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L ADY LE ADER S   A SL EDUC ATION   TOWER M A M A S   WOMEN WARRIOR S   DR. LISA SPIGUEL

MARCH/APRIL 2018 | VOL. 16 ISSUE 02

NEWBERRY & JONESVILLE EDITION

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WOMEN’S I S S U E

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CONTENTS 

M A RC H/A P R I L 2018

G R E AT E R A L A C H U A C O U N T Y

| V O L . 1 6 | N O. 0 2

the

WOMEN’S I S S U E

IN THIS ISSUE >> WE CELEBRATE THE HISTORY OF WOMEN WHO WERE, AND ARE, TRAILBLAZERS IN OUR COMMUNITY. LEARN ABOUT THE LADIES WHO HAVE DEDICATED THEMSELVES TO ENRICHING THE LIVES OF YOUNG WOMEN AND AT-RISK GIRLS. ALSO, UNDERSTAND THE PLIGHT OF PROMINENT FEMALE FIGURES AND THE STRUGGLES THEY HAVE FACED IN ORDER TO LEAD. THIS ONE’S FOR THE GIRLS!

FEATURE STORIES 68

DR. LISA SPIGUEL This super surgeon and mom of three wakes up every morning to her dream job – helping countless women in their time of need.

132

WOMEN FOR WOMEN A nonprofit in Gainesville reaches out to victims of trafficking — offering empowerment, healing and love.

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OUR TOWNIES Another installment of the recurring series of interviews with people who live in our town. Everyone’s got a story to tell.

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TIPS FOR NEW MOTHERS Calling all new mothers! This is advice you can definitely use in the early days of motherhood.

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ALICIA ANTONE Meet a High Springs librarian whose outreach efforts for veterans are felt across the community and beyond.

140 WOMAN WITH A BADGE

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SISTERHOOD EXCHANGE Two foreign exchange students meet and immediately have an inseparable bond.

Alachua County’s first elected female sheriff, Sadie Darnell, serves and protects our community.

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PEACEFUL PATHS A domestic violence center works with 1,100 individuals a year to help them feel safe, connected and independent.

MARCH/APRIL 2018

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CONTENTS 

M A RC H/A P R I L 2018

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BOSSA GIRLBOSS A fourth year medical student at UF plans to dedicate her career to providing care for women both in the U.S. and her homeland of Haiti.

LADY LEADERS A spotlight on some of the amazing women kicking butt and taking names in our community. You go girls!

COLUMNS 34

by Crystal Henry

58 EMBRACING LIFE 56

24 WOMEN WARRIORS Bravery lives among us. Take a look into the stories of women as they served or will serve in the United States Military.

TOWER POWER MAMAS Hear what our awesome moms working at Tower Publications have to say about motherhood!

by Donna Bonnell

84 FARM TALES by Mother Hen

138 FUREVER FRIENDS 60

28 PACE Natalya Bannister dedicates herself to enriching the lives of young women by working with at-risk girls in our community.

A SILENT UNIVERSE A teacher’s passion for educating the community about deaf populations and the culture associated with them.

64 36 ONE OF THE LUCKY ONES Learn about the incredible woman behind the unforgettable performances of the Hippodrome Theatre. Lauren Warhol Caldwell is living her dream!

NAKED SALSA

LINDA CASTILLO A New York Times bestselling author recounts her road to success as she prepares to visit Gainesville for an upcoming author series event.

Spotlight on Rescue Animals

145 HEALTHY EDGE by Kendra Siler-Marsiglio

REVIEWS 72

READING CORNER by Terri Schlichenmeyer

128 GATE CRASHING by Brian “Krash” Kruger

78 40 RECIPE WONDERS Grandma’s delicious baking is not just reserved for holidays or special occasions. Treat yourself to this family recipe for Cinnamon Cake any day of the week!

42 LEADING LADIES Understand the history of women in Hollywood while also taking a look into the future of the industry. 10 |

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WOMANISH A photo essay by a NY artist and UF alum that seeks to reclaim and redefine the word woman.

INFORMATION

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100 Taste of the Town 106 Community Calendar 126 Charity Winners

ERIN JACKSON Meet the UF alum and Olympic competitor who exudes talent and speed. After only four months in the sport, this ice speedskater has reached new bounds in Olympic history.

The articles printed in Our Town do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Tower Publications, Inc. or their editorial staff. Our Town Magazine endeavors to accept reliable advertising; however, we can not be held responsible by the public for advertising claims. Our Town Magazine reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisement. All rights reserved. © 2018 Tower Publications, Inc.


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PUBLISHER Charlie Delatorre ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Hank McAfee

Anthony B. Agrios, MD Joseph S. Iobst, MD Jean C. Cook, MD Nicole Scogin, MD Shelley Russell, ARNP, CNM Julie Rischar, ARNP, CNM Kristen Cook, ARNP, CNM

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ericka Winterrowd editor@towerpublications.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kaitlin Applegate, Savannah Austin, Brooke Bajgrowicz, Kacey Finch, Crystal Henry, Monica Humphries, Peggy Macdonald, Stephanie Richards, Steph Strickland, Cynthia Wonders Winterrowd, Hayli Zuccola CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Steph Strickland, Samantha Fairfield Walsh ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Jenni Bennett jenni@towerpublications.com Helen Mincey helen@towerpublications.com Nancy Short nancy@towerpublications.com INTERN Steph Strickland, Savannah Austin, Kacey Finch, Jasmine Dahlby

CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS If you would like us to publicize an event in the greater Gainesville area, send information by the 1st day of the month prior to the next issue. For example, submissions for the March/April issue are due by February 1. All submissions will be reviewed and every effort will be made to run qualified submissions if page space is available.

Take care

of you.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR We want to hear from you. Send your letters to the attention of the editor at 4400 NW 36th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32606 or editor@ towerpublications.com. Letters must be signed and include a phone number in the event we need to contact you. (Your phone number will not be published.) OUR TOWN MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY TOWER PUBLICATIONS, INC. REPRODUCTION BY ANY MEANS OF THE WHOLE OR PART OF OUR TOWN WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM THE PUBLISHER IS PROHIBITED. VIEWS EXPRESSED IN THE EDITORIAL PAGES DO NOT IMPLY OUR ENDORSEMENT. WE WELCOME YOUR PRODUCT NEWS. INCLUDE PRICES, PHOTOS AND DIGITAL FILES WITH YOUR PRESS RELEASE. PLEASE FORWARD PRODUCT SAMPLES AND MEDIA KITS TO REVIEWS EDITOR, OUR TOWN MAGAZINE, 4400 NW 36TH AVENUE, GAINESVILLE, FL 32606. WE CANNOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR UNSOLICITED PRODUCT SAMPLES.

A Publication of Tower Publications, Inc. 4400 NW 36th Ave., Gainesville, Florida 32606 phone: 352-372-5468 fax: 352-373-9178


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EDITOR ’ S LET TER M A RC H/A P R I L 2018

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Growing up in a house filled with women, I never felt held back in any way because of my gender. My parents raised my sisters and me to believe that being a woman is one of our greatest strengths, and there was no limit to whatever we wanted to do or be. When my sister wanted to play baseball – she played baseball. And both my mom and dad were at every game supporting the only girl out on the field. Breaking gender stereotypes has always been a big part of my family. I’ve never really given much thought to it until now, and for that I am very grateful. You see, my parents simultaneously championed our womanhood while also paving a gender-neutral playing ground when it came to our goals and dreams. My big sister wanted to be a doctor. And why wouldn’t she? She in fact became one. My little sister wanted to be a dentist. And why wouldn’t she? She graduates this June from dental school. I wanted to be an artist, a writer, and a mermaid. And why wouldn’t I? (I’m still working on the mermaid part, but I can tell you that in the meantime I’ve become a pretty good swimmer.) This issue celebrates the history of women who were, and are, trailblazers in our community. Learn how the resilience of one woman led to generations of educated women, as Lassie Goodbread-Black became the first full-time female student at UF. Meet Dr. Lisa Spiguel, a breast cancer surgeon with UF Health and busy mother of three who has dedicated her career to helping women overcome their darkest days. Enjoy a photo essay titled “Womanish,” which seeks to redefine the word woman. These photos and interviews investigate gender as well as the rules and conventions that are attached to that word. Also, learn how a local medical student is achieving her American dream after emigrating from Haiti as a small child. Lastly, with International Women’s Day being celebrated on March 8th, let’s remember the incredible ladies who have come before us — lighting the way for so many others to follow. We’re all sisters, after all.

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Ericka Winterrowd, Editor-In-Chief


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Jump the Creek benefiting Grind For Life Grind for Life is an organization that helps provide financial assistance to cancer patients and families who need to travel long distances to get treatment, according to its website. The organization was founded by Mike Rogers, a two-time sarcoma survivor. The nonprofit organizes skateboarding events to raise funds for families and provides support and education to patients. Gainesville residents, Florida Virtual School students and anyone in the state are welcome to attend the event, not just skateboard enthusiasts, said FLVS organizer, Susan Swails. It will be a family-friendly event for all ages. Attendees can expect skateboarding lessons and activities as well as food trucks, face-painting, bounce houses and more. “We want everybody to come and enjoy our gorgeous weather in April and just really partake in some fun family entertainment,” Swails said. The idea for the event was first suggested by Robert Scott Hughes, a FLVS AP Art History teacher, who is an avid skateboarder and attended a Grind for Life event where he met Rogers. When Hughes approached Swails about hosting an event with FLVS and the nonprofit, she said she thought it was a great idea. The event and mission of Grind for Life is personal for Swails, as she and her oldest son are both cancer survivors. “This is something that we never think about. We never think about these families that have to travel,” Swails said. “Personally to me, helping out people when tragedy strikes is amazing. It just shows how strong we are.”

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CONTRIBUTOR S 

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M A RC H/A P R I L 2018

STEPH STRICKLAND is a first year journalism student within the UF Honors Program and she loves telling stories through writing, photography and digital media. Outside of her studies she enjoys mountain hiking, nature photography and spending quality time with friends and family. stephanieannestrickland@gmail.com

SAVANNAH AUSTIN is a journalism and art student at UF. She is a passionate advocate for the color mustard yellow and can be found making hand-lettered greeting cards, binge-watching Jane the Virgin or incessantly taking photos of friends and family. savannahkaustin@ufl.edu

BROOKE BAJGROWICZ is a senior journalism student at the University of Florida. In her free time, she likes to jam at concerts, explore new places and rewatch her favorite episodes of The Office. bnb1997@ufl.edu

KACEY FINCH is a sophomore journalism major at the University of Florida. When she’s not writing, you can find her drinking Starbucks, binge-watching Netflix and trying to explore all the world has to offer. kaceyfinch@outlook.com

KAITLIN APPLEGATE is a recent Rock School graduate. In her spare time she enjoys creative writing and finding inspiration in unexpected places (in truth, mostly from Netflix). kaitlinapplegatewrites@gmail.com

MONICA HUMPHRIES is a senior journalism student at the University of Florida. Beyond writing, she loves going to local concerts, traveling the world and exploring all Gainesville has to offer. monicamh@centurylink.net

STEPHANIE RICHARDS is a freelance writer and a native of suburban Chicago. She was the Story Editor for The Sturbridge Times Magazine before recently moving to Newberry from New England. She loves to exercise, volunteer and spend time with her family. sarichards7@gmail.com

PEGGY MACDONALD is a native Gainesvillian and the executive director of the Matheson History Museum. She has taught history at Florida Polytechnic, Stetson and UF. She is also the author of Marjorie Harris Carr: Defender of Florida’s Environment. peggymacdemos@gmail.com

CYNTHIA WONDERS WINTERROWD is an award-winning writer who was raised in Illinois and lives in Gainesville. She is proud to be a “Gator Mom” of three daughters, all UF graduates. Cynthia loves sharing family recipes that have been passed down in her mother’s handwritten cookbooks. recipewonders@gmail.com

HAYLI ZUCCOLA is a New England native who enjoys listening to music and traveling. After graduating high school with her AA degree she got her Bachelor’s in Journalism from the University of Florida. HayzDesigns@yahoo.com

MARCH/APRIL 2018


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BEAUTY AND BR AINS MEDICAL STUDENT >> DEINA BOSSA

Bossa Girlboss A Med Student’s American Dream S TORY A N D PHOTOG R A PHY BY ERICK A WINTER ROW D

S

ome might assume that life has been a piece of cake for Deina Bossa. After all, the fourth year medical student at UF’s College of Medicine will only be 24 years old when she graduates this May. Not bad for someone who essentially taught herself how to speak English by watching “Dora the Explorer” in the third grade. At eight years old Bossa immigrated with her family to the United States from her homeland of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Her father was a Ph.D student at Auburn University where he was finishing his studies in agronomy and soils. Her family faced poverty and other struggles as they sought greater opportunity in America. Bossa can recall the moment when she had to say goodbye to a familiar face. “I remember having to break it to my best friend at the time [in Haiti] and we were playing on the playground,” Bossa said. “I told her that I’d be moving to Alabama and I remember feeling really sad because I was like – man, I may never get to see her again.” Once in the States, she said she’d be sitting in class and wouldn’t even know what the teacher was saying or what to do for her homework. “My dad knew some English, but it wasn’t that great at the time,” Bossa said. “And my mom didn’t know any English at the time either.” She explained that being totally immersed in an environment where she had no choice but to learn the language actually helped her. And by the time Bossa was in the fourth grade she was completely fluent, without having taken any formal classes at all. “I can’t tell you MARCH/APRIL 2018

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exactly how it happened,” she said. “It’s amazing how the brain works and is able to learn languages.” Bossa said it was during that first year in America that her interest in medicine began. “One of my classmates was diagnosed with a brain cancer,” Bossa said. “And she had stopped going to school for several months and we had all noticed that.” She said her teacher explained to the class that the student had brain surgery. The thought of this amazed a young and impressionable Bossa. “So that really piqued my interest in medicine and all the wonderful things you can do to help people.” Once Bossa was in high school, her family would make their 22 |

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way to Gainesville where they have been located ever since. While at Buchholz High School she participated in the dual enrollment program through Santa Fe College. This allowed her to start taking college classes during her junior and senior year, which helped put Bossa ahead of the game when she was accepted into UF for undergrad. Soon after she was also accepted into UF’s Medical Honors program, where standout students are chosen to begin medical school a year early after applying as sophomores. Since then, Bossa has never looked back and she even graduated undergrad with a double major in economics and biology.


MEDICAL STUDENT >> DEINA BOSSA

“I ended up really loving that area of medicine and I feel like it’s a field I’ll be able to have an impact not only in the U.S. but also in Haiti one day.”

Bossa explained that during her first two years of medical school her favorite system to learn about was the reproductive and endocrine block. “I thought it was so fascinating to learn about different hormones and how the body regulates so many things all at one,” she said. “It’s a miracle that things go right.” Bossa said that her third year was spent rotating through different specialties in medicine and there was one in particular that clicked right away for her. To no surprise it was OB/GYN. “I ended up really loving that area of medicine and I feel like it’s a field I’ll be able to have an impact not only in the U.S. but also in Haiti one day.” In March Bossa will find out which OB/

During her spring break this year, Bossa will be returning to her homeland for the first time through a weeklong medical mission trip called Project Haiti. “Things have come full circle and now I feel like I can go back with skills that can really help the people of Haiti – my people,” she said.

GYN residency program she matches with. She said after she completes her training she would ultimately want part of her practice to involve going back to her homeland to offer care to the women in need there. It seems this soon-to-be doctor has truly found her calling and she loves just about everything that her future field entails. “I love the aspect of once I’m done with my training and I’m out and established – that I’ll get to grow old with a group of women that I take care of,” she said. “And I’ll get to kind of go through the same things that they go through and be pregnant when they’re pregnant, and I’m really looking forward to that.” MARCH/APRIL 2018

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MILITARY >> WOMEN WARRIORS

HONOR / SERVICE/ LOVE OF COUNTRY

Women Warriors WRITTEN BY STEPH A NIE STRICKLA ND

McKenzie Smith vividly remembers the feeling of her body breaking down, when fatigue and exhaustion started to take over. Smith, alongside her teammates, was competing in the Ranger Challenge competition, which features a grueling amount of mental and physical obstacles for its participants to overcome. Smith recalled the moment she was particularly close to her breaking point, “The captain of the team grabbed me by my ruck and said, ‘McKenzie I believe in you. You can do this.’” It was this small act of encouragement that made all the difference in Smith’s completion of the competition. A tear slid down Smith’s cheek as she reminisced on her most treasured memory during her time in the ROTC program at the University of Florida. “I get chills every time I think about it,” Smith said. “Someone 24 |

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who was a leader believed in me and that was so inspiring.” Smith believes that programs like this have tested her physical and mental limits, but have also showed her how strong she can be in the face of adversity. “It opened my eyes to how strong your mindset and the psychological aspect of the military [can be] … especially as girls,” she said. “Because we were still held to that same standard.” Now, Smith is beginning her preparation to graduate and commission into the United States Army Nursing Corps. She said it will be the “most inspiring and rewarding job,” and she owes her confidence within academic and professional settings to her experiences within ROTC. PHOTOGRAPHY: STEPHANIE STRICKLAND


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MILITARY >> WOMEN WARRIORS

Cameron Cobb found her path and purpose during her time in the United States Air Force.

Leaving home was a difficult transition for Dillan, but she feels that she has found a community who pushes her physically, academically and professionally while also providing the comfort of a family. “[ROTC is a] community of people you can go to for help at any time,” Dillan said. The structure and stability the program provides melded well with Dillan’s existing personal interests and will further help her as she continues to learn about the role she plans to fulfill in the military after she graduates. For Cameron Cobb, the military became her compass. Halfway through her senior year of high school, Cobb realized that she wanted to join the United States Air Force to focus her goals and long-term career plan. “I really needed a sense of direction,” Cobb said. “Being pushed beyond the point of your own confidence is a trying, yet very rewarding experience.” Cobb was placed in countless stressful situations in her role as a Communication/Navigation Avionics Technician on B-1B Bombers. The mechanics job was initially daunting to Cobb. However, she said, “I felt as if I was challenged in ways I never knew I needed to be.” This shift in her life was much needed. “By this point, the thrill of my job as a Publix cashier was starting to dwindle,” Cobb said. “I really enjoyed the idea of doing something out of the ordinary.” Following the four years that Cobb served in the Air Force, she enrolled at the University of Florida where she received her bachelor’s degree in journalism, and is currently working toward her master’s degree. Cobb said she owes her career in journalism to her time in the Air Force. “It helped me realize that mechanical skills are not for me,” she said. “And thus I picked the exact opposite career pursuit of a journalist.”

“Being pushed beyond the point of your own confidence is a trying, yet very rewarding experience.” Tess Dillan, a sophomore in the ROTC program at UF, agrees that moments like that are at the core of military programs. She said the program provides “motivation to push ourselves to be better and to be leaders.” Dillan claims joining the ROTC program was one of the best decisions she has ever made, and even as a freshman she recognized the value of the program. “Out of all the organizations I was looking into freshman year,” Dillan said. “This one struck me as one that really emphasized personal growth.” For Dillan, the communal and closeness of the corps of cadets is what inspires her most. Even through the most stressful situations the cadets are presented with, such as field training and Ranger Challenge, she said they work together and get through it. 26 |

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SPOTLIGHT >> NATALYA BANNISTER

GIRL POWER

Natalya Bannister Executive Director of PACE Center for Girls S TORY A N D PHOTOG R A PHY BY MONIC A H UMPHRIE S

W

hen Jalisia Long told her story in front of hundreds of people, Natalya Bannister was standing next to her holding her hand. When Skylar Keller was having a hard time at PACE, Bannister gave her the push start she needed. For the past three and a half years at PACE Center for Girls, Bannister has been present. As the executive director of PACE Center for Girls, a program where 56 young women receive education, counseling, training and advocacy, she spends each day dedicated to these girls. “The biggest part of my job is to show up every single day and be present,” 33-year-old Bannister said. Long, 17, said she never sees Bannister without a smile. “You could be having a bad day, and then she comes around smiling,” the PACE girl said. “It makes you want to smile.” Long and Keller both have a special relationship with Bannister. Both girls were chosen to share their story at an annual luncheon in front of hundreds of people. Bannister worked with the girls to tell their story. Through PACE Center for Girls, Bannister has become a role model for both of them. “She doesn’t want you to feel sorry for yourself,” Long said. “She wants you to grow from it.” 28 |

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“I decided to follow my heart and advocate for underprivileged youth. I didn’t ever want to look back and have regrets.” Sitting on Bannister’s desk is a sign that says, “I’m fighting for the girls who never thought they could win.” Bannister said she originally imagined that fight happening in a courtroom. “I was always told I was going to be a lawyer,” she said. “It became ingrained in me.” Bannister went to the University of Florida for her undergraduate and graduate degrees. While there, she started interning at the Boys and Girls Club. 30 |

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“I woke up every day so happy,” she said. One day she decided to throw away her law school applications and pursue working with at-risk girls. “I decided to follow my heart and advocate for underprivileged youth,” Bannister said. “I didn’t ever want to look back and have regrets.” Over the course of her time at the Boys and Girls Club she created four different programs, and three of those programs received a national honor award for program excellence. Whether


SPOTLIGHT >> NATALYA BANNISTER

it was a health program or a sports program, she took the needs and interests of the children and created something they could benefit from. One day, a community member mentioned that PACE Center for Girls was looking for a new executive director. Kathie Southwick, the former executive director, and Bannister met over lunch to discuss the position. “We have a similar passion for the mission and similar values,” Southwick said. Bannister decided to apply and the next day got a call back from the state search committee. The moment Bannister knew PACE Center for Girls was the right fit was after she interviewed with the young women. Part of the interview process included a meeting with PACE girls, where she was asked a variety of questions. The girls wanted to know everything from her passions to the way she did her hair.

“They need me, and I need them,” Bannister said. The moment Bannister left the interview she knew it was the right fit. During the transition process, she felt immense pressure. “People kept telling me, ‘you have big shoes to fill,’” she said. But when it came down to it, Southwick and Bannister both wear a size 8, they joked. “The shared passion we have, it’s part of our purpose,” said Bannister. Southwick had no doubt Bannister would be successful, but that didn’t mean she wouldn’t face a few challenges. One of hardest aspects was joining a team with such a strong bond. “I’m walking into a situation where I’m totally responsible,” she said. “But I had to create trust and learn their culture first.” Over time, Bannister gained that trust. Students, staff and facility accepted her and her leadership style. MARCH/APRIL 2018

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SPOTLIGHT >> NATALYA BANNISTER

“It took me a year and a half to walk as an authentic leader,” she said. Another challenge Bannister has faced is proving herself as a young woman. Whether she’s mistaken for a PACE girl in a meeting or not given much respect, she uses each opportunity as a teaching moment. “I don’t get defensive,” Bannister said. “I educate.” Over time, educating has become her focus. Whether it is teaching PACE girls a new life lesson, working with the staff or broadening the community’s view of PACE Center for Girls, she’s tackled every new challenge. When Bannister started at PACE Center for Girls, she was constantly met with misconceptions about the program. “I heard, ‘oh it’s a school for bad girls or pregnant girls,’” she said. “I fought to tear that barrier down.” So, Bannister launched the Girls Rock Rally to combat those misconceptions. “I wanted to create a sense of pride in PACE,” she said. Each year, PACE Center for Girls puts on a Girls Rock Rally, which is a pep rally where PACE girls, other high school students and the community can interact. The event includes a fashion show, speakers, sorority performances and other programming. “It’s an opportunity for girls to see successful women just like them,” Bannister said. However, for many of the PACE girls, Bannister is the successful woman they’re looking up to. 32 |

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“She is a really good role model for me and everyone here,” Keller said. “I’m trying for her, it’s just that simple.” Bannister laughed when asked about life outside PACE Center for Girls. “PACE is my life,” she said. Beyond PACE Center for Girls, Bannister spends most of her time with her daughter, Nyana. Bannister’s main job is being a role model for her daughter. She brings Nyana to PACE events, so she can interact and learn with the other girls. Bannister grew up in Queens Village, New York, and moved to Florida when she was 12 years old. She came to the Gainesville for college and never left. “Gainesville is one of the most generous communities,” she said. “There’s so many people in the community that believe in what we do.” Since coming to Gainesville, Bannister has found her own mentors. Southwick has become her “local mommy.” Between the three-hour lunches, spontaneous phone calls and texts for advice, Southwick helped to guide Bannister’s transition at PACE Center for Girls. “It’s like when you’re in trouble and you don’t know what to do so you call your mom,” Southwick said. “She called me a lot that first year.” Their initial lunch turned into a permanent friendship. “She is an amazing human being,” Southwick said. “I would be very proud if she were my real daughter.”


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COLUMN

CRYSTAL HENRY’S

Naked Salsa THE F WORD

CRYSTAL HENRY IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND COLUMNIST BORN AND RAISED IN WEST TEXAS. SHE RECEIVED HER B.S. IN JOURNALISM IN 2006 FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. SHE IS IN LOVE WITH THE FLORIDA LANDSCAPE. ces03k@gmail.com

THERE’S A NASTY F WORD BEING THROWN AROUND LATELY THAT’S REALLY GOT PEOPLE UPSET.

