scene. continued on page 43

PHOTOS BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

The Gainesville Roller Rebels Back row (from left): Ryan “Wisconsin Ref Trip” Tanay, Amber “Block Buster” Delmas, Jennifer “Lava Tramp” Black, Adrienne “Rage-rienne” Filardo, Sarah “Sara Leethal” Purcell, Carrie ““Beretta Vendetta” Shoemaker, Kathryn “Demonomia” Ross, Kerri “Suzie Bonebreaker” Duffi eld, Nandy “Zelda Shagnasty” Ferguson, Laurie “Girzzly Madams” Frierson, Miriam “Stocky Balboa” Hill, Sarah “Loose Seal Bluthe” Trainor, Robin “Patsy Clothesline” Morris, Melanie Devlin, Mark “Markus Akillius” Dykes.

Front Row (from left): Jessica Wyneken, Sarah “Jamburglar” Steele, Miranda “Matriarch” Ryan, Dawne “Coldwell Spanker” Nuri, Sara “Dr. PopHer” Williams, Amanda “Enola Slay” McCrary, Jessica “Grenade O’Conner” Windberg, Lena “Trick James” Lantinen, Jennifer “Aurora Nox” Wallace and Katie Wimmer.

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Autumn 2010 | 41


42 | Autumn 2010


o continued from page 41 Nevertheless, their fans can be seen at bouts cheering the Rebels on to victory, holding signs with their favorite player’s name and dressing in derby attire. Skirts, fishnet stockings, ripped clothes and tattoos are common in this workplace. All of this adds to the excitement for the Roller Rebels. The louder and more outgoing the crowd, the harder the players seem to skate. “What I am sure inspires people is when they see us take a hit and then we get right back up on our feet,” Filardo said. “It’s almost a metaphor for how you have to live your life, you know?” In Roller Derby there are two teams skating against each other. Each team consists of five energized ladies filled with enthusiasm. Four positions out of the five are known as blockers. The fifth position is called a Jammer. The object is for a team’s Jammer to skate past the opposing team’s blockers while being defended by her own blockers. Once the Jammer has passed the last blocker on the opposing team, she is able to start scoring points. The Jammer is easily identified by a large star worn on her helmet. The game is made up of two thirty-minute halves. The Jams run for about two minutes or until the Jammer declares the jam is over. This seems like a short time period for cheering fans, but the nonstop action of skating, falling and dodging elbows are enough to tire the greatest competitor. “On the track you are charged with protecting your girls,” Filardo said. “It might sound a little counter continued on next page

PHOTOS BY TJ MORRISSEY LOTUS STUDIOS

Kathryn “Demonomia” Ross, Kerri “Suzie Bonebreaker” Duffi eld and Adrienne “Rage-rienne” Filardo.


intuitive but derby gives you a very intense instinct to protect and care about those around you. This has a tendency to show in other parts of your life as well. For the truly brave at heart, there is suicide seating on the floor, right up close and personal. Blockers sometimes send their opponents flying into this area, which almost always results in a visit to the penalty box, known to the Derby Girls as the Sin Bin. Grizzly Madams is easily seen as a crucial player for GRR. To date, she holds many of the team’s MVP Awards. Being one of the rebel’s power blockers, to the fans she is truly a bear on wheels. With her thousandyard stare and her second amendment slogan, “The Right To Bear Arms,” she is more than intimidating for the girls trying to snake past her to get a point. “Roller Derby is very unique in that ladies of various backgrounds, ages, shapes and sizes can be successful at this sport,” Madams said. “At my age of 45, you have

to be at the top of your game. Once your body is conditioned you become a force to be reckoned with. You have already gone through many of the trials and tribulations in life. You have slain many of your monsters. Because of this, your experience is broader than that of a younger opponent. It gives me an edge in my sport.” Madams is an intensivecare nurse who has a real love for the sport. On the track she brings a no-nonsense approach to the game. But afterwards, she is with the other Rebels staying long after the match, taking photos and chatting with fans. “Being a nurse is an intensive job and it requires an intensive hobby,” Madams said about blending her career with on court activities. Founded in 2007, this grassroots organization has grown over the last few years. “Everything that GRR is today we owe in large part to our founder Catherine ‘Ms. Rebel’ Seemann,” Filardo said. “GRR has a lot to be proud of since our founding in November of 2007. Our membership, which began with five or six league members, has reached almost 50. In a town as transient as Gainesville, it really says a lot that we have the member retention that we do.” Screaming fans cheering the rebels on to victory and holding signs with their favorite player’s name adds to the excitement to the game. In the end, this is what keeps both player and fan coming back for more. s For more information about upcoming bouts and events, visit gainesvillerollerrebels.com

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COLUMN >> CRYSTAL HENRY

Naked Salsa I heard the most beautifully sad song today. It wasn’t a twangy country tune, or a slowdance ballad. It’s one you probably know. t’s a song I learned as a child. It goes, “Happy birthday to you. Happy birthday to you. Happy birthday dear so and so. Happy birthday to you.” Typically this song is only upsetting for those celebrating the 10th anniversary of their 30th birthday. But when the “so and so” was replaced by my baby girl’s name, this song put a knot in my throat and a tear in my eye. And the second verse, “How oh-old are you? How oh-old are you? How old are you Sunny? How oh-old are you?” Well that one just opened the water works. So much so that the third verse, “She’s wuh-un year old. She’s wuh-un year old. She’s wuh-un year old. Sunny’s wuh-un year old,” well that one was an unrecognizable stream of blubbering sniffles. My baby is 1. It’s just not possible. Only a second ago I was toting her around all safe and warm in my womb. She’d tumble and somersault while I read books about What to Expect. And I had read all the books, so I thought I knew just what to expect. But oh, what a year of surprises this has been. The first thing I didn’t expect was how big my love could be for something that small. It’s not that I didn’t think I’d love her with my whole heart. It’s just that I didn’t know how big my heart would grow to be. I wouldn’t just take a bullet for this kid. I’d take the bullet and get back up to stomp the face of the person who even though about putting such a dangerous object within 100 yards of my precious angel. They also don’t tell you that the world changes once that child arrives. Oh people can tell you all day how different your life will be once you have a child. But until that little miracle arrives, you just think that means you won’t be going to the movies for a while. But no. When Sunny was born, the world I used to know vanished. I remember being wheeled out of the hospital as my husband Cary pulled the car around. And as I looked up at the sky, the air smelled different.

I

46 | Autumn 2010

It’s as if when I waddled my pregnant butt through those revolving doors, I was entering a black hole. And as I came out of the same doors a few days later, I was entering a parallel universe. That has to be what it is. The Parents and the Non-Parents co-exist in different layers of the universe. Everything looks the same, but it’s different. We can see the Non-Parents, and they can see us. They can especially see us when our children are screaming bloody murder in a fine family dining establishment. But there’s some sort of layer between us. When I lived in the NP world, I was a thrill junkie. I loved riding roller coasters and watching scary movies. I craved the adrenaline rush. But now that I’ve entered the Parenting world, my adrenaline is jacked up nearly all day. I’m chasing this little thing around who likes to dive off of beds and literally play with fire. And it’s my sole job to make sure she lives to see another day. Any more adrenaline rushes would send me into cardiac arrest. So although I used to curl up in the dark and enjoy a good thriller, I now leave the lights on just a little bit during “Finding Nemo.” I can feel for that little clown fish father, and I hope that my baby never gets scooped up by a scuba diver dentist with a deranged niece. But of all the things I didn’t expect, I think the one that shocked me the most is the fact that I’d have to say goodbye so soon. When I found out I was pregnant, I knew that some day I’d have to fight back tears as we moved her into her college dorm. And I knew I wouldn’t be able to stop the tears when her daddy walked her down the aisle. But I never imagined that I’d only have a year before I had to say my first goodbye. Yep, just one year after I gave birth to the most beautiful creature on earth, I had to say goodbye to Baby Sunny. You see, as we sang the words “Happy birthday to


you,” I realized Baby Sunny was slipping away, and Toddler Sunny was moving in with us. My first clue should have been the disappearance of the 3-month onesies and the breast pump, but I was oblivious until I heard, “How oh-old are you?” Well as we all know, at wu-uhn year old, she’s not a baby anymore. She’s a walking, talking trouble machine, who is slowly gaining the independence I desperately desired just 11 months ago. Baby Sunny needed me for everything. I was her source of transportation, food, entertainment and security. I was on call for that child 24 hours a day and seven days a week. But Toddler Sunny just waddles her way over to her box of teething biscuits and giggles as she dumps them on the floor for a feast. My job has been reduced to security detail. I just have to make sure she doesn’t smack her head into anything as she masters this walking business. And truth be told, I might be fired soon from that. I remember thinking when she was just a few weeks old, and I was sleep deprived and hormonal as all get out, that if I could just stick it out until she was a little more self-sufficient it would get easier. I felt guilty for wishing that she didn’t need me for everything. And now that she doesn’t, I feel a little remorse for not cherishing every single solitary screaming moment of those first few months. Because now that Baby Sunny is gone, all I have left of her is a

hard drive full of photos and videos that I don’t have time to peruse because Toddler Sunny is trying to ride the poodle around the living room. But I have to say, as I’m starting to get to know Toddler Sunny, I think I have more in common with her than I did with Baby Sunny. Toddler Sunny gets my sense of humor, and she understands way more English. She’s a giggly little squirt with a mischievous grin and a penchant for cuddling. And although she doesn’t need me to do everything for her, she certainly wants me around to watch her do it for herself. We’re going through a phase now where she crawls up my leg if I try to put her down too soon. She loves me with her whole heart, and she’s just so darn fun. I feel a little guilty because although Baby Sunny was so sweet, Toddler Sunny is the one I want to party with. The little bouncy butt jig she does when she hears music is just about the cutest thing I’ve ever seen. So I’ll say goodbye to Baby Sunny with a tear in my eye. But I will welcome the birth of Toddler Sunny. She’s spunky and inquisitive and someone I love discovering the world with. She loves to point and make a sound as if to say, “What’s that Mommy?” She’s just a little sponge soaking up all I can teach her. And since she loves to dance and sing, I’ll teach her a little ditty I learned as a kid. “Happy birthday to you. Happy birthday to you. Happy birthday Toddler Sunny. Happy birthday to you.” s

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>> EDUCATION

Lake Alice Wildlife Sanctuary & Real World Laboratory BY ALBERT ISAAC or longer than most can remember, Lake Alice consisted of little more than a small farm pond. When the water level is low, old fence posts can still be seen emerging from this relatively shallow water body, testament to a time when farmland surrounded the University of Florida. As the university grew, and roadways, sidewalks and buildings began to cover the landscape, when it rained all that water runoff had to go somewhere. Lake Alice seemed the most logical place to retain the overflow. Yes, Lake Alice is a retention pond. Granted, a very scenic retention pond, but a retention pond all the same. The lake now encompasses about 30 acres of marsh and 22 acres of open water teeming with life. “From what I understand, originally there were a couple of small natural ponds, most likely old sinkholes,”

F

said UF Professor Chuck Cichra. “Then they actually built a small levee around one side and it became deeper and it grew, up to a couple of acres or so.” Cichra is also the extension fisheries specialist responsible for coordinating and conducting the university’s statewide fisheries, aquaculture and pond management extension program. He has studied the lake since July of 1986. Lake Alice is home to a variety of major sport fish, Cichra said, including largemouth bass, bluegill (bream), redear sunfish (shell crackers), black crappie (speckled perch), spotted sunfish, as well as brown bullheads (speckled cats), Florida gar and the occasional longnose and bowfin (mudfish), to name but a few. “And thousands of golden shiners,” he said. “All continued on next page those species I named are

1. PHOTO COURTESY OF LARRY KORHNAK

2. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK CICHRA

Students electrofish the lake to collect data on

UF students collect data from fish. A weed conveyer

the fish. From left: Tanya Darress, Rio Throm, Kurt

belt can be seen behind them.

Larson (teaching assistant) and Erin Jarc show off their catch: a largemouth bass that had been tagged earlier in the semester by students. Each tag has a number indicating when the fi sh was tagged, its

3. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK CICHRA

A Bluegill caught in Lake Alice. A wide variety of fish can be found in the lake.

length and how much it weighed. By recapturing it,

4. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK CICHRA

they can estimate the number of fish in the lake and

University of Florida students on electrofishing boat

its growth rate since its time of capture.

with a weed harvester in the background.

50 | Autumn 2010


1

2

3

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“We estimated there were 15,000 tilapia that died off. They’re about a 4-pound fish, so we’re talking 60,000 pounds of tilapia.” found in virtually every natural lake in Florida.” But despite the abundance of sport fish, fishing is not allowed at Lake Alice. Even Cichra and his students need permits from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to sample the lake. Piloting aluminum boats, Cichra and his students electro-fish the lake. “It’s kind of like a taser,” Cichra said. Using nets they pull each of the stunned fish into the boat. They weigh, measure, tag and otherwise study the fish before releasing them back into the lake. Over the decades, the lake has grown and shrunk, depending greatly upon human activity and rainfall. In the 1930s, only the west end of the lake was wet and consisted of about 4 hectares, or 10 acres. In the ensuing decades, in addition to storm water runoff, wastewater from UF and Shands was pumped into the lake. By the end of the 1960s, Lake Alice had grown to more than 80 hectares — nearly 200 acres. “It was bigger in 1968,” said Larry Korhnak, a senior biologist at UF. “The whole basin was full because of a heating plant at Shands that put in about a million gallons a day — a lot of water. Then the water hyacinths began taking over.” Korhnak’s 1996 thesis examined the effects of removing the flow of wastewater into the lake. When water laden with nutrients enters wetlands, nature does the recycling. Bacteria essentially convert nitrogen into nitrogen gas that goes into the atmosphere instead of into the aquifer.

52 | Autumn 2010

“The lake and the wetland in particular were a permitted part of treatment system,” Korhnak said. “What’s been fun with our class as we sample the lake for years, is that when it was receiving sewage effluent, tertiary treated, we’d go out there electrofishing and the numbers of the catch were so great we could never work them all out,” Cichra said. “Of course, the water was really green because it was getting all the nutrients. And we had all those tilapia out there feeding and stirring up the bottom and eating all the little plants.”

TILAPIA

In the early ‘90s, when the effluent was flowing, Cichra said they would catch 14- and 15-pound largemouth bass. “We were out there one day and we released about a 10-pound bass,” Cichra recalled. “It was still a little lethargic from being shocked, and an osprey came and grabbed it. The fish actually took the bird underwater. A few seconds later


It’s Your

Future Are You Ready? PHOTO BY ALBERT ISAAC

This panorama provides a view of Lake Alice from end to end. From this vantage point off of Museum Road, alligators and softshell turtles can often be seen in the water just off the bank.

this bird came up to the surface, flopped around, and flew off into the trees — without the fish.” In the fall of 1994, the treated wastewater was diverted away from the lake through a pipe running along museum road and directly into an injection well. The effluent — which is treated to drinking-water standards — now flows into the aquifer. But diverting the wastewater away from the lake had consequences. “In the winter of 2000-2001 there was a huge tilapia die-off,” Cichra said. “We estimated there were 15,000 tilapia that died off. They’re about a 4-pound fish, so we’re talking 60,000 pounds of tilapia. Now students study the effect of the tilapia die-off.” Without the tilapia, plants began overtaking the lake. First came the green, stringy filamentous algae, Cichra said. Then, over time, the larger plants began showing up. Water hyacinths covered most of the lake’s surface. “The tilapia are little aquatic pigs out there just rooting around on the bottom,” Cichra said. “They were eating diatoms and filamentous algae.” The reason for the massive die off, Korhnak said, is because of the change in water temperature. “When they were putting the wastewater in, that water was actually heated compared to normal water, and the lake was warmer and would actually support tilapia,” Korhnak said. When the flow was shut off, Cichra said they also saw immediate declines in the phosphorus and nitrogen, and over time the fish have become less abundant. The lake has become less productive. continued on next page

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54 | Autumn 2010


PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK CICHRA

Some plants can double in 15 days, said UF Professor Charles Cichra. Harvesters are used to remove the overgrowth.

To help battle the runaway plant growth, genetically engineered grass carp were introduced into Lake Alice. Cichra said UF obtained a permit from the FWC to put these sterile, exotic fish into the lake. “UF had to purchase them — $6 a fish — and put them in because the tilapia died off and the algae and vegetation got worse,” Cichra said. “There was too much vegetation. Some of those plants double every 15 days. And you had to haul them somewhere and dump them somewhere. The harvesters were going steady for a couple of years. They had a big conveyor belt by the boat ramp at the south end of the lake and they had to back up a dump truck and fill it.” Effluent or not, the lake still supports a diversity of life, from alligators to turtles to all kinds of waterfowl: anhinga, osprey, wood ducks, great blue herons and great egrets, to name but a few. In decades past, alligators became a great concern. A local newspaper reportedly published a photo of a jogging student having to hop over a gator on the jogging path. Sometime in the late 1970s or early ‘80s, islands were constructed in the lake to provide a spot for the gators to lounge in the sun away from people.

