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GATOR TAILGATING | FALL FESTIVALS | NATIONS PARK GRAND OPENING Autumn 2012

F EE FR E TA TAKE ONE NE

Life Saver Hillary Glanzer Gave the Ultimate Gift

AROUND THE BEND HIGH SPRINGS SAGA Kayaking (way down) upon the Suwannee River

Our city’s storied past as a pioneering frontier town

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Striving to shed the true light of

JESUS CHRIST

“And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man.” -Luke 2:52

FGCA WELCOMES STUDENTS BACK FOR 20122013 SCHOOL YEAR

What is the purpose and mission of the school? Forest Grove Chrisan Academy strives to help students become more Christ-like while equipping them with the thinking skills and discernment they need to be successful not just in the classroom but in life. The school was started in 2006 and supports K-3 through 12th grade.

! Educaon at Forest Grove Chrisan Academy seeks to develop the total child spiritually, mentally, physically, and socially. We believe in teaching each child according to his/her individual needs, and we work together with the family and the church.

What benefits does Forest Grove Chrisan Academy provide that differ from public schools? • Small class sizes (10-12 students per class) • Chrisan learning environment • Students are taught academics and important life skills such as Chrisan conflict resoluon, problem solving, and leadership. • We BELIEVE that each student has the innate ability to succeed with the proper support.

What type of academic and other support is available to students? • The school provides a 1:7 student rao for personalized aenon. • Student progress is monitored on a weekly basis and tutoring is available. • A major goal is to maintain close contact with parents and to communicate regularly. • Full and paral scholarships are available from McKay and CTC. Please inquire at the school.

“You guys have changed my girls’ lives. They went from struggling academically and having an intense dislike of school to academic success and a love of learning.” -Jodie Strope

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page

52

CONTENTS AUTUMN 2012 • VOL. 10 ISSUE 03

>> FEATURES 28

40

52

Can You Dig It?

Continued Tradition The Univeristy of Florida Homecoming Parade

BY JANICE C. KAPLAN

BY ALLYSEN KERR

High Honors

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Albert E. Gator

Local Tumblers Vault into National Spotlight

A Brief History of UF’s Beloved Mascot

BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON

BY ALBERT ISAAC

How to Save a Life Hillary Glanzer Gave her Cousin the Ultimate Gift BY JEWEL MIDELIS

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Ft. White Students Win Big by Helping Their Community Grow

140 High Springs Saga of a Frontier Town BY ELLIS AMBURN

168 Amiable Alpacas

Gator Tailgating

Not Your Typical Farm Animal

Campus Comes Alive with a Timeless Tradition

BY JEWEL MIDELIS

BY ALBERT ISAAC

10 | Autumn 2012


ON THE COVER

PHOTO BY TOM MORRISSEY

When Newberry native Hillary Glanzer heard through Facebook that the cousin of a childhood friend needed help, she stepped up and did something not many people would consider doing: she gave her a kidney. In June, donor Hillary and recipient Hannah Craig checked into Tampa General Hospital for transplantation surgery.

>> IF YOU BUILD IT...

Nations Park

by Cassie Ganter

Take Me Out to the Ball Game

Take Me Out to the Ball Game

Nations Park in Newberry officially opens to the public on November 18, kicking off a five-day celebration with a parade. Nations Park is home to baseball tournaments for teams of children under age 8 to 13 from all over the U.S. and Canada.

BY CASSIE GANTER

L

ou Persutti first fell in love at age 5. From the first time he swung the wooden bat, struck the hard, white sphere and heard the crack of a good hit, he knew he was hooked. The first time he played baseball he fell in love. From playing the game to coaching it, he has felt an infatuation with America’s traditional pastime over the course of 66 years. Because of this passion, the now 71-year-old Persutti found himself becoming a founder of travel baseball tournaments. Based on his lifelong career in the game, he founded Newberry’s own Nation’s Park as an extension

of his passion that reaches out not only to Alachua County, but also — as the name suggests — an entire nation of young baseball players. Founded on the principle that no player gets left behind regardless of his or her skill level, Nation’s Park will soon become the home to baseball tournaments for teams of children under age 8 to 13 from all over the U.S. and Canada. The park is set to officially open to the public on November 18. Kicking off with a parade, the fiveday-long celebration is going to be huge, said Kyle Donnelly, a baseball operations coordinator. “This grand opening is going to involve the entire town of Newberry,” Donnelly said. “It’s a celebration of the whole county uniting and

PHOTO PROVIDED COURTESY OF NATIONS PARK

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coming together to embrace this new complex where players from all over North America can play. It’s a new concept that we are so excited to debut in Alachua County.” Nation’s Park, which houses 16 fields in a single complex, is unique in both its size and its ability to hold multiple tournaments in one location. During the grand opening, for example, the park will host tournaments for about 96 teams with approximately 15 people on each team.

For youth baseball and girl’s softball, tournaments that are held all over the country will now have the option to be hosted in one central location. This is one of the unique aspects of the ballpark that Persutti is most proud of. “A baseball complex this size is more conducive to the sport,” he said in a telephone interview. “Running a multi-team tournament in one place is much easier for the players and the families. It relieves some of the time, costs and energy

20 | Autumn 2012

that travel baseball and softball often demand.” But the impacts of the park do not end there. In a relatively small town like Newberry, a park of this magnitude will bring children from all over North America. Those children will also bring parents, family members and friends, who are interested in watching their loved one play in the park’s multiple tournaments. Nation’s Park is bound to have a significant impact

www.VisitOurTowns.com

>> DOWN BY THE RIVER

on the tourism industry. “This park is expected to be a huge economic stimulant for Alachua County and the city of Newberry,” Donnelly said. “It has created jobs at the park — from my job in baseball operations to the jobs in concessions — and after the grand opening and the start of the baseball season, it will undoubtedly have an impact on the businesses in town.” Ranging from hotels to movie theaters, the small businesses of

Autumn 2012 | 21

PHOTO BY JANICE KLAUM

Canoes are beached for the night at Dowling Park River Camp.

70

Suwannee Kayaking

by Debbie Meeks

Paddling Around the Bend

Paddling Around the Bend

Writer Debbie Meeks says she found her bliss in fishing, kayaking, cave diving and Florida springs conservation. In this story, she offers a personal account of her travels by kayak down the black water of the Great Suwannee River.