P

eople who use it either say it loud and proud, or they wince with disgust and spit it out like a rotten piece of fruit. Feminism. Widely used, and wildly misunderstood. I saw a post on social media recently of a guy ripping on feminism because it was stripping him of his manliness. This fella was somehow under the impression that the rise of the female could only come at the cost of all men. Women in power could only happen if masculinity was ground into sandy bits, and I just couldn’t help but interject with a truth bomb. Feminism doesn’t take away male power anymore than racial equality takes away white power. The concept of feminism has taken many forms over the course of history. But recent movements like #metoo have brought to light just the tip top of the iceberg of the issues women have been dealing with. And it’s making some people squirm. The idea that feminists are out to destroy men is just false. My husband is one of the biggest feminists I know, and he’s about as gun-toting, camo-wearing, whiskey-swilling manly as they come. I won’t argue what it’s like to be a white male since I’m not one. But I am a woman, and I’d like to help explain why this push for feminism shouldn’t be shot down as a bunch of ugly screeching she-devils hell bent on a testosterone-free world. It’s simply a recognition of our worth as human beings. I got breasts at 9. It was the same year I lost my dad, so all in all 4th grade was a real crapfest. What I remember about getting breasts is that one day I was running around the house in my underwear, and the next day I was supposed to feel ashamed

about it. I still watched cartoons and ate rainbow colored cereal in the mornings, but I was suddenly a tempting piece of meat that needed covering. When word got out in school that I was sprouting jugs, it wasn’t good. Some of the girls were jealous, and most of the boys were obsessed. I didn’t get what the big deal was because I felt the same. But as soon as the first student noticed my bra strap I felt like I was sporting Dolly Parton style hooters on my birdy 9-year-old frame. One day a squirrelly boy named Jacob came up behind me and snapped my bra. It wasn’t as physically painful as it was embarrassing and irritating, and I yelled at him to stop. My coach told me to be quiet. Jacob and the other boys made a game of snapping my bra, and it happened every single day on the playground. I used to enjoy soccer, but instead I found myself just trying to stay out of sight by the fence. I even quit gymnastics because I was too embarrassed to change in the locker room. The other girls started rumors that I was stuffing with Kleenex. As if I wanted any of this. I kept trying to lay low, but Jacob kept chasing me and snapping my bra. And no matter how many times I told him to stop he thought it was way too hilarious not to keep going. One teacher told me it was because he liked me. Don’t get me started on how damaging that is to tell young girls. But the most vivid thing I remember is our coach looking me in the eye and saying “Boys will be boys. Now go play.” Well girls will also be girls. At 9 years old I just wanted to play kickball and hang upside down on the monkey bars. Instead I was hiding in the corner of the playground, plotting to use my femininity to combat assault. One day I sauntered up to Jacob at the beginning of recess and told him I’d show him my bra if he met me under the slide.

I kept trying to lay low, but Jacob kept chasing me and snapping my bra. And no matter how many times I told him to stop he thought it was way too hilarious not to keep going. One teacher told me it was because he liked me.

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I swear he drooled, but he agreed. I casually walked off to the swings, and he ran to the slide. When the coach turned his back I stealthily hurried over to the slide where Jacob was licking his chops. I told him to close his eyes so I could get ready, and when he did I planted my foot square between his legs with everything I had. Those soccer days paid off in dividends. To this day I wonder if he has children. If he does I hope he got girls. Jacob never snapped my bra again, however, I was awarded three days of lunch detention. I served them with pride. Jacob was a kid just like I was, and as an adult I get that and feel a little bad. However the world we lived in told him it was ok to do things to a girl’s body without her consent. The authority figures in our lives were fine with it, so how would he know any different. When I tried to defend my own body I was punished. And that was only the start of my journey through womanhood. For a long time my identity was wrapped up in what was under my shirt. And I bought into it. The world told me that my body was my most valuable asset. So I went along with it until my body gave me my most valuable asset — my daughters. After the birth of my first child I realized the true power of a woman’s body. No longer was I proud of having big breasts because men thought they were great. I was proud of the fact that they single handedly sustained the life of my child for a full year. The parts of my body that had been prime real estate for the male gaze for so long had accomplished some of the most mind bending things I’d ever witnessed. Something broke inside me when I looked at my tiny daughter’s face for the first time. I never wanted either of my girls to let anyone else decide their value. I never wanted them to accept that their bodies were not their own to control. I wanted them to support other women, and lift them up rather than tearing them down. I wanted them seen as whole people, and valued for what they have to offer the world. So I started using the F word loud and proud since the day they were born, to teach them that they are worthy human beings who are valued on this earth. And F anyone who tries to shut that down.  MARCH/APRIL 2018

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PROFILE >> LAUREN WARHOL CALDWELL

STORYTELLER

One of the Lucky Ones The Life of Lauren Warhol Caldwell W R IT TE N BY K AC E Y F I NC H P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H S T R I C K L A N D

S

ince finding her artistic home at the Hippodrome State Theatre in downtown Gainesville over two decades ago, Lauren Warhol Caldwell has climbed the ranks and served as artistic director of the regional theatre for more than a decade. “I get to get up every day of my life and walk inside the doors of that which I love so very much,” Caldwell said. “I found my roots, and I think we were meant to be together, so it’s been great.” Before becoming the leader she is today, Caldwell was a student at Baylor University seeking a degree in business in the 1970s. She developed a love for the fine arts, volunteering at her local community theatre in high school, but never saw it as something she could do with her life.

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Her passion for theatre began to nibble at her in college when she found herself spending afternoons in a dark, empty theatre studying and nights attending plays. “Once the bug bit, it bit, and it stuck,” Caldwell said. “It’s been part of me forever since then.” Caldwell graduated from Baylor with a bachelor’s degree in directing and design. Upon graduating, she spent time as a freelance actor, traveled for a company called the Success Motivation Institute and worked for Liza Minnelli. While working for the iconic actress, Caldwell got to know Minnelli’s friend, famous pop artist Andy Warhol. Caldwell told Warhol she wanted his name; he said she could have it. “I said, ‘Well I’ll wait until you die,’ and he laughed and said, ‘No, you can have it now,’” she said.


Stage lights shine on Lauren Warhol Caldwell as she sits front and center on the mainstage at the Hippodrome State Theatre.

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PROFILE >> LAUREN WARHOL CALDWELL

Warhol has been an icon in Caldwell’s life, so she decided to add his name, and it caught on. When Caldwell decided she wanted to earn her Master of Fine Arts in acting, she knew someone who was hired as a new faculty member at the University of Florida and checked out the university’s program. The Texan left her home state to attend UF. During her time at UF, and after she graduated, the Hippodrome called her to do some acting gigs. However, Caldwell always pictured herself in a big city with several professional theatres, not in a small, southern city like Gainesville.

Caldwell was offered the director of education position, in which she continued with the teen program, wrote five plays that were toured statewide and worked with at-risk kids in the community. While in the position, she found time to familiarize herself with the theatre by volunteering in every department. If she planned to run the theatre someday, she thought it was important to understand the role of every employee. Caldwell continued to climb the ladder and served as artistic associate for years before structural changes took place at the theatre.

“I love people, and I just love telling stories, wrapping them up in a big bow and giving them to our audiences.” “I realized after spending some time back and forth and in and out of the Hippodrome that I had found an artistic home, and that’s what actors really want – is an artistic home,” she said. “I found that, for me, creating rather than competing was really where I wanted to lay my head.” Her first love has always been directing, so when management of the Hippodrome contacted Caldwell about getting involved in the education program, Hippodrome Improvisational Teen, it was a match made in heaven. She spent time working with teenagers from all over the area, writing scripts and directing.

She transitioned to her current position as artistic director when the theatre hired a new managing director. Now, Caldwell’s job is to make sure the artistic aspect of the theatre is healthy by bringing in new works, putting together seasons, hiring designers, casting actors and working closely with the administrative side of the theatre. She works alongside the managing director, Jessica Hurov, in leading and running the Hippodrome and making sure the plays come first. “It’s not a theatre where the marketing department chooses the shows so it’s easier to sell,” Caldwell said.

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In 2014, Caldwell started the Hippodrome Acting Company, a group of more than 30 actors from all over the country who she calls on to do shows and allows to “stretch their artistic wings.” When it comes to directing, telling the story is Caldwell’s philosophy. “I think that when you tell the story, there’s a responsibility as to the playwright to tell the story that was written by the playwright,” she said. “But I do think that there is sometimes a certain brand or a certain style or a certain way that the story was told that people can tell the play belongs to a certain director.” Caldwell has directed well over 500 productions, but, to her, her biggest accomplishment isn’t what she’s done. Instead, it’s how she’s done it — with unwavering love. “As difficult as it is, and it is difficult, it’s difficult to direct shows, it’s difficult to produce plays, and it’s difficult to run a theatre; there’s a lot that goes into that; there’s a huge price that is paid to be involved in a regional theatre,” Caldwell said. “So, the fact that I have been able to fall in love and stay in love is probably my biggest accomplishment.” Her passion for and commitment to professional theatre was honored in November 2017 when as artistic director, she was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award in the Florida Theatre Conference’s Professional Theatre division. “I was very honored, but when you think of a lifetime of work, I have miles to go, miles and miles to go,” she said. Caldwell’s passion for what she does and her love for the home she has found at the Hippodrome is unquestionable. “I love people, and I just love telling stories, wrapping them up in a big bow and giving them to our audiences and letting them open that big bow and open the box and be in awe of what they find inside,” she said. “I guess I’m one of the lucky ones. I’m getting choked up because I get to do that.” 

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RECIPE SERIES >> GRANDMA’S CINNAMON COFFEE CAKE

LET THEM EAT CAKE

Cynthia Wonders Winterrowd ’s

RECIPE WONDERS FOOD ST Y LING & PHOTOGR A PH Y BY ERICK A WINTER ROWD

GR A

A

N DM A’ S

few weeks ago I had a hankering for an old family recipe, so I got out my mother’s four hand-written cookbooks and started looking. It isn’t exactly a speedy process, though, because in each of the four books are hundreds of recipes in no particular order. I hadn’t made this recipe in over 25 years, so I wasn’t even sure of its name. I just called it Grandma’s Cinnamon Coffee Cake. In my memory it was a recipe from my father’s mother, Bessie Wonders (Yes, Wonders – as in “Recipe Wonders.”) In my mind’s eye I could even see it baked up in several of my grandmother’s old pie tins. So to me, it was always Grandma Bessie’s Cinnamon Coffee Cake – and that was how she prepared it. After pouring over these treasured cookbooks for several days (a task that is tedious, but also a very sentimental journey), I still hadn’t found the prized recipe. What is a gal to do in these

A CO F F E E C

KE

trying times? Well, fortunately in this day and age we have—ta da—Social Media! First I private messaged several of my cousins, but after a few days had no luck. I decided to be a little bolder with my next step and just put it out there on Facebook. It took a day or so, and then… success! One of my cousins recalled the recipe, but she remembered it as my mother’s recipe. To her it was “Aunt Ronelva’s Cinnamon Coffee Cake.” A few phone calls later and the next day I was whipping up this recipe in my kitchen! Just the aroma as it was baking took me back to a place and time of happy childhood memories. So whether this is Grandma Bessie’s recipe, or my mother Ronelva’s, it makes no difference. Both of these women were amazing cooks, loving mothers and wonderful grandmothers. They were pillars in their community — a dear friend and good neighbor to all. These are the women I grew up with, and the memories I am pleased to share with you along with this recipe. Happy Baking!

CYNTHIA WONDERS WINTERROWD IS AN AWARD-WINNING WRITER WHO WAS RAISED IN ILLINOIS AND LIVES IN GAINESVILLE. SHE IS PROUD TO BE A “GATOR MOM” OF THREE DAUGHTERS, ALL UF GRADUATES. CYNTHIA LOVES SHARING FAMILY RECIPES THAT HAVE BEEN PASSED DOWN IN HER MOTHER’S HANDWRITTEN COOKBOOKS. recipewonders@gmail.com

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GRANDMA’S CINNAMON COFFEE CAKE INGREDIENTS FOR CAKE BATTER BASE:

2¼ ½ ½ 1 ¾ ¾

cup regular flour teaspoon cinnamon teaspoon salt cup brown sugar (packed down) white sugar cup oil (any cooking oil)

METHOD:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9 x 13 cake pan with butter and dust with flour, being sure to shake off excess flour. Mix the dry ingredients well, then add oil and mix on medium speed until well blended. There will be a few lumps. Remove ¾ cup of the base mixture and put it in a medium bowl for topping. INGREDIENTS FOR THE TOPPING:

¾

½ 1 1

cup of the flour/sugar base mixture you set aside cup pecans or walnuts teaspoon baking soda teaspoon cinnamon

TO COMPLETE CAKE BATTER, ADD TO BASE:

1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon powder 1 egg 1 cup buttermilk Mix well, until blended. METHOD:

Pour completed batter base into pan and spread evenly. Spread the topping evenly over the batter. Bake at 350 until cake springs back and toothpick comes out clean. Every oven is a little different, but 30 minutes should be sufficient.  If you don’t have buttermilk, add 1 tablespoon vinegar and regular milk to measure one cup. MARCH/APRIL 2018

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ROLE MODELS >> WOMEN IN FILM

FEMME FATALE

THE FUTURE OF FILM IS FEMALE

Leading Ladies W R ITTEN BY BROOK E BA JGROW ICZ

While the 2018 Golden Globe Awards brought light to the sexual harassment women face in the film industry with nearly every woman dressed in black as part of the Time’s Up movement, these women remain underrepresented in Hollywood. One of the most notable moments that brought light to this during the award ceremony came about when Natalie Portman presented the award for Best Director alongside Ron Howard. “Here are the all-male nominees,” she said. Over the past 75 Golden Globe Awards, only seven women have received nominations for Best Director, and only one of them has won. Despite the lack of recognition women in film production have received, there are many who have impacted the industry; and female directors, screenwriters and actresses 42 |

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are beginning to amplify their voices. According to Maureen Turim, the director of film and media studies at the University of Florida, women have historically played a big role in film production. In early cinema production, there were many important female directors, but over time they have become rare. Many reasons including the nature of the U.S.’s private film industry and sexism have caused this shift. Women have been and continue to be important screen writers, but roles such as director,


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ROLE MODELS >> WOMEN IN FILM

camera operator and film editor have been dominated by men. Worse, women are oftentimes closed out of guilds related to these positions, making it difficult to survive in the film industry, Turim said. During the Great Depression and World War II, women were moved into the workforce while men fought away at war. Although the film industry was exempt from this, it was still impacted by the intense movement that followed. “After the war there was this huge effort to tell women that they really wanted to get married and have families — catch up on domestic life,” Turim said. The second wave of feminism in the late 60s and 70s moved women back into management, but it failed to reach Hollywood in the same way it reached other industries. Fewer and fewer female producers and directors were able to make a name for themselves in Hollywood. Despite the sexism that women in film have faced over time, many actresses fulfilled strong on-screen roles even when scripts tried to contain them. In 1979, for example, Sally Field starred in “Norma Rae.” Despite having a male director, Field fulfilled the role of a strong female lead who becomes important in union organization in 44 |

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North Carolina. Turim often uses this as an example for her students as a movie that broke through as a direct result of the women’s movement. Later in 1983, Barbra Streisand directed, produced and starred in “Yentl,” which landed her a Golden Globe award for Best Director, making her the only woman to receive an award in this category. This was especially groundbreaking for Streisand due to her successful transition from an actress to a producer, Turim said. Unfortunately, these notable women are exceptions in the male-dominated industry. Many women in film have been snubbed of the recognition they deserve. Now though, historical trends are beginning to change at the top levels of production and management, Turim said. In recent years, more independent female characters have been introduced into films. Women are depicted in the work force, taking political stances and even saving the world like in the 2017 blockbuster hit, “Wonder Woman.” “Wonder Woman” broke through as the third highest domestic grossing movie of the year. Starring a woman and directed by one, it was considered by many to be a success for females in the film industry. After years of male-dominated super hero


movies breaking box-office records, women finally received a film that served as more than just a record breaker. It served as an inspiration to women everywhere. “Wonder Woman” wasn’t the only successful female-led movie in 2017. “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and “Beauty and the Beast” domestically grossed $612,729,780 and $504,014,165 respectively, becoming the top grossing films of the year and making the top three films of the year ones that featured strong female leads. While films featuring independent female characters are changing society’s perception of women, the women behind these movies are impacting the movie playing field as well. Reese Witherspoon is one actress who is working to create more opportunities for women in film. In 2016 she created a media company, Hello Sunshine, that is dedicated to telling stories from a female

perspective across all platforms including books, television and of course, film. Witherspoon is planning to give more women the opportunity to create and connect with female-centered media as her company grows, according to Hello Sunshine’s Facebook page. Female directors are also rising above the curve. While only 8 percent of the top 100 grossing films in 2017 were directed by women, according to the Women and Hollywood blog, there are still directors who are beating the odds. Female directors like Kathryn Bigelow are leaving their mark on the action genre, while others like Sofia Coppola are creating impactful dramas. Greta Gerwig has also made a name for herself with her successful release of “Lady Bird.” This coming-of-age film was praised by critics for its depiction of a genuine mother-daughter relationship, while earning itself a 99 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. Although Gerwig didn’t receive a nomination for Best Director for the 2018 Golden Globe Awards, she did receive a nomination for Best Director for the Academy Awards, becoming the fifth woman to ever receive one. Although the number of women in film production is still overall low, there are many other women rising up to create films that empower and celebrate women. 2018 will welcome several female-centric movies including “Ocean’s 8” and the female-directed “A Wrinkle in Time.” “When women gain control, there is potential for dramatic change,” Turim said. There is hope for a more inclusive film industry, and we’re just beginning to see the start of it. Hollywood better grab its sunglasses – its brightest women are about to shine.

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EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN >> LEADERS IN OUR COMMUNITY

SPOTLIGHT

Lady

Leaders From physicians to artists and everything in between, meet 10 women making an impact in our community as fearless leaders. W RIT TE N BY S TE PH S TRICKL A N D

SUSIE ULLOA Breast Cancer Survivor and NFRMC Oncology Nurse Navigator For most, bravery is something that must be practiced or experienced, but for Susie Ulloa bravery comes naturally. Susie immigrated to America from Columbia, leaving behind all that was familiar in order to provide for her children. In Columbia, she worked as a physician. However, when she moved to America she saw that her family needed her, and she devoted all of her time to ensuring their welfare. “It was all about choice, and this choice was simple,” she said. Later, Susie began working as a nurse, where she had to face the stereotypes of a “step down” in her career. However, she was never discouraged by others. “It doesn’t matter what letters I have after my name,” she said. When Susie was diagnosed with breast cancer she said it changed her completely and caused her to shift her perspective. Now, Susie focuses on the big picture and is able to relate more to the patients that she serves at the cancer center of North Florida Regional Medical Center (NFRMC). She said she understands the patients because she had a similar experience of having to listen to the words “you have cancer.” Susie applies all of her experience as a physician, nurse, patient and mom into her current role. She is currently in the process of writing a book documenting all of her experiences. 46 |

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After battling breast cancer, Susie Ulloa learned to appreciate those around her every day. Her experiences as a mother, patient, doctor and nurse aid her in her current role as a patient advocate.


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EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN >> LEADERS IN OUR COMMUNITY

BRINN STRANGE Owner of Barre Forte and Master Barre Instructor Empowering women is a fundamental part of Brinn’s role as owner of Barre Forte. Brinn said her position is “really all about the relations with women in the studio.” She is able to inspire women to achieve their goals, playing an important part in their fitness journey. Barre Forte has engaged in countless activities to support women in the community, from their body positive atmosphere in the studio to fundraisers, client recognition and promotion of various female entrepreneurs outside of the studio. Brinn strives to “create a community within the studio,” by engaging in social activities both in and out of class. On top of creating a popular fitness establishment, Brinn also creates a fitness family for every client that comes to her studio.

COLLEEN O’FALLON Owner of Sweet Paws Bakery and Doggie Daycare What do you get when you combine natural ingredients in animal products and an ambitious dog mom with an entrepreneurial spirit? Colleen O’Fallon. Colleen began baking dog treats for her cocker spaniel puppy after seeing the large quantity of artificial ingredients used in animal treats. She started selling her treats in famers markets, and in 2007 it grew into the business she owns and runs today. Sweet Paws Bakery and Doggie Daycare isn’t what she had originally planned as a career, but it is something she really enjoys and wants to continue doing. “Life’s a journey,” she said. “Some goals get diverted.” Colleen extends her compassion towards animals in shelters by coordinating with rescues to host events and fundraisers. She said she feels it is her duty to try to help the animal community. Colleen and her mother work together to maintain the bakery and daycare. She urges others to “be open to any possibilities in life.” 48 |

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EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN >> LEADERS IN OUR COMMUNITY

JENNIFER CO-VU Fetal Cardiologist, Director of Fetal Cardiology at Shands Jennifer originally wanted to stay in her home in the Philippines, but when her family moved to America she seized every opportunity to work hard and reach her goals. Jennifer works in fetal cardiology. “It is one of the fields that I think won’t become mundane,” she said. “There is always something new and exciting every day.” Fetal cardiology is a male-dominated

field, but according to Jennifer her coworkers at Shands are understanding and collaborative. Jennifer also worked collaboratively with her peers to develop an app with Locus Health that works as a single ventricle home monitoring system. This app has enabled Shands to report a zero percent mortality rate in this field. Jennifer encourages others to achieve their goals of becoming doctors because she feels the profession not only makes a difference in someone’s life, but also in the world. MARCH/APRIL 2018

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BETSY PEPINE Real Estate Broker and Owner of Pepine Realty Real estate has not always been a part of Betsy’s life. After being educated in business at Duke University and receiving her MBA in marketing from The Wharton School of Business, Betsy worked in pharmaceutical marketing. However, she said “I’ve always had an interest in real estate…[and] the impact housing can have on a family.” In order to pursue a job in real estate, Betsy 50 |

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had to overcome the stigma that she would be “stepping down” in her career. Convincing her family that she was making the right choice was a challenge. Now, Betsy owns Pepine Realty, where she is able to incorporate her passion for real estate alongside her passion for volunteer work. “I have always been an active volunteer in every community I’ve been a part of,” Pepine said. Pepine Realty organizes at least one service project a month based on the interest of her staff. Betsy also believes it is important to


have mentors in your professional, spiritual and financial life. She said it is crucial to “pick out role models you are willing to emulate.”

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KATHY SARANTOS Pediatrician at Alliance Pediatrics Being a pediatrician is about much more than healing boos-boos for Kathy Sarantos. This supermom works as an MD at Alliance Pediatrics while raising her children and engaging in community service. Kathy has found her balance in all aspects of her life through learning the vital life skills of time management and prioritization. She is always looking to help people, and she strives to heal families and children in her role as a pediatrician. “It’s not just about treating children,” Kathy said. She also teaches preventative health and mental wellness for all of her patients. Her work in the community does not stop there, Kathy also embarks on humanitarian trips. Her most recent venture landed her in Thailand. Outside of medicine, Kathy focuses on her family and her faith. She continually seeks to inspire her children by working closely with their schools and reminding them “with perseverance and persistence there is nothing that they can’t achieve.”

MEG THELOSEN Co-Founder of First Magnitude Brewing Meg TheLosen has never been much of a risk taker. However, she said after gaining confidence in the business world, she has taken on numerous start-ups that each bring something unique to the community. Meg is well known for her work with First Magnitude Brewery, where she was able to create a place for “so many interesting things to go on,” she said. First Magnitude’s branding also reflects Meg’s love for the community. Through donations and other functions the company seeks to be more than just a great business in Gainesville. Now, Meg works with the nonprofit start-up Working Food where she is constantly inspired by those around her. Meg said her biggest professional role model right now is Board President of Working Food Anna Prizzia because of the incredible way she “works in the community professionally… and still manages to work on nonprofits.”

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EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN >> LEADERS IN OUR COMMUNITY

MARGARET TOLBERT Artist Art holds a deeper meaning in Margaret Tolbert’s life. She has made it her career and her medium through which to impact the community around her. Margaret wants to set an example for others and encourage them to “follow a passion and make a career by finding things that are important,” she said. As an artist, Margaret is inspired by everything around her. She finds role models in those who can become engrossed in their work, and she encourages others to take time to find a passion and pursue 52 |

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it. Margaret’s passion for art flows like water, which happens to be the subject of many of her pieces. “The magic for me [is] seeing water in natural ways that take me to that specific place,” she said. Margaret considers herself an advocate for waterways and nature in general, and she incorporates these themes into her work. “You can’t help but be an activist with nature as your subject,” she said. Margaret finds inspiration from artists who spread change in the world. Her parents also inspire her; “I watched them in how they worked,” Margaret said. “But [they] always had a lot of fun.”


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EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN >> LEADERS IN OUR COMMUNITY

CLAUDIA COMETA CEO of Peace Advocacy Group One stormy night, driving from Orlando to Gainesville, following a visit with her father, Claudia Cometa had an epiphany. In that moment Claudia decided to part ways with her pharmaceutical career in order to become a patient advocate. Prior to this decision, she had been serving as her father’s advocate during his battle with lymphoma. Through this experience, Claudia witnessed the dark side of medicine. “It gave me a new perspective on what [patients] are going through,” she said. By April of 2016 Claudia turned her epiphany into an organization that works to guide patients as they navigate the rough waters of the healthcare industry. Peace Advocacy Group had no precedent to work from, but Claudia used her avant-garde idea to pave a new road in the medical field. As a mom and an active member in the Gainesville community, Claudia encourages others to “find their strengths and passions and go for it.”