Surrounding Lake Alice is a variety of interesting places to visit. A sidewalk running along Museum Road traverses a good deal of the lake, passing first by Lake Alice Field and then University Gardens. At the gardens visitors can walk the paths that wind through the area. Various trees along the way are identified with plaques. A boardwalk provides a dry venue that meanders through the woods out to the lake. The sidewalk continues beside Lake Alice, offering an up-close and personal view of the lake — and gators. Along the trail are picnic tables and benches to sit and admire the scenery. In one area along the banks people can almost always count upon a visit by large softshell turtles that swim to the shoreline. Across the street the two UF Bat Houses can be seen rising above the gardens. Constructed in part to keep the flying mammals away from campus, these structures house thousands of bats. At dusk, people gather to watch the nightly fly out. The path continues around the lake leading to the Baughman Center. This cathedral-like sanctuary overlooks the lake and provides a fitting venue for weddings or meditation. Part lake, part lab, part water retention pond, Lake Alice provides a fitting spot to relax and take in much of what Mother Nature (with some help from humankind) has to offer. s

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The real taste of New York here in Gainesville L Located just 4.5 miles west of the Oaks Mall on Newberry Road in Jonesville, Dave’s New York Deli is quickly establishing itself as a “The Real Deal” when it comes to NY Deli food. Owner David Ande Anders could not be more pleased with the feedback he receives from customers every day. “It’s been a fantastic experience, I opened last October and from the very first day, my customers have been thanking me for opening a real NY Deli here.”

We sat down with Dave for a quick Q&A about his Deli… What makes it a real NY Deli? Dave: “It’s the right mix of high quality ingredients, a clean, bright atmosphere, good people and reasonable prices. If you are going to call yourself a NY Deli, you better back it up with authentic, quality ingredients. I knew from the start that I wanted to serve only the best so I have all of my Pastrami, Corned Beef and Cheesecake shipped in from New York’s Carnegie Deli. My bagels are real NY kettle boiled bagels, my Knishes and Cannolies are from Brooklyn and I have just become licensed to sell Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs. Many of my NY customers have told me that my Pastrami and Corned Beef is the best they have had since leaving NY and the cheesecake already has a cult following, I’ve sold over 1200 slices since October!

58 | Autumn 2010

What other types of food u serve? do you W I opened the Deli Dave: When w I also wanted to do I knew nttic Philly Steaks. I grew authentic th h real Philly Steaks and up with w how hard it is to get I know d one in FL so I made a a good point off getting good quality ieents delivered to me from ingredients deelphia. I use only real Philadelphia. nspected seasoned USDA iinspected nd d authentic beef and osso rolls. One of Amoroso sttomers from my customers ummed it Philly su summed en ntly, after he up recently, ed d his finished

cheesesteak he came up to me at the counter and said “That makes me feel like I’m home, Now I want to get up and go to a Flyers Game.” It doesn’t get better than that.


We serve a hot pressed Cuban featuring Mojo marinated Spanish Pork from Miami. My customers love them and many have said it’s one of the best they have had. We have a great $2.79 kids menu and we also do hot and cold subs, 100% Angus Burgers, Hot Italian Grinders including Meatball Parm, Veal Parm, Chicken Parm, Eggplant Parm and many others. Do you serve Breakfast? Dave: Yes, we serve breakfast 7 days a week, all day long. We serve a traditional deli breakfast including Bagels with Nova Lox & Cream Cheese, Lox Platters and Egg sandwiches with Pastrami, Sausage, Bacon or Ham. We feature Barnie’s

Coffee along with some more traditional southern breakfast items like Sausage Biscuits, Biscuits with sausage gravy and Hash Browns. Our Breakfast sandwiches are served on Bagels, Toast, Kaiser Rolls or Sub Rolls. Do you offer catering? Dave: Yes we do, we offer private and corporate catering platters and packages for all types of events. We have a full catering menu online at DavesNYDeli.com Earlier, you said it’s about the people. What did you mean? Dave: You can have the best food around but if you don’t have a good staff it’s not going to work. My team takes pride in the deli and they understand how to

treat people right. They know that the deli experience is more than ordering a sub and having a kid push a button for a #5. It’s all about understanding the food and the tradition, listening to the customer and making sure you get what you want, how you want it. I have a great team, Casey, Brittany, Joey, Seth, Michelle, Tori and Staci all take pride in our food and making sure you enjoy your experience with us. You will always be greeted with a smile! To learn more about Dave’s New York Deli visit them online at DavesNYDeli.com Dave’s New York Deli, 14145 West Newberry Road, Jonesville 352-333-0291

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PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS


>> LEPIDOPTERA

Wing on Out to the

ButterflyFest A peek into the world of Butterflies BY DEBBIE M. DELOACH un goes hand in hand with learning at the Fifth Annual ButterflyFest. Speakers, a field trip, contests, live performances, workshops and more center on everything butterfly. The festival is on October 23 and 24 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. The Florida Museum of Natural History, home of the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, hosts the festival. The McGuire Center includes the Butterfly Rainforest and public exhibit space. It also houses research facilities and the world’s second largest collection of butterflies and moths, also known as Lepidoptera.

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behind-the-scenes tours bring people into the fascinating world of the study of Lepidoptera. Professor Jacqueline Miller, the Allyn Curator of Lepidoptera and Associate Director of the McGuire Center, will be leading these tours. “During behind-the-scenes tours

people get an opportunity to see and to actually visit material that is in the collection,” Miller said. “What we do is put out some of the really spectacular specimens for them to look at and they also have an opportunity to look at diversity within a continued on next page

Tours Butterfly plant experts will lead tours of the butterfly gardens located behind the McGuire Center. Recently, the garden has been spruced up. The plants in the garden have nametags, also. Another popular tour takes visitors into the research laboratories and collection rooms of the McGuire Center. These

PHOTO BY JEFF GAGE

Volunteer Naomi Ware, dressed in a pollinator costume, hands out a prize for correctly answering a pollination question.

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Autumn 2010 | 61


particular family [of Lepidoptera.]” Also included in the tour is a look at some old, rare reference books that McGuire Center researchers still use today. One of the 32 original copies of the “Butterflies of Georgia,” printed in 1798, still holds the vibrant colors of hand-painted images of butterflies and their caterpillars.

Speakers Miller and McGuire Center Director Tom Emmel will be speaking jointly about the diversity of Lepidoptera in Honduras on the Saturday morning of ButterflyFest. Miller has been collecting moths in Honduras and she recently described a newly discovered species. “Honduras is the missing link as far as our knowledge-base is concerned within Central America,” Miller said. University of Kansas Professor Chip Taylor will be this year’s keynote speaker. Taylor is a respected

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PHOTO BY MARY WARRICK

Ian Segebarth holds a tagged monarch before placing it into a holding cage for release later at the Butterfly Fest.

entomologist and founder of Monarch Watch, a nationwide program that facilitates and coordinates tagging and monitoring monarch butterflies.

Project Monarch Watch Monarch Watch is an ongoing project at the Butterfly Rainforest. Staff and volunteers raise and tag monarch butterflies. Later, they release these butterflies outside to continue their lives wild and free. When tagged butterflies are found and reported to Monarch Watch, the information contributes to understanding monarch migration patterns. This year Taylor will be helping the butterfly taggers. “One of the really great things about this tagging process is that the people who are participating in

it are actually becoming a part of the Monarch Watch program,” said ButterflyFest Coordinator Kendra Lanza-Kaduce. “It’s really neat because the individuals involved are becoming part of the larger science.”

Workshops One of several workshops offered during ButterflyFest will enable attendees to tag monarch butterflies. This workshop will be held Friday, October 22, and the tagged butterflies will be released during the weekend of the festival. Expect Taylor to show up and help. Edith Smith of Shady Oaks Butterfly Farm is going to conduct a butterfly-rearing workshop. She will be teaching and demonstrating how-to raise butterflies. A Picture-Perfect workshop will be held both mornings of ButterflyFest before the museum opens to the public. “We really limit the number of people who can attend this workshop so that individuals can

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bring in their tripods, which is usually not allowed in the butterfly rainforest,” Lanza-Kaduce said. “We also have staff on hand with newly emerged butterflies to help stage photographs. So it really is an amazing opportunity to get that perfect shot if you’re looking for it.” Jeff Hansen, assistant manager of the Butterfly Rainforest, will be teaching a workshop on advanced butterfly gardening and design. Many of the plants that attract and feed butterflies, including their caterpillars, will be on sale in the front of the museum during the festival.

Field Trip The Friday before the festival, Linda Krause, noted environmental educator, will be leading a field trip to Payne’s Prairie. This excursion promises wildlife viewing and potential encounters. A McGuire Center lepidopterist may also go along to help identify butterflies. continued on next page

Autumn 2010 | 63


PHOTO BY MARY WARRICK

Left to Right: Ryan Fessenden, Butterfly Rainforest employee, watches over Caryle Spence a participant in the Picture PerfectRainforest Photography workshop.

Displays and Performers About 10 to 15 non-profit or educational groups and organizations from Alachua County and beyond will have displays and activities set up both inside and outside of the museum. “The focus is pollinators but

also backyard wildlife,” LanzaKaduce said. “We’re looking at butterflies as the ambassadors to the natural world.” All exhibitors will have hands-on activities for children and adults, including crafts. Some organizations will display live animals. The exhibits aim to keep people engaged

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and interested while they learn more about the natural world. Some of the butterfly and moth collections will be out on display and McGuire Center staff will be on hand to answer questions. This provides an opportunity to speak with scientists who normally have little professional contact with the lay public. Outside the museum, merchandise and food vendors, and entertainers await. Jugglers, dancers and at least one school band are set to appear. “It’s always so much fun to watch them performing in the front of the building,” Lanza-Kaduce said. “They always draw a huge crowd.”

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Contests The second annual pollinator photo contest draws entrants from across the country. There are two categories, adult and junior. According to the ButterflyFest website, the junior category is for ages 10 to 17. Photographers should submit their photos to the Florida Museum between Aug. 23 and Oct. 10. Experts will identify the pollinators in every photo to ensure that they are native. Pollinators include all insects, birds, mammals and even bats. “This will be the first year that we are doing a butterfly gardening contest,” Lanza-Kaduce said. “It is open to Alachua, Marion and Levy counties and all of The Villages. There are two categories, large gardens and small gardens, and we’re looking for good nectar sources, host plants, things that are going to stay in flower for a good part of the year.” Small gardens are less than 1,000

square feet and large gardens are between 1,000 and 40,000 square feet. Finalists can expect a panel of judges to visit their gardens. The winners of both contests will receive their prizes at an award ceremony early on Saturday, Oct. 23, so they can be recognized during ButterflyFest weekend. Prizes include cash, passes to the Butterfly Rainforest and certificates for merchandise from the gift shop and for live plants. “One of the really great things about this event is that it truly is a museum-wide effort,” LanzaKaduce said. “You see people from pretty much every division and department in the museum pulling together to put on this wonderful community event.” Entry to the ButterflyFest is free, but some activities have fees. Pre-registration and fees are required for the field trip, workshops and behind-the-scenes tour. Participation is limited so register early to secure a spot. s

Butterflyfest Hosted by the Florida Museum of Natural History SW 34th Street and Hull Road Contact: Kendra Lanza-Kaduce: 352-273-2064 www.flmnh.ufl.edu/ butterflyfest Photo contest info: www.flmnh.ufl.edu/butterflyfest/photo_contest.htm Garden contest info: www.flmnh.ufl.edu/butterflyfest/garden_contest.htm

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COLUMN >> ALBERT ISAAC

Different Note Immortal jellyfish? Cross-dressing cuttlefish? Science is just plain weird sometimes. tranger than any fiction I can come up with. Today, I learned a bit about Darwin and fish (although I don’t believe either jellyfish or cuttlefish are actually fish at all). I know this may sound like I’m making it up, but I assure you, I am not. I have always been interested in immortality and fossils and dinosaurs and cuttlefish. Well, maybe not cuttlefish. I never gave them much thought until recently. But we all have heard of Darwin and the remarkable thinker he was. He traveled the world on a beagle for five years, collecting fossils and dead birds, and somehow came up with the origin of the species. His theory of evolution, now known as the “The Single Greatest Idea Ever,” was utterly outrageous in those days and caused quite the uproar (still does in some circles), especially when he announced to the world that we are all descended from monkeys. This did not go over very well. Plus, we now know we are actually descended from fish. Yes, fish. Human embryos have gills. In fish embryos the tiny slits around the neck turn into gills; in humans they became the bones of the human ear. In fact, most people would be hard pressed to tell the difference between the embryos of a chicken, bat, turtle or human. What Darwin didn’t know was how evolution happens. What causes change? What makes a fish crawl out of the sea and breathe air? I’ll tell you what: bigger fish in the sea trying to eat him, that’s what. (It’s true I saw it on TV). As it turns out, most of Darwin’s theories were spoton, and modern science is now validating them — as

S

68 | Autumn 2010

well as offering up a lot of other surprises. For instance, in 1990 the Human Genome Project commenced to map the entire DNA of people, and some plants and animals as well. There were running bets in the scientific community as to how many genes it takes to make a person. 80,000? 120,000? After all, we are complex and highly intelligent beings, so surely it must take a lot of genes to create a creature as magnificent as yours truly. Not so much. As it turns out, it takes about as many genes to make a person as it does to make — are you ready for this? — a chicken. Yes, you read that right. In fact, we have less genes than an ear of corn. About the same as a nematode. I had to laugh out loud when I heard that one. Ha! There were other astounding revelations as well, especially for someone as scientifically challenged as me, who flunked biology in high school (which I think had nothing to do with my grades and everything to do with making fun of my teacher’s big ears, which apparently function quite well, thank you very much). But I digress. Scientists have cracked the code and determined that 98 percent of a DNA’s structure is junk (their word, not mine), i.e. dark matter (the scientific term used to describe anything that is not understood). No one knows what it does. The vast bulk of DNA doesn’t code for proteins, which means only 2 percent makes the stuff of our bodies. They further postulate there are switches hiding in that junk that, when thrown, turn some genes on and others off. This can create innumerable variations ranging from spotted wings on fruit flies to white fur on desert rats to cross-dressing cuttlefish (more on this later). And how do they know about these switches, you may ask? Well, they spliced a glowing jellyfish protein into a spotted-winged fruit fly gene and inserted it into the DNA of a regular fruit fly and ended up with a lightning bug. Sort of. I’m exaggerating a tad, but the truth is they actually did end up with a fruit fly with spotted wings that would glow in the dark — no lie I saw it on NOVA. What does this have to do with cross-dressing cuttlefish? Evolution, natural continued on page 70


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o continued from page 68 selection and survival of the smartest, that’s what. Apparently, the clever cross-dressing males have a better chance of mating with the hard-to-get females. Cuttlefish, as you probably know, are these funky fish/ squid-looking things that most people only see on their dinner plate. These fascinating creatures can change color and shape faster than you can say “cross-dressing cuttlefishes.” During the courting process, young vulnerable males will disguise themselves as females in order to sneak by larger, aggressive males. While the big boys

“Mating in a cuttlefish is a strange affair. They go head to head, we call it.” are dukin’ it out, the smaller and smarter cross-dressers slip by and play patty cake with the females. Now, cuttlefish do not reproduce like any other creature on earth. This is because they live in the ocean. But aside from that, according to NOVA, “Mating in a cuttlefish is a strange affair. They go head to head, we call it. Then they join those eight arms together from each animal. Then the male has one special arm underneath, in which he reaches back and he pulls out a packet of sperm. And then he just places that packet

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of sperm right up amidst the arms of the female.” Yes, he hands her a packet. How formal. The female will in turn save the packet for a rainy day, so-to-speak. The male has no say in the matter. In an interesting twist of natural selection, the female determines which eggs to fertilize and then swims off to deposit them under a rock. Then she dies. So do her mates. I’m glad I’m not a cuttlefish. So, who’s the lucky daddy? Only one way to find out, or so say the scientists: a paternity test (again, no lie). Much to everyone’s surprise the females chose the cross-dressers. The girls are apparently impressed with this “very bold, smart tactic,” according to NOVA. “And may be acknowledging that, in evolutionary terms.” Now how does an immortal jellyfish fit into a theory of evolution? I mean, the theory is based upon things dying. Yet, jellyfishologists have discovered a creature known as the turritopsis nutricula, which is the Benjamin Button of the jellyfish kingdom. “Like the Brad Pitt movie character, the immortal jellyfish transforms from an adult back into a baby, but with an added bonus: Unlike Benjamin Button, the jellyfish can do it over and over again — though apparently only as an emergency measure,” according to National Geographic Magazine. When injured or facing starvation the immortal jellyfish turns into a “blob-like cyst” which in turn becomes a polyp colony, and thus starts over again. So there are a lot of these little guys. Swarms have been found in the waters off Spain, Italy, Japan, Florida, Panama, and elsewhere. I wonder how many genes it takes to make one of those? Perhaps more importantly, I wonder how long before scientists inject TNJ (turritopsis nutricula jellyfish) into our DNA. Talk about population explosion. No one would get old. Everyone would get young. Nursing homes would be replaced by nurseries. The Baby Boomers would soon be surpassed by the Baby Boomerangers. But don’t sign me up any time soon. I don’t know about you, but I’m in no hurry to re-live my teenage years. s

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>> COMMUNITY

Sebastian Ferrero Foundation Progressing Toward a Gainesville Children’s Hospital BY CHRIS WILSON ragedy for one Gainesville couple is much closer to realizing a bright future for children’s medical care in Alachua County and throughout the region. The Sebastian Ferrero Foundation, which is going into its third year, has experienced both progress and growth. That progress, and the ongoing dream of having a dedicated, stateof-the-art children’s hospital in Gainesville, will be celebrated at the foundation’s third annual Noche De Gala in October, a fundraising event that features live entertainment, silent auctions, live cigar rolling and fine dining. The Sebastian Ferrero Foundation was started by Horst and Luisa Ferrero, after their son Sebastian died at age 3 because of a medication overdose at Shands Hospital. Since then, the Ferreros have dedicated themselves to building a full-service pediatric hospital in Gainesville. The foundation has also been working with Shands HealthCare and the University of Florida College of Medicine to develop a nationally recognized, comprehensive patient safety

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72 | Autumn 2010

program that will be implemented as part of the Sebastian Ferrero Office of Clinical Quality and Safety. “They’ve done a courageous and admirable job in taking something like the senseless loss of a perfectly healthy boy, who died from a medical error, and turning it into a positive for the community,” said Mark Minck, a family friend and the Gainesville co-chair of the Noche de Gala. “It’s hard to imagine somebody being anything but angry or bitter. They’ve transformed their grief into a positive force.”