BY DEBBIE MEEKS

B

acking down the boat ramp at dawn one day in the spring of 2011, much of my kayak extends past the tailgate, pointing at the water like a compass needle. This is the beginning. The keel of the boat digs a furrow into the sandy bank as I drag it from the car. The nose bobs impatiently in the river while the hatches are packed with no room to spare. Have I packed too much or is something missing? My feet get wet for the first time as I settle into the boat — the first of many foot drenchings on a long float downstream. I’m committed now. I start repeating the mantra words that keep me going and keep fear at

bay: What’s around that bend? Primeval is the first word many people use to describe the Suwannee River when they are on it for the first time. In most of the country, it’s nearly impossible to evoke a primitive-river experience outside of a theme park, so the Suwannee is special. It is one of the least obstructed major rivers remaining in the United States, with no dams or locks. The river’s apparently unspoiled state is a mixture of nature and nurture. The river has an unsociable habit of rising as much as 40 feet, which discourages full-time residence on its banks so there are few houses. The Suwannee River Water Management District’s primary goal isn’t to nurture the

unspoiled feeling of the river, but by purchasing property for flood control, water quality protection and natural resource conservation, it inadvertently creates an opportunity for adventure. I heard about the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail Camps when the Peacock Slough camp was built in 2008 and I wanted to see it for myself. The camps, however, are only accessible by boat, which is both a challenge and an invitation. To get there I had to plan a boatcamping trip, so I started to look at the Suwannee River differently. With a skiff, the whole river can be traveled in a couple of days, but there’s something special about “slow travel.” I prefer richness and adventure: those kindred moments

70 | Autumn 2012

www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2012 | 71

>> AT YOUR SERVICE

152

Giving Back

by Allysen Kerr

At Your Service Service organizations have a long history of selflessly serving their communities, from weeding highway medians to refurbishing daycare facilities in need. In this story, we visit three such organizations: The High Springs Rotary, the Kiwanis Club of Santa Fe, and the High Springs Lions Club.

Changing the Community, Changing the World

BY ALLYSEN KERR

W

hether it is reading programs, fundraising events or back-toschool drives, the civic service organizations in the High Springs/ Alachua area are creating a ripple effect of change that can be felt locally and abroad. Rotary International’s main objective is service “in the community, in the workplace and around the globe,” states its website. Since its inception in 1926, the High Springs Rotary has been dedicated to the mantra of “Service above Self.” It accomplishes this goal by sponsoring several events in the area throughout the year. Most recently the club participated in cleaning up

the High Springs Community School just in time for the new school year. The club aims to be in the forefront of the community and to help out in any aspect, said the club’s president, Valorie Cason. The Annual Car Show, which takes place October 26 and 27 this year, and the Annual Duck Race at Camp Kulaqua are the largest fundraising events for the organization. The funds raised from these events go to support education, training, and other non-profit organizations. These include the Boy Scout Troup 69, the Rotary InterACT Club at Santa Fe High School, Friends of Alachua, Stop Children’s Cancer and other organizations. This year, the club was able to sponsor a Closed Closet event,

152 | Autumn 2012

which provided polo shirts for children whose families could not afford uniforms. They also teamed up with other Rotary Clubs to participate in the Dictionary Project. Cason, a professional and a parent, holds these types of events near and dear to her heart.

“We had several kids that were like, ‘this is the first book that I’ve ever had’ and I’m sitting here looking at my kids’ side of the bookshelf full of books and you don’t realize that sitting right next to you could be somebody that has never had a book in their life,” Cason said.

Since the Rotary club is an international organization, members and the community can feel its affects overseas and on the home front. “We’re helping with water projects overseas, we’re helping to eradicate polio, but you’re also seeing the effects of what the Rotary does right

www.VisitOurTowns.com

PHOTO BY ALBERT ISAAC

High Springs Rotary Club member Heather Clarich holds up the winning rubber ducky during the Annual Duck Race fundraiser at Camp Kulaqua in 2011. Also pictured are Micky Milam (left) and Rotary Club President Valorie Cason (right).

Autumn 2012 | 153

The articles printed in Our Town Magazine™ do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Tower Publications, Inc. or their editorial staff. Our Town Magazine endeavors to accept reliable advertising; however, we can not be held responsible by the public for advertising claims. Our Town Magazine reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisement. All rights reserved. © 2012 Tower Publications, Inc.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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>> FEATURES page

Published quarterly by Tower Publications, Inc.

80

www.towerpublications.com

PUBLISHER Charlie Delatorre charlie@towerpublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Albert Isaac editor@towerpublications.com fax: 1-800-967-7382 OFFICE MANAGER Bonita Delatorre bonita@towerpublications.com ART DIRECTOR Hank McAfee hank@towerpublications.com DESIGNER Neil McKinney neil@towerpublications.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ellis Amburn Cassie Ganter Janice Kaplan Allysen Kerr Debbie Meeks Jewel Midelis Amanda Williamson INTERNS Jewel Midelis Cassie Ganter PHOTO BY DELIA LANDER

Young tailgaters Chad Hollingsworth (left) and Kyle Lander continue the Gator tradition in Gainesville.

Nancy Short 352-416-0196 nancy@towerpublications.com

COLUMNISTS 38 66 102 134 159

ADVERTISING SALES Jenni Bennett 352-416-0210 jenni@towerpublications.com

Crystal Henry ............................................................ NAKED SALSA Donna Bonnell ......................................................... EMBRACING LIFE Kendra Siler-Marsiglio ..................................... HEALTHY EDGE Albert Isaac ................................................................ DIFFERENT NOTE Diane E. Shepard .................................................. MAMA MUSINGS

Pam Slaven 352-416-0213 pam@towerpublications.com Helen Stalnaker 352-416-0209 helen@towerpublications.com Annie Waite 352-416-0204 annie@towerpublications.com

INFORMATION 106 Community Calendar 126 Library Happenings 130 Gator Sports Schedule 12 | Autumn 2012

132 2012 School Calendar 136 Worship Centers 176 Advertiser Index

ADVERTISING OFFICE 4400 NW 36th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax


When you visit Tioga Town Center you’ll get the latest Lilly Pulitzer resort wear, shoes, accessories

…and Susan. Sure, the picturesque storefronts, coffee shop, boutiques, restaurants, world-class fitness center and bakery make Tioga Town Center a prime shopping and business destination. But it’s more than that here — It’s the people who make Tioga Town Center an experience like no other in Gainesville. It’s people like Susan Hines and her staff at the Colorful Gator, keeping your wardrobe bright and beautiful with the latest Lilly fashions, who will make Tioga Town Center your favorite place to visit. So come on out! Take a stroll around and talk to the people who will make Tioga Town Center your favorite destination in town.

SW 128th Street & W. Newberry Rd. Tioga, Florida 32669

352.331.4000 www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2012 | 13 www.TiogaTownCenter.com

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SPECIAL >> WORLD SERIES

Babe Ruth Softball cores of female softball players, their family and their coaches descended upon the City of Alachua for the 2012 Babe Ruth Softball World Series from August 4 to August 8, and they brought a surge of business to the local economy along with them. “Economic impact overall did very well,” said Hal Brady, recreation director for the City of Alachua. “Our city is very welcoming, and they are really, really big on youth recreation activities.” Brady believes approximately 20,000 people flocked to Alachua County to partake in the experience surrounding the World Series. According to him, seven or eight hotels from Alachua to Gainesville housed visitors from

S

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outside locations. The influx of people affected all aspects of the economy, he said, including local stores, dry cleaners, car rentals, hotels and restaurants. “People bought everything you can think of,” Brady said. “They even bought school supplies.” Conestogas Restaurant experienced a greater influx in business during the 2012 tournament than last year’s world series, he said. Even though the tournament only lasted four days, many of the visitors stayed for as long as seven days. Brady expects the tournaments to last three weeks in 2013 because of the addition of two tournaments scheduled to take place in Alachua, which could bring more than 40 teams to the area.