MARY WISE Head Coach for the UF Volleyball Team Winning might not be everything, but Mary Wise certainly does a lot of it. Mary has been recognized on countless occasions for her grit and passion for the game of volleyball. According to ncaa.com, Mary has won 14 SEC Coach of the Year awards and led the Gators to seven Final Fours. Her most recent accomplishment was surpassing Elaine Michaelis, former BYU women’s volleyball coach, in total number of games won by any division one female coach in NCAA volleyball history. Mary responded to earning this title by tweeting, “So thankful for all the players who won those matches and hope the record is broken by 100s of women 100s of times.” Girl Power! 54 |

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PHOTO COURTESY OF UF ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION


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MOTHERHOOD >> TOWER MAMAS

MAGAZINE MOMS AT THE OUR TOWN OFFICE

Tower Power Mamas Q&A BY ERICK A WINTER ROWD

Did you know that every woman in our sales department at Tower Publications happens to be an awesome mom, too? WITH THIS ISSUE BEING DEDICATED TO WOMEN, WE WANTED TO HIGHLIGHT THE AMAZING LADIES THAT DEDICATE THEMSELVES TO BOTH THEIR FAMILIES AND THIS MAGAZINE.

As a soldier’s mother, can you describe the feeling of pride you have when your son returns home from overseas? “There are so many adjectives and emotions. The anticipation, excitement, joy and love that we feel is just overwhelming for not just me, but the whole family. My mind goes to a memory of our family waiting in the Orlando airport to pick John up after he spent a long year 56 |

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and a half in South Korea. Our hearts were filled with such pride and delight as we stood impatiently waiting with our ‘Welcome Home Soldier’ poster! We had missed him so very much. The dedication and sacrifices that our soldiers make is felt through their families as well. It’s a real team effort to support each other and get through the time apart. #Armystrong #proudmamma” — NANCY SHORT


“A sense of accomplishment, family, roots from the past, present, and future… When my grandchildren are over it’s tea parties, big trucks, adventures in fairy lands far away, popcorn and movies. When they’re over we build forts in the living room, drive Nanny crazy. Then I get a big hug and the best words ever ‘I LOVE YOU NANNY, You’re in my heart!’ I think grandchildren are blessings from God, for loving our children and always sharing love in our families and homes. I have five beautiful grandchildren: Liam, Farrah, Kennedi, Maddox and Carter. From the first time I saw each of their beautiful faces, I was smitten and my heart was full. I knew my dreams had come true in these little angels. When we’re all together I see a reflection of myself in all of them, sometimes it’s like my spirit lives outside my body in their souls. When I look back on my life, I thank God for those five little blessings and I’ll cherish them forever.” — ANNIE WAITE

MOTHERHOOD >> TOWER MAMAS

Describe the feeling you have when all of your grandchildren are together in your home…

What’s the best part about being a Grandma? “Everything… Spoiling them and then sending them home to their parents… They give the best hugs and kisses, and to hear them say your name just melts your heart. I’m blessed that I live close enough to take them to school and be a part of their lives and to watch them grow.” — PAM SAPP

What does motherhood mean to you? How do you balance your time as a busy mother of two sons that happen to be very active in sports? “What is the key to balancing work, family, sports, and school? Is there really only one right answer? As a mother of two boys, Cohen, 10, and Preston, 7, who are both very active in baseball and basketball, life can be more than hectic at times. With practice and/or games practically every night of the week, I find that staying organized and planning out the week’s schedule in advance is very helpful in managing my time. Although being a mother of active boys is more time-consuming than I ever imagined, I wouldn’t have it any other way. Being a “boy mom” is an honor and an adventure. Watching them do what they love is the most rewarding feeling that I have ever experienced. Most people will never meet their favorite players... I’m raising mine.” — JENNI BENNETT

“Motherhood for me is about hearing ‘I don’t like that’ because they don’t want to eat their dinner for the 4th night in a row. It’s about the full on temper tantrums over what they will wear. It’s the arguments over homework and forgetting to turn papers in on time. It’s constantly second guessing myself. It’s telling my 8-year-old she is too young for a phone or my 3-yearold to stop picking her boogers for the 100th time. That’s the reality of being a mom, but more than anything, it’s about the bear hugs, Eskimo kisses and hearing ‘I love you mom.’ Motherhood is challenging and some days I wonder how I will make it through, but in the eyes of my children — I am supermom.” — HELEN MINCEY Go Team Tower! MARCH/APRIL 2018

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COLUMN

DONNA BONNELL’S

Embracing Life BODY, BREATH, MIND

DONNA BONNELL BECAME THE AUTHOR OF HER COLUMN, EMBRACING LIFE, MORE THAN A DECADE AGO. SHE SHARES HER PERSONAL CHALLENGES AND VICTORIES WITH THE GOAL OF INSPIRING HER READERS TO ANALYZE WHY THINGS HAPPEN IN THEIR OWN LIVES. bonneldj@gmail.com

B

rad Pitt said, “We’re so complex, we’re mysteries to ourselves; we’re difficult to each other. And then storytelling reminds us we’re all the same.” Pitt’s quote is the perfect introduction for this column. Let’s face the facts. Life is a daily trial. While attempting to succeed and determine our own divine purpose, we speed through our chaotic lives. Others, across the globe, travel on the same fast lane. Oftentimes delays, disagreements and distrust develop. Agitation evolves into physical and verbal collisions, creating stress. How do we slow down this crazy train of self-destruction? Perhaps, pausing long enough to breathe is the simple solution. Our challenges and desires differ, but everyone needs the same essential elements to sustain life. With some variations, the average person can survive three weeks without food, three days without water and three minutes without oxygen. Getting air into our bodies and brains is our most immediate vital task. It is the first thing we do at birth and our last before death. Ironically, in between (unless faced with a respiratory illness) most folks take breathing for granted. With the exception of concerns over my daughter and grandson suffering with asthma, I fell into that category. At just the right time in my life’s journey, the Universe revealed a new path to investigate. With a little reluctance, I seized the opportunity and began exploring the benefits of mind-body healing. Regular readers know I recently endured an unfair, unpredictable life-altering event. In its aftermath, I was perplexed emotionally and spiritually. After a year of painful work, I conquered most of those maladies. In the meantime, my body retaliated. Hypertension, thyroid malfunction and other issues were exacerbated. I began exercising with vengeance, only to hurt my back. Fortunately, it was not serious. I did, however, have to re-evaluate my next step in improving my physical well-being. That setback was my key to finding Tai Chi, Qi Gong and breathing/meditation classes. A physical therapist suggested that I temporarily refrain from strenuous workouts. He warned, though, not to stop entirely. I pursued interim alternatives. The goal was to keep moving until I was able to return to my full vigorous training sessions. That is when I learned about Tai Chi, described as medication/ meditation in motion. My primary care physician supported the idea, as the movements are gentle, yet very effective. In addition, they improve balance and stability. So, I began attending classes.

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Initially all I cared about was learning the routines and the names for the series of motions, such as ‘cloud hands’ and ‘single whip.’ As an uncoordinated novice, in a class with participants who had studied the art for years, I was (honestly) pathetic. It took several months before I realized that many of the movements were Qi Gong, which means breath or energy work. Eventually I began incorporating the breathing, focusing and meditation aspects of those centuries-old practices. Shizam! A whole new world opened up for me. The revelation came when realizing that our breath, bodies and minds really work collectively as one unit. They are not independent functions occurring randomly. That particular eye-opener surfaced when our instructor asked his students to ‘smile from the heart.’ Of course, I tried to follow instructions, but the result was forced. I had to be missing something. With just a little perseverance, I discovered there was much more. Heart-Smiling is a technique that leads to an energizing state, known as cardiac coherence. Coherence is a synchronization between the functions of the brain and heart. The heart pumps oxygenated blood, which connects intellect, emotions and body. By focusing on positive thoughts, such as gratitude, joy or love, harmony prevails. Sometimes referred to as intelligence of the heart, brain waves are communicated to the rest of the body with each heartbeat. Cardiac coherence is only possible with oxygen, which we get from breathing. Voila! We have come full circle. Decreasing anxiety, stress and temper could be as easy as deep breathing. When frustrated or faced with perceived danger, our fight-or-flight natural response is triggered. Our bodies experience an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, along with rapid shallow breathing. Taking deep deliberate breaths can almost automatically reverse those symptoms. By calming our bodies and minds, we diffuse emotional energy and are better able to control negative reactions. In the 2015 tune, Everything Is Changing, Jonny Diaz sings, “Chaos calls but all you really need Is to just breathe Just breathe” Embrace the healing power of your own breath. It works for me.


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DEAF CULTURE & EDUCATION >> MICHELLE FREAS

DEAF CULTURE

A Silent Universe The Signs of Michelle Freas S T O R Y A N D P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y K A I T L I N A P P L E G AT E

S

ilence is becoming louder in Gainesville. Thanks to the work of people like Michelle Freas, Deaf culture is growing locally. The community around Deaf culture starts with American Sign Language, but its reach goes far beyond silent communication. Deaf culture is a community of individuals who take pride in the strength of quiet. Michelle Freas works as a professor at Santa Fe College. However, her passion to reach the Deaf community started in middle school. “One of my teachers knew a little bit and taught our class. I started getting dictionaries and looking signs up not knowing that I would do something with it in the future,” Freas said. Since then, Freas has gone on to be an active

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agent in teaching ASL, interacting with other nations to enrich Deaf culture and educating the hearing population about a community that we don’t need to leave Gainesville to reach. In other words, Freas invests her time focusing less on the divide that separates the hearing from the Deaf and more on building bridges that bring us together. Before teaching at Santa Fe, Freas educated Deaf children as an elementary teacher. “You become more than a teacher to some of those children,” Freas said. Working in elementary Deaf education involved integrating the family as well as their child into the world of Deaf pride. Currently, Freas commits herself to educating Gainesville in ASL and Deaf culture. “I always knew I wanted to teach at Santa Fe,” Freas said. “It was a different way to educate people in the Deaf


“One of my loves as a teacher is to be able to see the passion that someone develops for ASL. Whenever the Deaf get together it’s an alive experience.”

Michelle Freas dedicates herself to developing the contagious electricity behind the Deaf community.

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Freas shares the sign for unity.

Santa Fe was Michelle Freas’ (above & top right) career mission from the start. She now transforms lives through education. She connects compassion to class as she teaches students ASL. Santa Fe College offers Deaf Culture as well as all four divisions of ASL. Santa Fe plays an integral part in growing Gainesville’s Deaf awareness. Small class sizes has cultivated lasting hearing and Deaf relationships between students that reach beyond the classroom. Elizabeth Preston (right) works with Sweden and Palestine to connect Deaf communities all over the world. Preston teaches 9-year-old Ellie Walters (below) how to sign.

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DEAF CULTURE & EDUCATION >> MICHELLE FREAS

community.” Working as a professor allows Freas to introduce hearing people to a silent universe. In some instances, education morphs into igniting passion. Freas introduced Elizabeth Preston, one of her ASL students, to the culture of Deaf community. “One of my loves as a teacher is to be able to see the passion that someone develops for ASL,” Freas said. However, Preston, much like Freas, stumbled upon her interest. When she first took an ASL class, Preston said, “I was totally culture shocked when I found out that there were not just people who used it but [also] a whole culture that came along with it.” Reflecting back, Preston said, “Now, it’s hard for me to remember what it was like to not know that the Deaf community existed and to not want to advocate or be a part of that in some way.” Freas spoke through a smile as she talked about what the future for the Deaf community will look like with people like Preston involved. “I saw passion grow within her,” Freas said. “The development with her has really been part of why I do this job. I know that she’s going to do something with that someday.”

“It’s hard for me to remember what it was like to not know that the Deaf community existed and to not want to advocate or be a part of that in some way.” As Preston shared her vision, she said “Since I’ve been around it the idea of Deaf education has felt so important to me. Nine out of ten Deaf kids have parents who can’t communicate at all with them. My hope is I get to communicate with people more than just in the classroom.” As Freas’ work intertwines with Preston’s, their stories invite others in to join the world of Deaf community. “The best way to know about anything is to actually meet people part of that culture,” Preston said. Gainesville offers several opportunities for the hearing to become connected with Deaf locally. Gainesville Ocala Deaf Night out meets regularly to develop the Deaf community. Hearing and Deaf alike are encouraged to join. For those who feel hesitant, Freas said “the Deaf community is really helpful, and they want people to learn about their culture.” Knowing ASL is not a requirement to experience the Deaf community. Freas describes these events as more of a bridge between the Deaf and hearing than a separation. “As you form relationships with the Deaf they form relationships with you,” she said. While the Deaf community flourishes under the work of strong woman like Freas and Preston, it calls out to others to join in, too. The Deaf have a pride in themselves that they want to share –one that offers unity and understanding to all. MARCH/APRIL 2018

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AUTHOR >> LINDA CASTILLO

BOOK WORM

THE LONG JOURNEY OF AN AUTHOR

Linda Castillo W R I T T E N B Y S AVA N N A H A U S T I N | P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y PA M L A R Y

At the age of thirteen, Linda Castillo wrote a novel called “Long Journey” about twin sisters who run away from home on the backs of their Appaloosa horses. She thought it was long gone, yet, a few years ago, Castillo stumbled back upon the spiral notebook complete with a sweaty handprint on the back that contained her pencil-written story from her childhood. “Even then when I was thirteen years old, I loved to write, and I loved to create characters,” Castillo said. Now, the 57-year-old Texan resident is a New York Times bestselling author for her debut Amish Thriller, “Sworn to Silence,” the first in her “Kate Burkholder series.” Castillo has been working on the next chapter in Burkholder’s story and the ninth book of the series, “Down a Dark Road,” which will be available to readers in July 2018. 64 |

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“Down a Dark Road is one of my favorite books,” Castillo said. “I learned some things about Kate that I didn’t know when I started that book. It gives readers a little bit of a glimpse into her past as an Amish girl.” When Castillo wrote the first Amish thriller, she said she had no idea how many she would be writing. “I always tell myself one of things that my job as a writer is to keep the series fresh,” Castillo said. “That means character growth and sometimes going out of my comfort zone, especially on plotline.” Prior to the “Kate Burkholder” series, Castillo wrote romantic suspense novels while working in the corporate world. It took 11


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AUTHOR >> LINDA CASTILLO

“When you’re a writer, you always sort of have to refill the well. The creativity that’s inside you, you never want that to be depleted in any way.” years of sending in manuscripts and receiving rejection letters to become published, but the first one, “Remember the Night (Men in Blue),” was bought by Harlequin Publishing. “I have to tell you, it was a moment.” Castillo said. “It was an amazing moment, even though this was a romance novel, it was a really great moment.” Eventually, another publisher, Berkley Publishing Group, bought another of her novels, and soon, Castillo began hearing similar critiques from both editors. “[The editors] said these are romance novels, and you really need to concentrate on the relationship between the hero and the heroine,” Castillo said. “They basically told me I had to stop killing people.” “At that point, I started plotting, and I knew I wanted to write a breakout book,” Castillo said. “I knew this book was going to have to be something special.” The next winter, she visited her brother-in-law in Ohio and was standing out in the front yard in 20 degree weather with snow on the ground. It was then she heard “the clip clop of shod hooves” and turned around and saw a buggy with an Amish man driving. “He was clad in black and his family was tucked into the rear of the buggy. I watched them go down the road,” Castillo said. “In that moment, I knew I had found what this breakout book that I had been plotting for so long [was about] – I knew that I had to set that in Amish Country. That’s when ‘Sworn to Silence’ came together.” As the series has progressed and Castillo is a full time writer now, she is always working, yet is learning how to balance writing and living. “When you’re a writer, you always sort of have to refill the well. The creativity that’s inside you, you never want that to be depleted in any way,” Castillo said. “That means you have to be able to get away from your computer and go out and live life. For me, in terms of writing, I always take some extra time to soak in the sights of Amish Country.”

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Soon, Castillo will be taking in the sights of Alachua County, as one of seven authors coming to Gainesville for the Alachua County Library District’s third annual Author Series. “When you’re an author, you spend a lot of time sequestered behind a computer and you work alone.” Castillo said. “It is such a gratifying feeling to be able to get out and talk to people who have read and loved the books.” The trip won’t be the author’s first time visiting central Florida, as she accidentally once got lost on her way back from vacationing in Miami. “We got all the way from Miami to Chiefland, and broke down,” she said. “t was actually one of those disasters that turned out to be so much fun.” She and her husband, Ernesto, stayed at a Sleepy Time Motel and went canoeing in the Suwannee River. “I’ve really not spent time in Gainesville proper, so I’m looking forward to making the trip.” Castillo will be speaking, answering questions and will be available for book signings on Sunday, March 18 at 2:30 p.m. at the Alachua County Library District headquarters located at 401 E. University Ave.


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SURGEON >> DR. LISA SPIGUEL

THINK PINK

Dr. Lisa Spiguel Super Surgeon and Mom W R I T T E N B Y S AVA N N A H A U S T I N

A

pink ribbon keychain, a gift from a patient, dangles from Dr. Lisa Spiguel’s ID as she takes a seat behind her office desk. A large textbook titled “SURGERY” on a shelf behind her juxtaposes a framed watercolor painting of a colorful hot air balloon on construction paper, signed by her 9-year-old son. The day is already in full swing for Spiguel, a breast surgeon, clinician and assistant professor for UF Health. She has been at the hospital since 6:30 a.m. and has already attended two meetings. Then, she will travel from her office in the UF Health Shands hospital to an operating room in the cancer hospital across the street through a tunnel below Archer Road. After a day of operating, she will leave around 7 p.m to go home and see her kids. To the 39-year-old surgeon, this is the life. “I love what I do,” Spiguel said. “I think medicine in general is a lifelong dedication, and to be excellent at what you do, you have to dedicate time and commitment.” Growing up, Spiguel knew she wanted to be a doctor. Born in Marlton, New Jersey, she was an athlete in high school, competed in field hockey, basketball and lacrosse, but she wanted to stay focused on medicine in college. She attended the University of Michigan where she met her husband, of 17 years, Andre. After earning their undergraduate degrees, they both graduated medical school – he at the University of Chicago and she at Wayne State University. It was there in medical school that she realized surgery was her future. 68 |

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL PRIVETTE, FOOTSTONE PHOTOGRAPHY


As a female surgeon, Spiguel said that she thinks the field is not as male-dominated as it was before. “I think times have changed a lot in regards to the number of females in surgery.” she said. “I’ve never felt at a different level than a male colleague of mine.”

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SURGEON >> DR. LISA SPIGUEL

“When I sat down and looked at who I was as a person, what I wanted out of my career in the future and how I could best impact lives and be fulfilled with that, breast surgery was the right choice for me.” “When I started medical school I thought to myself, ‘The only field that I won’t do is surgery,’ because of what I thought the lifestyle, the demand on [my] life would be,” Spiguel said. “When I did my surgery rotation, I just fell in love with it. It really chose me in some regards because of who I am as an individual.” From there, Spiguel completed her residency at the University of Chicago where she was administrative Chief Resident and awarded for her academic achievement. When it came to deciding a specialty, she was influenced by the women in her life, including 70 |

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her grandmother who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and her mother who had breast surgery. “[My mother] had always kind of mentioned to me, what about breast surgery?” Spiguel said. “It was always in the back of my mind, could breast surgery be for me?” “When I sat down and looked at who I was as a person, what I wanted out of my career in the future and how I could best impact lives and be fulfilled with that, breast surgery was the right choice for me,” Spiguel said. PHOTOGRAPHY: SAVANNAH AUSTIN


PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE JONES, UF HEALTH CREATIVE SERVICES

MARCH/APRIL 2018

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SURGEON >> DR. LISA SPIGUEL

Now, her family has been in Gainesville since 2012. Her husband also works for UF Health as an orthopaedic surgeon in the Oncology and Trauma divisions. The two are parents to 9-yearold Cristian, 5-year-old Alex and 2-year-old Livia. “We have a lot of family support that makes it doable, but I think in general, having a significant other that is in the same profession makes it doable,” Spiguel said. “It makes it harder in regard to time commitment, but it makes it easier in regards to understanding, like when we’re in the OR later than expected. We know why – we’ve been there.” During the weekdays, they care for their patients, but the weekends are strictly for family, starting with dinner at Spiguel’s mother-in-law’s house every Friday night joined by her sister-in-law and her kids. Saturday mornings are devoted to Both Spiguel and her husband are surgeons with UF Health. the kids’ sports and maintaining “My husband was very the household. supportive,” Spiguel said. “I do the best I can to show my “We’ve been married going on children that I don’t do work out17 years. We were both medical side of the hospital,” Spiguel said. students together and we talked a lot about it and the time “So if it’s waking up at 5 [a.m.] on [commitment], and he said, Saturday and Sunday before they ‘you need to do this.’” are up or staying up late to do work after they go to bed, I do my best to do that.” Her children have a relative idea that she is a doctor, Spiguel footsteps, her advice is to them is to be passionate about what they do and to love it, just like she does. said, but they probably don’t know all of the different roles she “I just tell them that I wouldn’t want any other job. But then, plays throughout the week. I also tell them that you need to have a job like that. Whatever She sees establishing relationships with patients as a clinician you do as a woman, you need to have a job where you want to and working with a team of brilliant minds as one of the most be there,” Spiguel said. rewarding parts of her job. “You just need to make sure you’ve got the support, and it “My role as a breast surgeon is to advance the care that our works. But surgery is not easy – I don’t want to sugarcoat it,” breast cancer patients receive in the community. By doing that, she said. “But if you have that endurance, you have that determy goal is to make UF a leader in the field,” Spiguel said. mination, you have that drive, then don’t not do it. Because it’s In addition to caring for her patients, she teaches students, doable.” interns and residents and mentors young surgeons. As Spiguel continues to care for patients, teach future surSince she joined UF Health, four of her residents have decided to go into breast cancer surgery and have accepted fellowships geons and raise her children, her mission is to make UF Health a center of excellence for breast care and advance the care that across the country. “From a mentoring standpoint, that’s very rewarding,” Spiguel her patients receive. “I feel very blessed that I chose this profession,” Spiguel said. “It’s really rewarding to see residents get passionate about said. “Because almost every day of my career, I think, ‘Wow – I it and for me to be able to support their career.” did such an awesome thing today.’” As far as the young female surgeons that will follow in her

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BOOK REVIEW

TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER’S

Reading Corner THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID: WHAT MEN NEED TO KNOW (AND WOMEN NEED TO TELL THEM) ABOUT WORKING TOGETHER written by Joanne Lipman C.2018, WM. MORROW, $28.99 / $35.99 CANADA, 297 PAGES TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER HAS BEEN READING SINCE SHE WAS 3 YEARS OLD AND SHE NEVER GOES ANYWHERE WITHOUT A BOOK. SHE LIVES WITH HER TWO DOGS AND 11,000 BOOKS. HER BOOK REVIEWS ARE PUBLISHED IN MORE THAN 200 NEWSPAPERS AND 50 MAGAZINES THROUGHOUT THE U.S. AND CANADA. bookwormsez@yahoo.com

THE MEETING WENT WELL.

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verybody was there on time, discussions were lively, ideas presented, and you wrapped up with a good feeling. It was a productive meeting and it went well – or, as you’ll see in “That’s What She Said” by Joanne Lipman, it went well for some of your team. News Flash: “Men Aren’t the Enemy.” That’s the first thing Joanne Lipman wants you to know. Issues with the gender gap – whether in work or wages - are not men’s “fault.” It’s just that women have discussed those issues amongst themselves for generations, but “What we don’t do is talk to men about it.” It’s time, she suggests, to fix that. Men, Lipman says, would generally love to see more equality in the workplace, but they don’t know how to achieve it. They walk on eggshells, avoid giving feedback, feel “terrified that they’ll screw up,” and become paralyzed by tears. Women, on the other hand, spend their “whole careers trying to fit in with men.” It shows in their appearances, mode of dress, speech patterns, work scheduling, and in reluctance to speak up for themselves or to participate fully in meetings. The problem, says Lipman, began in the sandbox: boys play competitively, while girls play collaboratively. On the playground, “little boys don’t listen to girls” or they talk over them, which can carry into the workplace decades later. So men do that – and don’t even realize they’re doing it.

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And then there’s this thing called “unconscious bias,” which begins in childhood, is felt by nearly everyone, and can’t be changed – although we can change how we act. We can also forget “diversity training” because it doesn’t work (at best) and backfires (at worst). We can interview, hire, and train with neutral décor, remove the word “bossy” from the lexicon, and hire “invisible women.” We can learn to complement one another’s skills. And because studies show that mixed-sex teams are more productive, we can be mindful that “the best thing you can do is hire women.” In an atmosphere where #metoo is a thing and EOE seems like a call of urgency, “That’s What She Said” might be the timeliest book you read. It might also be the most important one. But first, go back and read the “news flash,” above. Author Joanne Lipman absolutely is not laying blame anywhere in this book; if nothing, any blame can go on the brains of all employees, collectively. Indeed, Lipman shows how biology and neurology sets us on the path to both irritation and understanding, which explains how we got where we are and why, no finger-pointing. That, the studies and stats she includes, her own experiences in male-dominated workplaces, and plenty of examples serve to highlight the solutions she offers and the future she envisions. This is a book for every employee and the managers who oversee them. It’s something to read, from CEO down; it’s useful, and it has a happy ending. “That’s What She Said” will help in every work-gender situation you may meet.