A Three-Year Progression The foundation has grown from just an idea to an organization that has received more than $7 million in contributions and pledges in less than three years. “It started as a very grass roots organization and rapidly grew into a movement of transformative change,” Horst Ferrero said. “We’re supported by many in the community, including 150 pediatricians. Our two Noche de Gala events have been sold out and we have been able to influence and advocate change at UF and Shands with the

patient safety mission.” When the foundation launched, the Ferreros made a $1 million matched challenge; they matched every dollar donated and have since exceeded the first million dollars. One of the most sizeable donations came from Gainesville native and Google technology director Craig Silverstein, who contributed $5 million. During the past three years, the Ferreros and a number of the charity’s board members and consultants have visited other children’s hospitals. “At the children’s hospital we visited in Atlanta, there are therapy rooms set up for recovery for children who had been in accidents,” Luisa said. “There are therapy rooms on the same floor for patients who need the same treatments, so there is no need to transport the patients all over.” Another big step for the foundation was the implementation of the patient safety curriculum by the UF College of Medicine and Shands. The new four-year curriculum features classes on patient safety and quality of care, teamwork and communication skills.


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SEBASTIAN FERRERO FOUNDATION

Horst and Luisa Ferrero with Sebastian’s brothers, Sergio Ferrero (4), Santiago Ferrero (2) and Stefano Ferrero (5 months), during a visit to Mexico.

“Now students receive patient safety courses throughout their career, not just for one year,” Horst said. “We have been invited two years in a row to give a talk to the first-year medical students.”

Next Steps The Foundation recently partnered with ShandsHealthcare for a needs assessment survey to gather information to determine the characteristics and scale that a full-service, dedicated children’s

hospital at the University of Florida will require to provide world-class pediatric care. Plans were to release the results of the study to the public the end of July. In addition, the new UF and Shands “Forward Together” five-year strategic plan states that, “Consideration would still be given to creating the children’s hospital in a new tower depending on financial feasibility, including the ability of philanthropy to bring in the necessary dollars.”

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“That’s in great part because of what we have been able to do in terms of awareness and fund raising,” Horst said. “For the organization, we are happy to see all of this progress.” There are other aspects advocated by the organization that were part of the same “Forward Together” plan. The North Tower at Shands will be a dedicated children’s emergency room, with its own waiting and inpatient/outpatient units. In addition, continued on next page

Autumn 2010 | 73


PHOTO BY ALBERT ISAAC

A costumed couple stroll the grounds staying true to theme of a Venetian Masquerade Ball. Last year’s Noche de Gala, held at the 642-acre Besilu Collection located in Micanopy, included performances by Broadway ‘Phantom of the Opera’ sensation, Ted Keegan.

there is a plan to improve patient information management by implementing the electronic medical records system advocated by the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation. The Ferreros envision a children’s hospital for Gainesville that would serve patients from all around the world. “Here in Gainesville, just because of the talent that we have in the medical community, we are able to attract patients from all

around the state and from abroad as well,” Horst said. “In order to retain and recruit that talent, we have to have the facilities, as well.”

Tioga Town Fair The third annual Tioga Town Fair will be held on Saturday, August 28, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. The event, which benefits the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation, will have activities for the entire family. The fair will include bounce houses, a giant slip and slide, obstacle courses, a rock climbing wall, petting zoo, face painting and nail art. There will also be carnival games, including a dunking booth, ring tosses, a pastry-eating contest and relay races. Favorite fair foods, such as corndogs, burgers, snow

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Noche de Gala The third annual Noche de Gala will be held on Saturday, Oct. 23 at the Besilu Collection, a 642-acre horse farm in Micanopy. The theme of the 2010 Noche is a “Grand Ball,” and guests are encouraged to wear black tie attire. The inaugural Noche de Gala was held at the Tioga Town Center, which it has since outgrown. “At first, we thought to do an event for 300, then we jumped to 500 and then we maxed out at 750 guests and we couldn’t add any more,” Luisa said. “A lot of people couldn’t come, but they still gave us their support. This year, we’re reaching out to Lake City, Ocala and Tallahassee, because what we’re going to have here eventually will benefit their communities as well.” The event will be chaired by Cynthia O’Connell, UF trustee and the widow of former UF president

Stephen C. O’Connell. UF men’s basketball coach Billy Donovan is the celebrity chair. The foundation also has co-chairs throughout the cities of North Florida, including Gainesville, Ocala, Lake City and Tallahassee. Gainesville co-chairs Mark and Deborah Minck, who have volunteered for the event in the past, have known the Ferreros since before the couple had children. They said they were proud to help promote this year’s event. “This year is critical for the community to hear the voice of the foundation,” Deborah said. “There are a lot of other charities in town. But, the urgency of bringing a full service, state-of-the-art children’s hospital to Gainesville needs our attention now.”

The Dream Is Still Alive While the Ferreros have seen progress, they too admit that a full-service children’s hospital is urgently needed now.

“Children require specialized equipment and people with specialized training,” Horst said. “Even the radiology department, the pharmacy, everything, has to be geared towards the needs of children. Even having a family center, so that there are private rooms, a place where siblings can visit and not feel threatened, a place where a kid can be a kid and not just a patient, where Mom and Dad can have access to a computer and the kids can keep up to date with school. Things like that make a children’s hospital a special place.” While the Ferreros know nothing will change the past, the foundation has been a comfort to them, and a much-needed way to channel the love for their child into a positive force. Both Horst and Luisa shared that turning their tragedy into a catalyst for change would ensure their son’s Sebastian’s legacy and continue to impact the lives of so many children and their families. s

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>> THE 26TH ANNUAL THORNEBROOK ART FESTIVAL

A Village of Art Within the City BY LARRY BEHNKE hornebrook Village feels like its own little town within the city of Gainesville. The shops are laid out in an intimate cluster, hidden from the cars rushing by on nearby 43rd Street. Early every October, Thornebrook is transformed into a community of artists, and the public is invited. Between the quaint shops and greenery, the covered walkways become galleries. More than 140 artists set up a variety of their creations. Painting, sculpture, pottery, jewelry, portraits and fine crafts await the visitor. Musical entertainment is scheduled throughout the two-day festival at four venues. Activities are planned for children too.

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Fine artists and craftspeople are chosen for the festival by a jury of local artists, art teachers and gallery owners.

The design used for this year’s poster and T-shirt was drawn by Diana Fava.

78 | Autumn 2010

Lyn White has directed the art festival the past six of 26 years. “It started with the Gainesville Fine Arts Association joining with the Thornebrook Merchants Association,” White said. “They thought the space was nice, with lots of undercover spaces so no tents are needed for the artwork.” White formerly ran Gainesville’s downtown art festival, which the city currently operates. Now she has expanded the Thornebrook festival to bring in more people, within reason. “We’re a small show; we don’t want it to be bigger,” White said. “The artists really like the atmosphere.” But each year more artists apply, so White tries to expand the layout to accommodate some of them. Fine artists and craftspeople are chosen for the festival by a jury of local artists, art teachers and gallery owners. Works are evaluated on the basis of quality and originality, and prizes are awarded. Best of Show is $750, two Awards of Distinction bring


$500 each, two Awards of Merit bring $300, two Judges Choice at $150 and a $250 Purchase Award complete the honors. The variety of artwork for a show this size is what keeps visitors returning. Each year holds surprising new items worthy of “wow” moments. The recent economy has not been kind to artists. “Artists are having a hard time making a living now, so we haven’t raised our entry prices even thought expenses have gone up,” White said. She credits sponsorship by KTK/Sky radio, the Gainesville Sun and WCJB, and is thankful for their help. Diana Fava created the poster and T-shirt design for this year’s festival. It shows delicate jellyfish gliding on a sea of black. The lines were scratched in India ink sprayed on porcelain, then colored. Fava won last year’s award of distinction at the show, the same time her artwork for the poster was chosen to represent the upcoming festival. Fava is a watercolor painter, has

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Gainesville artist Lennie Kesl sings with a group of musicians during last year’s Thornebrook Art Festival. This annual event includes art, music, food and children’s activities.

a teaching gallery in High Springs and is a founding member of the High Springs Art Co-op that opened in February of this year. “I feel honored they chose my work,” she said. Although many attend the festival to view the art and hear the music, White said people do come to purchase art. “People come from as far as Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Orlando and Tampa,” she said. “We have unique art, our own little niche.” She mentioned a special “emerging artists” section and another area for children’s art. Friday, October 1 is preview night with live jazz, wine and cheese from 6 until 9 p.m. The show continues Saturday, Oct. 2 and Sunday, Oct.3 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. s

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80 | Autumn 2010


>> AQUIFERious

Painting the Springs BY DENISE TRUNK KRIGBAUM searing, icy blue swirls, bubbles and collides with swathes of sapphire. The vibrant shades mingle and dance across the canvas with all the energy of the Florida springs they represent. Here and there the crystalline images are clouded with tea-colored tannin, or streaked with twining eelgrass or sparked by a silver grey flicker of fin and fish. Gainesville artist Margaret Tolbert has captured the energy and essence of Florida’s springs in her paintings for more than 25 years. Tolbert’s paintings, which are often created on canvases nearly as large as the springhead she paints, invite the viewer into an underwater oasis of cool, gushing water. In her most recent endeavor,

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a 160-page book named “AQUIFERious,” Tolbert takes a morethan-refreshing dip into the subject of the springs. Conceived initially as an art book to coincide with a New Orleans exhibit of her work, the project expanded to include science as it delved into the artistic, poetic, environmental, historical and geological depths of what makes the springs so vital to Florida. Because Tolbert photographs, swims and kayaks in the spring water as part of her painting process, she has witnessed changes to the springs’ pure, ageless water. Subsequently, she has recorded the water’s increased cloudiness and algae growth in her paintings. Tolbert learned that many of the ecosystem’s

subtle changes, such as species die-off, were occurring because of increasingly high concentrations of unseen pollutants and chemicals like nitrates in the water. “I see that information and history is presented in a science museum, but in an art museum what is presented are these objects that increase in value,” Tolbert said. “I want the springs to be seen as that — something that have increasing value.” Tolbert said she became interested in doing something more direct by combining science and art to bring the threats to the springs into peoples’ awareness. In 1998, she began a website that featured scientists, artists or anyone involved continued on next page

PHOTO BY TJM STUDIOS PHOTOGRAPHY

Artist Margaret Tolbert, paintbrushes in hand, stands waist-deep in the cool, clear water of Blue Springs. As part of her process, Tolbert photographs, kayaks and swims in the spring water that she paints.

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Autumn 2010 | 81


3

1

2 in the springs contributing information about the nature of the springs. That site is now defunct, but it provided a springboard for the idea of a book. “Part guidebook, part art book, part information-about-the-springs book, it is created to suggest a whole world readers could get involved with,” Tolbert said. In “AQUIFERious,” Tolbert gathered essays from writers, artists, cave divers, biologists, and geologists and combined them with her own writings, poetry, photography and paintings to

82 | Autumn 2010

immerse readers in what could be considered the lifeblood of Florida. With its veins running beneath a sand- and pine-covered limestone

weak or the aquifer flow is strong, water bursts to the surface in the form of a spring. Tolbert, who earned both her

“There are cultures in which a body of water, a grove of trees, or a spring — they achieve a level of devotion…” skin, Florida is blessed with a constant flow of fresh water that pulsates through the underground rivers of the Floridan Aquifer. In places where that limestone skin is

undergraduate and MFA degrees at UF, was captivated by the unique qualities of the springs and began painting them in 1983. Her inquisitive nature brought her to


1. PHOTO BY DENISE TRUNK KRIGBAUM

Margaret Tolbert stands in front of two works-in-progress in her backyard studio. She prefers to paint outdoors, using a ladder to reach upper areas of her larger works.

meetings of the springs working groups, which are organized to address problems that cause damage or degrade the springs. “I began learning about the springs and the fact that they are very threatened,” Tolbert said. Rather than report in the book what she had learned, Tolbert brought together knowledgeable contributors to disclose different perspectives of the springs. The contributors include scientist Jim Stevenson, former chief biologist for the Florida State Park System for 20 years and chairman of Florida

Springs Task Force Initiative who implemented springs protection projects; Tom Morris, biologist, cave diver; Jon Martin, geological sciences professor at the University of Florida; Eric Hutcheson, extreme cave diver, cave cartographer, artist; Howard Jelks, fish biologist; Dan Rountree, artist; and Bill Belleville, writer and filmmaker, among others. In addition to essays, poetry, stunning art, photography and maps of underwater cave systems, the book contains useful links, information, and how-to advice for helping continued on next page

www.VisitOurTowns.com

2. PHOTO BY STEFAN CRACIUN

In her backyard studio, Tolbert creates a base paint layer by throwing paint from a bucket and using a mop, tape and gravity to guide or restrict the paint’s movement. Applied this way the paint acts like the water she is trying to depict, Tolbert said, and the process establishes the basic energy of the painting. 3. BY TJM STUDIOS PHOTOGRAPHY

As the morning fog lifts at Blue Springs, Tolbert floats out to paint on a large canvas that sits upon her kayak.

Autumn 2010 | 83


conserve and protect the springs. Belleville, author of five books and the soon to be published “Salvaging the Real Florida: Lost and Found in the State of Dreams,” said when he met Tolbert he was pleasantly surprised to realize she was an artist who could also write. “AQUIFERious” is not just an art book, it is a work of art itself,” Belleville said. “The book is far more then art — it is an alert, too. I’m hoping people will see this and learn that the springs are losing magnitude, and water quality is down, and that it’s a trend and a tragedy.” In addition to his essay, Belleville helped in the creation of the book by recommending other sources to Tolbert. “It was a magical process,” Tolbert said. “I wasn’t sure how I was going to cover all these things, but one person led to another.” And for Tolbert, one project leads to another. She sees “AQUIFERious” developing in many forms and directions, including on a new website to launch in the fall. “I would like “AQUIFERious” to also be exhibits,” Tolbert said. “Ideally it should include a show that includes a film festival, and exhibits in both art and natural history museum. I would like the

book to be a template for exhibits in art venues.” She and Bellville are considering a “making of” documentary on the book and use that to expand on the topic of springs. In the meantime, Tolbert’s art and “AQUIFERious” will be featured during WUFT’s fall fundraising drive, with a book and poster signing to take place at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art in October. As the disaster of the BP oil spill draws environmentalists and concerned individuals to the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem, Tolbert said she hopes people can really come to understand the value and uniqueness of springs as a natural system and not just something visually beautiful. With a deeper level of awareness people might be moved to work to protect the springs before they simply become something missed and regretted. “There are cultures in which a body of water, a grove of trees, or a spring — they achieve a level of devotion. And there is not a hierarchy [that differentiates] ‘well, that is the natural world and this is art.’ I think that this thinking should be here in our culture as well. “The state of grace is here.” Tolbert said. “We are in it.” s

Tolbert’s art can be found in multiple venues around town this fall. The Blue Path: Protecting Florida’s Springs Aug. 12 - Dec. 12. - Coordinated by Florida’s Eden - The Florida Museum of Natural History This exhibition launches the Blue Path grassroots campaign to protect Florida’s freshwater springs, initiated by North Central Florida artists, writers, filmmakers, educators and scientists. Photographs, paintings and displays invite families to learn how everyday choices can continue to deplete and damage the water supply or restore it.

Slick. A Menacing Rainbow Aug. 27 - Sept. 27. - Randy Batista Gallery, - 21 SE 2nd Place A joint fundraiser exhibit at the Randy Batista Gallery, Slick will feature Tolbert’s paintings and the work of six or seven additional regional artists whose work is inspired by the nature of the Gulf Coast. Proceeds from Slick will be donated to the Gulf Restoration Network. Opening night and Fundraising Reception takes place as part of Artwalk, 6 p.m. - 9:30 p.m, Aug. 27, and runs through Sept. 27.

Featured Poster/Book WUFT/89.1 Fundraiser Oct. 20 -30. AQUIFERious and Tolbert’s art will be featured in this fall’s WUFT fundraiser. The book and poster will be available for purchase. A public book and poster signing will follow within two weeks of the end of the drive. The book is also available through Amazon.com.