Local businesses participated in the World Series by purchasing pink helmets for every girl playing in the tournament. For example, Valerie’s Loft sponsored the team from New Hampshire. Volunteers escorted the teams to their respective business to pick up the helmets. Valerie Taylor, owner of Valerie’s Loft, said that purchasing the helmets was worth every penny. “It made those girls so happy, and their families were so impressed,” she said. “It made them feel so welcome.” Even though it was 9 p.m. when the girls arrived at Taylor’s shop, the families browsed through the store. They purchased a lot of jewelry, Taylor said, and came back over the days they were here to continue to shop. s


MESSAGE >> FROM THE EDITOR

Greetings faithful readers! Ah, yes another season has come and gone and we are all looking forward to cooler weather. I know I am. The days are growing shorter and we’re back to rising at the crack of dawn to get our son off to school on time. It’s been a slightly lazy summer of sleeping in for all of us; I miss it already. Along with the fall season and the startup of the new school year comes football season, both of which are well underway as I type these words. Along these lines we offer you first a story about the honors bestowed upon some Fort White students by the Nutrients For Life Foundation for a gardening experiment they conducted last year. (Spoiler alert: the group won a $5,000 first-place prize). And speaking about students winning awards, we bring you a story about some young athletes from Tumblemania based in High Springs. The group recently came home with a bevy of honors from the 2012 United States Trampoline and Tumbling Association (USTA) National Championships in Madison, Wisconsin. We also share with you stories on some long-time UF traditions, from tailgating to the Homecoming Parade to the history of a pair of my favorite mascots, Albert and Alberta of the Florida Gators. There are many service organizations in our area, and in this edition we focus on three: Kiwanis Club of Santa Fe, the High Springs Rotary and the High Springs Lions Club. Read all about the efforts made by these organizations to better our communities. The time has come for the grand opening of Newberry’s Nations Park. During the week of Thanksgiving the park will host its Louisville Slugger “Showcase Invitational,” described as a “true showcase of Coaches and Players who love the game of baseball.” Play ball! Last but certainly not least, we bring you a story about organ donation and a young lady from Newberry who gave one of her kidneys to a woman in need. Hillary Glanzer takes generosity to an entirely new level, offering the gift of life to the cousin of a childhood friend. These stories and more await you within the pages of this magazine. Enjoy! s

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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www.fabulouscoach.com Players Card required by casino. Information needed: Full Legal Name, Address, Date of Birth, Driver’s License Number. Fee can be paid over the phone or cash to the driver on day of trip.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2012 | 15

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STAFF >> CONTRIBUTORS Cassie Ganter

Amanda Williamson

is a freelance writer and a senior at UF majoring in journalism. A South Florida girl at heart, she enjoys relaxing days spent on the beach when she is not busy writing feature stories.

is a recent graduate of UF’s College of Journalism and Communications. She has been writing for as long as she can remember. She enjoys spending time with her friends, family and animals.

clganter@ufl.edu

awilliamson@ufl.edu

Janice Kaplan

Ellis Amburn

has been a freelance writer since 2005. In her spare time Janice loves cooking, Gator sports, Jimmy Buffett anything and spending time with her husband and kids.

is a resident of High Springs and the author of biographies of Roy Orbison, Elizabeth Taylor and others. ellis.amburn@gmail.com

kaplan_ janice@yahoo.com

Crystal Henry

Jewel Midelis

is a freelance writer and columnist born and raised in West Texas. She received her B.S. in Journalism in 2006 from the University of Florida. She is in love with the Florida landscape.

is a freelance writer and a student at UF’s College of Journalism. In her spare time, she enjoys going to the beach, camping at state parks and playing with her puppies. jmidelis91@yahoo.com

ces03k@gmail.com

Allysen Kerr

Debbie Meeks

Allysen Kerr is a freelance writer and graduate of the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications.

used to steal time from her careers — first as a cabinetmaker then as a computer programmer — for her outdoor adventures. Now that she’s retired, she can enjoy Florida without having to steal anymore.

allysenrenee@gmail.com

meeks.debbie@gmail.com

16 | Autumn 2012


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CoolSculpting® and the CoolSculpting® logo are registered trademarks of ZELTIQ Aesthetics, Inc. The “snowflake” mark is a trademark of ZELTIQ Aesthetics, Inc. Copyright © 2011, ZELTIQ Aesthetics, Inc. IC0406-A

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Saturday, September 29, 2012 The Se Seba b tian Ferrero Foundation’s annual bas fundraising event Noche de Gala hass beco bec me e a stan tandal dalone one event, unsurpassed in our regio ion n. Follo Fo Fol lowing last year’s sold out event, this year’ ar’ss Noche de Gal Ga a promises to be packed with elect ctrifying g en enter t tainment by Team iLum Lum min inate, ina mad de famo ous by America’ss Go Gott Tale T lent nt, performa pe mancess fr ma from o Las Ve V gas il Vegas illus lusion ionist onis Simon Winthr Win th op, p a silent au aucti cti t on fea featur tu ing g un unique and ex ra ext rao ordi rdinar narry items, a Cham Champio pion Paso Fi Fino no hor horse o e sho show, w, a live e ba band, exquisite e dining d and n nd much muc h more m re!! No oche e de e Gal G a wi will ll be b hosted hos ho osted at a the sp pectacu acula lar 64 43-acre c Besilu cre Be Collect ction ion in Micanopy, Mic py y Fl F ori rida da.       

                      Ch Chi h ldr ld dren n at th the he Un h niversi siity of Flo Florid rida a

18 | Autumn 2012


Thank You to Our Sponsors

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>> IF YOU BUILD IT...

Nations Park Take Me Out to the Ball Game

BY CASSIE GANTER ou Persutti first fell in love at age 5. From the first time he swung the wooden bat, struck the hard, white sphere and heard the crack of a good hit, he knew he was hooked. The first time he played baseball he fell in love. From playing the game to coaching it, he has felt an infatuation with America’s traditional pastime over the course of 66 years. Because of this passion, the now 71-year-old Persutti found himself becoming a founder of travel baseball tournaments. Based on his lifelong career in the game, he founded Newberry’s own Nations Park as an extension

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of his passion that reaches out not only to Alachua County, but also — as the name suggests — an entire nation of young baseball players. Founded on the principle that no player gets left behind regardless of his or her skill level, Nations Park will soon become the home to baseball tournaments for teams of children under age 8 to 13 from all over the U.S. and Canada. The park is set to officially open to the public on November 18. Kicking off with a parade, the fiveday-long celebration is going to be huge, said Kyle Donnelly, a baseball operations coordinator. “This grand opening is going to involve the entire town of Newberry,” Donnelly said. “It’s a celebration of the whole county uniting and

coming together to embrace this new complex where players from all over North America can play. It’s a new concept that we are so excited to debut in Alachua County.” Nations Park, which houses 16 fields in a single complex, is unique in both its size and its ability to hold multiple tournaments in one location. During the grand opening, for example, the park will host tournaments for about 96 teams with approximately 15 people on each team.