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INSPIRATION >> OUR TOWNIES

MY PEEPS

Jim Underwood

EVERYONE’S GOT A STORY TO TELL

Our Townies STORY A N D PHOTOGR A PH Y BY STEPH STR ICK L A N D

Who is your greatest female inspiration? Jim Underwood is enjoying the relaxation that retirement brings. After working many years with the Department of Defense as a Contract Administrator in Fort Worth Texas, Jim decided that working to build planes such as F-16s and F-22s would become a thing of the past. During his time as a contract administrator, Jim worked alongside many knowledgeable and hardworking women in the field, who he said were just as capable as anyone else. Now, Jim lives in Alachua with his wife Janet, who he said is his biggest inspiration in life. Two years ago, Jim lost his previous wife, but with a smile he pointed to Janet and said, “she got me through.” For this reason, Janet is Jim’s biggest inspiration, and she 74 |

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continues to inspire him every day. Kate Pitcher is working to help others in their lives, through her roles as a wife and a student at Santa Fe studying Nursing. Kate said she enjoys both aspects of her life. She said, “I enjoy being a wife…[and] I want to help people.” She aspires to be most like her mom who owns her own boutique store. Kate described her mother as “independent and successful,” and she hopes that someday others will describe her by similar characteristics. Karen Dodge and her granddaughter Carly Gilliam found themselves in Alachua to have a meal and spend some quality time together. Carly said her grandmother is her greatest female inspiration because she “does anything for us and is so caring.” Carly’s grandmother, Karen Dodge, was also inspired by her grandmother who was an “honest and kind person.” Karen worked for many years as a technical director in


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INSPIRATION >> OUR TOWNIES

Kate Pitcher

Radiology, and she hoped that throughout her years in the industry she was able to inspire other women. “I still encourage everyone to pursue their interests,” Karen said. Carly assured that her grandmother was her inspiration, as Carly herself strives to work in a similarly competitive field. As a ninth-grader, Carly already has her sights set on becoming an aerospace engineer. She said she is prepared for the difficultly that this degree and career may bring. Sometimes Carly is intimidated by the high-pressure field she is seeking to enter, but she feels confident in her ability to achieve her goals. Karen works to remind her granddaughter, and many others, not to be intimidated by the industry they are seeking to work in, regardless of gender. Our Townies is a recurring article that poses a question to people at random who happen to be strolling the streets of our town. 76 |

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Carly Gilliam

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PHOTO ESSAY >> SAMANTHA FAIRFIELD WALSH

HIGH DEFINITION

Womanish P H O T O E S S AY B Y S A M A N T H A F A I R F I E L D WA L S H

The Womanish Project began as an attempt to reclaim the word woman. To redefine it. To see more stories, visit: thewomanishproject.com

ABOUT THE ARTIST UF ALUM SAMANTHA FAIRFIELD WALSH IS A NYC BASED ACTOR, WRITER, PHOTOGRAPHER AND PAINTER. THROUGH HER ART SHE HOPES TO DOCUMENT THE WORLD AROUND HER AND COMMUNICATE IT TO PEOPLE FROM DIFFERENT WALKS OF LIFE IN ORDER TO FOSTER AN OPEN DIALOGUE. VIEW ALL OF SAMANTHA’S PROJECTS AT: SAMANTHAFWALSH.COM

“Growing out my body hair — it’s a way to take my body back. The number one industry out there is based on women hating themselves. Honestly, if every woman woke up tomorrow and decided they were going to be okay with themselves America would be in the tank.” — ALESANDRA, 30

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“During puberty I didn’t really develop breasts. I’ve never been cat called. Growing up, I was pretty enough but there was never a sense of being a sexual object. I struggle with androgyny and feeling androgynous inside. Feeling the pressure to not be like a boy. To not be manlike. In the sense of being both mother and father to my son. Son and daughter to my Father. Just being female. Just being a woman. That would be really nice.” — JULIE, 38

“People who stare are not children. It’s the adults that stare. When I first started working out, a guy said to me – ‘you’ll be back to normal in no time.’ In my head, I was just like – no, no I really won’t. People just assume you cannot be born this way. They think you must have gotten into a car accident or something. I just want to tell them, ‘I’m not gonna get better. I don’t need to get better. I’m good.’” — STEPHANIE, 30

“I didn’t realize how much we didn’t have as a gay couple until we moved to NYC and realized how much we do have. As far as rights and support and non homophobic attitudes. I don’t know if I could ever go back to that. I don’t know if I could ever go back to a place where I have to curb holding my wife’s hand to walk down the street.” — NATASHA, 37

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PHOTO ESSAY >> SAMANTHA FAIRFIELD WALSH

“No one is here without a woman. No one. Period. You didn’t come into this plane of existence without coming through a woman. I think that that’s extremely, extremely powerful. I think, that in general, we’ve been taught not to think that way. I think that we’ve been taught to deny that because our society is so patriarchal.” — LYNNETTE, 33

“You’re always questioning yourself as an artist. Or at least, I always am. There’s a little part of me that’s always making sure that I’m believable. Because I have these other jobs. Or because in most other jobs it’s not a question of when. Or having people ask you, ‘so how long are you going to try this out for? When are you going to stop and get a day job? When is the end for you?’ I realized there is no end. I am this person and I will always be this person until the day I die. I am and will be an artist for my whole life span. There’s no retirement. There’s no end point. It just is.” — ALISHA

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“When my Dad moved here from the USSR, he had a hard time learning English, assimilating into the system — he had to find ways of still being himself but in a new country. I have these faint memories of when I was a kid and the Metro fare was still those weird coins with like a square in the middle, of my Mom and my Dad switching me off on the train platform and me going to the bakery my DadËworked at and going upstairs and eating a plate of french fries while he was downstairs making bagels. That was the closest he got to becoming Americanized. Even in the long run he didn’t really learn English.” — JULIE, 25


“You think of all the real housewives shows and then you think of the little women Lifetime shows. Whatever they’re doing on that show –all the drama– that’s how people perceive us as a population. Real Housewives — people can just call that trashy TV and just leave it at the door. Anything you put out there that is a perception of our community affects how we’re treated because most people have never seen one of us or sat down and had a conversation.” — BECKY, 33

“I think when I really feel I’m a woman. Like wholeheartedly this is me being a woman is when I’m dancing. When I’m dancing, whether it’s at a club or at a workshop or if it’s choreographed or freestyle, I’m so in touch with my body and with emoting. I feel so powerful and so emotional and so full of womanly pride. Every time I dance. Every time.” — Madison, 23

“College was an introduction to colorism for me. I had someone call me, ‘yellow bitch.’ That’s a thing. Being yellow – that’s what I am. That’s a derogatory term for being light skinned. You can’t take my blackness away from me. It’s something I’ve worked with and struggled with and found a way to be proud of not embarrassed of. You don’t get to take that away from me. This is mine. I’m going to have it empower me and not limit me.” — SARIN, 22

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“In high school I felt like I needed to prove myself. Like, I am in a wheelchair but I can be as normal as anyone else. But I took it to another level. I’d just start dating and seeing and being sexually active with all of these guys just to prove to myself that I could. I wasn’t really self conscious of my body. I was more afraid that I’d be this virgin in a wheelchair and no one would ever want to date me. That was what I was afraid of.” — Bethie, 26

“Last June I was raped by a police officer while I was living in Long Beach. I had a tough experience deciding whether or not I wanted to report. Especially a member of the police force. The thought of bringing a man who is supposed to uphold the justice system back into the system that he is supposed to uphold didn’t make any sense to me.” — JORDAN, 25

“People expect women to look a certain way and I think it’s incredibly unfair. The fashion industry, their notions of how we should look is incredibly unrealistic because everything is photoshopped. One of the only professions where women make significantly more than men is modeling. That says something about our society. One of the few professions that a woman can work in and make more than a man is based solely on her appearance.” — LILY, 31

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PHOTO ESSAY >> SAMANTHA FAIRFIELD WALSH “I was twenty five when I came out. Very late. The first time that I started having feelings for a girl was when I was twenty four. It was with a best friend and I started questioning it because all of my life, I had been void of any emotional intimacy. All of a sudden, I had this amazing relationship where we shared everything with each other, it was safe, there was no judgement between the two of us, no hierarchy. It was just this beautiful equal relationship. Up until then, I had always had these straight relationships where the male is dominant and the female is submissive. It started to shift how I saw myself. I started questioning my sexuality.” — KRISTEN, 29

“It’s this fear of difference that’s all around us and for people with disabilities, unfortunately, people just don’t know how to act. So many times I find myself having to desensitize that. Sometimes I wish I could have a camera on my shoulder and show the world what my life is like. A great example is going to the supermarket. I’ll be walking around, just trying to grocery shop, and a little kid will tug his Mom’s jacket and go, ‘Look, Mommy. Look, look, look at the short…’ and sometimes there’s name calling. Just so you know, midget is a no no word. Sometimes I’ll get a parent that is willing to have that moment to teach their child and be like, ‘You don’t point. You don’t stare. She’s just grocery shopping like you or me.’ Sometimes you have the parent that’s like, ‘Shhhh. Shhh. Stop. That’s rude.’ I encourage the parent to talk about it. To not make it a scary thing. Because if that’s the first time that child sees someone of any difference and the way their parent reacts is to shut it down and make it quiet and pretend like it doesn’t exist, that’s how that person is going to deal with those kinds of people for the rest of their life.” — SOFIYA CHEYENNE, 25

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COLUMN

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MOTHER HEN IS PROUD TO BE A “BABY BOOMER” RAISED ON A FARM POPULATED BY DOGS, CATS, CHICKENS, DUCKS, GEESE, HORSES AND COWS. THE WISDOM SHE GAINED WHILE GROWING UP IN THE COUNTRY CAN’T BE FOUND IN BOOKS. YOU CAN CONTACT MOTHER HEN AT motherhenfarmtales@gmail.com.

I COME FROM A LINE OF STRONG WOMEN.

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n my mother’s side, her grandmother came as a young girl from Germany to start a new life in America. She settled in the Midwest. In that community she met and married her husband, who was also a first-generation immigrant from Germany. I wish I knew more stories of their life. Sadly, those stories didn’t pass down, but I do have stories from my mother about what a loving, kind and strong woman she was. They were farmers in the 1800s in the harsh climate of Illinois. That says it all. My mother and her older sister were strong women too. When illness took their mother (my grandmother) away from their home, they had to grow up fast to take on the duties of the household. In their early teens, they divided up the chores. My aunt assumed the duties of cooking and cleaning in the home. My mother, being the physically stronger of the two, took charge of the outdoors. She made sure the animals were fed and watered, planted the garden and tended the vegetables as they grew. She harvested the food, which was canned for the winter months, in addition to helping her father whenever possible with his farming. Having tackled such a huge life-changing situation while still children, and surviving because they pulled together, their sister-bond remained strong throughout their lives. They actually spent their adult lives living less than a mile apart, having both married farmers in the community. My aunt had a large family of seven children—five of which were girls. I was an only child; however living so close to my cousins, I was often a part of their family activities. Through the years I saw my female

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cousins grow and take on the vast household duties necessary for a family this size, while the two boys helped their father with the farming and dairy cows. My eldest cousin helped with the babies as they arrived, while the next eldest seemed to be endlessly washing dishes and helping her mother with the meals. The younger girls grew into those positions as their older sisters married and moved to homes of their own. I grew up with my strong mother for a role model. Since I had no siblings, my mother and I were constant companions. I watched her strength on a daily basis, and saw her tackle “the impossible” in a multitude of ways. She used to say, “Your father will do anything I ask of him, if he can do it while sitting on a tractor.” So that would leave just about everything else up to her. As I said, she was physically strong, and she loved the outdoors. It was nothing unusual to see her with a shovel or sledge hammer in her hands, mending a fence or planting trees, flowerbeds and her garden. She also wallpapered the house, painted woodwork and trim, sewed my clothes and baked amazing pies. Oh, and the meals she prepared were better than a 5-star restaurant! I like to flatter myself and say that I am a strong woman too. In the early 1970s I braved the unknown and moved with my newlywed husband from my roots in that small Midwest community. Like my pioneer great-grandmother, I picked up everything and moved to an unknown land of opportunity. My husband and I made a life for ourselves and raised three daughters of our own. My “chicks” are all strong women as well, having worked hard, gotten degrees and made successful careers for themselves — in male dominated professions, overcoming many obstacles along the way. Not surprising, though. It’s in their genes.


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VETERAN SUPPORT >> ALICIA ANTONE

OUTREACH

Veteran Support Alicia Antone’s Healing Heart S T O R Y A N D P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S AVA N N A H A U S T I N

O

n a cool Thursday morning in the meeting space of the High Springs Public Library, a group of veterans and their family members are gathered, and Alicia Antone is proudly beaming as she holds up a red, white and blue beaded mobile. It is a gift made for her by 68-year-old Army veteran Delbert Mullins. “She’s so nice. She’s been so sweet to me,” Mullins said. “I just wanted to do something for her – return the favor.” He had met Antone, the library branch manager, a few months prior through a monthly Help Vets Heal Craft Program event organized by Antone and the library. Mullins and his wife, Karen, had only been to the event once, yet six months later when Antone later saw him in a Publix parking lot, she recognized the veteran and called him by name. She encouraged him to come back to the next Thursday morning craft event. “We had only been to one event, so it surprised me that she remembered his name,” Karen, 58, said. “She’s a real asset to this community.” Antone, a 57-year-old Rhode Island native, has been working at the library since December of 2016. She was instrumental in bringing Help Heal Veterans, a national organization that provides free therapeutic craft kits to veterans that are homebound or in the hospital, to High Springs. In October of 2017, she was awarded the annual Carol Combs Hole award for “Exceptional Outreach to the Community” for her efforts with

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Bill Lee, a Vietnam veteran, hugs Antone at the end of the January meeting. He has been attending the events ever since it was initiated by the library and brings his Yorkshire Terrier, Max, with him.

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Army veteran Delbert Mullins and his wife Karen are Fort White residents that have been attending the HSPL events every month for about six months now.

the program. The award-winning woman’s story as a librarian started after failing veterinary school. She explained that the surgical aspect of the job felt too much like she was hurting the animals. Her next option was teaching, but Linda, her sister, already was one, and Antone wanted to do something different. Then Linda suggested, “Why

four older sisters and two older brothers. At the age of five, her mother was killed in a car accident by a drunk driver the week before Christmas, leaving the children without any parents. With the help of their pastor, her oldest sister Ruth became the legal guardian of all of the siblings at the age of 19. The seven children grew up in East Providence, Rhode Island, and one morning, Antone swore the

“She is very supportive of the veterans and she really understands where we’re coming from and where we’ve been. She set this up so that we would have something we can take home and during our bad times.” don’t you be a librarian?” “I’m still teaching, but in a different way,” Antone said. “I’m still helping the community, so for me, that was the perfect match.” An avid reader since the age of two, Antone said she remembers standing up and reading books aloud while her mother, an educator, cooked and cleaned their home. Antone was the youngest in her family, with 88 |

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Jackson Five were moving in three houses down from her. However, it ended up just being her future husband, Robby, and his family settling in. “Oh my God, I thought he was so cute. He was just drop dead cute,” Antone said. Robby, a National Guard veteran of 10 years, will be retiring in September from the Florida Department of Transportation. The 67-year-old said he knew his wife for many years as a neighbor


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and eventually took her on a dinner date to a restaurant in East Providence. Twenty-seven years of marriage later, Robby said she is still his best friend. The two have had parallel lives, Antone said, as they both were raised by siblings. Their mothers are even coincidentally buried right down the street from each other. “We always say we have a match made in heaven because I’m sure they were up there saying, ‘My son needs a good wife – my daughter needs a good husband.’ We like to think that,” Antone said. Antone is a mom to Lily and Rose, two Rottweilers, and a cat named Dewey (after the decimal system used in libraries). “I love being a pet mom since I never had any kids of my own,” Antone said. Antone was never able to conceive children, but she has come to accept that. “I just felt that it wasn’t God’s plan for me or for us, but we’re able to mentor kids in a different way. For me, through my work, I’m able to do that,” she said. Interacting with people and children is her favorite part of being a librarian. It’s important to her to make sure that they have a good experience in the library. “They are future constituents first of all, so we want to make sure that they know that the library is here for them,” she said. In the same way that Antone cares about the children in the community, she remains passionate about helping veterans in the area, as she had spent time studying at a naval war college back home and both of her brothers and Robby served in the military. The program she helped establish was the result of a patron’s suggestion and the library staff’s desire to serve veterans in the community. Every month at the Thursday event, there are 15 to 20 men and women that come to make crafts and visit with each other at 10:30 a.m. Alicia’s goal for it is to help raise awareness of the impact of veterans and to give the members of the community a place to bond. “They really look forward to the activities,” Antone said. “This morning – We get here at 8:30 [a.m.] – and I [looked] out and I [saw] three of them already there in the parking lot and it wasn’t even 9 o’clock yet. So I think this camaraderie and almost family that they have built is very powerful.” Mullins feels the same. “I love the program,” he said. “I can’t wait to get here.” Bill Lee, a library regular and a former Vietnam medic, said he still smells the gun powder and the swamp in his nightmares, but the crafts help. “It keeps me from doing this,” he said, holding up his hand and shaking it. He wears a Purple Heart Combat Wounded hat that hides his shaggy white and gray bangs. Before he leaves, he hugs and teases Antone, sending her into a fit of laughter. “She is very supportive of the veterans and she really understands where we’re coming from and where we’ve been. She set this up so that we would have something we can take home and during our bad times,” Lee said. “I think she’s great. She’s outstanding.”

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Top: Antone interacts with veterans at the January Help Vets Heal event. Above: Antone won the Carol Combs Hole Award in October 2017 for her service to the community for the Help Vets Heal craft program at the library. Below: Bill Lee browses the various crafts available for the veterans, including a kit to make moccasins.


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SISTER , SISTER EXCHANGE STUDENTS >> SPAIN & BELGIUM

Mar Ma Mar Marion a ion ionna Crue ueells lllls (l (left leeft eft) aand nd d Lucile Luc i e Ku ile K nic icca are r ex experi exp eriienc eri er e ing ng educa edu catiion cat io on, b bask aask skketb ketb etb baal ball alllll an and ssiisster sis erhoo er hhoo oo od whil hile hi ille d doin oing a o oing oin foreig for orreig o eig gn eexch xchan xch xchang aang nng ge prrog ro og o gram raam inn tthe thhhee U.S S..

SPAIN MEETS BELGIUM IN NEWBERRY

Sisterhood Exchange STORY A N D PHOTOGR A PH Y BY STEPH A NIE R ICH A R DS

When you first meet Belgium and Spain, as they are affectionately called on the basketball court, it seems they have known each other for years. They laugh, finish each other’s sentences and interact in such a way that their friendship seems to carry deep roots of a longtime relationship. It was just seven months ago that Lucile Kunica, who is from Lie’ge, Belgium, met Mariona Cruells, who is from Barcelona, Spain. The two, 16-year-old students are participating in a year-long exchange program as juniors at Newberry High School. Both are the youngest of three siblings and had only brief interaction on social media before they first met here in August. A bond quickly developed between the two as they share a room at their host home, attend high school classes and play basketball together. 94 |

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Cruells, who has two brothers who completed exchange programs in Germany, is here through the International Student Exchange Program. “My friend had a good experience with a program in the U.S., so I decided to try it,” she said. “The only thing I really knew was what I studied about the American Revolution in school. When I arrived, the first difference I saw was that there are churches everywhere. In addition, when you want to go somewhere [stores, movies, etc.], you have to travel. In Spain, I live in the city and everything is right there.” Both of Kunica’s siblings also did exchange programs in Africa, but she decided to come to the U.S. through the World Education Program. “My mom said I could go to Africa like my


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EXCHANGE STUDENTS >> SPAIN & BELGIUM

Exchange students Lucile Kunica (left) of Belgium and Mariona Cruells of Spain are spending a year studying in America. They have both developed Panther Pride as students at Newberry High School.

“We are always together at school and playing on the high school basketball team. It is not like other friendships. From the first day, we were already laughing together.” brothers or come here. I wanted to be here… especially because of basketball,” she said. “I watched American movies, but it is not the same as living here. Everyone is so friendly at school. Religion is also very important here; in Belgium you don’t go to church every week.” Initially, the girls had two of the same classes but through a schedule change, they now spend almost their entire school day together. Cruells played high school volleyball in the fall, but once basketball season came they were inseparable. “We are always together at school and playing on the high school basketball team. It is not like other friendships. From the first day, we were already laughing together,” Kunica said. “At Christmas you are used to being with family, so we experienced the same thing… wishing we could 96 |

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be with family. You need to know that things can happen; my grandmother passed away and I couldn’t be there for all the stuff. It is very different, but if you are open-minded and want to learn, I think it can be the best experience of your life.” Even though they have been playing basketball for eight years, both girls say it has been a learning curve here. “We practice every day and sometimes have had three games a week. In Spain, we only practice three days a week and play games on Saturday,” Cruells said, who is considering doing an exchange program again next year. “We also play 10 minute quarters and some rules are different – there is no one-on-one.” Being a part of a team at the high school is unusual too, Kunica said. “In Europe, sports are in a club outside of school and you play the same sport all year. You don’t have different seasons,” she said. Both girls had taken English prior to coming, but agree that learning and speaking in a class and actually using it are two different things. Cruells is fluent in Spanish and Kunica speaks French. “Sometimes we don’t know how to say things in English,” Cruells said. “One day Lucile said something in French with an English accent. Sometimes, I say a word in Spanish that is similar in French and we understand each other, but no one else does. We always just laugh.” Although schoolwork has not been as challenging, Kunica said it has been exhausting at times interpreting English. “The teachers talk too fast and you try to listen all day, and then we have basketball practice,” she said. “We go home, eat, and sometimes go right to bed.” The experience has taught them a lot about being independent. “If you want something, you usually just call or ask your family. Here, you have to do it and ask for everything,” said Cruells, who wants to study business. “I was very shy when I came, but not so much anymore.” The two have enjoyed tasting different foods and some fun activities, attending University of Florida men’s and women’s basketball and football games and going to Universal Studios. Before they leave in June, they want to experience Disney World and the beach, which got postponed due to Hurricane Irma.

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This is the 15th year that their host mom, Karen Megason of Archer, has opened up her home to exchange students. Currently working with the Aspect Foundation, she has previously hosted two students at the same time. “I know some of my other exchange students have formed relationships that endure after going back to their home countries,” she said. “The girls get along pretty well and do a lot of laughing.” The girls say the experience has been challenging but rewarding. “It has been a lot of change for only one year, but a good one. We are both more independent, we continue to learn from each other, and now we can say we have friends from all over the world,” said Kunica, who wants to be a teacher or go into the Army. “We have already talked about her visiting me in Belgium during the winter. I like to snowboard and she likes to ski, but they don’t have snow in Spain. I also want to visit her in Spain and go surfing as we both like that too.” Cruells said their relationship has made a difference. “Change can be so huge, you have to consider what is more comfortable,” she said. “I was open to having someone to experience this with and now I have a friend in Lucile.”

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FOR RATES AND INFORMATION.

Dave’s New York Deli Two Locations - Open 7 Days Tioga Town Center 12921 SW 1st Road, Newberry, FL Haile Plantation Area – 5750 SW 75th Court, Gainesville, FL

352-333-0291 Tioga 352-363-6061 Pk LnDavesNYDeli.com North East Flavors — Dave’s NY Deli has been delivering the flavors of New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia to the Gainesville area since 2009. Owner Dave Anders says “We are very excited about the addition of our new location in Park Lane Plaza near Haile Plantation. Now it’s even easier for you to enjoy our authentic Philly Cheesesteaks, NY Style Pastrami and Corned Beef, Nathan’s Hot Dogs, NY Kettle Boiled Bagels, Nova Salmon, Paninis, Wraps, Cubans, Hot & Cold Subs, Kids Menu and much more.” Come see us soon for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner at either of our two locations. Open 7 Days a week.

Copper Monkey West 14209 W Newberry Road, Jonesville, FL 32669 Across from the Steeplechase Publix Sunday-Thursday 11:00am - 11:00pm Friday-Saturday 11:00am - 12:00am

352-363-6338mycoppermonkey.com Restaurant & Pub — Now serving Breakfast on Saturdays & Sundays 8:30am - 10:45am. We are located in the heart of Jonesville, this All-American dining is convenient to all neighborhoods in Gainesville, Alachua, Newberry, High Springs and beyond. Our family-friendly dining features great food at a great price. Whether you come in for the “best burger in town” or try any one of our freshly made salads, pastas or sandwiches, you will not leave disappointed. Our USDA choice steaks, served with 2 sides, offer a great alternative for the perfect celebratory meal. We also feature a full-service bar with signature drinks and many options for your viewing pleasure. Great food, great price, we’ll see you soon.

Piesanos Stone Fired Pizza (Archer Road) 5757 SW 75th St. — 352-371-8646 • (Millhopper Road) 5200 NW 43rd St. — 352-371-7437 (University) 1250 W University Ave. — 352-375-2337 • (Grand Oaks Plaza) 2575 SW 42nd St. Ocala — 352-351-6000

Mon-Thurs: 11am-10pm Fri-Sat: 11am-11pm Sun: 11am-10pm

www.piesanostogo.com Pizza, Pints & Pies — Piesanos is a locally owed and operated restaurant that is proud to use only the finest ingredients available, including Grande brand premium mozzarella. We are a full service dine in restaurant with an attached take out center and also offer catering. Our dough is made fresh daily and all of our pizzas are baked directly on the stone in our unique Granite Stone Fired Pizza Oven. We offer a great variety of Specialty pizzas, such as our Pizza Antico-(ultra thin crust- Fresh Mozzarella, mini cup & char pepperoni & fresh basil) Specialty Pastas, Calzones, Fresh soups and salads, classic italian entrees, and a great selection of craft beer. We also offer a gluten free menu. For full menu please visit PIESANOSTOGO.COM.