Never mind the man behind the curtain

Margaret Tolbert and Tom (T.J.) Morrissey of Lotus Studios photograph each other during a recent morning photo shoot at Blue Springs. T.J. often goes to great lengths to get the shot, in this case wading up to his elbows with camera in hand and perching his expensive lighting equipment on a ladder submerged in the spring.


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ccording to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falling is the leading cause of injury-related deaths for seniors. But falling does not have to be a fact of life for the elderly population. Caretenders of Gainesville offers a revolutionary course of treatment called Optimum Balance to help patients with the cause of their falls and not just treat the results. “The focus of the Optimum Balance program is to decrease and prevent falls,” said Deborah Hill, Rehab Manager at Caretenders. “Of the people over age 65 who fall and fracture a hip, 25 percent die within one year. So our therapists want to get to the root of why they’re falling, so that they don’t fall again.” Optimum Balance incorporates all five systems that contribute to balance – vestibular, somatosensory,

vision, musculoskeletal and cognitive. Therapists give patients a thorough evaluation of these five systems, and then the clinical team implements a customized treatment strategy. A wide variety of treatment methods is used in the Optimum Balance program, including anodyne infrared light therapy, the Epley Maneuver (canal repositioning treatment often done with vertigo patients) and retraining of oculomotor system. Patients undergoing Optimum Balance treatment experience a significant decrease in falling. Studies show that 90 percent of program patients had not experienced a fall for one year after treatment, and 87 percent experienced a decrease in neuropathic pain. Evette Reed, physical therapist and the Clinical Champion of the Optimum Balance program, has treated

under the program for two years. “It’s changed the way I do physical therapy,” she said. “I look at our patients differently and I have a much better understanding of the vestibular and balance system as a whole. I can help them to a larger degree than ever before.” Reed also ensures that staff members are properly credentialed; each therapist is required to take 19 hours of specialized training and engage in specific clinical practice sessions and inhome skills competencies to become a part of the Optimum Balance program. Optimum Balance fits in perfectly with Caretenders’ mission of senior advocacy. “Your balance is a key piece of wellness and sustained independence,” said Reed. “There’s so much more we can do to keep ourselves healthy and well. We should never accept anything less than the best in our lives.”

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>> WHO YOU GONNA CALL?

Ghosts and Spirits Nearby Haunted Inns Offer Guests an Opportunity for the Unforgettable BY JESSICA CHAPMAN AND NICOLE GREINER ome people say they heard footsteps in the night. Some people say they smell sweet fragrances. Others say they feel someone tucking them in at night. Even still, some say they have been spritzed in the face with water in the middle of the night. The stories go on and on. Sometimes the lights flicker. Doors slam shut. A woman in a wedding dress appears on the second floor. Of course, all of this is hearsay, but to some, the Herlong Mansion in Micanopy and the Grady House Bed and Breakfast in High Springs are indeed haunted. Hauntings, however, may not be as scary as they might seem. Andrew Nichols, a parapsychologist who investigates hauntings with the American Institute of Parapsychology, said that a haunting is only a particular person reacting to a particular location with prolonged unexplainable experiences. Trying to explain these unexplainable experiences is a little more challenging. Throughout history, one common reason for a house to be haunted is because of a death in the house. The Herlong Mansion is one such example. The ghost of Inez allegedly haunts the Herlong Mansion. The mansion was originally a cracker-style farmhouse built in 1845 and remodeled in 1910. The house was left to the Herlong’s six children when their mother died. After a bitter 18-year battle, only one of the children could afford the home: Inez. Legend has it that soon after Inez acquired the home

S

90 | Autumn 2010

she died in her childhood room, said Chanity Brown, assistant manager at the Herlong Mansion. The ghost of Inez is said to now haunt the mansion. Nichols, who has investigated the Herlong Mansion on multiple occasions, said such hauntings illustrate an important misconception about haunted houses — that for a place to be haunted someone must have died there. There is usually no connection between historical events and a haunting, he said. “If that’s the case why aren’t hospitals haunted?” Nichols asked. “A whole lot more people die there. Ghosts may be real, but they have nothing to do with history.”

The Grady House was originally a bakery in the 1800s and then used as a boarding house for railroad supervisors in the 1900s. The Grady House Bed and Breakfast in High Springs is one place that proves Nichols’ point. Grady House owner Lucie Regensdorf said while there is no reason for her bed and breakfast to be haunted, past owners and guests have had haunting experiences. Regensdorf said people have reported being tucked into bed, chess pieces continued on page 92


PHOTO BY JESSICA CHAPMAN

The Grady House Bed and Breakfast in High Springs is reported haunted. Guests and owners of the B&B have reported strong fragrances, hearing footsteps, ghosts helping them pack their things and a myriad of other ghostly things. The Grady House is on the national registrar of historic places and was named to have one of Gainesville’s best breakfasts.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2010 | 91


PHOTOS BY JESSICA CHAPMAN

The Herlong Mansion in Micanopy, said to be haunted by the ghost of Inez, was originally a cracker-style farm-house built in 1845 and completed to its full structure in 1910. The Mansion has 10 rooms and two cottages houses and serves a southernstyle breakfast in the mornings.

o continued from page 90 mysteriously moving or a strong sense of perfume in their room. Some have said that someone helped them pack up their things. One guest went to sleep with magazines scattered all over the bed. The next morning they were in a neatly stacked pile. Another person said they were asleep one night and the radio kept turning on. When the person said, “Turn it down,” the volume was turned down. When he said, “Turn it off,” the radio went off. Although her husband Paul has never had any haunted experiences, Regensdorf has. She described the time she was home alone one night and clearly heard male voices upstairs, causing her dog to growl. However, Regensdorf said living in a haunted house does not bother her at all. She loves living in and owning a bed and breakfast. “I fantasized about opening a bed and breakfast,” she said. “It’s a nice lifestyle.” The Grady House was originally a bakery in the 1800s and then used as a boarding house for railroad supervisors in the 1900s. While a boarding house, Regensdorf said the rooms were half the size and included kitchens. When the boarding house was remodeled to a bed and breakfast, the rooms were remodeled and made bigger too. The Regensdorf’s also run the Easterlin House, which was owned by High Springs’ first female mayor in the 1950s. The Easterlin House was built in 1896. Regensdorf said some guests have reported hauntings while staying there, as well. Although the situations at haunted houses can be scientifically explained, Nichols said people must be careful when claiming they have been haunted because these experiences can often be explained by

92 | Autumn 2010

overactive imaginations. In reality, Nichols said, a haunting is the interaction between place and mind. It is a particularly sensitive person reacting to particular place. Magnetic fields can affect the place, Nichols said. Magnetic fields can be localized to a specific area, so when a person enters a place with a strong magnetic field, such as possibly the Herlong Mansion or the Grady House Bed and Breakfast, they are effected by the field and have unusual reactions to things they see and hear. People label it a haunting to try and explain what is happening. Water underground and fault lines can influence magnetic fields. Houses with long histories of being haunted often have strong field strength, Nichols said. Places like the Herlong Mansion and the Grady House might be examples of these. Places with strong magnetic fields are not limited to bed and breakfasts, however. Nichols spent time investigating one house in Archer that had no exciting legend behind the hauntings. Linda Kasicki, who lives with her husband Bob in the haunted house in Archer, said their home sits on a fault line that runs through Archer, so it is possible they are in an area where the field strength is especially strong. She said Nichols spent investigating the house as part of a six-week course he taught. “It’s a true haunting,” Kasicki said. “There’s even a certain chair where someone will tap you on your shoulder. In our house you are never alone.” People who have these reactions may often have such experiences, but they are amplified in areas with strong magnetic fields, Nichols said. For instance, they might often see things out of the corner of their eye, but in haunted houses like the Herlong Mansion or


“There’s even a certain chair where someone will tap you on your shoulder. In our house you are never alone,” Kasicki said. the Grady House, such experiences may occur in more obvious ways. Nichols said about 10 percent of the population are sensitive to instances like this. While we know who this happens to and why it happens, Nichols said, we do not know if what they are seeing and hearing is real or imaginary. We may never know, he said. “I don’t think these people are lying or crazy,” Nichols said. “We just need to modify some of our understanding.” Regardless of whether a person’s experience is real or imaginary, we have to believe it is real to them, Nichols said, which is important to keep in mind when looking at the Herlong Mansion. Although the ghost of Inez is said to haunt the Herlong Mansion, both Brown and current owner Carolyn West said the legend is not completely true. West and Brown said Sonny Howard, who bought

the southern-styled bed and breakfast in 1987, began the myth as a marketing method to draw people to the Mansion. Howard claimed Inez died in her childhood room on the third floor. However, that room was not completed until after her death. In fact, at the time she was living, the third floor was an attic. Inez also reportedly died in the hospital. While Nichols stayed at the Herlong Mansion, he read many haunting stories in guest books about people describing their experiences, he said. Nichols said when he stayed at the house he read many stories about people describing their experiences. Howard’s tale may not be true, Nichols said, but Howard did not make up the stories people told after staying at the Mansion. Places like the Herlong Mansion and the Grady House are multi-generational haunted houses; places that have been haunted for decades. In most cases, however, Nichols said hauntings only last about a decade and can be very easily explained. But the science behind a haunted house does not necessarily take away the spookiness. Whether real or imagined, places like the Herlong Mansion and the Grady House could easily pass as haunted. Although the lights may flicker and the portraits may seem scary to some, these bed and breakfasts, with cozy rooms, beautiful gardens and delicious breakfasts, seem to have it all. s

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Haunted Inn(terview) Our Writers Discuss Thier Assignment to Document Things that Go Bump in the Night BY ALBERT ISAAC or our story on hauntings, we sent two intrepid reporters on special assignment to the Herlong Mansion in Micanopy and the Grady House Bed and Breakfast in High Springs — both of which are reportedly haunted. Admittedly skeptical, Nicole Greiner and Jessica Chapman spent a night in each of these inns. This is what they have to say about their experiences.

F

Q:

First of all, do you believe in ghosts?

Jessica: I’m not one to believe in ghosts, haunted houses or anything similar. But after staying at both the Grady House Bed and Breakfast and the Herlong Mansion, if I was going to get haunted anywhere it would be at the Herlong Mansion. Nicole: I don’t believe in ghosts, either. However, I can live without spending another night in a mansion in a storm when the lights go out.

Q:

Tell us about your experiences at the Herlong Mansion. I understand a storm blew in?

94 | Autumn 2010

Jessica: It was really nice. Nicole: It was a pretty house. The sun was shining when we got there. Jessica: From the front, it had huge trees with moss hanging down so it is believable that it could be haunted. Especially when you get inside, because it’s big and it just felt very, very old. In a good way. Nicole: I thought it was just a really nice older house. It wasn’t as scary to me, like the Grady House, which was smaller. Jessica: That’s what was surprising to me. I did not get remotely spooked at the Grady House. But at the Herlong Mansion, that’s about all I got. Nicole had the opposite experience. I just don’t get it.

Q:

Did the innkeeper at the Herlong Mansion share any ghost stories with you?

Nicole: Carolyn told us stories about the ghost hunters [who came to investigate]. They brought a ton of equipment into the room and had their camera set up to take

10 pictures at a time. And in one there was a very distinct picture of a woman wrapped with a cloth around her head, and she was standing outside of the [second story] window. Jessica: It was like a woman from the 1800s with a shawl wrapped around her. I was sleeping right next to that window where they saw the ghost. See why I was spooked? We are staying in the room where ghost hunters had stayed, it’s storming outside, and then the lights went out. The first thing I thought when the power went out was that I didn’t have enough battery left on my computer to write my story. Nicole: I am sitting at the foot of the stairs talking to a friend on the phone and all of a sudden the lights go out. And I screamed. Jessica: I heard Nicole scream. She ran in and slammed the door shut and started pacing. She was very freaked out. She sat down on the floor near the fireplace. Nicole: It just really wasn’t cool


with the lights going out. I was outside of our room. And I was creeped out, even before the lights went out, because I looked down and saw this man walking around. I didn’t scream that time. I was really quiet. I ran to the room, and in the back of my mind I thought it was the guests, but they weren’t in the main house.

Q:

Was it a ghost?

Nicole: It wasn’t a ghost, sorry to disappoint you.

Q:

So are you more afraid of the living than the dead?

Nicole: Yes. Jessica: I wasn’t. I was more afraid of the dead.

Q:

Can you tell us about your experiences in the Grady House?

Nicole: I just thought if there would be any ghosts in the houses it would be in the Grady House, because of the way it was set up. Jessica: How? I don’t understand that. I thought it was cozy. We had the perfect conditions for it to be haunted that night [at the Herlong Mansion]. I told Nicole when it started storming that this should be a horror movie. Nicole: I guess I just wasn’t in the mood that night. But the Grady House has the narrow hallway. And there was an old telephone there. Everything was more old fashioned there, I thought. There were old pictures of people on the walls, black and white pictures of people from the 1800s. I constantly felt their eyes watching me. The steep staircase and narrow halls made me feel as though a ghost would have a grand ole time in the home.

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Q:

Did the innkeeper share any stories with you?

Nicole: Yes, she did. Lucie said she was in the house alone one night with her dog. And she heard distinct male voices upstairs. And then her dog growled. But she didn’t want to go up there.

Q:

I understand there is a book at the Grady House, “Haunted Inns of the Southeast” that describes radios turning on by themselves, guests being tucked in, chess pieces moving. Did you experience any such phenomenon?

Jessica: I saw no ghosts. I heard no mysterious footsteps. I smelled no overwhelming perfume. And no one smoothed my covers as I went to sleep. I guess ghosts are scared of the press. continued on next page

Autumn 2010 | 95


Nicole: No radios turning on or off, but I did move a chess piece and I’m pretty sure it moved... Jessica: No it didn’t. Nicole, I was moving pieces too. Nicole: You moved them but you didn’t move it that time. Jessica: Yes, I did. Nicole, a chess piece did not move by itself. Nicole: But the thing is, the ghost in the book doesn’t really know how to play chess. The ghost would put the chess piece on top of another piece. But it didn’t do that. It just moved it. So maybe over the course of a hundred years it learned how to play chess. Oh, and I smelled perfume. Jessica: Nicole, we were in the Peach Room, it’s supposed to smell good. Nicole: I think it was the air freshener in the room. But I don’t know. Jessica: I try hard to respect that you had that experience. I don’t want to seem harsh but I find it totally unbelievable.

that we hear about, I don’t think there’s much merit to them.

Jessica: But if we did believe it, that is what we would think [Ghosts].

Nicole: I think there’s a lot that you can do with your own imagination.

Q:

Jessica: Exactly.

Jessica: Both bed and breakfasts were amazing. Each place had something particularly special about it. At the Herlong Mansion it was the history and bigness of it all. At the Grady House it felt delightful and luxurious and the house and garden were beautiful. My biggest regret at the Grady House was not being able to stay for breakfast. Knowing the previous morning’s breakfast was strawberry-stuffed French toast did not help a bit, either. The houses were really, really nice.

Nicole: If you really want to believe something you can believe it. I’ve seen things out of the corner of my eyes at places, but that’s nothing. That happens to everyone. You believe what you want to believe.

Q:

You visited, briefly, the Newnansville Cemetery and took some photos. Why didn’t you stay until after dark?

Nicole: Because that would have taken away from our experience at the Grady House. And we hadn’t eaten.

Q:

I understand something appeared in one of your photographs?

Nicole: Jessica seems to think it’s the light. I seem to think it’s kind of interesting. I wouldn’t say it’s a ghost, I just think it’s a weird blotch that shouldn’t be there. Jessica: I don’t know (rolls eyes).

Q:

You are both ghost skeptics - how do you explain these experiences?

Jessica: I don’t think these instances that we read about and

Q:

So what I’m getting here are two skeptics arguing about something neither one of you actually believes in.

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How would you describe your overall experiences?