PHOTO PROVIDED COURTESY OF NATIONS PARK

For youth baseball and girl’s softball, tournaments that are held all over the country will now have the option to be hosted in one central location. This is one of the unique aspects of the ballpark that Persutti is most proud of. “A baseball complex this size is more conducive to the sport,” he said in a telephone interview. “Running a multi-team tournament in one place is much easier for the players and the families. It relieves some of the time, costs and energy

that travel baseball and softball often demand.” But the impacts of the park do not end there. In a relatively small town like Newberry, a park of this magnitude will bring children from all over North America. Those children will also bring parents, family members and friends, who are interested in watching their loved one play in the park’s multiple tournaments. Nations Park is bound to have a significant impact

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on the tourism industry. “This park is expected to be a huge economic stimulant for Alachua County and the city of Newberry,” Donnelly said. “It has created jobs at the park — from my job in baseball operations to the jobs in concessions — and after the grand opening and the start of the baseball season, it will undoubtedly have an impact on the businesses in town.” Ranging from hotels to movie theaters, the small businesses of

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PHOTOS PROVIDED COURTESY OF NATIONS PARK

“This park is expected to be a huge economic stimulant for Alachua County and the city of Newberry,” Newberry will soon have to accommodate the families and friends of those playing at Nations Park. “Because of the games, friends and family of the players will need the services offered near the park,” Persutti said. “These people have to eat somewhere, shop somewhere, sleep somewhere and get gas somewhere.”

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With the park attracting up to 96 teams per tournament and 15 players per team, the city expects Nations Park to bring an influx of people to a spot that is not typically perceived as a tourist location. Aside from the economic surge, Persutti also thinks that the park will have a more sentimental effect on the city.

“It will bring the community a great sense of pride and dignity to say that there is a nation-wide recognized venue located in their hometown,” he said. “Nations Park will be known to the entire baseball community throughout North America and everyone in Newberry will be able to say that they house the park. We couldn’t have done it without Alachua County’s seamless partnership that will make this a national success.” Although the current size of the ballpark complex is already impressive at 16 baseball fields, Persutti and


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PHOTOS BY ANNE BELLO

baseball operations coordinators have bigger sights set for Nations Park. In the future, Persutti hopes to double the size of the park. Since all 16 of the fields currently tend to leagues in youth age divisions, the next 16 field additions would cater toward the older players ages 13 and up, he said. These fields will specifically be used for showcase games and have larger dimensions. “The opening of this park gives the city of Newberry a lot be excited about,” Persutti said. “It will now be the site to be known across all of

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North America for national tournaments. These are some of the most exquisite fields in the country and the great design of the park I think will exceed expectations of players and coaches all over the country.” Envisioning the completely finished ballpark, Persutti described his devotion to youth baseball and girl’s softball as inspiration stemming from a lifelong respect and admiration of the sport and the traditional morals that the game instills in its players. With all of the excitement to look forward to in relation to

Nations Park, Persutti’s main interest and mission is not to make the city of Newberry famous, stimulate its economy, or even to change the way baseball tournaments are played. His mission in founding Nations Park since day one has remained the same: to preserve the values that baseball stands for. “This isn’t about me,” he said. “This is about the passion of the game that starts in the youth. This is about our country. This is nothing more or nothing less than values, tradition and the American flag revisited.” s


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>> DOWN TO EARTH

Can You Dig It? Ft. White Students Win Big by Helping Their Community Grow

BY JANICE C. KAPLAN ccording to the United Nations, the world’s population is expected to reach 10.1 billion by the year 2100 — a 43 percent increase from current numbers. Whether this rapid rate is due to increased birth rates, better medical care or other reasons, it brings with it a stark reality. Someone has to feed these people. But increased food production has to take into account the welfare of the planet. Wildlife habitats need to be preserved and pollution must be avoided. “We’re concerned about water quality, the leaching of nitrogen and other nutrients getting into the water supply and our springs,”

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said Wayne Oelfke in a phone interview. Oelfke, along with Jill Huesman, teaches the Foundations of Agriculture classes at Fort White Middle/High School. “And yet on the other side, we hear about being a sustainable community. It’s almost a dichotomy; maybe we shouldn’t use nutrients in these areas, or maybe we shouldn’t be watering. But we still have to produce the most important energy of all, and that’s the energy that sustains the human population.” It is a tricky balancing act that nations around the world strive to achieve. But on a local level, Oelfke and some of his students are already finding answers to this question. Last year, the group conducted a seven-week experiment that tested

the effects that varying amounts of water and different types of nutrients had on mustard greens. Their findings garnered a $5,000 first-place prize from the Nutrients For Life Foundation’s annual Helping Communities Grow competition. “We understand plants need nutrients. The purpose of this project was to take a look and ask, ‘Using best management practices, can we control the use of nutrients and water and produce the best amount of food we can and have little or a lot less effect on the environment?’” Oelfke said. Fort White was an ideal environment for such a project because of its porous soil and its proximity to natural springs and other sensitive areas. So Oelfke and 58 Fort White


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PHOTOS COURTESY OF WAYNE OELFKE

At the open house, students demonstrated the steps of their experiment and explained their findings to members of the community. On two thirds of an acre, the class managed to grow 1,800 pounds of mustard greens — enough to supply 50 families for one week through the Christian Service Center of Columbia County.

“Not only did they have to do this project and record and analyze the data, but they also had to deliver it to the community and tell them what they found.” students (some of whom are also members of the Future Farmers of America) prepared a two-thirds-acre plot of land to transplant the mustard greens. The plot was divided in half to test two variables — the amount of water given to the plants and the type of fertilizer used. In the water-testing half, a third of the plants received the normal recommended amount of water, a third received half that amount, and a third received one and a half times the normal amount. Plants in all three of these sections were given the same levels of ammonia nitrate fertilizer, one of the most common nutrients used in farming today. The fertilization-testing portion of the land was also divided into three areas. One was given ammonia nitrate, one was given