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Mi Apá Latin Café Gainesville – 114 SW 34th Street (352-376-7020) Alachua – 15634 US Highway 441 (386-418-0838) Both locations open every day 7:00am - 10:00pm

MiApaLatinCafe.com Cuban — Everyone knows Mi Apá has an amazing lunch and dinner menu, but we also have Gainesville’s best cup of coffee and a delicious, authentic selection of Cuban breakfast items. Enjoy a Cuban egg sandwich, Arroz a la Cubana, a stuffed arepa, and much more at either of our two locations in Gainesville and Alachua. Mi Apá Latin Café serves traditional Cuban breakfast prepared using only the freshest, most authentic ingredients. Have a seat in our casual dining area and enjoy the morning newspaper or order carryout on your way to work. Our Gainesville location even has a convenient drive-thru window. The best Cuban food north of Miami is always just minutes away!

World of Beer 140 SW 128th Street Tioga Town Center, Jonesville 32669 Open at 11am Everyday

352-727-4714worldofbeer.com TAVERN FARE — At World of Beer, we have 40 craft beers on tap, over 500 in the cooler and now we have added a tasty tavern fare that’s crafted to go perfectly with any beer. Our menu offers a wide variety of choices including a giant pretzel with beer cheese dip, artisan sausage boards, flat breads, innovative sandwiches and burgers, soups, salads and so much more! Visit our web site for a full menu and event schedule. Whether you’re a beer master or just beer curious, our insanely knowledgeable staff is here to guide you through every last pint, pour, and pairing. So c’mon. Let’s go. Because there’s no better place to go around the world, one sip at a time.

Adam’s Rib Co. 2109 NW 13th Street, Gainesville, Florida 32609 1515 SW 13th Street Gainesville, Florida 32608 Monday-Saturday 7:00am – 9:00pm Closed Sunday

352-373-8882 NW 352-727-4005 SWAdamsRibCo.com BBQ — Celebrating our 10 year Anniversary. Looking for the best BBQ in Gainesville? Then look no further than Adam’s Rib Co. Adam’s is North Florida’s Premier Barbecue restaurant, serving North Florida’s finest bbq spare ribs, pulled pork, beef brisket, slow smoked chicken and turkey. Choose from over 20 sauces – from honey sweet to habanero hot – and everything in between. Don’t forget dessert, like our scrumptious banana pudding and famous peach cobbler. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, Adam’s can cater any event locally. Give Adam a call for your next tailgate party 352-514-8692!

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Gator’s Dockside 3842 W Newberry Rd #1A, Gainesville, FL 32607 Mon - Sun 11am - Midnight

352-338-4445gatorsdockside.com family-friendly — Gator’s Dockside is a family-friendly, sports-themed restaurant that offers a fun atmosphere for everyone! We’re known for our big screen TVs, great food, and friendly service. Our signature wings are flavored with our tasty wing sauces that have made us famous, especially our award-winning Scooter sauce. We only use the freshest, highest quality ingredients in all our menu selections, including burgers, hearty sandwiches, made-from-scratch ribs, entree salads, and desserts. We also have some of the best meal deals in town, like all-you-can-eat wings on Mondays and Wednesdays, and 2-for-1 on select drafts, house wine, and liquors all day, everyday. We can’t wait to see you at Gator’s!

I Love NY Pizza 2645 SW 91st St, Haile Plantation (Market square) Gainesville Monday-Saturday 10:00am – 10:00pm Closed on Sundays

352-333-6185www.ilnyp.com Pizzeria — We are a family owned, family friendly restaurant that serves authentic New York style pizza and delicious Italian entrees. We offer dine, take out, delivery and catering. We make everything fresh and with high quality ingredients from our dough, to our sauce, to each of our dishes — including classics such as Baked Ziti, Chicken or Veal Parmigiana, Chicken Marsala or Alfredo, and many more. If you are in the mood for pizza, you can “take and bake” at home or let us prepare you one of our specialty Brick oven pizzas. So many choices of specialty pizzas, try them all! Pizza by the slice is available for lunch or dinner! Let’s not forget about the Stromboli, Calzones, Salads, Desserts and yes, we have a kids menu too! What ever you choose, we guarantee to bring you all the unique flavors of New York City. Visit our website for a full menu and coupons.

Mancinis’s Tuscan Grill 3501 SW 2nd Ave., Gainesville, FL 32607 Dinner Every Day from 4–10pm (11pm on Fri. & Sat.) NEW!! Weekday Lunch: 11:30–4pm • Weekend Brunch: Sat & Sun 12–4pm

352-505-3595www.mancinisgnv.com Classic steakhouse with Italian flair — Mancini’s is sure to become one of Gainesville’s premier restaurants and your new family tradition. With exquisite cuisine, exceptional service and an intimate atmosphere, Mancini’s Tuscan Grill caters to both the casual and sophisticated diner. Mancini’s features a unique selection of aged steaks, fresh fish and Italian specialties. A specialty cocktail list, several wine selections and a variety of specialty spirits display Mancini’s passion for the finer things in life. For your next event, we encourage you to give our catering a try. With perfection cooked into every bite, we are sure to give your guests the culinary experience that they will not soon forget. Private dining for small parties to corporate functions also available.

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Bev’s Burger Café 315 NE Santa Fe Blvd. • High Springs Monday - Saturday 7am-9pm

386-454-9434 Casual — If you’re looking for fresh, homemade food in High Springs, look no further than Bev’s Burger Cafe. Known for the best burgers in town and fast, friendly service you’re sure to leave satisfied. You may also want to try one of their BBQ dinner favorites such as sliced pork, smoked turkey, BBQ chicken, baby back ribs, and more. Stop on by with the kids on Monday nights for some magic & balloon animals with Magic Mike. Every Tuesday pork sandwiches are $3.00 all day. Also, on Wednesday nights starting at 5pm sodas and their famous tea are only $1.00, and bottled beer only $1.50. Don’t forget Bev’s is open for breakfast, also, served from 7am to 10:45am. Come check out our newly renovated kitchen & dining room, and our new menu items including fried chicken!

Bangkok Square 6500 SW Archer Rd, Gainesville Lunch: Monday-Friday 11:00am-3:00pm • Saturday-Sunday 12:00pm-3:00pm Dinner: Sunday-Thursday 5:00pm-9:30pm • Friday-Saturday 5:00pm-10:00pm

352-375-4488 www.bangkoksquarefl.com Authentic Thai Cuisine — Thai cuisine, blending the best elements of the freshest foods. Thai herbs; garlic, basil, ginger, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, galangal root, chili and more, prepared with the finest blending of fish sauce, shrimp paste, and coconut milk. All of our meals are made to order and prepared on site. We specialize in vegetarian, vegan and gluten free orders. All of our foods can be prepared to your satisfaction with mild, medium, hot, or Thai hot, balanced to the four tastes: sweet, sour, salty, and slightly bitter. Meals can be prepared for take out and we cater to any event. We also have gift cards available. Save 10% off your next dining experience when a gift card is purchased.

Brown’s Country Buffet 14423 NW US Hwy 441, Alachua, FL 32616 Monday-Friday 7:00am - 8:00pm Saturday 7:00am - 2:00pm Sunday 8:00am - 3:00pm

386-462-3000brownscountrybuffet.net Casual — Country-style cooking at its finest, just like Grandma’s house! A buffet style restaurant, Brown’s Country Buffet is open seven days a week! Foods like fried chicken, grilled pork chops, real mashed potatoes, steamed cabbage, banana pudding and coconut pie, just to name a few, are served in a laid-back, relaxing environment. We offer AYCE fried shrimp on Friday nights from 4-8 along with whole catfish & ribs. In addition to their buffet, Brown’s also offers a full menu to choose from. Serving lunch and dinner daily and a breakfast buffet Friday-Sunday until 10:30am, you’re sure to leave satisfied, no matter when you go. So, when you’re in the mood for some good home cooking, Grandma’s style, visit Brown’s Country Buffet.

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Pizza in the Hood 14212 NW 154th Avenue, Alachua, FL 32615 Tuesday – Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Friday & Saturday 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m.

386-518-5656 Italian — Pizza in the Hood is a new and unique restaurant and pub in the City of Alachua. We use the highest quality ingredients imported from around the country, and fresh produce sourced locally when in season. All meals are made fresh with original Italian recipes. In addition to 16 New York style specialty pizzas, there are a variety of appetizers, salads, hot subs, burgers, pasta dishes, vegetarian entrees, and dessert. Customers have praised the chicken wings, with over 20 varieties, as the best in town. Our pub has icy cold imported and domestic beers and beer on tap. There are daily happy hour specials from 5:00 – 7:30 p.m. We deliver all around northern Alachua County.

Flying Biscuit Café 4150 NW 16th Blvd., Gainesville, FL 32605 Located in the Fresh Market Center Monday-Friday 7:00am – 3:00pm • Saturday-Sunday 7:00am – 4:00pm

352-373-9500www.flyingbiscuit.com Breakfast — The Flying Biscuit is out to reinvent breakfast in Gainesville! Maybe you’ve tried their soon-to-be-famous creamy, dreamy grits or their “moon dusted” breakfast potatoes, but did you know you can have them at anytime? With a unique open menu, all the items that appear are available throughout the day. With a variety of healthy and hearty dishes, The Flying Biscuit caters to a variety of tastes. With options ranging from the Smoked Salmon Scramble, the Bacon Cheddar Chicken Sandwich or the Tofu and Tater Salad, there’s something for everyone. Call us up to an hour before your expected arrival time to add your name to our call ahead seating list.

Napolatanos 606 NW 75th Street Gainesville, FL Tuesday - Thursday & Sunday 4:00pm-10:00pm Friday 4:00pm-1:00am • Saturday 4:00pm-11:00pm

352-332-6671www.napolatanos.com ITALIAN — Napolatanos is the longest original owner operated restaurant in Gainesville. Nappys, the name the locals have given Napolatanos has the most extensive menu. Whether you choose pizza, calzones, salad, burgers, sandwiches, pasta, seafood, steak dinners or the best chicken wings in town, Nappy’s uses only the freshest ingredients. Visit on Tuesday for half price appetizers. Burgers & Brew Night on Wednesday and live music inside. Thursday is Pub night with Better than England’s Fish & Chips $7. Outside dining with live music, on the patio, on Sunday evenings. GRAB & GO family dinners feeds 4-6 adults, starting at $25.95. Choose from Ziti, Lasagna, Chicken Alfredo, Chicken Marsala and more!

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A FANTASY STORY LOV ROMANCE, OF LOVE, GREE ED AND POWER. GREED

APRIL AP PR 7 at 7:30pm C Curtis M. Phillips Center ffor the Performing Arts Based on Wagner’s Ring cycle PLUS three new works featuring UF Symphony Orchestra and faculty from UF School of Music. Live music paired with DANB’s amazing dancers is sure to bring this fantasy to life! SPONSORED BY ALLIANCE CREDIT UNION

A TASTE OF V VALHALLA Photograp Pho r hy by: Johnston Photo to ogra graphy phy

April Apr ril 7 at 6:00 PM in the Fackler Fo Foyer at the Phillips Center Gods and Viki Vikings couldn’t have dined better! Sweetwater Catering, feast and imbibe Catered by Swe eetw and then journey y to tthe fantasy world of ‘The RING’.

Tickets available at the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts Box Office: 352-392-ARTS and 800-905-ARTS and on-line at: www.performingarts.ufl.edu INFORMATION AT: DALIVE@BELLSOUTH.NET AND DANCEALIVE.ORG MARCH/APRIL 2018

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Florida Gator Football: Orange & Blue Game

Saturday, April 14 at 3pm

RIPCORD March 2 – March 25 The Hippodrome Theatre

GAINESVILLE - Florida Premiere! A hilariously high-stakes comedy set in the Bristol Place Assisted Living Facility. When cantankerous Abby meets her new, infuriatingly optimistic roommate Marilyn, she has no choice but to get rid of the woman by any means necessary. What starts as an innocent wager between the women quickly spirals out of control and threatens to expose these worthy opponents’ most hidden secrets. Ripcord is as heartfelt as it is deliciously inappropriate. thehipp.org

PLOWING UP THE PAST March 2 & 3 from 9am - 2pm Dudley Farm Historic State Park, 18730 W. Newberry Rd.

NEWBERRY - See farmers on their vintage machines plow a field where sugar cane and corn will soon be planted. This event honors the innovations in methods and equipment, showing the historical significance and importance of the tractor to agriculture. 352-472-1142

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RUN AMUCK WITH THE DUCK 5K Saturday, March 3 NFRMC, 6420 W Newberry Rd.

GAINESVILLE - Join survivor Caren Gorenberg and Crackers the Duck, MD for the 9th Annual Run Amuck with the Duck to raise much-needed funds for the patient services and clinical research projects of the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation. Choose to walk, jog or run as an individual or as part of a team. bit.ly/2018duck

RACE THE TORTOISE 5K RUN/WALK Saturday, March 3 O’Leno State Park

HIGH SPRINGS - The proceeds from the race will help provide for the creatures in the Park’s Nature Center and to help expand its exhibits. This family-friendly running and walking event that promotes a healthy lifestyle and the beauty of O’Leno State Park. Some participants will be racing for prize money and awards, some to achieve a personal best, and some to complete

their first running event. Whether you run fast, slow, or walk, come out and challenge yourself to Race the Tortoise. All levels of ability welcome. friendsofoleno.org

TOUR OF KITCHENS Saturday, March 3 Various Locations

GAINESVILLE - The Junior League of Gainesville’s largest fundraising event. It is a self-guided tour of beautiful kitchens and outdoor spaces of lovely homes throughout the area. It includes gourmet samplings from the area’s best restaurants and caterers. gainesvillejrleague.org

THE HIGHWAYMEN: FLORIDA’S AFRICANAMERICAN LANDSCAPE PAINTERS Saturday, March 3 from 4 – 5:30pm Matheson History Museum, 513 East University Avenue

GAINESVILLE - In the late 1950s in rural Florida, a group of young, self-taught African American artists began to paint optimistic and colorful


Florida landscapes. They periodically left their backyard studios and took to the highway to sell their works to white customers, earning the name The Highwaymen. Their glowing images represented the American dream. Photographer Gary Monroe got to know these artists and will speak about their work and their legacy. His book, “The Highwaymen: Florida’s African-American Landscape Painters,” explores the lives, art, and legacy of the Highwaymen. A book signing will follow his presentation. mathesonmuseum.org

PLANT HIKE A FLOODPLAIN FOREST AND SWAMP Saturday, March 3 at 9am Rum Island Park, 1447 SW Rum Island Ter

FORT WHITE - Colette Jacono, PhD, a botanist and plant ecologist specializing in aquatic and wetland plants, will lead a short hike through a low-lying hardwood forest and swamp adjacent to the Santa Fe River. Springtime ground covers of lilies, ferns, violets and sedges will pave the path to springs and sloughs where otters may be seen foraging for breakfast. Learn how to recognize tree species such as pop-ash, elm, and hornbeam that characterize a community that is in many ways part of the river itself. OurSantaFeRiver.org

Cirque Eloize: Saloon Saturday, March 17 at 7:30pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Road GAINESVILLE - Cirque Eloize has created performances filled with magic and continues to be one of the leaders in contemporary circus acts, combining acrobatic feats with music, dance and theatre in a breath-taking and original manner. Saloon tells the story of the American West through the lens of a small desert town’s saloon. Driving folk music, amazing acrobatics, colorful characters, and original choreography highlight this family-friendly spectacle. performingarts.ufl.edu

GFAA WINTER FINE ART FAIR AT TIOGA March 3 - 4 from 10am - 5pm Tioga Town Center, 105 SW 128th Street

GAINESVILLE - Produced by the Gainesville Fine Arts Association, The 11th Annual GFAA Fine Arts Fair at Tioga Town Center includes 125 talented artists, live stage entertainment, local student art, and a Kid’s Zone in a pedestrian-friendly streetscape, with ample parking and convenient access. gfaaartsfairtioga.org

10CAN’S 4TH ANNUAL SURVIVAL RACE FOR HEROES March 3 - 4 (overnight optional) Blue Springs State Park, 7450 NE 60th St

HIGH SPRINGS - This event sets the stage for survivalist to showcase their skills against other survival experts, for athletes to test their strength and endurance, and for beginners to have fun while supporting children of American Heroes. bit.ly/10can2018

will explore the quiet and remote section of the Santa Fe River, above the River Sink and O’Leno Park. Learn a few high points of this area’s geology and history, includingËthe site of the mission village, Santa Fe de Toloca. OurSantaFeRiver.org

MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY Monday, March 5 at 7:30pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - Revolutionary vision, artistic mastery. The Martha Graham Dance Company has been a leader in the development of contemporary dance since its founding in 1926 by pioneering choreographer Martha Graham. performingarts.ufl.edu

FASHION SHOW AND GARDEN PARTY HAT COMPETITION

PADDLE THE SANTA FE: FROM O’LENO TO OLUSTEE

Thursday, March 8th from 10am - 1pm 1350 NW 75th Street

Sunday, March 4 at 10am Boat Ramp, 2023-2099 SE Bible Camp St

GAINESVILLE - Wear and/or create a fashionable hat for a fun competition. Fashions by Chico’s and lunch. Buy a table with friends, neighbors or tennis team! ggcfl.org

HIGH SPRINGS - This 3+ hour up-and-back paddle, led by Master Naturalist Lars Andersen,

INSPIRING WOMEN LEADERS CONFERENCE March 8 - 9 Hilton UF Conference Center, 1714 SW 34th St

GAINESVILLE - The inaugural Inspiring Women Leaders Conference brings together highly talented industry leaders to speak, discuss and network with industry professionals. The purpose of the conference is to promote the success of professionals by building collaborative relationships and a community of leaders to exchange ideas, knowledge, and expertise. bit.ly/2018womenleaders

BILL GAITHER & GAITHER VOCAL BAND Friday, March 9 at 7pm First Baptist Church, 2801 SE Maricamp Rd

OCALA - Multi-Grammy Award-winner Bill Gaither will host a spectacular evening of music, laughter and encouragement featuring the talent of the prestigious Gaither Vocal Band. This event will celebrate timeless themes of faith, unity and eternal hope through a variety of music the whole family will enjoy. www.gaither.com or www.premierproductions.com

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THE WIZ Saturday, March 10 at 1:30pm and 7pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - The Danscompany presents their Spring Concert. Delight in watching professional performers from across Florida as they light up the stage. Join Dorothy and her friends as they dance their way down the yellow brick road to the Emerald City. Will the Scarecrow find a brain? Will the Tin Man find a heart? Will the Cowardly Lion find courage? Will the trio escape the Wicked Witch? Ease on down the road to the Performing Arts Center and find out! performingarts.ufl.edu

GAINESVILLE SBAC SPRING FESTIVAL Saturday, March 10 from 10am - 1pm 312 NW 16th Ave

GAINESVILLE - A fun and informational event for children with disabilities and their families. There will be music, snacks, arts and crafts, face painting, door prizes and lots of fun for all. Free and open to the public. card.ufl.edu

WRITERS ALLIANCE OF GAINESVILLE

2018 AMALIE OIL NHRA GATORNATIONALS

Sunday, March 11 from 2:30pm – 4pm Millhopper Branch Library, 3145 NW 43rd St

March 15 - 18 Gainesville Raceway

GAINESVILLE - A panel of award-winning WAG members will discuss submitting your work to writing contests and journals. They will share their experiences in researching possibilities and the pros, cons, benefits, and challenges of contest and journal submissions. Free and open to the public. writersalliance.org

GAINESVILLE - Each year, Gainesville Raceway hosts the East Coast opener as the world’s best drag racers power down the quarter mile. gainesvilleraceway.com

ASK A SCIENTIST: GEOLOGY Sunday, March 11 from 1pm – 4pm Florida Museum, 3215 Hull Road

GAINESVILLE - Science is all around you! Take advantage of this opportunity to talk with researchers from the UF Department of Geological Sciences and ask those questions you have been wondering about. Bring your specimens and find answers during an afternoon of discovery and learning. floridamuseum.ufl.edu

WILLIAM HAGEN, VIOLIN SUPER HAPPY FUNTIME BURLESQUE

Tuesday, March 13 at 7:30pm Squitieri Studio Theatre, 3201 Hull Rd

Saturday, March 10 High Dive, 210 SW 2nd Ave.

GAINESVILLE - At just twenty-three years old, American violinist William Hagen is already a seasoned international performer. performingarts.ufl.edu

GAINESVILLE - Utterly unique and unclassifiable; Super Happy Funtime is all at once a live band, an original work of musical theater, a comedy show, a bawdy and sexy theatrical production, a giant ball of chaos rolled up into one neat little production that has been leaving jaws on the floor for nearly a decade. 18+ only unless accompanied by a parent or guardian. This event is a double feature with Gainesville’s own Dr. Sinn’s Freak Island Musical Sideshow. highdivegainesville.com

SANTA FE RIVER SPRING HOP Saturday, March 10 at 10 am Hwy 27 Boat Ramp, 27004 FL-20

HIGH SPRINGS - A nine-mile section of Santa Fe River, from Hwy 27 to Hwy 47 will be paddled over five hours, guided by Master Naturalist Lars Andersen. The route will include the river’s most famous springs: Poe, Rum Island, Blue, Ginnie, Devil’s Ear & Eye, July and Myrtles Fissure. In addition, paddlers will pass swallets, where the water drains through underwater cracks into the underground aquifer. Andersen, a full-time river guide, also will discuss the river’s unique geology, history and lore of the area plants and animals. OurSantaFeRiver.org

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ANDY MCKEE Monday, March 12 High Dive, 210 SW 2nd Ave.

GAINESVILLE - Andy McKee is among the world’s finest acoustic guitarists. He entertains both the eye and the ear as he magically transforms the steel string guitar into a full orchestra via his use of altered tunings, tapping, partial capos, percussive hits and a signature two-handed technique. highdivegainesville.com

SHEN YUN March 14 - 16 Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Road

GAINESVILLE - Heroes, mischief and miracles, everyone likes a good story. Chinese culture has 5,000 years of them. Folktales, legends, and timeless classics make up this magical world of immortals and miracles. Its heroes — a quirky monk, a fearless general, or maybe a mischievous monkey — fly up to the heavens, split mountains, and visit deep-sea palaces. Dive into the action-filled stories embodying the wisdom and virtues of ancient China with Shen Yun. performingarts.ufl.edu

CAN YOU DIG IT? Saturday, March 17 from 10am – 3pm Florida Museum, 3215 Hull Road

GAINESVILLE - Dig into geology and discover the Earth at your feet! Enjoy hands-on activities and watch demonstrations of volcanic eruptions. Explore the Museum and check out displays and activities on geology, fossils, gems, minerals and much more from Florida and around the world! A free, fun event for all ages! floridamuseum.ufl.edu

BLUES CANOE CRUISE Saturday, March 17 from 9:30 am - 1 pm Hwy 27 Boat Ramp, 27004 FL-20

HIGH SPRINGS - An enjoyable paddle of the Santa Fe RiverËfrom Hwy 27 to Rum Island. Rendezvous at Lazy Turtle Lodge’s beautiful riverfront lawn and enjoy an old-style picnic with live music featuring award-winning Bear & Robert. Paddlers will meet at the State Road 27 Bridge just north of High Springs to unload boats and gear. Paddlers will have the option of taking their vehicles to Rum Island Park and catch a shuttle back to the boats or shuttling themselves. Paddlers should bring picnic lunch and liquids, blanket or chair. (Rum 138 is offering shuttle, lunch and canoe and kayak discounts for this event.) No charge. OurSantaFeRiver.org

NEWBERRY MAIN STREET SPRING FESTIVAL Saturday, March 17 from 9am - 4pm Downtown along the Railroad tracks

NEWBERRY - FREE to everyone! There will be arts, crafts, and food vendors, face painting, pony rides, and free bounce house for the kids. www.Newberrymainstreet.org

ST. PATRICK’S SHAMROCK 5K Saturday, March 17 550 NE 16th Avenue

GAINESVILLE - Run, walk or roll (wheel chairs and strollers-no bikes please!) through Northeast Park and Gainesville’s charming, historic Duckpond Neighborhood. The event will be followed by the St. Patrick’s “Pot o’ Gold Festival,” with plenty of food, activities, fun and fellowship for everyone. bit.ly/2018stpatrick


PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ Saturday, March 17 from 7pm – 11pm Hilton UF Conf. Center, 1714 SW 34th Street

GAINESVILLE - The 31st Annual Puttin’ on the Ritz, scheduled for Saturday March 17, 2018, guarantees a fun night of food and entertainment for a good cause – to support Children’s Home Society of Florida’s efforts to break the cycle of child abuse and neglect. The event includes an extensive auction, live entertainment, dancing, an open bar and samplings from the community’s finest restaurants. chsritz.com

AUTHOR SERIES: WENDY THORNTON Saturday, March 17 from 2:30pm – 3:30pm Headquarters Library, 401 E University Ave

GAINESVILLE - Wendy Thornton will tell about writing her book, “Sounding the Depths”, in which she explores the past fifty years of music, the way it’s changed and how it’s stayed the same, through humorous essays and remembrances. A founder of the Writers Alliance of Gainesville, widely published, and winner of many awards for her writing, she will sign books and answer questions after her talk. Free and open to the public. aclib.us/author-series

SONGWRITERS REUNION @ MUSIC IN THE PARK Sunday, March 18 from 1pm - 3:30pm at James Paul Park and 4pm - 7pm at Great Outdoors

HIGH SPRINGS - The OSFR Songwriters’ Reunion hosts March’s Music in the Park concert to promote both live local music and the preservation of our local waters. Previous songwriting contest winners and select contestants from the annual contest sponsored by Our Santa Fe River organization will showcase their love of local resources as well as their songwriting and performing talent. Free and open to the public. OurSantaFeRiver.org

Great Inflatable Race Saturday, March 24 Alachua County Fairgrounds GAINESVILLE - The Great Inflatable Race is a fun run with inflatable obstacles spread throughout the running course. You and your friends will feel like kids again as you jump, dive and bounce on custom-designed inflatables. Get fit, support the Climb for Cancer Foundation and create epic memories that will last you a lifetime! www.thegreatinflatablerace.com/Gainesville

LIL BUCK AND JON BOOGZ: LOVE HEALS ALL WOUNDS Tuesday, March 20 at 7:30pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - Lil buck and Jon Boogz don’t identify with the title “hip-hop dancers.” They prefer to be called movement artists. You could be forgiven for thinking the dancing Lil Buck and Jon Boogz do is computer-generated; it seems impossible for the human body to move in such a way. performingarts.ufl.edu

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS WITH JOSHUA BELL, VIOLIN

AUTHOR SERIES: LINDA CASTILLO

Thursday, March 22 at 7:30pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

Sunday, March 18 from 2:30pm – 4:30pm

GAINESVILLE - One of the most celebrated violinists, one of the most distinguished orchestras. The partnering of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields with music director and virtuoso violinist Joshua Bell seems almost too good to be true. Regarded as one of the world’s greatest chamber orchestras, The Academy has been long renowned for its fresh, brilliant interpretations of the world’s most-loved classical music. performingarts.ufl.edu

Headquarters Library, 401 E University Ave

GAINESVILLE - Meet Linda Castillo, author of the New York Times bestselling Kate Burkholder series which are crime thrillers set in Amish country. Her latest novel published in July 2017, “Down a Dark Road”, is number nine in the series. aclib.us/author-series

SUICIDE GIRLS: BLACKHEART BURLESQUE TOUR Thursday, March 22 High Dive, 210 SW 2nd Ave.