Nicole: I had a wonderful time at both the Grady House and the Herlong Mansion, the antiquity of the homes was remarkable and the hospitality was welcoming. Also, although I am a Yankee I do enjoy a good southern-style breakfast every now and then, courtesy of the Herlong Mansion. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to stay for the award-winning breakfast at the Grady House, but I will have to just make a special trip for that sometime. Ghosts or no ghosts — it would seem as though hauntings may be in the eye of the beholder. Guests will just have to see for themselves. s

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CALENDAR If you would like to have an event considered for publication in this calendar, please submit information directly. post 4400 NW 36th Ave., Gainesville, FL 32606 | e-mail editor@towerpublications.com | fax 352-373-9178

Prosperous Living Group Every Sunday 6:00pm - 8:00pm Prosperous Living Center, 1135 NW 23rd Ave, Suite F/2. A community of likeminded truth-seekers studying, sharing and teaching multiple paths to prosperity in all aspects of life wealth, relationships, health, personal missions, professions and spirituality. Our intention is to uphold each participant on actualizing their visions with a foundation of group-supported integrity. 352-514-3122 www.prosperouslivingcenter.com

VNA’s Strength in Numbers: A Fall Prevention Program Every Wednesday Noon - 1:00pm The Movement and Balance Center, 7135 NW 11th Place Suite B3. Join the six-week fall prevention series for free. Space is limited to 20 participants per session. Please RSVP. 352-331-9356 www.movementandbalance.com

Gainesville Comedy Showcase Every Friday and Saturday 7:00pm 98 | Autumn 2010

Clarion Inn and Conference Center, 7417 W. Newberry Road. A live stand-up comedy show on Friday and Saturday nights, featuring the best of our local cast of amateur and professional stand-up comedians. Weekly drink specials and $5

both pet owners and breeders, we feature informational sessions covering all aspects of birds: care, feeding, training, breeding, behavior, eco-travel, conservation, the list goes on! The first meeting is free. 352-378-9796

spouse from divorce or death. The course uses the book “Rebuilding: When Your Relationship Ends,” by Dr. Fisher and Dr. Alberti ($17.00). The course provides lifeline support, insight, friendship and healing. This is not a therapy group, for couples or for ex’s to take jointly. 352-371-4092 www.trinitygnv.org/

Interweave Sun. 8/8 6:30pm

Haile Homestead Tour Every Saturday 10:00am - 2:00pm Kanapaha Plantation. The Haile family and friends wrote on the walls of the home, all together over 12,500 words. In 1854 the Hailes moved their family from Camden, South Carolina to Gainesville, Florida where they established a 1,500-acre Sea Island cotton plantation they named Kanapaha.

pitchers. Eighteen and over only. Free admission before 9pm, and $7 for the general public after 9pm. 352-332-2224

Gainesville Bird Fanciers Sun. 8/8 1:00pm - 3:00pm United Way of North Central Florida, 6031 Northwest 1st Place. Join this local bird club to learn more about our feathered friends. Meeting the needs of

Rebuilding: When Your Relationship Ends Sun. 8/8 3:00pm - 5:30pm. Trinity United Methodist Church, 4000 N.W. 53rd Ave. This seminar is designed to help men and women adjust to the ending of a love relationship, such as in the loss of a fiancé, significant other, or

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 4225 NW 34th St. Interweave is a group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, & transgender individuals and their heterosexual allies. Each meeting begins with a delicious potluck and continues with an informative presentation and interesting discussion. 352-377-1669 Uufg.org

“Passages” to Middle School Wed. 8/11 8:00am - 5:00pm Westwood Middle School. Two day summer program designed to prepare girls for a smooth transition into Middle or Junior High School. The Program features: Organization Tips, Dealing with Bullies, Managing Friendships, Navigating the Halls, Self Confidence, Personal Fitness,


Gym Class - Lockers, Note Taking & Study Tips. Price: $40.00 *scholarships available 352-376-3004 www.girlscouts-gateway.org/

Century Tower. School of Music presents a Carillon Recital. Free. 352-273-3181

Swing and Sway with Live Music

Food Safety and Quality Program (ServSafe)

Fri. 8/13 8:00pm - 11:00pm

Wed., 8/18 8:30am - 5:00pm

Thelma Boltin Community Center, 516 N.E Second Ave. Music for ballroom dancing by the famous Blue Notes Band on a beautiful wood floor, hosted by the Swing and Sway Dance Club. Intermission features free dance instruction. Singles or couples welcome. No reservations required. $9 per person or $18 per couple, except for special events. 352-375-1996

Alachua County Extension Office, 2800 NE 39th Ave. This program is dedicated to providing training that enables food managers and staff to offer Florida consumers food that is prepared in a clean and safe environment. 1-888-232-8723 foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu

Carillon Recital

Family Day: “Jack Nichelson: Sojourner Dream Reliquaries”

Sun., 8/15 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Sat. 8/21 1:00pm - 4:00pm

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Adventure Club of Gainesville Meet and Greet Thurs., 8/19 - 6:00pm - 8:15pm Mother’s Pub & Grill, 1017 W. University Ave. The Adventure Club meets on the 3rd Thursday of each month for the purpose of introducing the club to the community. Stay active and involved in everything from windsurfing lessons, to bowling, to theatre, to skydiving, to biking, to community service, and of course, socializing. 352-262-1162

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Create artwork related to favorite family vacation memories after looking at the ones on display in the “Jack Nichelson: Sojourner Dream Reliquaries” exhibition. Harn.ufl.edu

Breastfeeding Successfully and Going Back to Work/School Wed. 8/25 6:30pm - 8:30p

Plant Project will hold its spring sale. A selection of edible plants, fruit trees and seeds will be available. This is a great time to plant warm season vegetables and greens, sugarcane and yucca or cassava, all of which will be available. 321-501-4927

Women’s Dinner and A Movie Sun. 9/5 5:00pm

The Birth Center of Gainesville. This twohour class is taught by an experienced lactation consultant and presents information pertinent to breastfeeding mothers who need to return to work or school but want to continue to breastfeed. 352-372-4784 www.nurturingmothersandbabies. com/

Pride Community Center, 3131 NW 13th St., Suite 62. Relax with the gals, enjoy a nice dinner, & catch a new movie — all for just $5! Can you think of a better way to spend a Sunday evening?! Hosted jointly by Kindred Sisters Magazine & PCCNCF. 352-502-4101 gainesvillepride.org/ index.php

Poker Nite

Dance for Life

Sat. 8/28 7:30pm - 10:00pm

Mon. 9/9 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Hippodrome State Theatre. Fun-filled evening to benefit Dance Alive National Ballet in the new V.I.P. Lounge at the Hippodrome. Poker, blackjack, reverse raffle, prizes, finger foods and cash bar. Spectacular dealers! Tickets available at the Hippodrome or Dance Alive. 352-371-2986 www.dancealive.org

University of Florida. Free movement program for people living with Parkinson’s Disease and other movement disorders and their significant others. Learn a variety of social dances — including Tango, Swing, and Hula — to develop strength and balance in a fun, social environment. Free, accessible parking available. To register call Shands Arts in Medicine. 352-733-0880

Fruit Tree and Plant Sale Wed. 9/1 4:00pm - 7:00pm Union Street Farmers’ Market in the Downtown Gainesville Plaza. The Edible

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National Alliance on Mental Illness Mon. 9/9 7:00pm - 9:00pm National Alliance

Autumn 2010 | 99


on Mental Illness, 1624 NW Fifth Ave. Support/educational meetings for family members of a loved one with a serious mental illness. 352-374-5600 ext. 8322 www.namigainesville.org/

Volunteer Orientation at the Florida Museum of Natural History Thurs. 9/9 1:00pm - 3:15pm Florida Museum of Natural History 352-273-2055 The orientation includes an overview of volunteer duties and an opportunity to view museum exhibits and presentations by departments currently seeking volunteers. Interested individuals must attend the orientation and are asked to register online by Dec. 1. 352-273-2055 www.flmnh.ufl.edu/volunteers/

Adventure Club of Gainesville Meet and Greet Thurs. 9/16 6:00pm - 8:15pm

Mother’s Pub & Grill. The Adventure Club meets on the 3rd Thursday of each month for the purpose of introducing the club to the community. 352-262-1162 www.adventureclub.info/

2010 Alachua County Start! Heart Walk Sat.9/18 8:00am North Florida Regional Medical Center Duck Pond. The Start! Heart Walk is a non-competitive walk promoting physical activity and heart-healthy living in a family friendly environment. The Start! Heart Walk creates hope, inspires change, and celebrates success. 888-352-3824 ext. 8013 alachuaheartwalk. kintera.org

UF School of Music Concerto Competition Wed. 9/22 9:00am - 5:00pm University of Florida: University Memorial Auditorium. Student musicians compete to perform with UF

Symphony Orchestra in the 44th Annual Concerto Competition Concert. Free.

Breastfeeding Successfully and Going Back to Work/School Wed. 9/29 6:30pm - 8:30pm. The Birth Center of Gainesville. Two-hour class is taught by an experienced lactation consultant. 352-372-4784 www.nurturingmothersandbabies. com/

Feast & Fashion Fri. 10/1 7:00pm - 10:00pm Dance Alive National Ballet, 1325 NW 2 Street. Evening of fine food, fashions and great conversation. Gourmet dinner at the home of Wayne and Elaine Taylor and fabulous fashions by Ilene’s For Fashion - all modeled by your favorite Gainesville celebrities. All proceeds to benefit the Educational programming of Dance Alive National Ballet. Ages 21 and older. Price: $50 352-371-2986 www.dancealive.org/

26th Annual Art Festival at Thornebrook Fri. 10/1 6:00pm - 9:00pm Thornebrook Village. More than 100 artists and fine craftsmen show paintings, photography, mixedmedia, ceramics, sculpture, wood, fiber, jewelry. Friday night preview: 6:00pm 9:00pm and Saturday. Sunday 10:00 am 5:00 pm 352-692-4466 www.thornebrookart.org/

High Springs River Festival Fri. 10/1 - Sun. 10/3 Beginning 5:00pm (Fri.) Downtown High Springs. The High Springs Main Street Program will be hosting a River Festival. Live music concerts downtown to conservation efforts throughout the weekend and live presentations by world-renown photographer and cave diver Jill Heinerth. 386-454-2889 www.highspringsriverfest.com

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Thurs. 10/14 8:00am - 6:00pm University of Florida: University Memorial Auditorium. High school ensembles convene to share and celebrate choral music. Event is free.

Carillon Recital Sun., 10/17 3:00pm - 4:00pm University of Florida Century Tower. School of Music presents a Carillon Recital. Free. 352-273-3181

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Noche de Gala Sat. 10/23 7:00pm - midnight Besilu Collection, a 642-acre horse farm in Micanopy. The theme of the 2010 Noche is a “Grand Ball,” and guests are encouraged to wear black tie attire. www.nochedegala.org/

ButterflyFest Sat. 10/23 10:00am - 5:00pm Florida Museum of Natural History. Explore the lives of bees, bats, birds and butterflies at ButterflyFest. Come dressed in your favorite pollinator attire or decorate your own mask and wings for the Pollinator Parade. 352-846-2000 www.flmnh.ufl.edu

Men’s Glee Club & Women’s Chorale Wed., 10/27 7:30pm

University of Florida: University Memorial Auditorium. Concert. $10 general public, $8 faculty & staff/non-UF students, free to UF students. 352-392-ARTS ticketmaster.com

Art Today Wed., 10/27 6:00pm Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Tales of Plastic Surgery, Genetically Altered Rabbits and Other Acts of Art. Lecture by Eleanor Heartney, art critic and contributing editor to Art in America and Artpress. Free. 352-392-9826 www.harn.ufl.edu

Micanopy Fall Harvest Festival Sat. 10/30 - Sun. 10/31 9:00am - 5:00pm (Sat.) 9:00am - 4:00pm (Sun.) Many local artists, crafters, and musicians participate as well as other artists from across the southeast. The festival attracts a broad range of the buying public, along with 200 displays of arts and crafts there are many other attractions. 352-466-7026 www.micanopyfallfestival.org/

Boo-soon to You Sun., 10/31 7:30pm University of Florida: University Memorial Auditorium. UF Bassoon Studio’s annual Halloween concert. Costumes optional. Event held at the University Auditorium. Event is free. s


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>> BACK TO SCHOOL

2010 - 2011 School Calendar August 16 – August 20 Pre-Planning (5 weekdays) Monday, August 23 First Day for Students Monday, September 6 Holiday - Labor Day Tuesday, September 28 Send Interim Reports Home Friday, October 15 Holiday - UF Homecoming Tuesday, October 26 End of First Nine Weeks Friday, October 29 Pupil Holiday / Teacher Workday Tuesday, November 9 Send Report Cards Home * Thursday, November 11 Holiday - Veterans’ Day Wednesday, November 24 Pupil Holiday / Teacher Holiday November 25 – November 26 Thanksgiving Holidays

Wednesday, December 8 Send Interim Reports Home December 20 – December 31 Winter Holidays (10 weekdays)

March 28 – April 1 Spring Holidays (5 weekdays) Monday, April 18 Send Report Cards Home

Monday, January 3 Classes Resume

Friday, May 13 Send Interim Reports Home

Monday, January 17 Holiday - ML King Birthday

Monday, May 30 Holiday - Memorial Day

Thursday, January 20 End of First Semester

Tuesday, June 7 School out Last Day for Students

Friday, January 21 Pupil Holiday / Teacher Workday

* Wednesday, June 8 Post-Planning for Teachers

Monday, January 24 Begin Second Semester

* Thursday, June 9 Post-Planning for Teachers

Thursday, February 3 Send Report Cards Home * Monday, February 21 Holiday - Presidents’ Day Wednesday, March 2 Send Interim Reports Home Thursday, March 24 End of Third Nine Weeks * Friday, March 25 Pupil Holiday / Teacher Workday

Extended School Year Schedule Summer school begins June 16 and ends July 9. (four days per week, with the exception of the last week, where July 5th and July 6th are holidays and school is in session July 7-9.) Drivers’ Education (dates not yet established)

* THESE DAYS MAY BE USED TO MAKE UP DAYS CANCELLED DUE TO HURRICANES OR OTHER EMERGENCIES. FOR THE 2010-11 CALENDAR, THEY WILL BE USED IN THE FOLLOWING ORDER:

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Old-Fashioned Customer Service Really Keeps Your Motor Running Since 1983, Jack’s Small Engine Repair has been selling and servicing small engine equipment the “old fashioned” way – with customer service their number one focus. New owner’s Debbie Marshall and Mark Singleton are proud to continue Jack’s tradition and have recently completed their second year. Specializing in lawn and garden equipment sales, service and repairs, Jack’s is the largest authorized HUSQVARNA dealer in the area. One of the most trusted names in outdoor equipment, Jack’s delivers more than a great product line. Each item sold is assembled on site and comes with personal instructions. Unlike the big box stores, Jack’s will take the time

to show you how to best use and maintain your new equipment, advise you on the equipment to buy and help in any way throughout the buying process. Come by and talk with Sales and Parts Manager, Larry Jackson. With more than 40 years experience, Larry will take the time to make sure you’re buying the right machine for the job. Known for their service and repair departments, Jack’s can help with almost any small-engine need. Whether it’s blowers, edger’s, tillers, four wheelers, go carts, generators, pressure washers, lawn mowers, chain saws, trimmers or most others, their authorized mechanics, Thomas, John and Mark, will diagnose and repair most

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rcher Family Health Care offers high quality healthcare for children, adults and families in Archer and the surrounding areas. Managed by the University of Florida College of

Nursing, this practice provides outstanding health care for most of your health care needs. Their nurse practitioners provide expert care for you and your family and are supported by a team of healthcare

professionals, including a consulting physician, a clinical pharmacist, community health nurses and a practice manager. The Archer Family Health Care team works together to make sure you get the best possible

health care. In a nurse managed practice you get more time with your health care provider. Their nurse practitioners listen to your concerns, learn your needs and can help you take control of your health. A nurse practitioner can provide nearly all of the primary and preventative health care most of us will ever need while a physician is available for consultation and referral. Their team of professionals takes the necessary steps required to insure you receive the highest quality of care. Regardless of age, Archer Family Health Care provides the services needed to remain healthy and to prevent disease.

Health services included at Archer Family Health Care: • Diagnosis and treatment of illness and injuries • Monitoring of chronic diseases • Prescriptions • Ordering, performing and interpreting diagnostic studies, such as lab work and x-rays

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110 | Autumn 2010


>> CARVE. GRIND. SLASH.

Possum Creek’s Skate Park

SKATEBOARDERS’

NEW HOME

BY MALIKA WRIGHT here is not a special lane in the road for skateboarders. Unlike other sports, they do not have a basketball court or a football field to enjoy their craft. It was as if the sport for which Gainesville resident Chris Baucom made the Florida Hall of Fame was not even recognized in our town. Sure, there were a few basic public skate parks and a private

T

park that charged skateboarders $5 per visit. But most skateboarders were students who tried to get the cheapest skating deal possible, said Jordin Frazier, a 16-year-old skateboarder who practices his sport every day. The public skate parks with a few little ramps were not any fun for Frazier, a self-proclaimed rail and stairway skating expert. Riding

a skateboard on the street as if it was a motor vehicle, skateboarding on prohibited property or gliding down wax-covered rails meant Frazier was breaking the law. To work on their skills, he and other skateboarders risked getting in trouble with the police when rolling down streets and other areas where skateboarding was not allowed. continued on next page

PHOTOS BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

Former professional skateboarder Chris Baucom,45, catches some air at the Possum Creek Skate Park. He and his son, Alex, (Above) go to the park together about twice a week.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2010 | 111


PHOTOS BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS Alex Baucom

catches frontside air in the bowl. Alex just won the 2010 “Grind for Life” Florida Skateboard Series in the 16-29 age-group.

Since it is an in-ground skate park, the children on the playground seem louder than the skateboarders. “Now we don’t have to do that,” Frazier said. “We just come here and it’s peaceful.” “Here” is Possum Creek Park, located at 4009 NW 53rd Ave., a place skateboarders can go and not

112 | Autumn 2010

have to worry about trespassing. Possum Creek Park was recently renovated to include a new skate park that opened in April. The skate park is always packed, said Chris Baucom, who was a professional

skateboarder in the 1980s. Some people come to skate as early as 7:30 a.m. he said. At 8 p.m. on a school night, the crowded skate park has people swerving around the bowl, skating over ramps and boxes and grinding on rails. Frazier goes to the park every day after school and has already learned 15 to 20 new tricks. He is able to “let loose” and set his mind free at the skate park that


PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS The new skate

park at Possum Creek offers visitors of all ages a variety of obstacles to hone their skateboarding skills.

PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

Jordin Frazier, a 16-year- old skateboarder, said he practices his sport every day.

has everything, he said. He is able grow as a skateboarder by trying new obstacles, such as the bowl. As Baucom rides around the bowl that he describes as “lesschallenging,” he receives smiles from young skaters paying complete attention to him. He has 39 years of practice. Although he grew up skating in a more advanced park, with bowls that are about 12 feet deep — 6 feet deeper than the bowl

at Possum Creek — he sometimes comes to the park with his son, and teaches younger skateboarders. He and other older skateboarders try to clean up around the park and encourage younger skateboarders not to tag the park with graffiti. “Let them build us more before you go doing that,” he would say to the skateboarders. He does not think the park will stop some skateboarders from skating in the street,

www.VisitOurTowns.com

but the park is usually full, he said. “It’s a lot easier for police to tell them to get off someone’s private property if they can say, ‘go to the park,’” he said. The contemporary skate park is complete with a bowl, rails and a stairway, boxes, a step up and other obstacles that some Gainesville skateboarders have not seen until visiting the park. Steve continued on next page

Autumn 2010 | 113


PHOTOS BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS Gainesville has been in

need of a skate park for many years. “If the city does not provide a skate park,” said Steve Phillips, the city’s park and recreation director, “the city becomes a skate park.”

Phillips, the city’s park and recreation director, said there has been a need for a park for many years. “If the city does not provide a skate park, the city becomes a skate park,” he said. He said the park is allowing kids an opportunity to have another form of recreation besides the basics, and a lot of kids are skateboarders. After several city meetings it was decided the city would have the new skate park, although some

114 | Autumn 2010

residents opposed the idea. Phillips said he tried to address the public concerns by building the park mostly in-ground. Many thought the park would be noisy, but since it is an in-ground skate park, the children on the playground seem louder than the skateboarders. Others were concerned things would get out of hand and lead to criminal activity. Some people believe the park may decrease criminal activity. Ed Book, a captain at the

Gainesville Police Department, said when he receives calls about skateboarders it is usually because they are trespassing or skating on rails and stairways. Book said he thinks there will be less trespassing problems now that the park is open because skateboarders can skate on rails and stairways at the park. Young skateboarders are so busy trying out new tricks and skating on the step up and box that they do not mention skating elsewhere. s


www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2010 | 115


Let Us Cater To You. Whether you are dining in or we’re bringing it to you

J

oe’s Place and Northwest Grille, both part of Gainesville Restaurant Group, are two locallyowned, casual restaurants that provide unique dining experiences. Our chefs’ attention to detail and the fresh food we buy allows these Gainesville Gainesvi villlle e restaurants rest re stau a rants to deliver wide del eliv ivver a w wid ide id e variety variiet va etyy

of unique and delicious dishes. We are committed to providing warm service, creative menus and inviting atmospheres while also giving back to the community in which we operate. Our passion is sharing great food and drink with you, our guests, and it would be our pleasure to see you at one of our tables soon.

GRG Catering Services WHAT DO WE CATER? Casual Lunches & Formal Luncheons, Private Parties, Santa Fe College & UF Events (Except Alumni Hall), Dinner Parties, Rehearsal Dinners & More! WHAT SETS US APART? Quality Food, 100% On-time & Reliable, Locally owned, Great Vegetarian options, Adhere to dietary needs, Full Liquor License for Full Bar. 10% Back for Non-Profits

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CONTACT OUR CATERING COORDINATOR TODAY 352-376-3437 - catering@gainesvillerestaurantgroup.com Joe’s Place • 5109 NW 39th Ave. • 352.377.1365 Northwest Grille • 5115 NW 39th Ave. • 352.376.0500

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ADVERTISEMENT

Thinking of Remodeling?? raetz Remodeling is a locally owned family orientated business comprised of a group of people whose passion for construction is apparent in the final product. A positive success rate of any renovation company can be derived by a number of measures, however; when a company has a large number of return customers like Graetz Remodeling, it is clear the company is doing things correctly. “We want homeowners to be happy with their decision to allow Graetz Remodeling to assist them with renovations” says Allan Graetz – Owner/President; “it is the small things that can make a difference and we try not to look them over or take them for granted”. Currently celebrating their 10th year in business, Graetz is quick to point out “flying by the seat of your pants is not going to make you very successful in this industry; you have to know what you are doing and how to handle the unforeseen” Graetz Remodeling specializes in custom bathroom and kitchen renovations, home additions and whole house renovations. “We have been renovating homes and small business since our conception in 2000 – we were renovating homes while everyone else was building homes”. With

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118 | Autumn 2010

the downturn in the economy suddenly the market is full of contractors looking to renovation work. “Renovation work can be complex. Renovations are not like building from nothing. There are lots of hidden factors that can cause setbacks or changes; its knowing these before hand and knowing how to handle them once uncovered that determines

your performance and ultimately the outcome”. Graetz Remodeling has seen a rise in the amount of work homeowners are seeking for newly purchased homes as well as for homes to be put on the market. Graetz offers a few thoughts to consider. “If you are selling your home keep things modern and moderate – meaning keep it simple, chances are that your elaborate or eclectic style may not be what someone else would have done therefore reducing

your return on investment”. The Graetz Remodeling website www.graetz-construction.com has links to the most recent cost versus resale charts which can assist you in determining the level of renovations you may want to consider, whether you are purchasing, selling or just renovating. Honesty is the number one principal Graetz Remodeling is based on. “If we can not be 100% with our clients we have failed regardless of what the outcome of a project is” says Allan. Graetz offers one last piece of advice; “Prior to contracting with any contractor investigate and make sure they are State of Florida licensed, insured, and are reputable. Homeowner’s can go to www.myfloirdalicense. com/dbpr/index.html and search for licensure and complaints on any contractor as well as talk with your friends and neighbors for references”. References for Graetz Remodeling should not be hard to come by; for starters visit the references page of their website, www.graetz-construction.com 1901 NW 67TH Place; Suite B Gainesville, Fl 32653 1-352-371-7730 1-352-371-7537 fax


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Shop Consignment T

hese days, we’re all looking for ways to save money. With fuel prices, the everincreasing costs of goods and services, and most people feeling the pinch, many of us are looking for ways to tighten the budget. One way to significantly save money is by shopping at a consignment store. Valerie’s Loft, in Alachua, is ready to help. At Valerie’s Loft, customers can shop in a boutique-style setting while saving up to 75 percent off the original price. “Consignment shopping is the way to go,” says Valerie Taylor, owner of Valerie’s Loft. “In this economy, you have to come check here first. Buying from a consignment store offers shoppers a wonderful way to extend their buying dollars. Brides on a budget can find beautiful wedding dresses at a fraction of the cost and parents can find a huge selection of nearly new clothing.” With sizes ranging from girls size six to adult size 5x, Valerie’s Loft offers an extensive line of casual wear, formal wear, wedding

gowns and accessories. Of course, if you’re looking to make a little extra money, selling your clothes through Valerie’s Loft is an excellent way to add to your bottom line. Valerie’s Loft accepts clothes during normal business hours and offers sellers either 40 percent of the eventual sales price or 50 percent towards in-store credit. If your closet is full of clothes you never wear, why not put Valerie’s Loft to work for you? Owner Valerie Taylor invites you to stop in and check out the store for yourself. As a longtime resident of Alachua, Valerie serves on the board of directors for the Alachua Business League, the Alachua Historical Society and the Alachua Woman’s Club. Heavily involved in the local economy and in support of local businesses, Valerie sees consignment shopping as a great way to shop local and save money. Open 6 days per week, including Saturdays, Valerie’s Loft is located in beautiful downtown Alachua on Main Street.

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>> FAMILY FUN

Be aMazed Micanopy Family Farm’s Annual Corn Maze

BY TARA MASSAGEE-STANLEY or the second year in a row, visitors and guests galore will stalk a field in a small town. Coon Hollo Farm has been in Micanopy for four generations, but just last year the idea to incorporate a corn maze was brought to life. The maze was the brainchild of Amy Perryman, who said she

F

Besides the maze there are a variety of other activities available knew of other mazes in Florida that were doing well and thought it would be a good idea to start one with her family’s farm. She said the farm was not making enough on its own and there needed to be something that could generate more income. Perryman’s mother, Ginny Williams, said Perryman tried for years to convince her father Jack to grow the maze, but he did not like the idea. But last year he gave in when the farm went through a rough patch. For the inaugural event, Ginny Williams said she estimated that about 1,200 people would attend the maze. But, to her surprise, over 10,000 visitors came

through the maze. “It was unbelievable,” she said. During the first two weekends of the maze being open, Perryman said about 200 to 300 hundred people attended each weekend. She said when people were arriving early before the maze opened it gave her reassurance that people would actually come. But the third weekend was jam-packed with people. Perryman said she can remember people lined up 30 minutes before they opened, and the line of cars kept growing from there. There was a line from top of the hill where Perryman’s house is to the end of the road below the hill and around the corner, she said. Williams has a country store at the maze and said she can remember all of the baked goods she made had been sold off the shelves and the jam she spent all season making was gone. She said she had to buy back the jam she donated to her church just so she could put something on the shelves. “In two hours time everything I spent all night baking was gone, from 9 p.m. to 5:30 a.m.,” she said. So, in preparation for this year’s maze, Williams said she is “stockpiling fruit, 1,000 to 1,200 jars” to jam. Right now there are 18 flats of strawberries in the freezer waiting to be jarred but she still needs a lot more blackberries, she said. continued on next page

PHOTOS BY TOM RENO

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) 1) A sign outside of the corn maze announces the rules. 2) Trina Sargalski and Nicole Reno brave the corn maze in the dark of night at last year’s event. 3) Cameron Reno and Lila Saarinen ride the see-saw, one of several activities children can enjoy at Coon Hollo. 4) Lila and Justin Saarinen take a ride on the barrel train. 5. Cameron Reno and Justin Saarinen explore the giant haystack.

122 | Autumn 2010


Growing the Maze Around July 15th Perryman said they would have planted the field that will become the maze. Even though the maze is called a corn maze, it is actually a crop of sorghum that people will be walking thorough. Perryman uses sorghum because it grows thicker and taller, 12 - 16 feet, than corn because corn needs irrigation, which the farm does not have. She said within three weeks of planting, the sorghum will start to sprout. Once it is about one or two feet high they will cut the pattern, she said.

124 | Autumn 2010

Last year Perryman said they cut the pattern of the maze on their own, and this year they will too. The design used for the previous maze were the words “COON HOLLO.” Once the design is set, the family will go out with large sheets of graph paper with the words plotted in dimensions of 50 feet in length and 40 feet in width to measure the words in the field. The lines are drawn and a lawn mower is used to cut the pattern. This year, Perryman said the family plans to use a zero-turn lawnmower to cut the pattern because the push mower they used last year took “forever.” Also, the pattern in the field has to be cut multiple times because the sorghum grows so fast, Perryman said. “It took so long to cut it that we were still cutting the weekend before we opened,” Perryman said about last year’s design. She said that for next year they may bring in a company to cut the pattern for them. Besides the maze, other activities are available. The cow train is one activity that Williams said went very well last year and will run again this year is It “never stopped,” she said. The cow train is a group of barrels on wheels that people ride in while being pulled by a tractor. The train was designed primarily as a children’s ride but sometimes the “children had to fight off the adults” to ride, Williams said.


A new activity the family hopes to implement this year is a scavenger hunt within the maze. Laurie Berry, Perryman’s sister, said stations would be set up and each person would be given a sheet of paper that would be checked off at each station. She said there would be an agricultural learning aspect to each station but the specifics have not been worked out yet. When the maze is closed for the season, the farm offers field trips to schools and other groups. “Part of our duty as agriculturalists is to teach the youth,” Berry said. The students are taken on a hayride around the farm and taught about the history and aspects of running a farm. The students are also allowed to feed the cattle that the farm raises. Also, Perryman said the family is thinking about doing a Christmas activity during the holiday season. Plans include Christmas movie classics out on the lawn, caroling, a horse drawn carriage, a Christmas tree lot and Santa’s workshop. Aside from the economic help the maze brings to the farm, Williams said the best part is that families are doing something together when they come to the farm. “Families come back again and again,” Williams said. She said she remembers seeing families come one weekend and then come again the following weekend with their friends and their families. “This was our field or dreams,” Williams said. s

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>> HALLOWEEN

Boo at the Zoo A Halloween Festival Coming Soon To A Zoo Near You BY KATE HELLER trolling through the Santa Fe Teaching Zoo is always an experience, but on Halloween evening it is an adventure. This Halloween, the zoo will host the Fifteenth Annual Boo at the Zoo event, opening its grounds to families, costumes and candy. The event, which takes place from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 31, boasts 12 trick-or-treat stations and festive decorations covering the grounds. Staff and students at Santa Fe College’s Teaching Zoo get instructions to begin planning the event on the first day of fall semester, said Jack Brown, the director of Santa Fe Teaching Zoo. Roughly 130 students are divided into four groups, which are each assigned one of the four sections of the zoo to decorate in their spare time. Each section has a theme, and there is a constant, friendly competition to create the best demonstration. The winning group is rewarded with a day off. Themes have ranged from Sleepy Hallow to Harry Potter’s Hogwarts castle. Decorations are festive but not exceedingly gory or scary as the environment is intended to appeal to a large range of children from preschool to elementary school. With decorations, costumes, games and all of the regular animal exhibits, Boo at the Zoo has seen overwhelming success. Last year the event, run by the zoo’s staff of eight, attracted 7,000 attendants in the four-hour period, Brown said. A canned food item is required for each visitor’s admission. The food is distributed to two local food banks — both urban

S

130 | Autumn 2010

PHOTO COURTESY OF JONATHAN MIOT

Caitlyn Miller and Kat Hudgens, Zoo Animal Technology students, dressed as ghosts in masquerade costumes, pose with a young guest at 2009 Boo at the Zoo.


and rural. Only one item is required, but guests are encouraged to donate as many as they can. Food collection is a major part of the evening. “This is our opportunity to do two things: thank the community for being so supportive and provide food for the needy during the holiday season,” Brown said. Because Halloween falls on a Sunday this year, the event will not have to compete with school, and families are free to arrive earlier than usual. In the past, the crowd has noticeably thickened around 5 p.m. with younger kids coming for the early hours. Though long, the line out front moves quickly. Games and photo opportunities are provided in the front yard to keep visitors occupied while they are waiting to make their entrance, said Kathy Russell, an instructor and the general curator at the zoo. Construction for the event begins on Oct. 1, and the staff really gets into gear on the final touches two weeks

It is different every year with new themes and candy stations. before the event takes place. There is only so much decoration that can be set up ahead of time, Russell said. The zoo is closed the day before Halloween to allow staff members plenty of time to pull everything together. The zoo is currently busy with step one — looking for local businesses interested in sponsoring the Halloween festival. In past years, Publix Super Markets Charities has been a major sponsor and supporter. As a fun and safe way to enjoy the holiday, Boo at the Zoo is an event for all ages. It is different every year with new themes and candy stations. No child leaves disappointed, provided he brings a large bag. “Kids can have a pretty good-sized bag of candy by the time they get out of here,” Russell said. Though students and staff have only just begun construction and decorating, they are as excited as ever to open the zoo yet again with decorations of musical

PHOTO COURTESY OF JONATHAN MIOT

An Asian Small Clawed otter inspects a carved pumpkin during Boo at the Zoo.

monsters or alien encounters — or whatever the themes turn out to be. The festival has become a staple to many families in the surrounding community. Kim Cook, a mother of two, said she and her family have been attending Boo at the Zoo for nearly 14 years. Her youngest, a 12-year-old son, kept the tradition going even last year. “It’s like a tradition in our family,” she said. “My kids like to go through and compare the decorations from year to year.” The family’s favorite year involved the Harry Potter decorations. Curiosity kept the Cooks coming back for more, whether it was the zoo’s décor or fellow guests’ costumes. One year the family saw a man dressed as Dr. Evil from “Austin Powers” with his 2-year-old son dressed as Mini-Me — a sighting that quickly became a favorite, Cook said. Cook teaches English as a second language to adults, and she always encourages her students to head out to the zoo on Halloween night. The event that kicks off the holiday season is still a few months away, but Boo at the Zoo is already preparing to give back to the community while providing children with a secure environment, enjoyment and, of course, candy. s

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COLUMN >> BRIAN “KRASH” KRUGER

Gate Crashing On Deck: Hot Graves, The Effheads DATE: FRIDAY JUNE 18 VENUE: THE KICKSTAND reetings, live music aficionados! This month we’ll be spotlighting a show at the Kickstand, at 722 South Main Street. This location borders an industrial area, currently directly adjacent to the construction work that makes South Main Street impassable, so to get there it helps to approach from the south. The Kickstand building is behind the red, Discount Hi-Fi

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building and adjacent to the Gainesville Rock Gym. The Kickstand is not a live music club, but rather another in a long line of Gainesville spaces that have a bit of a split personality, with one purpose (typically something community-oriented), during most of the time, and offering live music on certain (typically evening) occasions. In the case of the Kickstand, its other function is shown by its more formal name, the Gainesville Community Bicycle Project. According to its website, thekickstand.org, the Kickstand provides free