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a slow-release resin-coated urea, and one was given organic Black Kow manure. An additional strip of plants was set aside from these sections and not given any nutrients at all. All of these sections were given the same amount of water. For seven weeks Oelfke and his students worked in the garden, testing the soil regularly for moisture levels and measuring the growth of the plants. Drip tape was used to deliver water directly to the plants, and control factors were meticulously maintained. A month and a half later, the group had some surprising results: there was no significant difference in growth among the plants that received fertilizer. The plants without any nutrients were much smaller, but all of the fertilized

plants thrived regardless of the type of nutrients used. Oelfke and his students also found that the same was true with the amount of water given to the crops; overwatering or under-watering from the recommended amount had no significant effect on them. These results pointed to an important conclusion. “We can live in highly sensitive areas,” Oelfke said, “and if we manage and control the amount of water and the nutrients we use, we can grow plants successfully. We can improve production on the acreage we already have and not have to expand to larger acres.” While the experiment was a class project, it also brought the community together at every stage. Experts from local organizations such as the University of Florida IFAS Extension, Columbia County Farm Bureau, Florida Farm Bureau and PotashCorp helped the students engineer the irrigation system and showed them the proper ways to plant, cut and treat the greens. At the conclusion of the project, the students held an open house to


show members of the community how they conducted each step and what their results mean. They also brought their findings to local libraries to educate the public on the practices that yielded the best results with the smallest impact on the environment. And once it was all done, they donated their crop of mustard greens — all 1,800 pounds of it — to the Christian Service

Center of Columbia County to be distributed to 50 area families in need. “The neat thing about the project is that the students had the opportunity to do something that produced some real results, something of significance to the community,” Oelfke said. “Not only did they have to do this project and record and analyze the data,

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but they also had to deliver it to the community and tell them what they found. When students teach others they tend to retain and internalize [the information] more.” In May, Oelfke submitted the group’s results for the Helping Communities Grow competition. A month later they were notified that their project was one of three in the finals, and they were invited

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF WAYNE OELFKE

Students regularly tested the soil to ensure adequate moisture levels. They used blue dye in the irrigation lines to see how well the water was delivered to plants. They found that when more than the recommended amount of water was given, much of the water ended up nearly two feet below the roots of the plant — away from where it can be drawn up.

“It felt amazing,” she said. “We would do presentations and see people’s faces change, and see how we’re contributing and how our school is growing from it.” to attend the Nutrients for Life Foundation’s convention in late June. The mission of Nutrients for Life is to educate the public about the benefits of fertilizer using sciencebased methods. It is a goal that dovetails well with the purpose of the experiment, and the foundation agreed, awarding the group its $5,000 first-place prize to further

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develop and grow the school’s agricultural program. Conny Ruiz was one of the students who worked on the project. Now a senior at Fort White High School, her passion on the subject is palpable during a phone interview. “It felt amazing,” she said. “We would do presentations and see

people’s faces change, and see how we’re contributing and how our school is growing from it. People recognize the importance of growing in a way that is ecologically sustainable but is also friendly, and that we’re actually benefiting the earth around here. [People should know] the importance of food in our life, and that it’s possible to grow in a sustainable manner in your own backyard.” Oelfke relishes the empowerment that his students feel as a result of their work and the recognition from Nutrients for Life. They gained confidence in their abilities to find the truth using sound scientific methods, and they realized that they can impact the future at any level. “This is not one-and-done,” he said. “We’ve got a lot of students that want to control their destiny a little bit here. That’s what was so pleasing and encouraging — that students want to take an active part. “I told the Nutrients for Life Foundation that even if we didn’t win the money, we still won.” s


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DENTURES SO NATURAL only you and your dentist will know Don’t let your confidence fade and appearance transform because of teeth loss. Socialize with friends! Laugh until your tummy hurts, enjoy the finest wines, dance until your feet go numb and get your life back!

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he best accessory is always a beautiful smile. It used to be that people felt tooth loss was inevitable with aging, but research shows that’s no longer the case-many people will go their entire lives with their original teeth. But when teeth do need to be replaced, there are more options than ever to mimic what Mother Nature intended, and no one but you and your dentist need know which are natural and which are not.

An estimated 33 million people, from all walks of life and of all ages, wear dentures. Today’s dentures bear little resemblance to those from generations past. And while many still feel dentures are a taboo topic, think about other such taboos that have fallen by the wayside, hair color, cosmetic surgery, Botox — these are taken for granted nowadays. And whether you want everyone to know or just you, dentures can be a comfortable, beautiful solution.

Fooling Mother Nature Dentures can be conventional or implant-supported for better retention. Every person’s mouth is unique, and a specialist can create a custom fit to ensure a natural-looking and functioning smile. Paivi Samant, M.A., D.D.S. specializes in prosthodontics, or the esthetic replacement and restoration of teeth. In addition to their years of training in dentistry, prosthodontists complete three years of training in complex dentistry. When it comes to a person’s smile, Dr. Samant says there is no one-size-fits-all. “We look at a number of factors when creating our

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The changes in technology seen by the dental industry over recent years are extraordinary improvements in materials and techniques — meaning dentures are more comfortable than ever before, and you have the choice between picture-perfect, or perfectly natural.” – Paivi Samant, M.A., D.D.S. Prosthodontist


“They really feel natural! It brings you back to just being normal. Recovery was no time.” — Mrs. B.

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patients’ treatment plans, with the goal of getting each person back to optimal function-feeling good, looking good, eating and speaking well.” Each denture is custom-designed to provide the best look and feel. The smallest adjustments can make all the difference. For example, slightly longer teeth can create a younger-looking smile, because teeth wear down over years of use. The most important thing, says Dr. Samant, is to replace missing teeth as soon as possible, even if a short-term solution must be used. “It doesn’t take very long for your bite to change, and that can lead to problems with eating and talking. The mouth and jaw can also start losing their shape, making people look much older and making for more difficult work down the road.”

Advanced Technology Dr. Samant says that with today’s materials, quality dentures are difficult to detect by regular folks, even close-up. Latest advances in denture teeth and resins help make a natural-looking smile that lasts for years. Tooth patterns can imitate the exact shape and size of original teeth and the base of a full denture, made to look like natural gums, is also made from the latest acrylic materials, “With these

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new materials, that make such natural looking teeth, you’d never know they weren’t yours,” assures Dr. Samant. Mrs. M., a very satisfied patient, agrees: “Even people that know me very well my mother, my sister — people don’t know unless I tell them.” It does require a little patience, however, to mimicor improve upon Mother Nature. No two dentures, even for the same person, will be exactly alike. Impressions of the mouth are made, custom trays to mold the dentures are created, precise measurements to determine exactly how the teeth will look and align — all go into making a first wax denture. Even better, says Dr. Samant, this will soon be done digitally. Most people need a few days to try their new teeth out to see how they fit and feel and to get a second opinion from their family and friends. “Ultimately, you must decide if it’s you,” she says. From there, the final denture is made, and after what for most people is a short adjustment period, it’s time to enjoy that perfect smile again. The final step to keeping that perfect smile perfect, reminds Dr. Samant, is regular check-ups, needed to make sure the dentures remain a perfect fit. And, daily care of these teeth is just as important as it was for the original set. With that, you‘ll be all smiles for years to come.