GAINESVILLE - The sexiest, smartest, geekiest, and most fun definitive pop-culture burlesque show! This show has been performed hundreds of times, delighted millions of fans in over six countries, and has been touring since 2003! 18+ only unless accompanied by a parent or guardian. highdivegainesville.com

STEEP CANYON RANGERS Friday, March 23 at 7:30pm University Auditorium, 333 Newell Drive

GAINESVILLE - Serious chops, fun music. Seventeen years and ten studio albums since forming in Chapel Hill, this sextet has proven time and again that it’s safe to say that these boys know bluegrass. Effortlessly walking the line between festival favorite and sophisticated string orchestra, they’re as danceable as any party-oriented string band but equally comfortable translating their songs for accompaniment by a full symphony. performingarts.ufl.edu

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THEATRE OBSERVERSHIP: THE CHRISTIANS March 23 - April 18 Hippodrome Theatre, 25 SE 2nd Place

GAINESVILLE - Go behind-the-scenes at the Hippodrome during our rehearsals and planning of “The Christians” by Lucas Hnath, directed by Lauren Warhol Caldwell. Alongside the director, designers, actors and staff, you will be immersed in the theatrical creative process and experience as the production team takes “The Christians” from page to stage. 5 sessions. Includes preview performance. tickets.thehipp.org

RIVERSIDE HAMMOCK PLANT HIKE Saturday, March 24 at 9am Santa Fe River Park (Hwy 47 boat ramp)

HIGH SPRINGS - Join Colette Jacono, PhD, a botanist and plant ecologist specializing in aquatic and wetland plants, as she explores a north Florida mesic hammock on a 1.5-mile hike along the Santa Fe River. This area contains the largest numbers of tree and shrub species per unit area in the continental U.S., with canopy is so dense that sunlight touches the ground only in the winter. Participants will search for flowering herbs of early spring, learn the common and uncommon hardwood trees, and recognize the diversity of flowering shrubs that flourish in this fire-free habitat. OurSantaFeRiver.org

SPRING GARDEN FESTIVAL March 24 - 25 Kanapaha Botanical Gardens

GAINESVILLE - This is Gainesville’s premier horticultural event. The Spring Garden Festival features about 150 booths offering plants, landscape displays, garden accessories, arts and crafts, educational exhibits and foods. Also featured are a children’s activities area, live entertainment and live auctions. Parking is free and two off-site parking areas are serviced by shuttle buses. Please no pets at this event. kanapaha.org

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Spring Break Art Camp March 26 - 30, Ages 7-11 Harn Museum, 3259 Hull Rd GAINESVILLE - Journey into the art studio at this year’s Spring Break Camp! Contemporary artist Erin Curry will lead our young “art-venturers” through the museum and guide them in art-making activities. Campers will draw inspiration from the galleries and explore drawing, collage, cloth, and paper to make individual and collaborative works. Registration required. harn.ufl.edu

ESCAPE THE SWAMP TRIATHLON Saturday, March 24 157 Gale Lemerand Dr.

GAINESVILLE - Swim in the Florida Pool, bike though UF’s scenic campus, and run around the heart of UF’s beautiful campus center including The Swamp. Celebrate three sports in a single sunshine-state morning. Gather up your energy and best friends for an event that will bring out the TriGator in you! Participants help provide the funding necessary for the University of Florida TriGators Triathlon Club to compete. facebook.com/TriGators

TRAIL OF PAYNE 10K

8TH ANNUAL OSFR SONGWRITERS CONTEST

Saturday, March 24 100 Savannah Blvd.

Sunday, March 25 from 1pm - 7pm Rum 138, 2070 SW County Rd 138

MICANOPY - The 8th annual Trail of Payne 10K at Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park is a pure trail race you wont want to miss! After a brief park-road start, this challenging course is all trails. Expect every type of surface: packed dirt, roots, grass, soft sand and even a little mud. Bring your friends and get ready to go off-road! This race has the potential to be very muddy depending on weather leading up to the event. bit.ly/2018payne

FORT WHITE - This competition of original songs written about the Santa Fe River brings local and regional songwriters and music lovers from around the state to celebrate and learn about a special spring-fed river. Original song submissions about the Santa Fe River are due March 1, 2018. This annual fundraising event, now in its eighth year, offers music, food and drinks, a silent auction and an afternoon of family fun. Proceeds go to

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educational and advocacy activities designed to protect the aquifer, springs and waters in this area. OurSantaFeRiver.org

BADFISH: A TRIBUTE TO SUBLIME Monday, March 26 High Dive, 210 SW 2nd Ave.

GAINESVILLE - The phenomenon known as Sublime ended with the untimely death of lead singer, guitarist and songwriter Brad Nowell in May of 1996. Encompassing the sense of place and purpose long associated with Sublime’s music, Badfish, a Tribute to Sublime continues to channel the spirit of Sublime. highdivegainesville.com

CANCER CONNECTIONS EDUCATIONAL MEETING Wednesday, March 28 from noon to 1pm HealthStreet, 2401 S.W. Archer Rd.

GAINESVILLE - Cancer Connections is a free monthly educational and networking meeting for cancer healthcare professionals, cancer patients/survivors/caregivers. Speakers include researchers, specialists, therapists, dietitians, hospice workers, nurse navigators, etc. RSVPs are requested. For more info contact: Barb Thomas bnbbarb@aol.com


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FREE UF HEALTH SEMINAR Thursday, March 29 from 9am - Noon UF Hilton Conference Center, 1714 SW 34th St

GAINESVILLE - Matters of the Heart: Today’s Innovative Procedures, Treatments and Research. Breakfast and Speakers on heart failure, minimally invasive valve procedures and stem cell research. Register at UFHealth.org/HeartMatters or call 352-733-0000.

DIEGO FIGUEIREDO AND KEN PEPLOWSKI Friday, March 30 at 7pm & 9pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd’s famous album Jazz Samba from April, 1962 hit #1 on The Billboard Pop Chart. Now the world-renowned artists Ken Peplowski and Diego Figueiredo recreate music from this era, but in their own special way. Two show times available. performingarts.ufl.edu

THE BARBER OF SEVILLE March 30 & 31 University Auditorium, 333 Newell Drive

Easter Egg & Treasure Hunt Sat., March 31 at 10am Waldo Flea Market, 17805 NE US HWY 301

WALDO - This is a FREE event for all kids ages 1-10. There will be over 3,000 eggs filled with candy, trinkets and other surprises. Special Scavenger Hunt Eggs will lead to various booths where vendors will be giving away assorted prizes for our egg hunters. In previous years there have been goldfish, arrowheads, cash, rings… all kind of interesting treasures. Grand Prizes will be awarded to the two lucky kids that find the Gold and Silver Eggs. Bring your camera for a photo with the Easter Bunny. waldofleamarket.com

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GAINESVILLE - What’s Opera, Doc? The answer, Bugs Bunny, is The Barber of Seville! This hilarious comedy is for music lovers of all ages and features the famous Overture, Figaro’s song, and numerous other favorites. The performances are a joint production of the UF Opera Theater and the Ocala Symphony Orchestra. Don’t miss this chance to see one of the world’s most popular shows. performingarts.ufl.edu

NERD 5K Saturday, March 31 UF Gale Lemmerand Drive

GAINESVILLE - The Nerd 5K is hosted by UF’s Honors Program and Honors without Borders. Proceeds benefit the Micanopy Tutoring Center in their efforts to help at-risk students attain their full educational potential. The race will begin at the Commuter Lot by Hume Hall. Prizes will be awarded for best nerd attire. Dress your nerdiest and support a great cause. squareup.com/store/nerd5k

RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN’S CINDERELLA Thursday, April 5 Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - Glass slippers are so back. From the creators of The Sound of Music and South Pacific, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella is the Tony-Award®-winning Broadway musical that’s delighting audiences with its contemporary take on the classic tale. This lush production features an incredible orchestra, jaw-dropping transformations and all the moments you love— the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball, and more—plus some surprising new twists! This hilarious and romantic Broadway experience is for anyone who’s ever had a wish, a dream… or a really great pair of shoes. performingarts.ufl.edu

SPRING PLANT SALE April 6 – 8 Florida Museum, 3215 Hull Road

GAINESVILLE - The Museum’s spring plant sale is one of the largest of the year, featuring more than 150 species of difficult-to-find and pollinator-friendly plants. Learn how to attract butterflies to your home and which plants are proven winners. Accent, host, native and nectar plants are available for purchase, with proceeds benefiting the Butterfly Rainforest. floridamuseum.ufl.edu

SYLVIA April 6 - 29 High Springs Playhouse

HIGH SPRINGS - Greg and Kate have moved to Manhattan after twenty-two years of child-raising in the suburbs. Greg brings home a dog he found in the park—or that has found him— bearing only the name “Sylvia” on her name tag. A street-smart mixture of Lab and Poodle, Sylvia becomes a major bone of contention between husband and wife. Written by AR Gurney. Directed by Matt Walters. Shows are 8pm Fridays & Saturdays and 2pm Sundays. highspringsplayhouse.com

LGAA 5K TEAM CHALLENGE Wednesday, April 4 Ironwood Golf Course, 2100 NE 39th Avenue

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GAINESVILLE - Enjoy a scenic 5K run on the Ironwood Golf Course. A fun course with a combination of grass and cart path running. Shot gun start at 6 p.m. Bring your strollers and walking or running buddies. You can walk or run. Enjoy food, music and beer after the run. This is a fun event benefiting LGAA’s scholarship and grant program. bit.ly/2018LGAA5K

Saturday, April 7 from 8am - noon Albert “Ray” Massey Park, 1001 NW 34th St

GAINESVILLE - Clear your schedule, and grab a few friends for the “Clean Your Block Party”. Keep Alachua County Beautiful will be hosting this event. Engage community volunteers in a full day of picking up litter, renewing parks and collecting and sorting recyclable materials.


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Jump the Creek benefiting Grind for Life Saturday, April 7 at 10am

Possum Creek Park, 4009 NW 53rd Ave

GAINESVILLE - Florida Virtual School presents Jump the Creek benefiting Grind for Life. Grind for Life (GFL) is an organization that provides financial assistance to cancer patients and their families when traveling long distances to doctors and hospitals. Mike Rogers, founder of GFL, educates other cancer patients and their families on how to survive and conquer cancer through fundraising from national skateboarding events. This event is free, family-oriented and for all ages. theboardr.com/events/3278

This beautification of neighborhoods and restoration of waterways through debris removal gives reason to celebrate the natural beauty of our community. Enjoy food, prizes, and a party afterwords! Sign up at www.kacb.org.

GATOR FLY IN & ARMED SERVICES APPRECIATION DAY Saturday, April 7 from 8am – 2pm

O’LENO OLE’ CHILI COOK-OFF & SPRINGS CELEBRATION Saturday, April 7 from 9am - 3pm 410 SE O’Leno Park Rd.

HIGH SPRINGS - The event includes a chili cookoff, arts and crafts vendors, live music with the Weeds of Eden, a guided walk, children’s activities, and environmental exhibits. Park admission is waived with the donation of a canned good to benefit local food banks. bit.ly/2018oleno

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GAINESVILLE - This is the 4th Gator Fly in at the Gainesville Airport. The event will have civilian and military aircraft on display, music, food and arts and crafts Vendors. This is a event for the whole family. Free and open to the public. bit. ly/2018gatorfly

THE RING Saturday, April 7, 2018 at 7:30pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - The UF Symphony Orchestra joins Dance Alive National Ballet in a fantasy story of love, romance, greed and power based on Wagner’s Ring cycle. performingarts.ufl.edu 114 |

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WORLD AUTISM DAY CELEBRATION April 7, 10am – 3pm Skinner Field, 15120 NW 141st Street

ALACHUA - April is Autism Awareness Month! Join your community as they lead the charge to promote and educate autism awareness for World Autism Day in Alachua. bit.ly/2018autism

GATOR CLOT TROT 5K Saturday, April 7 Depot Park, 200 SE Depot Ave.

GAINESVILLE - 5K and Fun Walk is a fun, healthy, and effective way to show your support for all those living with Hemophilia or other related

bleeding disorders. Come run or walk in your best Gator (or favorite team’s) gear to raise funds for HFGF to fulfill their mission to improve the quality of life for the bleeding disorder community. hemophiliaflorida.org

RUN THE GOOD RACE 5K & 10K Saturday, April 7 NFRMC, 6420 W Newberry Rd.

GAINESVILLE - The race, hosted by Drs. Peter and Katheryn Sarantos, and sponsored by the humanitarian organization, World Help, is held to generate awareness and support for the persecuted refugees along the Syrian and Iraqi border. This fun, family activity for a great cause is for all ages. bit.ly/2018goodrace

PLANT SALE AND GARDEN SHOW Saturday, April 7 from 9am - 4pm Van Ness Park, 5835 Ave. G

MCINTOSH - The Seedlings Garden Club of McIntosh, Florida is presenting its 13th event! Numerous vendors will be on site displaying various plants, crafts, garden art, and antiques to enhance your garden and home. Food trucks,


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entertainment, raffles, a Children’s Garden Activity Corner and more. Free entrance and parking. Contact Eva Jo Callahan for more info at 352-316-1613 or visit www.mcintoshseedlings.com.

NOLL/GALLMAN: FLORIDA BOOK AWARDS Sunday, April 8 from 2:30pm - 4pm Millhopper Library, 3145 NW 43rd St

GAINESVILLE - Learn about this elite contest from a previous winners and jurors. Steven Noll, PhD, University of Florida — master lecturer and author of three books including co-author of “Ditch of Dreams” and Matt Gallman, PhD, who teaches, reads, and writes about the American Civil War. Dr. Gallman earned his PhD in American History from Brandeis University and taught at Loyola College, Gettysburg College, and Occidental College before joining the Department of History at UF in 2003. writersalliance.org

EDGAR MOREAU, CELLO Tuesday, April 10 at 7:30pm Squitieri Studio Theatre, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - A rising star of the French cello, twenty-three-year-old Edgar Moreau has been consistently captivating audiences with his effortless virtuosity and dynamic performances. performingarts.ufl.edu

SPRING WINDS Tuesday, April 10 from 7:30pm - 9:30pm Santa Fe College, 3000 NW 83rd St E-127

GAINESVILLE - An enchanting musical evening of traditional concert band classics featuring solo performers and small ensembles all under the direction of Dr. Steve Bingham. sfcollege.edu/finearts

JAZZ UP SPRING! Thursday, April 12 from 7:30pm - 9:30pm Santa Fe College, 3000 NW 83rd St E-127

GAINESVILLE - A cool spring concert of hot Jazz featuring the Santa Fe Jazz Band under the direction of Dr. Steve Bingham. sfcollege.edu/finearts

THE OH HELLOS Friday, April 13 High Dive, 210 SW 2nd Ave.

GAINESVILLE - Recently featured on NPRs Tiny Desk Concert series, this sibling duo from Texas brings their touring ensemble of musicians to Gainesville to perform their unique mixture of eclectic folk rock. highdivegainesville.com

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AUTHOR SERIES: JAMIE FORD

But beneath all these layers of fabulously

Saturday, April 14 from 2:30pm – 4:30pm Headquarters Library, 401 E University Ave

ingly sharp social critic engaging audi-

GAINESVILLE - Meet bestselling author Jamie Ford’s and learn about his debut novel “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet”. This best seller is also a favorite of book clubs and was named the #1 Book Club Pick in 2009 by the American Booksellers Association. He has followed it with “Songs of Willow Frost” and his latest “Love and Other Consolation Prizes”. aclib.us/author-series

GATOR FOOTBALL: ORANGE & BLUE GAME Saturday, April 14 at 3pm Ben Hill Griffin Stadium

GAINESVILLE - UF’s annual spring game returns to Saturday afternoon for the first time since 2015 with the intent of allowing fans to experience a real Gators game day. Free and open to the public. bit.ly/2018orangeblue

HEAROES FOR HEARING 5K Saturday, April 14 UF Commuter Lot, 2015 Gale Lemerand Dr.

draggy camp and kitsch is an exhilaratences with keen wit, brazen humor, and courageous vulnerability. This performance includes content that may not be suitable for children. performingarts.ufl.edu

PARTAKE OF THE PAST April 14 & 15 from 9:30am - 3pm Dudley Farm, 18730 W. Newberry Road

NEWBERRY - Girl Scouts, as living historians, will reenact various tasks and skills common to farm life in the 1880’s. Even then, chores aside, fun and games were vital. Fun and educational for all ages. 352-472-1142

EQUAL ACCESS CLINIC NETWORK 5K Sunday, April 15 SW Recreation Center, SW 34th St.

GAINESVILLE - The Equal Access Clinic Network is a network of student-run free healthcare clinics established by the University of Florida

GAINESVILLE - The purpose of Hearoes for Hearing is to raise money to help purchase new test materials and therapy materials in the speech department for habilitation and rehabilitation, audiological tests, and provide loaner equipment for both the children and adult patients. bit.ly/2018hearing

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Sunday, April 15 at 2pm

Saturday, April 14 Celebration Pointe, 3528 SW 45th Street

possible through the generous contributions from student and faculty volunteers as well as funding from the community. equalaccess5k.itsyourrace.com

DANISH STRING QUARTET University Auditorium, 333 Newell Drive

GAINESVILLE - Since meeting as children at a music summer camp, the members of the

GAINESVILLE - Join more than 3000 people at the Alachua walk in support of moms at every stage from preconception to post-delivery with research, programs and education. Be sure to sign your little one’s up for the Superhero Sprint Race. marchforbabies.org

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Saturday, April 14 at 7:30pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - Taylor Mac (who uses “judy,” lowercase, as a gender pronoun) is impossible to ignore. Judy’s on-stage costumes involve clashing patterns, glitter, large feathers, some more glitter, elaborate face paint, potato-chip bags, towering wigs, and even more glitter.

for international acclaim. The quartet have established a reputation for their integrated sound, impeccable intonation, and judicious balance. With their technical and interpretive talents matched by an infectious joy worldwide by concert and festival presenters alike. performingarts.ufl.edu

SCREAMING FEMALES, THOU, HIRS, NIGHT WITCH Tuesday, April 17 at 8pm The Wooly, 20 N Main Street

GAINESVILLE - Live rock including Screaming Females, a three piece rock band from New Brunswick, New Jersey. thewoolygainesville.com


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PLANT EXPO Saturday, April 21st from 8am - noon Persimmon Farm, 17010 W. Newberry Rd.

NEWBERRY - Newberry Garden Club’s fund raiser to support community projects and scholarship funds. Flowers of all kinds, bulbs, shrubs, trees and fruit & vegetable plants. Plant/yard related vendors welcome. For info call 352-472-3928

HOGTOWN 5K BEER RUN Saturday, April 21st at 9am 5030 SW 91st Court (Haile Village)

Jest Fest! Sunday, April 15

Thomas Center, 302 NE 6th Ave

GAINESVILLE - Hilarity, hijinks, and feats of derring-do will thrill and amaze the entire family at this free event. The legendary Flying Wallendas star with their famous daredevil high-wire act, along with a revolving cast of clowns, jugglers, magicians, sword swallowers, stilt walkers, a one-man band, and a fabulous food court! Plus pony rides, ice cream, roving entertainers, and so much more! Arrive early for the best seats. gnvculturalseries.org

SAM HAYWOOD LIVE! Friday, April 20 from 7:30pm - 9:30pm Santa Fe College, 3000 NW 83rd St E-127

GAINESVILLE - Sam Haywood has performed to critical acclaim in many of the world’s major concert halls. As a chamber musician he is a regular duo partner of Joshua Bell and Steven Isserlis, and performs with many leading chamber ensembles. His latest album ‘Composers in Love’ brings together both well-loved and lesser known music inspired by composers’ muses. His work is broadcast widely in USA and Europe and he was recently a guest on BBC Radio 4’s Midweek. sfcollege.edu/finearts

THE CHRISTIANS April 20 – May 13 The Hippodrome Theatre

GAINESVILLE - This off-Broadway hit and New York Times Critics’ Pick now comes to Gainesville. Pastor Paul has worked for 20 years to build his church from a modest storefront to a mega-church of thousands. But the day he delivers an unexpected sermon, everything changes in ways that will shake his congregation to its core. One of the most talked about plays in regional theatre, The Christians takes you on a wild ride, as it explores the power of faith in our country. thehipp.org

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39TH ANNUAL 5TH AVENUE ARTS FESTIVAL Saturday, April 21 at 10am NW 5th Ave and 6th Street

GAINESVILLE - Two days of stage performances, exhibits food and children’s activities. Free and open to the public. culturalartscoalition.org

NATIONAL PARKS: FREE DAY Saturday, April 21 All National Parks

NATIONWIDE - Experience the national parks! All National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone. April 21st is the first day of National Park Week and admission is free all day long. Visit the website to discover which National Park you’d like to see next! nps.gov

GIRLS ON THE RUN SPRING 5K Saturday, April 21 University of Florida Campus

GAINESVILLE - Girls on the Run is a program for girls in 3rd-8th grade that encourages girls to recognize their individual strengths and celebrate connections with others. This celebratory, non-competitive event provides girls with a sense of accomplishment and instills the value of goal setting at a young age. alachuagotr.org/5K

GAINESVILLE - The 6th Annual Climb for Cancer Foundation Hogtown 5k Beer Run presented by Swamp Head Brewery. A unique cross country run in association with the Hogtown Craft Beer Festival benefiting the Climb for Cancer Foundation, plus a great new 1/2k “pint sized” Root Beer Run for kids 10 and under. All proceeds go to support oncology programs at UF Health Shands Hospital. www.cfc-foundation.org/20185kBeerRun

ALICE’S ADVENTURES: SPRING YOUTH CONCERT Saturday, April 21 at 2pm Performing Arts Center at P.K. Yonge, 1080 SW 11th Street

GAINESVILLE - Sun Country Dance Theatre’s 10th Anniversary Spring Youth Concert featuring an original story ballet, “Alice’s Adventures,” as well as guest artists from the Orlando ballet and distinct works by both resident and guest choreographers. “Alice’s Adventures” is a new production created by Judy Benton, Artistic Director, based on the classic stories of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking Glass” by Lewis Carroll and set to an exciting compilation of music from well-known composers. For more information, contact 352-246-9763 or dance@suncountrysports.com

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY SPRING BOOK SALE April 21 - 25 Friends of the Library, 430 N. Main St.

GAINESVILLE - Book sale to benefit Alachua County Library System and Literacy programs. Browse thousands of books, artwork, comics, manga, software, CDs, DVDs, videos, records and more. Cash or check only. Visit folacld.org or call 352-375-1676.