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or inexpensive bicycle-related services to all, helping people learn to maintain bicycles and use them in a responsible manner, by assisting in acquiring reliable bicycles, and providing access to knowledgeable volunteers and quality tools. The Kickstand’s website contains a brief mention of the fact that it also serves as a music venue. Specific shows, however, do not appear to be listed there, and although the website links to a facebook page, it does not appear that all shows are necessarily listed there either. As a result, your best bet for staying informed about any Kickstand shows is probably gainesvillebands.com, which is the best way to stay informed about Gainesville live music anyhow. As a result of its dual nature, the Kickstand faces some uphill battles in putting on a show. For one, the building is basically a big concrete block and corrugated metal workshop. Which means no central air conditioning (and I’m guessing no heat in winter). At any rate, the night I went, despite being the middle of June, it was still cooler outside than inside, even before the show started and the room got partially full, although the temperature and humidity inside were somewhat alleviated by a big shop fan or two. There is, of course, no bar. There are a few couches and stuffed chairs along part of one wall, and one long table, being used primarily to sit on (when I visited), along another wall. The Kickstand website mentions it

as having “limited access to bathroom facilities,” and though I never did find out exactly what that meant, suffice to say, when nature called I used the road construction “portapotty” a few hundred feet away out on Main Street. Drink policy is “BYOB,” and the night I was there the small black jeans and studs crowd was about evenly divided between those drinking cans of those popular horrible energy drinks, and stronger stuff. For a change I avoided the latter and went through about four bottles of water I had brought along. After more than an hour’s wait from the posted starting time, local band Hot Graves went on. As you might guess from the band name, the band plays music that could be described as thrash metal. This four-piece played an engaging and rather long set, given the stifling conditions in the room. With the two guitarists each playing through a half-stack and the bass through a big (8 ten-inch speakers) Ampeg cab, the PA could not keep up, and other than the typical growly vocals of modern metal it was difficult to make out much of the vocals. Still these guys had the necessary attitude and poses (and I mean the latter in a good way). The drummer’s work on what I assume to be a double-kick pedal was particularly impressive. After a short break, Boston quartet the Effheads came on. Well, let’s just say I can’t reprint the actual name of the band in this continued on next page

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN “KRASH” KRUGER

(top) Hot Graves L-R: Hutch (bass), Myk (guitar), Matt (drums). Obscured: Dusty (guitar) (bottom) Boston’s Effheads rock the Kickstand.

here family magazine, so you will have to use your imagination. Although there was only one guitar in this band, they made up for it by playing it through a full stack (two cabinets with four 12” speakers in each), and since the bass was run through the same Ampeg “fridge” cab used by the prior band, the vocal effect, PA-wise, was also the same. Since this band played more hardcore punk than thrash metal, the vocals were a bit more shouty than growly, but at any rate the band played a short set and were loading out before I knew it. Seeing a show at the Kickstand is sort of like primitive camping-you need to be prepared in order to make it enjoyable. Hopefully, now you know enough to prepare appropriately, and who knows, maybe some benefactor(s) will step up and help them with their PA or facilities. Now go see some bands. s

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>> CULTURAL EVENTS

Downtown Festival and Art Show BY ALBERT ISAAC

November 6th and 7th from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Downtown Gainesville Parking in the city parking garage, two blocks west of Main Street, is $5.00 daily and open 24 hours a day. Festivities will be free and open to the public. www.gvlculturalaffairs.org 352-334-ARTS

usic. Food. Art. And the chance to enjoy the great outdoors. Come this November, downtown Gainesville will close off some streets to motor vehicle traffic and welcome thousands of visitors to join in the festivities. People can meet the exhibiting artists, enjoy live music and dancing, and sample international cuisine during the 29th Annual Downtown Festival and Art Show. Presented by the City of Gainesville Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs, this event is one of the nation’s premier outdoor fine arts festivals, drawing a crowd of more than 100,000 each year. “We pride ourselves on our rich collection of art and the experience we provide to the community,” said Festival Coordinator Linda Piper. “It is always so much fun to walk around the festival and see everyone

M

enjoying the atmosphere.” This festival marks Piper’s 16th year producing the event, and 34 years in the Gainesville’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “The arts festival has grown tremendously over the years,” Piper said. “It is nationally recognized, and ranked no. 6 of the best fine arts festivals in Florida.” Piper said this is particularly noteworthy since the other five festivals are from big cities. The rankings are based upon sales. “Artists themselves get to rank the best shows based on their sales,” she said. “This shows that our Gainesville community truly appreciates the arts, purchases art and supports the arts.” According to the Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs’ news release, this event has ranked among the top festivals in the nation since 1996. Sunshine Artist magazine ranked the Downtown Festival and Art Show no. 27 among the best 200 fine art shows in 2009, and Greg Lawler’s Art Fair SourceBook included the show in its list of the nation’s top 100 fine art festivals. Visitors can expect to see original oils and acrylics, vibrant watercolors, unique sculptures, dazzling jewelry, decorative ceramics and vivid photography by more than 250 of the nation’s most talented artists. Artisans compete for more continued on page 138

PHOTO BY ALBERT ISAAC

This gigantic bird, courtesy of Lynn Polke and Rainbow Tiger Circus, could not be missed as she strolled the streets during last year’s Annual Downtown Festival and Art Show.

136 | Autumn 2010


www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2010 | 137


festival. Children have the opportunity to get creative at the Imagination Station, a free hands-on art activity area. Here they can draw with chalk, paint pictures, design masks, sculpt clay and create puppets and buttons. The Imagination Station even features a performance area with puppet shows, magic acts and music, so children can rock to their own beat. Art Education students from the University of Florida work throughout the fall semester to produce this hub PHOTO BY ALBERT ISAAC of family-friendly fun. More than 100,000 people attend the Annual Downtown Festival and Art Show, Visitors can sample a variety of and are treated to art, music and a variety of international dishes. food from vendors that provide bloomin’ onions, sweet barbecue o continued from page 136 ribs, hearty Mediterranean pitas, Cajun jambalaya and than $18,000 in cash prizes and purchase awards. authentic Thai cuisine. The festival features internaThe festival weekend kicks off Friday at 7 p.m. at the tional dishes from more than 20 food vendors. Bo Diddley Community Plaza with a Downtown Blues “We have some of the best food vendors,” Piper said. Concert presented by the North Central Florida Blues Near the steps of the Hippodrome State Theatre more Society. According to the city’s website, music from than 50 non-profit organizations educate the crowd local bands and solo musicians features a blend of folk, about services they provide to the community. jazz, country, pop and soul genres. Dance companies “The festival goes from the Hippodrome all the way also catch the eyes of the crowd with ballet, jazz, to city hall, and including University Avenue,” Piper modern and international dance performances. said. “The only time in Gainesville (other than the “One of the things that I think is kind of interesting is UF Homecoming Parade) when University Avenue is that people from all over apply to do the entertainment,” closed off.” said Entertainment Director Bill Hutchinson. “There are Piper said the festival brings a lot of tourism into the so many people in the area that we run out of slots.” area, creating a large economic impact. Hutchinson said he has been involved with the “It’s a great opportunity to begin your holiday shopfestival in one way or another since the beginning. ping,” Piper said. “That’s what makes it so successful. “We are really proud that we can showcase a lot of It’s the perfect time of year in Gainesville; the perfect talent of here,” he said. time of the year to purchase one-of-a-kind artwork for The festival offers live performances on three stages that special someone.” by local bands, solo musicians and dance companies. “I just always feel that we are so lucky to live in a “We have live music on the Bo Diddley Plaza and community that values culture and art,” Hutchinson on the side of the Hippodrome we have the acoustic said. “It is, of course, what makes us one of the most stage,” Hutchinson said. “The acts that aren’t as loud livable cities, in poll after poll. This is one of the really and are more intimate have their shows back there.” nice parties that we invite 100,000 of our closest friends There is something for young and old alike at the to help celebrate.” s

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Autumn 2010 | 141


>> COMMUNITY

Civilization Restaurant A Unique Dining Cooperative BY CHRIS WILSON ainesville is now home to what looks like the only cooperative restaurant in the state of Florida. Civilization, which opened in October 2009, serves breakfast, lunch and dinner nearly every day. While nobody can confirm if Civilization is, in fact, the only co-op restaurant in the state, the restaurants’ investors and workers believe it is. And an exhaustive Internet search proved they might be correct in that assumption. “Two of our investors are part of the Labor Party, so it was their brainchild,” said Civilization owner/ worker Esther Kaufman. “We had talked over the years about starting different cooperative endeavors and this is just the one that took. I don’t know of another [restaurant cooperative] in Florida. [Opening a cooperative business] is not an easy thing, when you’re dealing with the government. The state of Florida doesn’t recognize a worker-owned cooperative type of business. Really, we’re a limited liability company, but we let our structure work like a co-op.” The restaurant opened its doors for the first time on Oct. 6, 2009. Less than six months earlier, the investors involved in the business had purchased Terranova Catering Company and had intended to just run a catering operation. The group found a few catering jobs before the idea of a restaurant was born. “We’re locally funded, so we don’t answer to any particular person or bank,” Kaufman said. “When we were investigating what to do at the end of our lease, we wound up finding this space, so we ended up creating a restaurant as well.” The space that the investors had found was the

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former location of 2nd Street Bakery (1511 NW 2nd Street), just south of NW 16th Ave. The old brick building needed little remodeling inside or out. Inside, the restaurant has a about a half dozen tables while the front patio also has a handful of tables. “We were totally shut down from August through October to get the restaurant opened,” Kaufman said. “You can see it’s kind of set up for a coffee shop and we’ve kept it mostly the same.” The cooperative is owned by about 15 investors, but Kaufman said the company is open to more willing investors. Not all of the investors are workers in the restaurant and catering business. Kaufman said some are just investors, but everybody who invests gets a vote on what the democratically-run business will do. “We actually just lowered our investment requirement,” she said. “That’s unusual, but it’s a good sign. Usually you hear about companies wanting to get their hands on whatever amount they can.”


PHOTOS BY CHRIS WILSON

ABOVE: (from left) Esther Kaufman, Gracy Castine, Shawn Maschino, Matt Farrell, John Prosser, Laura Nesmith, Ann Murray and Adam Brown work the morning and lunch shift at Civilization. The restaurant cooperative prides itself on producing a diverse menu using local food sources. LEFT: Gracy Castine fixes a cup of coffee for a customer. Civilization’s coffee bar is busy throughout the morning, with takeout and dine-in customers. For customers looking for a beverage later in the day, the restaurant also serves beer and wine.

Beyond its interesting location and business model, Civilization is eager to provide customers with locally grown and raised foods, operating sustainably, and providing diners with a casual, relaxed atmosphere. “It was slow going at first, but things picked up in January,” Kaufman said. The menu, designed by chefs Shawn Maschino and John Prosser, offers a diverse array of ethnic and American dishes. “Our menu is eclectic,” Kaufman said. “We’re not trying to be overly fine dining. We want a comfortable atmosphere. We’re trying to be very broad and diverse. Our ownership group has broad tastes, so we want our customer base to be broad.” Half of the menu at Civilization is vegetarian, but the restaurant also caters to its meat-eating clients. “It’s not like some restaurants where you might have just one vegetarian meal,” Kaufman said. “We have a page of vegetarian meals. We also have a page of dishes with meat in them. We try to be really open to the most tastes. We are not trying to be exclusive in any way.” The restaurant serves a light breakfast on weekday mornings from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. The menu features

a variety of coffee and tea, plus scones, bagels, quiches and other baked goods. On Saturday, the restaurant opens in the morning (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.) for brunch, which features eggs, french toast, pancakes, sandwiches, burritos and casseroles. Each weekday, the restaurant also opens for lunch from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Some of the regular menu items include a roasted red pepper and avocado melt, spinach and sweet potato burritos, water buffalo burgers and flank steak sandwiches. There are also soups, salads and daily specials. Dinner is served Monday through Saturday, 5:30 p.m. to close (the organization does not specify a closing time). Dinner features a variety of pasta, vegetarian, meat and seafood dishes. The dishes range from fairly exotic, such as the pollo a la brasa (a Peruvian grilled chicken marinated in soy lime sauce served with yellow rice and avocado) to indigenous (the Old Florida Sampler features black-eyed peas and rice, collard greens, sweet potato casserole and hush puppies). Civilization also offers a variety of beer and wine. s For more information, visit www.welcometocivilization.com or call 352-380-0544.

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Autumn 2010 | 143


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144 | Autumn 2010


>> URBAN LEGENDS

True or False! Chomping Down on Florida Myths BY CRYSTAL HENRY he murky and misty Florida swamps have long been home to their fair share of legends and lore. Tales have been spun of science experiments gone awry and the genetic engineering of mutant bugs. Some rumors hold water, while others are just stories that have run as wild as the kudzu.

T

Love is in the Air In the early spring and late summer months, romance swarms the state of Florida in the form of pesky little copulating critters called Plecia nearctica, more commonly known as lovebugs. There are several myths flying around about the origin and purpose of these less-than-pleasant lovers, but as University of Florida professor Norman C. Leppla points out in his publication, “Living With Lovebugs,” the rumors just are not true. One of the most popular myths about the lovebugs is that they are a genetically engineered breed of mosquito hunters invented by UF scientists. Another similar myth says the bugs escaped after UF researchers brought them to Florida. But according to Leppla’s research, neither myth is accurate. Although lovebug guts have been rumored to eat the paint off of a Ford Mustang, the only living things they feed on are flowers. According to Leppla, lovebugs are slow moving herbivores that feed on pollen and nectar. Even if they were hungry for mosquitoes, they do not have the jaws or grasping legs needed to catch and eat their prey. They are also out at the wrong time to hunt mosquitoes. While lovebugs are active during the day, mosquitoes are nocturnal. And according to the Florida Integrated Pest Management

website, lovebugs actually migrated to the United States from Central America. They were first found in Texas, then Louisiana in the 1920s. According to Leppla, they did not reach Florida until 1949. He said while strong winds, vehicle traffic and sod transport may have sped up their move into Florida, UF researchers did not.

Shoo Fly, Don’t Bother Me Another story that has been bugging Floridians actually may hold water. According to an old wives’ tale, one surefire way to repel flies is a bag of water hanging in direct sunlight. There are a few variations of this story, some involve putting one or more pennies in the bag, and another calls for flecks of aluminum. But the common thread is the bag of water. Leppla said he has continued on next page

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Autumn 2010 | 145


everything near the bag. Any movement from or around the bag is then exaggerated, and the fly is scared away. Leppla said he is not sure either of these theories is accurate. “I’m not sure flies are afraid,” he said. “They might not have that emotion.” He said it might be a better idea to ask, “What motivates a fly?” Number one, they want something to eat. Then females look for a place to lay eggs, and males look for females. Since the bag of water offers none of these things, the flies might stay away. But whether it actually repels fl ies or not, Leppla said it might be Kudzu is a climbing, coiling, and trailing vine native to southern regions of a good idea for businesses to try. Japan and southeast China. He said if enough people think it frequented restaurants where there is no doubt in the works, then it might give the illusion that the business is restaurant owner’s mind that this is the best way to clean and free of pests. This sort of placebo effect might keep flies away from their business. However, from a be worth putting the bag up for business owners, even if scientific point of view, Leppla said this theory is counit does not actually cut down on the fly population. terproductive. He said shiny objects typically attract “Plus if you need a penny, then you know where to flies, and that insect repellent or insecticides may be a find them,” he said. better way to keep them at bay. The jury is still out on whether the method actually Kudzu works. One study, conducted by a professor at North Another rumor running wild is that of the origin of Carolina State University, tested the effects of clear kudzu. Some say that the invasive plant was invented plastic water bags as a fly deterrent on an egg farm. by a Southern university as cattle feed. While some say The study actually found that there was more fly UF, some say Florida State University and others say activity with the water bags than without. However, the Auburn University, kudzu is actually native to Asia. experiment did not use natural light. According to the Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council Since the original myth calls for natural light, some website, kudzu was introduced at the Philadelphia have theorized why this method still might work. Centennial Exposition in 1876, and by 1900 it was According to an article on eHow.com, there are two available through mail order. It was sold as an inexlight refraction theories. The most popular theory says pensive livestock forage crop and ornamental plant, that the light refracted through the water confuses and from the 1930s through the mid 1950s it was used the flies because they see their own reflection and get for erosion control. In 1970, the USDA listed kudzu as a confused, or the light refraction actually magnifies common weed and it is estimated that it now covers 7 million acres in the southeast. Since its introduction, kudzu has been taking over. It covers anything it its path and will smother other plants. It has been known to grow about one foot per day once the plant is established. Leppla said it is a World’s #1 selling oxygen legume, and is quite the interesting invasive species. & nutrient supplement He said research is being done on kudzu because it has CONTACT YOUR LOCAL DISTRIBUTOR: been a host for soybean pests. Since it also competes Suzette Thibault for resources with native species, kudzu is one pesky CellFood Distributors plant that is unwelcome in the Florida landscape.