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COLUMN >> CRYSTAL HENRY

Naked Salsa Don’t be such a wiener

iving birth to my second daughter was the most invigorating and wonderful experience of my entire life. I’m also one of those ridiculous women who think pregnancy is a beautiful time full of rainbows and unicorns. The first three trimesters are filled with little magical wonders that I cherish and love. But that fourth trimester, you know, the one where you actually get to hold and cuddle that little miracle you created inside your body? Well that one is for the birds my friend. I never want to do that nonsense again in my life. The cocktail of post-pregger hormones and sleep deprivation trumps morning sickness, backaches and cankles any day. I’d gladly let someone put their baby inside me. But, by God when that little darling is born it can go keep someone else awake at night. Now the hubs and I rarely agree. It’s what keeps things spicy around here. But one thing we can come together on is the idea that we are only marginally equipped to handle two offspring. An even number just makes it easier for dinner reservations and Disney rides. So that settles it. We will become a two-kid household. We have opted to play a man-to-man defense instead

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of a zone. So the only decision to make was who should pull the proverbial plug on our procreation. Now let it be known that this was not a long conversation, we were both stone-cold sober, and we were both fully clothed. We might have actually been at Denny’s at the time, so rest assured I could not use my womanly temptations to sway this verdict. But my manly man husband offered to sacrifice his own vas deferens in the interest of our family-of-four fantasy. Was it because he witnessed me stoically give birth to his child without so much as a Tylenol? Or is it the fear of screwing with my hormones, which aren’t the most reliable on a good day? We may never know. But he gets 150 cool points and a gold star for offering to go under the knife, or tiny little scopey thingy, whatever they use to do all that. And since I did birth a child, and he had to have an emergency appendectomy this year, we had met our deductible and were just looking for procedures to get done this calendar year. So, one Friday afternoon he chugged a beer, marched into the doctor’s office, and just half an hour later walked bow legged into a

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weekend of frozen peas, extra strength ibuprofen and watching golf from his recliner. I was pretty impressed with how quickly he healed from the whole thing. He started fiddling around the house on Sunday, rode his motorcycle to work Monday and played two softball games Tuesday. The man really did bounce back good as new. Plus, he got prescription conjugals; an added bonus of the procedure. However, his father was less than thrilled at the thought that his boy had nixed any chances of having a son of his own, and I’m pretty sure I was in trouble for not producing a male heir. Poor fella didn’t get the memo that it’s my hubby’s boys that determine whether I’ll have boys. But whatevs. I was charged with taking my husband’s manhood on top of it. He and others like him were completely appalled that my husband would agree, let alone offer, to give up his virility instead of me. I should have just tied my fallopians in pretty little bows and been happy to have to privilege. My father-in-law actually told my mother-in-law, “I hope you know there’s no way in hell I’d ever do that.” I was worried my hubs might feel pressure from all the negativity and brow beating these other “men” were giving him over this very personal and fairly heroic decision. But he didn’t even flinch. Well, not because of all the razzing. I’ll bet he flinched at some point during the actual snippety snip. But my baby’s daddy is man enough to shut off the supply valve without fearing that the whole factory will go kaput. So we giggle at our buddies who are done having kids, but are still too afraid of losing their manhood. One pal tried to convince his wife’s doctor to just go ahead and tie her up when she goes in for her cesarean. While they’re all scared out of their minds of having a little oopsie baby and avoiding each other like the plague, my fella is getting all the action because we know we’re in the clear. It’s downright liberating. So to all those “men” out there demanding their wives undergo yet another traumatic construction project on their nether bits I say, “Your wife’s been through enough you wieners. Grow a pair and get it done.” s

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>> JUMP AROUND

High Honors Local Tumblers Vault into the National Spotlight

BY AMANDA WILLAMSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM MORRISSEY way from the leotards, trampolines and tumbling mats, the eight girls of Tumblemania’s competitive team act just like any other girl their age. They watch “Pretty Little Liars,” enjoy spending time with friends and keep their grades high enough to be on the honor roll. But inside the High Springs’ gym, they become focused, driven National Championship winners. Three days a week, two hours a day, the girls set aside outside distractions and work together as a team to prepare for the next competition. After all, Team Tumblemania came home from the 2012 United States Trampoline and Tumbling Association (USTA) National Championships in Madison,

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Wisconsin, with 12 top ten finishes, and three of the girls took home first place in single events. Nineyear-old Allison Vargas won first place in the sub-advanced trampoline and double mini, earning the rank of a National Champion. Founded in 1971 by Larry Griswold and George Nissen, the USTA started its first nationals with approximately 250 members competing in one division. Today it has grown to nine divisions, 2,200 athletes and 5,000 events. “My main priority as their coach is that the girls are happy and healthy, and that I am creating an environment in my gym in which they will be able to reach their individual potential,” said Marci Schneider, owner and head coach


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of Tumblemania. Nine-year-old Allison Vargas won first place in the sub-advanced trampoline and double mini, earning the rank of a National Champion. Hannah Tapia-Ruano won first in flight and fifth overall in novice trampoline, while Mary Jo McGrath earned second in flight and fifth overall in sub-advanced trampoline. Kayley Halbrook, 13, took home first place in flight and second in advanced double mini. Out of all

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eight girls, Kayley has been on the team the longest. A year after she joined Tumblemania, she received an invite from Schneider to join the competitive team. Even if they did not take home first, each of the girls won a place among the top ten, including Rachel Morrison, Emma Scott, Katie Vaughn and Madison Weber. Many of the team members attribute success to their fellow Tumbling and Trampoline (T&T)

mates, believing that each person contributes to the whole, offering tips and encouragement. “I guess we’ve all bonded and became more than just people who get together every week,” Madison said. “We became friends.” For most of the girls, the sport called to them because it looked fun or a friend had mentioned it to them. “I never had a trampoline at my house, so it’s just really fun to come here and use the tramp,”


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Katie said. “I do things that a lot of people can’t do.” When the girls arrive for their training sessions at 6 p.m., Schneider said the night begins with a run around the gym to a current song, usually selected from the NOW CD collection. To prepare for the workout, the team spends approximately 25 minutes stretching and conditioning. The rest of the night is divided among the three events for which the girls train, said Schneider, including Tumbling, Double Mini and Trampoline.