ALACHUA MUSIC & ART FESTIVAL Sunday, April 22 Main Street, Alachua

ALACHUA - The first annual Spring Alachua Music & Arts Festival brought to you by Alachua Happenings. Enjoy the day with vendors and


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shops along Main Street in downtown Alachua. Listen to the best in local and regional music while observing great art and delicious food! Bring the kids to enjoy activities and your four-legged friends are welcomed as well. Free and open to the public. facebook.com/alachuamusicandart

live music, and of course, Swamp Head beer. 5 trees will be planted for every beer purchased during Tree Fest, 20 trees for every Tree Fest T-Shirt bought, and all sponsor donations will increase our tree planting. Attendance is free. bit.ly/2018tree

ALACHUA COUNTY YOUTH ORCHESTRA SPRING CONCERT

VOICES RISING SPRING CONCERT

Sunday, April 22 at 7pm UF University Auditorium

GAINESVILLE - The Alachua County Youth Orchestra’s annual Spring Concert. This free performance showcases middle school and high school students under the direction of UF Professor Emeritus Gary Langford. acyo.org

Saturday, April 28 at 3pm 419 Northeast 1st Street

GAINESVILLE - Voices Rising is an intergenerational community chorus in Gainesville, Florida, for adults and youth ages 10 and up. Our repertoire ranges from classical to folk to show tunes. vrccgainesville.org

MOONLIGHT WALK A CHORUS LINE Sunday, April 22 at 7:30pm Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd

GAINESVILLE - Musical theatre in its purest form! Its celebration and true-to-life depiction of performers and their struggle to achieve greatness on the Broadway stage has earned the show unanimous praise as one of the true masterpieces of live theater. The iconographic stories, simultaneously touching, funny, and inspiring, will haunt you long after you leave the theater. performingarts.ufl.edu

April 28 from 7pm – 10pm Kanapaha Botanical Gardens

GAINESVILLE - Kanapaha’s Moonlight Walk is a magical experience where there will be twinkle lights, lanterns, and approximately 1500 luminaries along a 1.25 mile walkway. There will also be live entertainment and the Alachua Astronomy Club will be out with telescopes to view the cosmos. Free Lovin’ Foodery, Backyard Grill & Smoke & Kona Ica will be out selling food and refreshments! Feel free to bring a picnic basket, blanket or lawn chairs. kanapaha.org

MARION CIVIC CHORALE

MARION CIVIC CHORALE

Sunday, April 22 at 3pm Countryside Presbyterian Church

Sunday, April 29 at 3pm West United Methodist Church

OCALA - Performing music by American Composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland and Eric Whitacre among others. All Concerts are free to the public. We welcome new members! Contact President@marionchorale.org for information.

OCALA - Performing music by American Composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland and Eric Whitacre among others. All Concerts are free to the public. We welcome new members! Contact President@marionchorale.org for information.

THE SOFT MOON & BOY HARSHER Tuesday, April 24 at 9pm The Wooly, 20 N Main Street

GAINESVILLE - The Soft Moon is an American post-punk band from Oakland, consisting of main producer, singer, songwriter, and instrumentalist Luis Vasquez. The Soft Moon’s music has also been described as darkwave, minimal wave and industrial rock. thewoolygainesville.com

TREE FEST GAINESVILLE - Tree Fest celebrates the environment by raising money to plant trees with the Alachua Conservation Trust in an event that features food trucks, family-friendly activities,

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GAINESVILLE - Tour a select few of Gainesville’s most beautiful private gardens at your leisure. Each chosen for its creativity, stunning garden features and interesting horticulture specimens. Maps will be provided. ggcfl.org

MARION CIVIC CHORALE Sunday, May 6 at 3pm First Presbyterian Church

Saturday, April 28 from 12noon – 11pm Swamp Head Brewery

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OCALA - Performing music by American Composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland and Eric Whitacre among others. All Concerts are free to the public. We welcome new members! Contact President@marionchorale.org for information.

WRITERS ALLIANCE OF GAINESVILLE Sunday, May 6 from 2:30 - 4pm Millhopper Branch Library, 3145 NW 43rd St

GAINESVILLE - Meetings feature a speaker or a panel discussion on a subject of interest to story-tellers and poets. Free and open to the public. writersalliance.org

RUMORS June 1 – 24 High Springs Playhouse

HIGH SPRINGS - The Deputy Mayor of New York has just shot himself. Though only a flesh wound, four couples are about to experience a severe attack of Farce. Gathering for their tenth wedding anniversary, the host lies bleeding in the other room and his wife is nowhere in sight. His lawyer, Ken and wife Chris must get “the story” straight before the other guests arrive. Written by Neil Simon. Directed by Suzanne Richardson. Shows are 8pm Fridays & Saturdays and 2pm Sundays. highspringsplayhouse.com

MELON RUN Wednesday, July 4 Westside Park, 1001 NW 34th St.

GAINESVILLE - A July 4th tradition, Florida Track Club hosts the almost “World Famous” 40th Annual Melon Run! Enjoy the rolling hills on the course and then enjoy free watermelon and refreshments after the race. floridatrackclub.org

RECURRING EVENTS CONTRA DANCE First Sundays & Third Saturdays Thelma A. Boltin Center, 516 NE 2nd Ave

GAINESVILLE - Contra dancing is energetic, social dancing that’s fun for everyone (all ages are welcome) and no partner is necessary. The music is live. Dances are taught, walked through, and called. No experience or special dress is required. Wear casual attire and comfortable shoes. godsdance.org

GAINESVILLE MUSIC ASSOCIATION PUBLIC SYMPOSIUM & WORKSHOP First Mondays from 6:30 – 7:30pm Aurora Downtown, 109 SE 4th Ave

GAINESVILLE - Join your music community for a workshop on a carefully developed aspect of different areas of the music business. These events begin with a presentation and workshop on a thoughtfully researched topic that our organization thinks will genuinely help our music community. gainesvillemusicassociation.com


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FUN WITH FLOWERS

KNOW WHAT’S BELOW. Call 811 before you dig to have underground utility lines located on your property.

Third Tuesdays from 9:30am - noon Gainesville Garden Club, 1350 NW 75th St

GAINESVILLE - Hands-on floral design program includes lecture, demonstration and materials. Coffee social at 9:30 am. RSVP requested rsvp. ggcfl@gmail.com or www.ggcfl.org

GOOD MORNING GAINESVILLE First Wednesdays from 7:30am - 9am 4650 NW 39th Place

GAINESVILLE - Join Jennifer Webb at St. Leo University on the first Wednesday of each month for a free, compassionate networking event. You’ll introduce your company, make great connections, and engage in a lively discussion on a topic that is designed to improve the community. For more information email Jennifer@ magiccomm.com

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GAINESVILLE - Join the Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo and the Alachua County Library every 2nd Wednesday of the month for Storytime at the Zoo starting at 10am. Typically this lasts 30-45 minutes and is a great way to start your visit! Storytime is free. Zoo admission information is available online. sfcollege.edu/zoo

UNION STREET FARMERS MARKET Wednesdays from 4pm – 7pm Bo Diddley Plaza

GAINESVILLE - Bring a bag and pick up some locally-grown and produced vegetables, meat and dairy to take home for your kitchen. Browse local vendors offering a variety of hand-crafted items from jewelry to kombucha. There’s also food trucks and live entertainment — all in a family-friendly atmosphere. Enjoy downtown and support local producers, musicians and artisans while sharing some quality time with your neighbors. unionstreetfarmersmkt.com

HIGH SPRINGS FARMERS MARKET Thursdays from 12 noon – 4pm First Saturday each month from 9am – 1pm 115 NE Railroad Avenue

HIGH SPRINGS - Florida grown fruit, vegetables, dairy & meats as well as honey, handmade treats and more. The Farmers Market is produced by The City of High Springs. farmersmarket. highsprings.com

HIGH SPRINGS FIRST FRIDAY NIGHT First Fridays from 5pm - 8pm Downtown

HIGH SPRINGS - Join the fun in lovely downtown High Springs. Local merchants will offer special sales, a raffle and more. Family fun for all ages. facebook.com/ HighSpringsDowntownMerchants

ARTWALK GAINESVILLE Last Fridays from 7pm - 10pm Downtown

GAINESVILLE - Artwalk Gainesville is a free self-guided tour that combines exciting visual art, live performance, and events in downtown Gainesville with many local galleries, eateries and businesses participating. Artwalk is an exciting, fun way to experience the amazing wealth of creativity the Gainesville community has to offer. Free and open to the public. artwalkgainesville.com

ALACHUA COUNTY FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 8:30am – 1pm 5920 NW 13th Street

GAINESVILLE - Don’t forget to bring shopping bags, your grocery list, and plenty of small bills. The market prides itself on being a grower’s only market – meaning the vendors selling produce, plants, and other products must have grown the items themselves. The event space is located in an open air pavilion with additional outdoor booths protected by shade cloth. 441market.com

HAILE FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 8:30am – 12pm Haile Plantation Village

GAINESVILLE - Take a stroll down the treelined streets of the Haile Village Center to browse for groceries, prepared food, and handmade gifts, then continue on for more shopping or brunching at the Village Center’s locally-owned shops and restaurants. hailefarmersmarket.com

SEND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS TO: 4 4 00 N W 3 6 T H A V E ., G A I N E S V I L L E , F L  32 606 or E V E N T S @ T O W E R P U B L I C A T I O N S . C O M Submissions will be published based on space available in the magazine. Recurring monthly/bi-monthly events must be free & open to the public. Paid events must be open to the public. Unique events that occur regularly such as classes, seminars and networking events will be published at our discretion. Religious organizations may post events only if the event promotes the arts, or is a fundraiser where 100% of the proceeds go to another, non-religious, non-profit organization. Events that are political in nature may not be approved.


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SUNSTATE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION’S

Community Connection SunState Federal Credit Union has been serving our community for over 60 years. Since the beginning we’ve always found ways to support some of the area’s most amazing charitable organizations. Check out our Facebook page for more information and get involved!

Operation: Cone THE COOLEST TRUCK IN TOWN This past summer, the Alachua County Sheriff’s Office unveiled a new ice cream truck under Operation Cone, which stands for Community Outreach and Neighborhood Engagement. “Our goal here, thanks to our great sponsors: SunState Federal Credit Union and The MARC Radio group – specifically Magic 101.3, is that we meet children right where they stand,” said Chris Sims, Sergeant Public Information Officer for the Alachua County Sheriff’s Office. He explained that the ice cream truck would go into the neighborhoods where there may not be the best perception of law enforcement, or where children may not have had the best experience with police officers — and begin to unveil the human side of the badge. “We go out and we start with ice cream,” he said. “Which leads into conversation and playing sports.” The idea came about a year ago, after taking note of a similar initiative at the Boston Police Department. “We decided this would be such a great idea for our community,” Sims said. “We have a way to interact with our community in an extraordinary way.” Sims said that they want to give children a “face to the name” and that zone deputies would be participating in the operation as well. “These are the deputies they interact with everyday,” he said. “And even when a bad situation may occur and we have to come into the neighborhood and take some kind of 124 |

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NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE CHARITY AS THE CHARITY OF THE MONTH AND GIVE THEM A CHANCE TO WIN $1000 FROM SUNSTATE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION! Visit the SSFCU Facebook page for more information. enforcement action, they’ll understand who we are and what we’re about. They’ll realize we have a job to do, and they’re still going to love us where we are — just as we love them where they are.” Sims explained that the ice cream truck and everything else needed for operation Cone was a donation. None of the operation is funded by county taxpayers. “There is no fee, this is all donated by community partners,” Sims said. This ice cream is free. We’re not coming out to collect any money from you, we simply want your participation and your conversation.”

“We always look for ways to involve the credit union in community projects like this. We just loved the idea of finding a way for our hard working law enforcement officers to build trust and rapport with members of our community.” Deeply involved in our community, SunState Federal Credit Union and The MARC Radio Group worked together to provide the Sheriff’s office with the resources they needed to fund Operation Cone. “We always look for ways to involve the credit union in community projects like this,” said Robert Hart, Vice President of Marketing for SunState Federal Credit Union. “We just loved the idea of finding a way for our hard working law enforcement officers to build trust and rapport with members of our community. Without the partnership of Magic 101.3, we could never have pulled off donating an ice cream truck to ASO.” “To have kids do a coloring contest to design art for the truck was MARC Radio GM Dave Cobb’s idea,” Hart continued, “His concept was to introduce the idea to the kids and get them involved from the very beginning. Dave and I both couldn’t be happier that both of our organizations bought into the ice cream truck idea. From now on in Alachua County, instead of those blue lights necessarily meaning THE MAN is coming, they might just mean THE ICE CREAM MAN is coming…how cool is that?” Since ice cream is a big hit for most children, Sims believes it will be a great way to open the door for starting conversations and building relationships. We’re going to meet them wherever they are,” he said. And we’re going to show them the human side of the badge that is commonly worn by law enforcement.

Proudly serving our community and our members since 1957.

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We feel the best way to find and recognize local charities in our communities is by asking you! The SunState Community Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization that serves the communities in and around North Central Florida by promoting and facilitating philanthropy. The Foundation was established to promote and provide charitable assistance that contributes towards the development, education and well-being of the communities, areas and residents of Alachua, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, and Levy Counties in Florida. The foundation’s initial goal is to administer and fully fund the award winning Facebook Charity-of-the-Month program. SunState Federal Credit Union started the program in 2013, but has turned over administration of the program to the foundation, with SunState Federal Credit Union acting only as a sponsor. This has been done in the belief that this path will ensure the program remains a strong and expanding community resource long into the future. The SunState Community Foundation, Inc., provides donors/members opportunities to participate in the furtherance of the foundation’s goals in multiple ways. First, and foremost, the donors/members are providing funds to support the foundation’s charitable initiatives. Donors/members can also nominate groups for the Charity of the Month program, and then vote for the group of their choice. Donors/members are encouraged to participate and vote in the Charity of the Month program. Ultimately, the voters choose where foundation donations go as part of the infrastructure of the program.

SunState Community Foundation, Inc.

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Recognized on all 4 Entercom Communication stations, 30 times (120 total); KTK, SKY, WRUF and ESPN.

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Our Town’s Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Our Town Magazine.

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500 RANDOM CHARITY SPONSOR Recognized on 2 of Entercom Communications stations, 30 times (60 total); WRUF and ESPN Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Our Town’s Facebook page. Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Our Town Magazine.

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Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Our Town’s Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Our Town Magazine.

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Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Our Town Magazine


MOST RECENT WINNING ORGANIZATIONS TO NOMINATE A CHARITY OF YOUR CHOICE OR TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE NOMINEES, VISIT:

www.facebook.com/SunStateFCU and click on “Charity of the Month”

DECEMBER WINNER

JANUARY WINNER

Getalong Dachshund Rescue

Newberry Elementary Safety Patrol

Congratulations to Getalong Dachshund Rescue for being selected as the charity of the month for December and being the recipients of a $1,000 cash prize. Getalong Dachshund Rescue is a non-profit rescue headquarterd in Florida that was formed out of an intense desire to change the lives of dachshunds who find themselves homeless. The organization pledges to not overlook dogs who are old, injured or ill. Getalong Dachshund Rescue runs their all-volunteer foster-based program in 24 states. Other winners include Georgia Ann Manley, who will receive $300 for nominating them. The random charity is Chi Omega - Make-A-Wish and they will receive $500. The random voter, Baley Shawver, will get $100.

The winner of the January Charity of the Month is Newberry Elementary Safety Patrol. Newberry Elementary is a top-rated school in Florida and is one of six schools in the nation to be selected as a SWIFT Model School. These Panthers are on their way to success as their school promotes an equity-based, inclusive education. Their safety patrol program will receive $1,000 and Michelle Tharp will receive $300 for nominating them. Other winners include the random charity winner of the month, which is the Gainesville Youth Chorus and they will receive $500. Additionally, the random voter for this month is Laura Bjornson and she will get $100.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS >> CHARITY OF THE MONTH

CH A RIT Y OF THE MONTH WINNER S

A project of the SunState Community Foundation, Inc. Presented by SunState Federal Credit Union, Our Town Family of Magazines and Entercom Communications

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BAND B BA ND REVIEW

BRIAN “KRASH” KRUGER’S

Gate Crashing ON DECK FOR REVIEW: THE VELVET SIRENS

BRIAN KRUGER IS A WRITER, MUSICIAN AND A GRADUATE OF THE UF COLLEGE OF LAW. HE HAS PLAYED IN SOME 17 OR SO LOCAL BANDS, PLAYING MOST EVERY GAINESVILLE VENUE FRIENDLY TO ORIGINAL MUSIC (AND SOME NOT SO FRIENDLY). bkrashpad@yahoo.com

DATE: MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2018 VENUE: VILLAGE OF WEST END

The Velvet Sirens

G

reetings, live music aficionados! This installment finds us at the Clubhouse of the Village of West End, out on Newberry Road in west Gainesville, just past Parker Road, not far from the Town of Tioga development. Unlike the restaurants and night clubs usually visited for Gate Crossing, the Clubhouse is exactly that, the activities building for the subdivision of the Village of West End. The Village of West End is a golf course community. In addition to the clubhouse and golf course, there are also apparently tennis courts, a swimming pool and a pavilion. Given that it was night out at this early evening show, all those amenities weren’t immediately obvious. But at any rate, we were there for music, not golf or tennis. The music was provided by husband and wife duo The Velvet Sirens, on tour from their native Columbus, Ohio, doing both “house shows” like this and more usual venues (they also played at Satchel’s here in Gainesville). The Velvet Sirens are husband Michael Kaplan and wife Jessie Chandler who bill themselves as an eclectic cabaret jazz and Bohemian torch swing duo. If that’s not enough adjectives for you, they occasionally throw in “flambe,” as well, although I did not see any barbecuing as part of the act (a la regional rock favorites Southern Culture on the Skids, and a few others). So I’m guessing that the flambe part is not intended literally. At any rate, the music was certainly hot enough for both the torch and flambe epithets, despite including cool jazz. Michael provides the musical accompaniment on baritone ukulele, a bigger instrument than the smaller tenor ukulele one might associate with Hawaiian music, Rudy Valley, or Tiny Tim. Jessie sings and occasionally plays, with brushes, of course, a small stand-up drum kit including cymbals. After a quick soundcheck of Blue Moon of Kentucky, the Bill Monroe song that arguably gave bluegrass music its name (and which was later covered by Elvis Presley), the set began

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with a medley of Gershwin’s “Summertime” and the traditional spiritual “Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child.” This was followed by 1919’s “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home,” later popularized by blues belter Bessie Smith. Then came “Bye Bye Blackbird” from 1926, popularized by the African-American Josephine Baker who left her native country to become the toast of Paris as an often scantily-clad dancing singer, and eventual movie star. Another Broadway standard, Kern and Hammerstein’s “Can’t Help Lovin’ That Man of Mine” from 1927 was up next, followed by 1928’s “Love Me Or Leave Me,” originally by white singer and movie star Ruth Etting. The song was later popularized by Billie Holiday who chose to alter the melody based on the horn part played by Louis Armstrong to better suit her limited range. Lest you think I have recently graduated from the college of musical knowledge—all these dates and historical facts regarding


the songs in the set were actually provided by Ms. Chandler between the song’s performances. Without getting overly didactic, this made for a set that was educational in addition to simply being fun getting to listen to talented performers. The set skipped forward in time to the 1944 Duke Ellington jitterbug, “I’m Beginning to See the Light,” popularized by Ella Fitzgerald, which was followed by Hank Williams’ (with possible assistance from Ray Price) “Weary Blues (from Waitin’),” from 1951. The duo then performed an original called “Resolution Blues” (the reference is to New Year’s resolutions), which is included on a holiday music EP that the group recently recorded.

This fun set by two very talented musicians was hosted by the Ukulele Club of Gainesville and was followed by a blues jam with the Velvet Sirens and club members. The set’s penultimate number was another Ella classic, 1953’s “Cry Me A River,” which came with the historical tidbit that the song was cut from a movie because it was assumed at the time that no one would believe that a black woman would know the word “plebian,” which is part of the lyrics. Closing out the set was another original, “How I Let You Get to Me,” which also appears on the aforementioned EP and contains some traditional blues lyric double entendres (if you have heard much of old jazz or blues you probably know that a “honey pot” in a song is probably not singing about Winnie the Pooh). This fun set by two very talented musicians was hosted by the Ukulele Club of Gainesville and was followed by a blues jam with the Velvet Sirens and club members. The Club meets the first and third Monday night of every month at United Church of Gainesville. The meetings are free to attend. Now, go see some bands.

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GATOR OLYMPIAN >> ERIN JACKSON

ICE, ICE, BABY!

OLYMPIC SPEEDSKATER AND UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ALUM

Erin Jackson WRITTEN BY MONICA HUMPHRIES

Erin Jackson travelled over 7,400 miles to Pyeongchang, South Korea, to participate in the 2018 Winter Olympics. This adventure came as a surprise after only training for ice speedskating for four months. Before this past fall, Jackson, from Ocala, would have been found on the roller rink instead of the ice rink. Since 2012, inline speedskating was her sport. However, she gave ice speedskating a shot, and it landed her in the Winter Olympics. “Originally I thought of going to this competition [the Olympic trials] and use it as a checkpoint in my training. I didn’t really come in thinking I was going snag one of these spots on 130 |

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the Olympic team, it just sort of happened that way,” Jackson said in an interview with Rolling Stone. Jackson originally intended to compete in the 2022 Winter Olympics, but instead she qualified for the 2018 Olympics. At the Olympic trials in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Jackson beat her personal record and landed a spot in the Olympics. In speedskating it’s impressive for athletes to drop a few hundredths of a second. Jackson dropped two-tenths of second, which put her time at 39.04 seconds for the 500-meter race. Beyond that accomplishment, Jackson will be the first African-American woman to compete in Olympic long-track skating. “Something that you might notice if you’re someone who watches the Winter Olympic Games is that there are not a lot of people of color participating. But I’m looking forward just to being someone that children and people of color can look to, and maybe make them say ‘maybe this is a sport that I can get PHOTOGRAPHY: AP/VADIM GHIRDA


into,’” she said in an interview with Rolling Stone. Jackson was born in Ocala, Florida, and went to the University of Florida. There, she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in materials engineering. Jackson has been an inline skater for 15 years and is an 11-time medalist at the Inline World Championships. She is also the 2014 Pan American Games gold medalist in the 500-meter race, according to her website. “The nice thing about inline [skating] is that the movements and strategy are sort of second nature. But coming over to ice, I’m still pretty new, and everything I do, I still have to think. Still, coming into the Olympic trials I was able to let it flow, and everything came together at the right moment. Somehow, I was able to let loose and go for it,” Jackson said in an interview with Rolling Stone.

Inline skating also led her to another sport—roller derby. She began her derby career in 2012 with the Ocala Cannibals and transferred to Jacksonville, Florida, to play with the New Jax City Rollers. She is also a member of the 2018 USA Roller Derby World Cup team. Two other Olympic skaters, Brittany Bowe and Joey Mantia, are also from Ocala, Florida. Bowe has been skating with Jackson for years and is excited to watch her journey in the Olympics. “I’ve known Erin since she was a little thing both growing up in Ocala and on the same inline skating team,” said Bowe in an interview with TeamUSA. “She’s one of the most talented girls I know. I keep telling people, if she gives this thing a shot and stays focused and determined, she’s going to be a force to be reckoned with. She proved herself today that it’s no joke.” Gator Nation is proud of you, Erin!

PHOTOGRAPHY: AP/RICK BOWMER, COURTESY ERIN JACKSON/INSTAGRAM, ZAKAS PHOTOGRAPHY

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GATOR OLYMPIAN >> ERIN JACKSON

Jackson was born in Ocala, Florida, and went to the University of Florida. There, she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in materials engineering.

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COMPASSION & CARE >> CREATED GAINESVILLE

HELPING HANDS

Women for Women Created Gainesville reaches out in love to victims of trafficking S TORY A N D PHOTOG R A PHY BY S TE PH A NIE RICH A R DS

W

h e n t h e m i n i va n approached where 33-year-old Becky was prostituting on 13th street late at night several years ago, she thought she was immediately going to jail. It looked similar to what police used in arrests and it was filled with women. Becky was not one to fight with police, so she didn’t run. To her surprise, the group of women, led by Alison Ungaro of Created Gainesville, were doing street outreach and offered her a gift bag full of hygiene products and words of compassion and encouragement. “They gave me the bag and asked if they could pray for me… I thought I could use all the prayer I can get. I never saw them on the street after that again,” she said. “Getting hygiene items is rare in the business and I remember 132 |

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taking the bag back to my apartment and showing the other girls what I got… I was ecstatic. I told them how these women prayed for me and gave me a Bible.” Becky had burned bridges with her mom through years of drug abuse and prostitution, getting clean and then relapsing again. When she was arrested and in jail a few years later, Ungaro and other volunteers were her only visitors. They came offering her encouraging words again and reminded her that they were there to be an advocate for her when she was ready. “I woke up one day [in jail] and said to myself, ‘This life sucks, I hate my life.’ I called my mom – and this is how God works in amazing ways – and told her I was really done and she came and got me. The rehab program I was going to enter was full. I called Alison and some of the ladies took me to church, lunch and then to see the movie ‘War Room.’ That day changed my life forever,”


Jewelry has been donated as one way for the nonprofit to raise funds. Alison Ungaro (below), founder and executive director of Created Gainesville, pauses for a moment in the nonprofit’s downtown Gainesville office.

Created Gainesville’s mission is to empower, heal and restore women who are victims of sex trafficking. Gift bags include items like hygiene products, pants, tops and flip-flops. These bags are taken to outreaches to provide women with daily necessities and show them care and compassion.

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Created Gainesville has its office in the downtown area to be more accessible to women. This conference room doubles as a training area and storage for fundraising items. Created Gainesville provides women with new items including undergarments, pants and tops. Donated shoes are also available to give to women who need them.