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146 | Autumn 2010

So although some myths are busted, and others are only half truths, the Florida landscape is still home to many more mysteries. For instance, were all the gators now in Lake Alice once lurking in the UF sewer system? s


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>> XXXXXXX

Underwater Hockey UF Team Takes National Title

BY CHRIS WILSON ockey fans usually watch a sport played upon a sheet of ice, during cold weather months and with as much speed and violence as possible. Welcome to “bizzarro” hockey, where the game is played underwater, during any month that it feels good to jump into a pool, at a snail’s pace, and with relatively little violence — except the occasional accidental flipper to the forehead. And, now, the University of Florida can string up another banner. One of the two UF teams recently won a national title in underwater hockey. The Gators, who have had an underwater hockey team since 2004, recently hosted the National Championship Tournament at Northeast Pool. The UF “A” squad won the overall

H

150 | Autumn 2010

national title for the first time in team history. The UF “B” squad took second place in the “B division.” The Gators had previously had a second place finish at a national championship tournament in 2006. Of course, the Gators have won tournament and conference championships. In spring 2010, the Gators won the Atlantic

Coast Conference championship. Gainesville is the host city for the sports’ national championship tournament on a biannual basis. Still, Gator fans are not exactly flocking to the poolside to catch a glimpse of a world-class team. While underwater hockey started at UF in 2004, the sport’s roots in Gainesville stretch back


PHOTOS BY CHRIS WILSON

ABOVE: Members of two UF Underwater Hockey Club teams that competed at the National Championships at Northeast Pool in Gainesville posed poolside

PREVIOUS PAGE: Bottoms up! An underwater hockey player dives into the action at the bottom of the pool. Between two simultaneous games in one pool, there is a lane for spectators to watch the action underwater.

even longer. Greg Mullersman, the faculty advisor and a player for the UF squad, said he remembers reading a newspaper article about the sport and a Gainesville-based club in 1999.

Rules of the Game Unlike many sports, underwater hockey is coed. Six players per side take to the bottom of the pool at a time, but as many as ten players are allowed to suit up for the game. The four extra players wait in the bench area for substitutions during the contest.

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“Subs play a big role in the game,” Mullersman said. “The players go in and play hard, then a sub can enter and quickly change momentum. Having fresh players keeps the team powerful.” Mullersman said that some players are strong enough that they may play the entire game without subbing. There are three defensive players and three offensive players per side. Unlike ice hockey, there are no goalies. Players shoot a two-pound puck, which is usually brightly colored, continued on next page

Autumn 2010 | 151


with a foot-long hockey stick that is held in one hand. The puck gets pushed around the pool floor, usually at a depth of 6 to 8 feet, until one team scores by putting the puck into their opponents’ stainless steel trough or gutter-type goal. A great time to sub players, said Mullersman, is during a foul. There are three referees in the pool and, at times, underwater with the players. The refs call fouls, most of which result from contact between players. Often, players will swim over the top of another player or get bunched up and contact, whether accidental or not, will occur, said some players. Refs can get the players’ attention by sounding a bell

The players surface periodically and most of the time, simply breathe through their snorkels so as not to lose sight of the puck. or banging on a pipe underwater. “It can be rough at times,” said UF junior and club vice president Sergio Fidanli. “There are refs and they call poking and things like that. I’ve never seen any serious injuries though.” The equipment is minimal. A tight-fitting Speedo, diving mask, snorkel, fins, a glove for the shooting hand, the stick and water polo

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helmet are all that is needed by each player. Play begins with each team at the goal its defending. The refs sound a bell that starts the half, which varies from 7 to 10 minutes depending upon the tournament. The players surface periodically and most of the time, simply breathe through their snorkels so as not to lose sight of the puck.

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above the surface is not an exciting way to watch underwater hockey. Between two simultaneous games in one pool, there is a lane for spectators to watch the action underwater.

“How long a player stays underwater depends on that player,” Fidanli said. “Some players stay down 30 seconds or less. But, we have some players who are down there for 2 minutes at a time. I guess it depends on what’s happening underwater.” So, where do underwater hockey’s similarities with ice hockey begin and end? Really, the only similarity, Mullersman said, is pushing a puck with a stick and in some of the strategies of the game. “It’s similar in that you have to advance the puck,” Mullersman said. “Beginners have a tendency to just run the puck towards the goal. More than likely in some situations, it’s good to pass it back to set up your offense. You see that happen in ice hockey and it’s useful underwater, too.” However, the game is way different from ice hockey in terms of its speed. “When you push the puck underwater, it might go 10 to 12 feet before it stops,” Mullersman explained. “And, that’s if you’re really good. On a slick tile bottom, it might go as far as 15 feet.”

Getting Started The good thing about underwater hockey is that almost everybody is a newcomer to the sport. While some players are more experienced, they too remember the first time they held that funny looking wooden stick in a pool. Members believe that one only needs to love

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the water to play the game. Both Fidanli and Mullersman were water polo players. “It feels very awkward at first,” Fidanli said. “Your first experience you find out that the puck doesn’t travel very far underwater.” UF junior Keely Kilduff, who is the club’s treasurer, started playing underwater hockey in February 2010. She was a regular lap swimmer at the O’Connell Center and had seen one of the hockey players practicing in the pool. “It combines the competitive aspects of a team sport, like soccer,” Kilduff said. “I used to swim competitively. Even though that is a team sport, it feels like your individual performance in a race is what really matters in order to help your team. This is more a group effort. It’s a great outlet for the competitive sports I love, with the water, and being part of a team.” Kilduff said that since most students began playing in the fall, she was the least experienced player at her first practice. “They all just wanted to jump in and play a game,” she said. “I’d never even seen it. But, nobody seemed to think much of it, so it was great. Practice just started as a crash course.” Underwater hockey may lack the speed and pounding of ice hockey. But when it comes to fun, the puck stops here. s

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GVOT-1010

bottom of the pool. Spectating from

The consensus from players and fans alike is that the only way underwater hockey can be a good spectator sport is if it is viewed from underwater. It just does not look like much from the surface. “It’s pretty hard to watch,” Fidanli admitted. “Sometimes family members will come to watch us. I guess it depends on the water clarity. It looks like a feeding frenzy from outside. It looks like fish coming to the surface for food.” During the tournaments, players from teams waiting their turn or others enjoy watching the games from a roped off area in the pool. These lucky spectators get to don their diving masks and see every minute of action. “You really need to be in the pool,” Mullersman said. “At some of the bigger tournaments, they have a jumbotron that has a delayed video of the game going on. Or, sometimes there are glass aquarium-type walls at some pools and you can watch the game through the windows.”

GVOT-1010

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GVOT-1010

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>> WILDLIFE

Seasonal

Hummingbirds In North Florida? BY DEBBIE M. DELOACH hen Laurie Sheldon of Alachua forgot to “Everyone in Alabama and Florida were told by X take her hummingbird feeders down one date you had to take your feeders down or they [humfall she was surprised by the appearance mingbirds] would die of the cold,” said hummingbird of a little brown bird sipping nectar. The ruby-throated researcher Fred Bassett in a phone interview. “Then hummingbirds which spend the warm months of the if they happened to see a hummingbird and tried to year at her feeders had left, bound for the tropics. What report it to anyone they were told that, ‘No you made was coming to her feeders now? a mistake because there are no hummingbirds here in Traditionally, ornithologists believed that all of the wintertime.’” North America’s The only species of hummingbirds hummingbird that migrated south to breeds in the eastern the tropics for the United States, the winter and returned ruby-throated, does north in the spring reliably migrate to breed. Any humsouth every fall. mingbirds found However, sometimes wintering in tempera feeder left out over ate areas such as the the winter would southeastern United gain a new user after States were considthe ruby-throateds ered aberrant, lost had left. These individuals doomed birds are invariably to death in freezing individuals of speweather. cies that breed only PHOTO BY FRED BASSETT “It was like in western North There is no mistaking the male buff-bellied hummingbird. It is larger October or America. Were these than most hummingbirds and has a red bill. November. It wasn’t the same individuals cold yet,” Sheldon every year, obviously said in a phone interview. “I didn’t know that there surviving winter freezes and migrating roughly east were multiple types of hummingbirds so I talked to and west instead of south and north? Bubba Scales at Wild Birds Unlimited. He said, ‘I’m Bassett decided to answer that question. He began going to put you in touch with Fred Bassett.’ So, then capturing and marking these winter hummingbirds you know we started calling back and forth and he in Alabama and Florida. Marking consists of placing [Bassett] said, ‘I’ll be there.’” a uniquely numbered band on one leg of each bird.

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PHOTOS BY FRED BASSETT

(top and above) Fred Bassett with his tools of the trade. His hand is on the ISTOCK PHOTO

trap. Sheldon’s Rufous female rests prior to release. Rufous hummingbirds are the most common species of western hummingbird found wintering in the eastern United States.

People who do this work are called banders. During the span of his ten-year project, Bassett has verified that some western hummingbird individuals migrate east every winter, returning to the same locations every year. The rufous, black-chinned, buff-bellied and calliope are those species of hummingbirds captured and banded in north Florida so far. The Hummer/Bird Study Group supports Bassett’s research in the southeast. According to its website, this organization, founded by Bob and Martha Sargent of Clay, Alabama, has been funding and supporting research on hummingbirds and other North American migratory birds since 1987. The group became a nonprofit organization in 1994 so that donors’ gifts would be tax deductible. The Hummer/Bird Study Group website urges people in southeastern states to leave their hummingbird feeders out and fresh during the winter. The website provides information on making nectar and on keeping nectar unfrozen during freezing weather. It also profiles a few of the western species of hummingbirds that

have been found wintering in the eastern United States from New Jersey to Ohio to Louisiana to Florida. The Group asks that anyone who has a brownbacked or solid green hummingbird at their feeder report it to them year round. However, report any hummingbird at a feeder after November 15 and throughout the winter to Fred Bassett at Fhound@aol. com or 334-244-0227. Then the fun begins.

Male Rufous Hummingbirds have a beautiful gorget that is showier than the females. When Bassett comes to visit the site of a reported winter hummingbird, the lucky hummingbird host family can expect a memorable experience. First, the bird must be coming to a feeder, not just foraging on flowers. This is essential to continued on page 159

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o continued from page 157 the trapping process. Bassett arrives early in the morning with a specially designed cage into which he places the feeder. Then he hangs it back up in the same location that the feeder had been hanging. “The hummingbird will examine it then go in to feed and I will close a little sliding door,” Bassett said. He can then reach in and quickly take hold of the bird. To dispel fears that the bird is suffering or hurting, he immediately offers the bird a vial of sugar water and the bird will feed while he is holding it. “As soon as I get the bird in my hand it calms right down,” Bassett said. “There’s no injury to the bird. I don’t keep it very long.” He then puts a uniquely numbered band on one leg, takes several measurements and takes a few pictures of the bird with the host. This provides proof positive to any disbelievers that a hummingbird is spending its winter in the host’s backyard. Finally, the host holds his hand out palm up and Bassett lays the bird on the host’s palm. It just lies there for a few moments then flies away. This process does not scare the bird away for good, though. It will be back to the feeder as if nothing had ever occurred. Of course, it will be sporting a new, tiny bracelet. “This year was my fifth year for the same hummingbird,” Sheldon said. “She came late this year. She didn’t come until December. I got scared that something had happened to her, that she just didn’t survive some kind of a storm or something. She can come from as far away as Alaska but most likely she comes from Oregon or Washington.” Bassett is no longer the sole winter hummingbird bander in Florida. As the project workload has increased, a team of dedicated hummingbird banders has been trained to ensure that all winter hummingbirds in the eastern United States are marked and identified. Be aware that strict laws dictate who may legally capture and handle wild birds. Both Federal and state laws require researchers to obtain permits to capture, mark and handle migratory birds such as hummingbirds. Aspiring banders must have special training and education as well as apprenticeship before working independently with wild birds in the hand. “Wherever we get a winter hummingbird bander, winter hummingbirds show up. And guess what? They were already there. It’s just that no one was leaving feeders out or gardening for them or looking for them,” Bassett said. Laurie Sheldon will have her feeder up fresh and ready come November 15. Will her rufous hummingbird, whom she named Fredericka, spend a sixth winter in her rural Alachua backyard? She and others in North Florida who have had wintering hummingbirds will find out soon if they once again host one of these amazing western migrants. s

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ADVERTISER INDEX 4400 NW 36th Avenue • Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax REAL ESTATE Forrester Realty ..................................131 Innovative Home Builders ................. 4 Pro Realty of Gainesville, Inc. .......... 4 The Village .............................................. 9

AUTOMOTIVE Ernie’s Southern Offroad................155 Gainesville Harley Davidson ............ 21 Maaco Bodyshop..............................140 Palm Gainesville ................................... 71 Santa Fe Ford .....................................167

PETS and VETS Archer Road Pet Resort .................. 32 Doggie Spot Day Care .....................117 Eager Pup .............................................88 Earth Pets.............................................. 97 Earth Pets Feed & Garden ..............121 Flying Fish Pets & Aquatics ......... 154 Haile Plantation Animal Clinic ..... 106 Pampered Paws ..........................67, 154 Wild Birds Unlimited ......................... 55 The Yuppie Puppy..............................117

RETAIL / RECREATION FINANCIAL / INSURANCE Allstate Insurance, Cathy Cain ...... 32 Campus USA Credit Union ........... 166 Pat Gleason, CPRS® ......................... 53 Sunshine State Insurance ...............128 SunState Federal Credit Union .....34

MEDICAL / HEALTH Accent Audiology ............................ 108 Accent on Eyes ................................. 129 Affordable Dentures ........................ 141 Alachua Dental Center ..................... 76 Altschuler Periodontic .....................69 Archer Family Health Care ........... 109 Caretenders ..........................................86 Dr. Angel Reyes, DMG, MAGD .......49 North Florida Regional Medical Center .......................................2 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery .... 160 Palms Medical Group ...................... 134 Samant Dental Group ..................... 148

FITNESS and BEAUTY Big Ron’s Yoga College ...................125 Charisma for Hair ...............................44 Curves of Gainesville ...................8, 141 LAE Beauty Tanning & Medispa .....24 Salon Eye Candy ...............................155 Star Martial Arts................ 32, 102, 147 Veda Salon & Spa ............................. 126 Weight Watchers.............................. 144

EDUCATION & CHILD CARE Alachua Learning Center .................. 3 Fundamental Therapy Solutions ......21 Gainesville Country Day School ...62 Kiddie Academy of Gainesville ..... 75 Loften High School ..........................140 Queen of Peace Academy ..............38 St. Francis High School ....................38 St. Patrick Interparish School ........38

162 | Autumn 2010

Artful Upholstery & More ................96 Beacher’s Lodge.................................88 Bennett’s True Value ........................135 Bikes & More ........................................115 Blue Springs ........................................128 City of Gainesville .............................128 Colleen’s Kloset...................................56 Cootie Coo Creations ..................... 154 Dollar General .................................... 159 Easton Newberry Sports ............... 124 Enchanted Memories .......................155 Europe Import Grocery.................. 138 Floating Island Gift Shop ................ 25 Gardener’s Edge ............................... 139 Hart’s Furniture ................................. 149 The Jackson’s Store ..........................26 Just Between Friends ..................... 149 Klaus Fine Jewelry ................................5 Lentz House of Time, LLC ...............70 Lighting Gallery .................................. 57 Merle Norman ......................................45 Music Junction .................................. 154 Paddywhack......................................... 33 Sapps Pawn, Gun and Archery ..... 37 Stephen C. O’Connell Center .......100 Suwannee Music Park ..................... 165 Target Copy ........................................ 158 Thompson Flower Shop ................ 102 UF Performing Arts ......................... 103 Valerie’s Loft Consignment .......... 120 West End Golf Club ..........................153 Wood You Furniture.......................... 47

SERVICE A Classic Moment Limousine .......152 Action ChemDry .................................64 Alachua County EPD ........................161 AllState Mechanical, Inc...................89 Big Blue.................................................. 97 COX Communications ......................20 Creekside Outdoor ........................... 101 DirecTV .......................................... 66, 161

D.W. Ashton Catery ..........................128 Florizona Fireplace & Gas ...............93 Gainesville Regional Airport ..........161 Gator Dorm Mom .............................100 Lotus Studios Photography .....13, 85 Mini Maid ...........................................7, 39 Ms. Debbie’s Cakes & Sugar Art ... 55 Phones and More.............................. 154 Ray French A/C & Heating ............. 74 3-Way Electrical Service Inc. .......104 Watson Construction ...................... 164

HOME IMPROVEMENT Alachua Door Company ..................69 Amira Builders .....................................56 Any One Can Do It Pest Control & Lawn Care ............. 106 Andy Bixby ......................................... 148 Carson’s Cabinetry & Design ......... 27 Decks, Docks and Barns .................147 Fences & Gates by IMI ....................104 Gulf Coast Supply .............................. 97 Graetz Construction ..........................118 Great Lakes Carpet & Tile ..............132 Jack’s Small Engine Repair........... 107 Livingston & Sons ................................ 6 M&R Granite, Inc. ................................66 Mike Hill Construction ...................... 79 Overhead Door ..................................127 Southland Rock & Stone..................38 Whitfield Window & Door................16

RESTAURANT Calico Jack’s .........................................48 Coffee Clutch ..................................... 154 Dave’s NY Deli .....................................58 David’s BBQ ........................................133 Domino’s Pizza ...............................15, 17 El Toro.....................................................70 Flying Biscuit Café ..............................19 Gainesville Restaurant Group ....... 116 Mad Hatters Café ..............................155 Mamma Mia Pizzeria .........................89 Take Away Gourmet ..........................65

MISCELLANEOUS Holly’s Cougar Den ...........................152 Cell Food ............................................. 146 Outreach for Kids ............................. 144 Waste Watchers................................104 Waste Watchers................................ 126


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