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During the off-season, the girls practice on skill building and progression. But when competitions get here, they focus on routine repetition, refining skills and passes. “I have always wanted to own a gym that was a place where students, whether recreational or on a team, felt like they were part of something truly special,” Schneider said. Many of the team members started Tumblemania at a young age, varying from three to nine years old. Schneider, however, does not want people to feel limited by

age. A lot of the growth associated with T&T is not from the age a person starts, but how much hard work and commitment they put into the sport. “The ones that have that competitive drive, that passion, it’s not going to matter how old they are,” she said. “They are going to seek this out.” Schneider helps her gym members, especially the competitive team, form shortterm and long-term goals. Team Tumblemania has its own bulletin


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board where each member lists how far he or she plans to grow during the coming year. When Hannah first started she was just doing forward rolls, but now she said she has progressed to flips and other complex moves. For her, she watched others perform bigger stunts than she could and knew she had to push herself to get there. While the sport may be challenging, Hannah believes that it is worthwhile, especially when she is having fun and winning trophies. “You’re never really in your

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comfort zone when you’re doing your skills,” Madison said. Like Hannah, Madison understands the importance of pushing herself. Not long after she started, she suffered a mental block, worrying about going backwards instead of improving at T&T. However, she never gave up. She believes the team has really helped her build self-confidence, teaching her that sometimes it is OK to fall. The important part, she said, is to get back up and try again. “The goal of our program is that

we want the children to be successful, but we also work really hard on building their self-confidence,” Schneider said. Tumblemania opened for business in March 1996 inside the Spring Hill Middle School gymnasium. After relocating to Alachua for several years, the gym once again found a home inside the High Springs’ city limits in 1999. In 2003, Tumblemania moved to its current location, a gym built specifically for the business. At Tumblemania, girls and


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LEFT TO RIGHT: Tumblemania athletes Mary Jo McGrath, Katie Vaughn, Madison Weber, Emma Scott, Rachel Morrison, Hannah Tapia-Ruano, Allison Vargas and Kayley Halbrook (front center in royal blue leotard).

boys from ages two and up are welcome to participate in the T&T practices. Mothers of the children can get involved at Tumblemania by attending the “Mom and Tots” class. Schneider trains the students using various forms of Tumbling and Trampoline equipment, such as double-mini trampoline, rod tumbling floor and competitive trampoline. For example, she said the children learn a routine consisting of 10 skills on trampoline. “It is a combination of flips and jumps that gets more complex as their skill level increases,” Schneider said. Through analysis of archeological drawings, tumbling skills can be seen as far back in history as

ancient China, Egypt and Persia, she said. However, the trampoline competition did not become an event until 1936, when George Nissen made the equipment portable. In 1964, the world saw the first Trampoline World Championships, and three years later it was recognized as an official sport. Each girl on Team Tumblemania knows the sport requires sacrifice, especially for people their age. “I give up being able to hang out with my friends, but it’s worth it,” Rachel said. And across the board, each of her teammates agreed. For the parents, the sacrifice may be financial. Team Tumblemania requires uniforms and equipment,

as well as travel fare and hotel costs when the team attends tournaments out of state. To help offset these costs, the Team’s parents and the eight girls fundraise by selling cups, running concessions at Gator events, earning corporate sponsorships and selling snacks in the gym lobby. But in the end, Schneider and Team Tumblemania know that it is not the medals, trophies or championships that keep the girls coming back each week. It is the sport, the people, and maybe, just maybe, the rhinestone-encrusted leotards. “When you ask them what their favorite part is, they will probably tell you what they’ve done as a team, not what awards they won,” Schneider said. s

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>> ULTIMATE GIFT

How to Save a Life One Woman, Two Kidneys, One Decision

BY JEWEL MIDELIS en years ago, Amanda Sara Glanzer was killed in a car accident in Newberry. At the tender age of 21, Sara was not brought to the hospital, but to the morgue. Although she was an organ donor, no one contacted her family about donating her organs. It was not until a week and a half later that the thought of donating her organs dawned on her mother, Joy. Sara’s younger sister, Hillary, said that her mother would have given anything to donate her

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organs — to save lives with the life that was lost. Earlier this year when Hillary, now 28, decided to donate her kidney to a friend’s cousin, Hannah Craig, she thought of her sister. She thought that this is a chance to donate while she is living. “To be a living donor and to see how well Hannah is doing today and how healthy she is, it is amazing to me,” Hillary said in a recent phone interview from her home in Orlando.

The Story that Saved a Life Growing up, Hillary and Hannah’s

cousin, Sara Decubellis, were best friends. Being so close to the family, Hillary was aware of Hannah’s health problems. She knew that Hannah suffered from lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease that can destroy any part of the body. She knew that when Hannah was two years old both of her kidneys were failing. She knew that because of this Hannah received her first kidney transplant, which was donated by Hannah’s mother. In January, Hillary heard about Hannah’s medical condition once again. Hannah’s aunt pleaded with

PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY

Newberry native Hillary Glanzer (center) with her proud parents, Joy and John. When Hillary learned that the cousin of a childhood friend needed a transplant, she rose to the occasion and donated a kidney.

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PHOTOS BY JOY GLANZER

Kidney donor Hillary Glanzer (above) poses triumphantly after the successful transplant in a Tampa hospital. Hillary says farewell (left) to her kidney “Irene” at a pre-surgery party dedicated to the organ. Hillary’s mother, Joy, named the kidney after the Nat King Cole song, “Goodnight Irene.” Hannah Craig and Hillary pose post surgery (right). Hannah said that recovery for the donor is more challenging than for the recipient.

friends on Facebook, asking them to get a blood test to see if someone was a match for Hannah. “I immediately emailed her aunt and decided to help,” Hillary said. “Three weeks later, I found out that I was the absolute best match. Then, they put the ball in my court.” Hillary, who had never broken a bone, had surgery or even stitches, began researching organ donation. She learned that donors could live long and healthy lives, even though there are always risks involved.

54 | Autumn 2012

She also learned that if she donated her kidney, she would be placed on the top of the transplant list, if she ever needed a new organ. Ignoring the side effects and undesirable possibilities, Hillary talked to her parents, who were slightly more hesitant about the donation. But, in the end, John and Joy Glanzer of Newberry let her make the final decision. Hillary recalled her mother saying, “You are a perfectly healthy adult, and if this is your decision, I couldn’t be more proud of you.” After a few days, Hillary spoke with Hannah’s aunt again and told her the good news. She was going to donate her kidney to Hannah. “How can you say ‘no’ to

someone when you know you are a perfect match?” Hillary said. “Her cousin was the first friend I had ever had. All my childhood memories are from that family.” When Hannah received the news, she was thrilled. “When I spoke with Hannah she was extremely grateful, just constantly chipper, excited and thankful,” Hillary said. “She was so tired from dialysis that she had started in early February. She was just ready to be healthy.”

Hannah Craig’s Struggle Ever since Hannah Craig was six weeks old, the hospital became her second home. At the age where babies learn to grab with their fragile fingers, Hannah was diagnosed with lupus. The disease


attacked her kidneys, and they began failing soon after. During the first two years of Hannah’s life, she was on dialysis. When the doctors were able to get Hannah to weigh 20 pounds,

she received her first kidney transplant from her mother. The kidney, placed on the right side of her abdomen, did its job for nineteen years. Like a revolving door, Hannah

has been in and out of hospitals more than 60 times throughout her life. Earlier this year, the 21-yearold nursing student began dialysis. Without a new kidney, Hannah knew she would have to continue

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PHOTO BY JOY GLANZER

Hannah Craig (left) and Hillary Glanzer exercise per doctor’s orders, walking the hospital hallways after the surgery. Hillary said that she would never take walking for granted again.

enduring these often-unpleasant treatments. “My dialysis was on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, and I had classes on Friday,” Hannah said in a recent phone interview. “I had good days and bad days, but it was pretty tough. I didn’t realize how sick I was until the transplant.” Because of Hannah’s rare blood type, B positive, she was at the bottom of the recipients’ list for transplants. Without Hillary, Hannah could have waited up to five years for a new kidney. “When I found out Hillary was going to donate her kidney to me I was very excited,” Hannah said. “I was extremely emotional. She could have said ‘no’ at anytime because it

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Although the average person is born with a pair of kidneys, the need for organ donations continues to grow. As of August 21, there are currently 114,838 people in the U.S. waiting for an organ, and 92,867 of those are waiting for a kidney. is such a hard and selfless decision. But, I always kept positive.”