Becky said. “I went home to my mom’s house, built a war room in her closet and prayed and read God’s word. I wouldn’t have a cell phone as I didn’t trust myself [to not go back] and immersed myself in church and studies every week.” The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 defines sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform

such act has not attained 18 years of age. Florida ranks the third highest in the U.S. for all trafficking cases, according to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center. The average entry age of girls involved in prostitution in the U.S. is just 13 years old, and on average it takes only 48 hours for a runaway to be approached by a trafficker or solicitor, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

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from women and became a voice for them… striving to meet their needs. It is really about being on the journey with each woman, walking with her at her own pace and letting her lead.” The organization received nonprofit status last July and is overseen by an 11-member board of directors. They work with the Alachua County Sherriff’s Office, Gainesville Police Department, Partnership for Strong Families, Grace Marketplace, SIRA, House

“Every chance we get to engage — whether a conversation in jail or on the streets — that woman is not being exploited, using drugs or being harmed. Even just those moments mean success.” “This is a global issue, but it is also one right here in our own backyard. I knew God gave me a large capacity to love and prayed for direction for about a year,” said the Gainesville resident, who was a speech language pathologist before she decided to be a stay at home mom. “There were three of us in the beginning, and we started by connecting with women at St. Francis House. They gave us a room to meet privately with women, where we could talk over coffee and manicures. We asked them if they would need to get out of the difficult situations they were in. We took that voice

of Hope, Child Advocacy Center and other groups to engage women caught in sex trafficking and help them be restored. “It is beautiful to see the community come together to impact the lives of women,” Ungaro said. “We become an advocate for these women and fight for the opportunity to receive rehabilitative services instead of prison time.” Each year, Created Gainesville connects with about 250 women through street, club and jail visitation outreach. In addition, the nonprofit offers a weekly class at the Alachua

COMPASSION & CARE >> CREATED GAINESVILLE

Created Gainesville’s mission is “To reach and restore women who have been sexually exploited and trafficked to an understanding of their value, beauty, and destiny in Jesus Christ.” It is an extension of Created Tampa that Ungaro founded in 2012. The mother of five felt a pull to make an impact in the local community after seeing a Project Rescue video about brothels in India where children are sold as babies into sex trafficking.

ESULTS DRIVEN. Gil Alba

Karen Yochim

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ville. v illle e. MARCH/APRIL 2018

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Volunteers of Created Gainesville offer love and support to women, whether they are on the street, in jail (top left) or trying to make a fresh start. Women who want a fresh start can participate in Created Care, which focuses on areas like trauma and addiction counseling, mentoring and housing assistance. It also includes a regular gathering (left) called Oasis, which is a weekly dinner and Bible Study. Created Gainesville executive director Alison Ungaro leads a weekly class for women in jail (above) using the Celebrate Recovery curriculum and assists them in developing an exit plan for when they are released.

County Jail using the Celebrate Recovery curriculum, and also provides assistance formulating an exit plan upon release and finding and applying to rehab centers. About 35 women completed the curriculum last year. “As part of our outreach, we also reach out to women in strip clubs,” Ungaro said. “We don’t have an agenda, but are there to build trust and let them know we are available if they need help. Managers see us as a positive presence because we are there to love and support women.” Ungaro said success isn’t defined just by the numbers. “There are so many things you can’t quantify,” she said. “It is about speaking love and value into a woman’s life. Every chance we get to engage – whether a conversation in jail or on the streets – that woman is not being exploited, using drugs or being harmed. Even just those moments mean success.” Becky now is out of the industry, working full-time and has been reconciled with the father of her two youngest children. The two will be married this year and are hopeful to petition the court together so their family can be restored. “God has blessed me a lot. What made me trust Alison is that she always loved me and did not put any stipulations on me. It was genuine love for me; she let me go my own route but loved me in the process, making sure I knew she would always be there,” Becky said. “She and the other Created volunteers go out really late at night and risk themselves… their love was genuine.” The organization has 59 volunteers and interest in joining the cause has grown exponentially, including college students 136 |

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to those past midlife. While a specific skill set and training is required for those doing street outreach, volunteers are needed in other areas such as marketing and celebration team. “The reality of the vulnerability of our youth has brought many younger people to be passionate about the injustice of it and want to do something to make a difference,” Ungaro said. Two years ago, the offices were moved intentionally to downtown Gainesville to be more accessible to women. Recently, a donor provided the organization with what will be a multi-phase transition home in the future. It will offer long-term sobriety and trauma care, skill preparation and counseling. “The biggest part is the funds to operate it – it is not enough to just offer these women shelter. These women need structure, safety and support,” Ungaro said. “Our greatest challenge is we need to get the community to get behind us. That comes with education; it’s hard because sex trafficking is something behind closed doors. It is uncomfortable and not normal conversation, but we need to feel uncomfortable to take action.” *Becky’s full name has been omitted due to safety concerns and the nature of the subject. For more information or to volunteer for Created Gainesville, call 352.870.8481 or go online to www.createdgainesville.com. On facebook, search Created Gainesville. If you or someone you know is being sex trafficked, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1.888.373.7888 or to get help text 233733 (BeFree). PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY OF CREATED GAINESVILLE


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SPOTLIGHT

RESCUE ANIMAL ADOPTIONS

Furever Friends TAZ & THE COFFEES

FUREVER FRIENDS IS A RECURRING PROFILE THAT FEATURES A LOCAL RESCUE ANIMAL AND THEIR OWNER, WRITTEN FROM THE ADOPTED PET’S “POINT OF VIEW.” NOMINATE YOURSELF OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW FOR OUR NEXT RESCUED PET PROFILE! CONTACT: EDITOR@TOWERPUBLICATIONS.COM.

get their attention and I was just trying to keep to myself. Then Kim and Tina Coffee came in and they stopped when they saw me, that’s right, my smiling face makes people stop right in their tracks! I guess they had been looking to adopt another dog for a while. They used to have three golden retrievers, but when their last one left they started looking for someone like me to make their hearts a little less empty. They ended up bringing me home that same day! Both my parents are retired but they keep pretty busy. Kim takes me for long walks and gives me baths, which make me smell nice and clean and ready to get dirty again! When he goes into the garage I like to be right by his side to see what’s going on and if I can help. I’m very curious, and I love to be included. Tina loves to show my pictures to her friends and she takes me places too! We recently went to PetSmart and I got to ride in the shopping cart, I guess their bigger dogs could never do that. One of my favorite things, besides my toys, is when we all watch TV together. I even have my own Gators jersey for when they play; Kim says I help them win.

Hi there! My name is Taz — actually my birth owners gave me a longer, more formal name, but I like being called Taz. I’m a three-year-old Shih Tzu, and I was born in Wisconsin – the cheese capital of America! Somehow I made my way to south Florida but one day (one theory is after Hurricane Irma) I found myself on the back of a truck and was taken to the Alachua County Humane Society. I wasn’t even there for a full day before I was placed in a foster home. They put my picture up online to see if anyone wanted to adopt me, but I think the lighting in the photo was bad because after about two weeks I was brought back to the shelter. It was kind of scary because I was one of the smallest dogs there. Everyone else was barking at the visitors to 138 |

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Kim, Taz and Tina Coffee (from left to right) have their first family photo together since adopting Taz from the Alachua County Humane Society on December 29. Taz wears a Gators jersey (far left) to show the Coffee family’s love for the team.

At night I like to have my space so I sleep in my kennel. I usually stick to my bed time, but some nights I don’t go to bed right away so I can stay up a little longer with my mom and dad. I’m so happy we found each other, but sometimes I feel a little sad thinking about the other dogs at the shelter who are still looking for a home just like mine. I think something people don’t realize is that dogs and cats are always going in and out of the shelter, sometimes we may even be in a foster home. So, if you don’t make a connection right away, always check back. It took my parents over six months to find me. The right pet is out there for you, just be patient. I mean, you may not find a doggy as good as me, but they come pretty close.


Tips for New Moms Advice for the early days of motherhood W R I T T E N B Y C R Y S TA L H E N R Y

B

ecoming a new parent is one of the most wonderfully terrifying times in a person’s n’s life. We joke that there should be a manual, but in reality the baby advice industry is a billion dollar llar business. There are books on every style of parenting, nting, and an expert on every subject. You can pick up a book on birthing, hing, sleeping, feeding and wearing babies, but the solid truth is thatt when that little bundle arrives it’s really just a crapshoot. Every baby is as unique as their teeny fingerprints, so the books rarely tell you what you need to o know. But for every new mother looking for some pro tips, we’ve got you fam..

Treat Yo Self

Ask For Help

Forgive Yourself

This isn’t about “push presents” or pedicures. This is about putting on your oxygen mask before attempting to help someone else. In the early days of motherhood it’s all too easy to focus all of your attention on taking care of the helpless sack full of baby lying next to you.

Whether it’s accepting the food train set up by your friends and family, or it’s being honest with your doctor about the baby blues, the best thing a new mother can do for her baby and herself is to ask for help. And sometimes that means asking your partner for help as well. Many breastfeeding moms fall into the trap of doing everything for the baby because they’re the primary food source. But there are plenty of non milk-related tasks that your partner can help with. Changing, bathing and snuggling the baby are all very important jobs that babies need. Bringing a new mom snacks while she’s feeding the baby is a great job for a partner who wants to be involved. Or let them take a shift after a feeding while you take a nap. The newborn days feel long, but they are gone in an instant. It’s not your new normal, and you won’t need that level of help forever. So accept the help when it’s offered, and ask for help when it’s not.

One of the biggest secrets of motherhood is that literally no one does it perfectly. Just like some people excel at math while others are top notch readers, all human beings have their strengths and weaknesses. Mothers are no exception. While one mom may be a champion breastfeeder, her baby won’t sleep unless he’s held. And another mom with a champion sleeper baby is struggling to decipher why her kid hasn’t pooped in three days. Parenting is really 75 percent luck and 25 percent skill.

But in order to be your best self, you need to practice some self care. Make sure you do one thing each day that is just for you. Far from being selfish, taking time out of your day to focus on yourself will help battle the feeling of identity crisis that often comes with the new role of Mama. Find your happy place, whether it’s in the garden or the clearance aisle of Target. Do something that grounds you back to the world you knew before baby. There’s real truth in the phrase “If Mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.”

The best approach to motherhood is to lead with love, trust your instincts and forgive yourself for your mistakes. §

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PROTECT & SERVE COUNTY SHERIFF >> SADIE DARNELL

Darnell won her first campaign during the September 2006 primary against three opponents. She went on to win the General Election in November to become the Alachua County Sheriff.

ALACHUA COUNTY’S FIRST ELECTED FEMALE SHERIFF

Sheriff Sadie Darnell W R I T T E N B Y H AY L I Z U CCO L A

In 1976, law enforcement in Gainesville and most of America was considered a man’s profession. A scrappy environment filled with breaking up fights, carrying guns and protecting citizens by taking down “bad guys” took strength and tenacity and therefore was presumably no place for a lady. Despite the prejudice of the era, no amount of judgmental glares, harassment or the occasional death threat would stop Sadie Darnell from achieving her dream of becoming a Gainesville police officer and later Alachua County’s first elected female sheriff. Darnell didn’t have a lifelong ambition of being on the police force. She didn’t grow up hearing stories from family members in a similar profession and instantly know that’s what she wanted 140 |

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to be; no, that goal came later in life. After she graduated from the University of Florida with her bachelor’s in psychology, she struggled to figure out what she wanted to do with her life. “When I walked out on the day of the last class I said ‘what am I gonna do now?’ and I really had no idea,” she said. Darnell became a secretary with the Gainesville Police Department, but working at a desk every day didn’t fulfill her desire of helping people in the community. Sitting at her kitchen table with her mom, Lottie, and her father, Jim, Darnell told her parents that she wanted to be a police officer. A frozen, heart-stopping expression washed over their faces, but they were ultimately supportive of her decision – wanting Darnell and her twin sister, Norma, to do whatever made them happy. Wanting to become an officer was one thing, but for a woman in the late ’70s, just being accepted into the police academy was a challenge all on its own. “I sent a form through to be sponsored at the police academy


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COUNTY SHERIFF >> SADIE DARNELL

so I could get my certification. All [the chief ] had to do was sign said. “You can’t paint a group of people with the same brush, the form and I would pay for it myself; I would go after hours at you have to get to know people as individuals and respect them for their differences.” night. So he signed the form, sent it back, and I guess had second After getting called to back up a fellow officer in a fight, thoughts because he sent a lieutenant a couple days later to say finally, Darnell proved herself to her male counterparts and ‘the chief would like to have the form back,’” Darnell recalled. things slowly got better. Despite a rough, unwelcoming start, Eventually the chief decided not to make an issue of it and allowed Darnell to join the academy. Surviving the intense Darnell began to rise through the ranks: becoming sergeant in 1981, lieutenant in 1988 and captain in 1994. physical and academic demands of the police academy isn’t In 2005, Darnell retired, which didn’t last very long. After as carefree as depicted in the string of ’80s movies of the same name. Those accepted into the program have to learn consti- briefly being the Gainesville Police Department’s Community Liaison, Darnell tutional law, first-aid, resigned to campaign tactical driving, defenfor the position of sive tactics, firearms Alachua County Sheriff and CPR among other – a role she was hesitant skills. Darnell’s biggest to run for. endeavor was trying to “I came across a leap over a six-foot, quote by Mark Twain solid wall. She spent that said basically to the weekends practicing effect of you don’t want until she was covered to be 20 years down the in bruises and she evenroad and regret never tually developed the having tried. And that technique to get over just was a sign to me the wall and pass the that I needed to at least physical exam. After give it a go,” she said. graduating from the “I filed and academy, Darnell was announced my canhired at the Gainesville Darnell on patrol as a sergeant with the Gainesville Police Department – a title she earned in August 1981. didacy on February Police Department in 14 b e c a u s e i t w a s 1978 where it became Valentine’s Day and for clear she wasn’t finthe most part I’ve always had lousy Valentine’s Days so I figured ished getting past that six-foot wall. “I went to my first roll call and nobody wanted to sit next to this was going to be a Valentine’s gift to myself.” Darnell won the 2006 election and became Alachua County’s me,” she said. “It was very clear that they didn’t want me there. first female Sheriff – a position she has held for the past 12 years. Some people would not speak to me. Some people that I worked Over the course of a decade, Darnell has implemented programs with for years never would speak to me again unless it was in like Rape Aggression Defense (RAD), a women’s self-defense the context of work. They made it very unwelcoming.” Some taunts like stealing her lunch or her hat were purely class; Teen Drive Challenge, a hands-on course to teach teenagers childish, while other forms like not backing her up on calls or driving safety techniques; and Lethality Assessment Program, a strategy to assess domestic violence, only to name a few. Despite being slow to arrive were far more dangerous. “Whether it was a fight, whether it was a robbery, whether becoming the second woman elected in a general election for sheriff in Florida – the first being Susan Benton of Highlands it was any call they would just not get there quickly,” Darnell County back in 2004 – Darnell notes that a person’s gender, said. “That was another way of trying to scare me to quit and race or any other factor shouldn’t matter in his or her ability to give up.” Darnell explained that while some of the Caucasian male succeed in whatever that person wants to do in life. “I see it as an individual responsibility that we have as officers let their bias interfere with their work, the Africanwomen to do our jobs, do it well. Not to expect favors, not to American officers and other female officers were there to answer expect entitlements, not to expect anything other than doing her calls. “It hit me that they knew what I was feeling, they knew what you need to do to get the job done,” Darnell said. “When I speak to people about being in what is a predominantly male how painful it was to be so unwelcomed and to actually be put in danger. It taught me a lesson that has carried through to work environment, [what I say] is do your best, work hard, refuse to let someone tell you that you can’t do it because you’re this day — that every person has a gift and to be judged just on your outward appearance and be judged so harshly was unfair, a woman or whatever the characteristic is... and let your work it was not right and it has stayed with me my entire life,” she be your proof.”

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John Thomas and Theresa Beachy stand in front of a mural painted by a past client. Beachy has worked at Peaceful Paths for 18 years and Thomas for eight years. Over time, both said they’ve seen the community grow to understand and fight against domestic violence.

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SUPPORT COMPASSION & SUPPORT >> PEACEFUL PATHS

Peaceful Paths Creating Conversations and Empowering Women W RIT TE N BY MONIC A H UMPHRIE S

P

eaceful Paths is a domestic violence center serving Alachua, Bradford and Union Counties. Each year it works with 1,100 individuals to get them access to resources that help them feel safe, connected and independent. A mural fills one wall of Peaceful Paths with vibrant reds, sunny yellows, patterns and flowers. It’s the first thing someone sees when she or he walks into the domestic violence center. A painted group of women circle around a wheel of power and control. This wheel is part of The Duluth Model, which is a way of thinking about how a community works together to end domestic violence. But behind the painted walls, women are accessing programs and resources. The center provides free services such as emergency shelter, support groups, trauma counseling and restraining order assistance to adult and child victims. Each year Peaceful Paths serves about 1,100

PHOTOGRAPHY: MONICA HUMPHRIES

people. Ninety-five percent of the adults are women. “A lot of times they don’t know what they need,” said Theresa Beachy, the executive director. “And they don’t know what we offer.” The services are divided into residential services, permanent housing services and outreach services. Peaceful Paths has 35 beds for temporary housing, seven apartments and helps an additional 800 people a year through outreach services. “One of the most important parts of our job is to meet them where they’re at,” said John Thomas, the director of community giving. Each person is served differently. Some will use its services for years while some women might just need help for a short period of time. Thomas, who has worked at Peaceful Paths for almost eight years, said there are still families receiving services today that were receiving them eight years ago. “For some people that support is very temporary,” Beachy said. “For others, we become a very MARCH/APRIL 2018

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Support groups and counseling can significantly impact clients. Rooms like this serve to foster those connections and relationships.

critical component of that support system for a long time.” Beachy stressed the importance of creating a network of support for clients. “Talking about domestic violence breaks down the isolation,” she said. She went on to explain that when the survivors have someone who has gone through similar experiences, it validates those experiences. For example, a mother might come in lacking eye contact and she may not appear visibly confident. But through counseling and group support that changes. “You’ll see her later, and she’s this gregarious person who’s speaking with others,” Beachy said. Through an empowerment strategy, Peaceful Paths aims for every woman to leave safe, connected and independent. “It’s an amazing journey to watch,” she said. Whether it’s a woman who’s finished her degree or someone who has started her own business or a family who lost and rebuilt everything, those stories leave a lasting impact. And although domestic violence can be difficult to measure, it’s an intensive problem, said Beachy. “It’s the number one call our law enforcement communication center takes,” she said. 144 |

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There are over 2,500 arrests for domestic violence a year between Alachua, Bradford and Union Counties. And getting access to help can have the biggest impact. Beachy has worked at Peaceful Paths for the past 18 years. Over time, she’s seen a lot of changes. But strengthening community partners has been the biggest, she said. “When I came on board, we were alone,” Beachy said. Now Peaceful Paths has the support of the Alachua County Sheriff’s Office, State Attorney’s Office and child welfare services. Together, the community has created prevention and intervention programs and strengthened funding and services. “We have people in power positions that focus on domestic violence in a way that allows us to do the core services,” she said. “And we have partners who do the stuff we can’t.” These changes have sparked important conversations, Thomas said. “One of the most important things to us is people giving us their voice and really talking about the issue,” he said. Thomas started working at Peaceful Paths in 2000. He explained that eight years ago no one knew about the center because domestic violence was something people didn’t talk about. Now people know, he said.

“All of the sudden we saw a shift where people were saying yes to being familiar with Peaceful Paths.” Along with familiarity came dialogue about the language people use. “Call a white tank top a white tank top,” Beachy said. “Not a wife beater.” They both stressed the importance of asking the right questions. Not, what was she doing wrong or did she deserve it? But why did he do that? “The biggest thing we can do in society to combat oppression in all levels is to change the language that we use,” Beachy said. Thomas said he’s working to continue community connections. He explained that through events individuals can see and hear about what Peaceful Paths does and needs to do in order to keep making that difference. One of their biggest events is the Guest Chef Cocktail Party on April 5. At the event, community members bring appetizer-sized dishes of their favorite meal. People eat, drink and listen to a survivor speak. “It’s a great way to help the mission,” Beachy said. If you want to get involved with Peaceful Paths, go to www.peacefulpaths.org or like them on Facebook. If you or someone you know is in need of help, contact their helpline at 352-377-8255. PHOTOGRAPHY: KRISTIN KOZELSKY


COLUMN

KENDRA SILER-MARSIGLIO’S

Healthy Edge ADHD IN GIRLS AND WOMEN

KENDRA SILER-MARSIGLIO, PH.D. IS A NEUROSCIENTIST, MEDICAL WRITER, COLUMNIST AND PRESIDENT OF THE NON-PROFIT COMMUNITYHEALTH IT AT NASA/KENNEDY SPACE CENTER. KENDRA ENJOYS TRAVELING, DANCING LIKE NO ONE’S WATCHING, AND LISTENING TO PEOPLE’S STORIES. kendra.sm@gmail.com

ALTHOUGH ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD) IS ARGUABLY MORE DAMAGING TO GIRLS AND WOMEN’S LIVES, ADHD IS MUCH LESS LIKELY TO BE DIAGNOSED IN GIRLS AND WOMEN.

W

hen you think about ADHD, what image comes to mind? For many, it’s likely a boy disrupting a classroom with inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive behaviors. Why are young boys considered the face of ADHD? Part of the answer is because young boys with ADHD served as the initial participants in ADHD research in the 70s. Also, more recent research shows that ADHD presents differently in girls and women than boys. Even today, ADHD diagnoses are still somewhat biased toward how ADHD presents in boys. For instance, in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM5)—used by U.S. healthcare professionals—ADHD diagnosis focuses on hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention. That’s not to say that DSM-5 hasn’t made any changes. For instance, it now defines three kinds (presentations) of ADHD: • Combined Presentation: If enough symptoms of both criteria inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity were present for the past six months • Predominantly Inattentive Presentation: if enough symptoms of inattention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, were present for the past six months • Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Presentation: if enough symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity, but not inattention, were present for the past six months. Girls and women typically present with a Predominantly Inattentive kind of ADHD. Girls and women with ADHD aren’t generally hyperactive and impulsive. Symptoms of ADHD in girls and women manifest as disorganization, daydreaming, scattered thought, carelessness, and forgetfulness. Girls and women with ADHD are also often quiet or introverted. For many girls and women, ADHD doesn’t “show” until they leave the support and structure of their childhood homes and grade school. For instance, reporter Lisa Ling wasn’t diagnosed with ADHD until she was 40 years old.

During her televised doctor visit, Lisa described her experience with ADHD. “As a journalist, when I’m immersed in a story, then I feel like I can laser-focus. But if I’m not working, my mind goes in every direction but where it’s supposed to go. I’ve been like that since I was a kid,” Lisa said. The expression of estrogen during puberty makes ADHD worse. Also, society’s expectations of girls and girls’ expectations of themselves can make it worse. Former New York Times reporter and writer Jenny Anderson asserts that girls frequently mask ADHD in an attempt to conform to society’s expectation that girls are on the ball and organized. Because many of the girls masking “female” ADHD symptoms don’t know they have ADHD, girls and women are often left wondering why they aren’t able to succeed or act like peers. Too frequently, the pressure they put on themselves leads to self-worth issues, eating disorders, poor relationships, and depression. Although more girls and women with ADHD are being diagnosed, healthcare providers and researchers believe that ADHD still substantially goes undiagnosed in girls and women. According to the CDC, from 2003 to 2015, prescription rates for ADHD increased “by 700 percent among women aged 25 to 29, and by 560 percent among women aged 30 to 34.” However, 50-75% of girls and women are estimated to still be undiagnosed. Researchers are also exploring if ADHD can first present in adulthood—without any childhood warning signs. Two 2016 longitudinal studies in JAMA Psychiatry show that ADHD can show up for the first time in adulthood, without ADHD symptoms during childhood. So, you may have ADHD “pop up” in your adult life. If you or your child is experiencing any ADHD symptoms and it’s affecting your life or others’ lives negatively, seek out clinical attention. To learn more about ADHD, check out the CDC website at: www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/diagnosis.html. MARCH/APRIL 2018

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n Cr è

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the

Liquor & Wine Shoppe at Jonesville Sh

NEW

BE R R

Y R D.

Kangaroo

Gator Spirits & Fine Wines

14451 Newberry Road, Jonesville Turn at CVS in Jonesville and come straight to us.

352-332-3308

5701 SW 75th St. Gainesville

I-7 5 ER WAD TORO

The Liquor Wine &oppe

CVS

CR 241

146

Lucky Leprech auns

ne Gator FiSpirits Wine &

A RC H

AD

E R RO

Conveniently located in the Tower Square shopping area.

352-335-3994

LIKE BOTH LOCATIONS ON FACEBOOK FOR UPDATES ON WINE TASTINGS AND OTHER EVENTS! 146 |

OUR TOWN MAGAZINE

MARCH/APRIL 2018


Are you prepared for a teenage driver? Vehicle insurance is important. Having a team to help you when you need it most – that’s being prepared.

352-333-3775 285 NW 138th Terrace, Suite 100, Newberry

HO HOME • MOBILE HOME • AUTO • BOAT MOTORCYCLE M • UMBRELLA INSURANCE

www.schneider-insurance.com w MARCH/APRIL 2018

OUR TOWN MAGAZINE

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148

CLEAN, SAFE COST-EFFECTIVE

Call GRU Natural Gas at 352-393-1400 or visit gru.com/naturalgas for details.

You may be eligible to receive a

$44 CREDIT

on your ďŹ rst month’s bill when you mention Our Town!*

Take advantage of up to

$1,600 in Natural Gas appliance rebates!

* Some restrictions apply. Offer limited to eligible single-family homeowners who replace their LP gas, oil or electric appliances with natural gas models. New GRU natural gas customers only.

148 |

OUR TOWN MAGAZINE

MARCH/APRIL 2018

Our Town 2018 MAR-APR (Newberry & Jonesville)  

IN THIS ISSUE >> We celebrate the history of women who were, and are, trailblazers in our community. Learn about the ladies who have dedicat...

Our Town 2018 MAR-APR (Newberry & Jonesville)  

IN THIS ISSUE >> We celebrate the history of women who were, and are, trailblazers in our community. Learn about the ladies who have dedicat...