The Transplant and Recovery After three months of X-rays, CT scans, and blood tests, it was time for the transplant. “I had to go back and forth to Tampa from Orlando,” Hillary said. “The doctors were very, very thorough. After all of the tests, we had to meet with a psychologist to make sure that we were in a good state of mind. Then, they went in front of the organ donation committee to make the final decision.” About four weeks before surgery,

Hillary started telling others about her decision once the doctors had set the surgery date. “I was very anxious for a couple of months, and then it started to get really real,” Hillary said. “Everybody was just shocked and speechless. You do not know how to react to people that say, ‘you are a hero.”’ On June 11, Hannah and Hillary went to Tampa General Hospital, the fourth busiest transplant center in the United States, to undergo surgery. While the two young women were getting prepped for surgery, all of Hannah’s worries disappeared. She knew that she would wake up

with a new kidney. When the surgery was over, it was time to recover. “Hillary was out of the hospital in four days, and I was out in five,” Hannah said, who stayed longer so doctors could be sure the new kidney was working properly. “The transplant for the donor is a lot more rough because the person’s organ is removed.” Hillary stayed at her parent’s home in Newberry for about a week, and then returned to Orlando. “Recovery was pretty intense,” Hillary said. “The pain was a lot more than I expected. Getting up

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PHOTO BY JOY GLANZER

Hillary (left) and Hannah (center) were invited to share their story on national television on the TODAY Show. Sunday co-anchor, Jenna Wolfe, interviewed the two girls on August 19. Both of the young women agreed that it was an amazing experience to spread the word about organ donation.

and walking around was extremely hard. I will never take walking for granted again.” Hannah stayed in Tampa and continued to see doctors for weekly checkups. An average transplanted kidney lasts 10 to 15 years, but she hopes that this one will work as long as her first.

Organ Donation In 1954, Dr. Joseph E. Murray successfully completed the first organ transplant in Boston. It was a kidney transplant from one twin to another. Although tissues were transplanted before, this was the first time people learned that transplanting organs was not just an ancient myth or legend. As new medications and

techniques were invented and discovered, organ transplants became safer, more successful operations. Thirty years after the first successful organ transplant, the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) was incorporated into a private, nonprofit organization. UNOS manages the national transplant waiting list, provides assistance to patients and family members, educates the public and transplant professionals, monitors every organ match, and develops policies through meetings, according to its website. Throughout the course of 24 years, there have been 16,667 kidney transplants performed in Florida, according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data. In 1990, Murray

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received a Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work on organ and cell transplantation. As of August 17, however, there are 3,397 people waiting for a kidney in Florida. Many of those candidates need a new kidney to save their life. The primary function of a person’s kidneys is to remove waste from the body by filtering the blood of toxins and other substances. Kidneys also help regulate blood pressure, blood volume, and the electrolyte composition of the blood, according to OPTN. There are many reasons why people need kidney transplants — diabetes, vascular and glomerular diseases, metabolic disorders and more. Although the average person

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PHOTO BY JOY GLANZER

Six weeks post-op, Hillary romps on the beach with brother Logan and friend Kim Yates in Panama, Central America.

“One deceased donor can save up to eight individual lives,” Giery said. “There are 114,000 people on the donation list. This is their last chance. They are sick and need an organ transplant to live. If they do not get it, they will pass away. It affects children, parents, and siblings. One organ donor saves so many.” is born with a pair of kidneys, the need for organ donations continues to grow. As of August 21, there are currently 114,838 people in the U.S. waiting for an organ, and 92,867 of those are waiting for a kidney, according to OPTN. There are two different types of donors. There are living donors, like Hillary, and then there are deceased donors. “All deceased donors would have died while in intensive care,” said Kathleen Giery, director of public relations at LifeQuest Organ Recovery Services in Gainesville, in a recent phone interview. “They consist of natural and severe injuries. When someone has a heart attack at home, the blood stops circulating to the organs, and everything shuts down. This person could only qualify for tissue and eye donations. It is a very narrow criteria for deceased donors.” LifeQuest is a deceased donor program and was one of the first organ procurement programs in the country, according to its website. “In 2011, in Florida, there were 569 deceased donors and 220 living donors,” Giery said, who has been working at LifeQuest for 15 years. “There are 8,000 deceased donors [in the United States] each year. Those people went on to touch thousands of lives.” People can sign up to become a donor by registering online. Although, Giery said, not everyone on the registry becomes a donor

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because organ donation is contingent upon a person’s death. If an adult is on a registry, the family does not have the authority to change the fact that he or she is an organ donor. If the person is a minor, however, the family does have the power to change the decision. Many people are under the impression that doctors do not try to save an organ donor’s life, so they can harvest a person’s organs for other patients, but Giery said that this is not the case. “When someone passes away, it happens because a person’s injuries were so grave,” Giery said. “No one goes into the medical career so they can lose a patient on their watch. When doctors lose someone that is the worst day of their career. When that happens that is when they start talking about organ donation.” Unlike deceased donors, living donors do face certain risks when donating an organ. After surgery, the risks involved with living donors are pain, bleeding, infection, pneumonia, and side effects from anesthesia, according to the New York University Langone Medical Center’s website. It is estimated that the risk of death from an organ donation is less than 1 percent. To qualify as a living donor, a person must be in good health, be physically fit, have low blood pressure, and no cancer, heart or kidney disease, according to the Transplant Living website. The average donor is typically 18 to 60 years old.

The Future More than two months have passed since Hillary Glanzer made the generous decision to donate her kidney to Hannah Craig. Numerous newspapers and magazines have interviewed the two. In August, they flew to New York City to be on the TODAY Show, which Hannah said was an amazing experience. “I haven’t noticed any changes in anything,” Hillary said. “Conscientiously, I have found myself wanting to be healthier. I would definitely do it all again.” The two young women now have an inseparable bond. “Now we are incredibly close,” Hillary said. “We talk and text almost every other day. She constantly gives me updates and tells me how great the kidney is doing.” For Hannah, her life is now renewed. “I am just able to enjoy life again,” Hannah said. “While I was on dialysis, I couldn’t do a lot of things that I normally could have done. I can be my own person now. I am — quote unquote — normal.” The nursing student is now considering switching her major to communication because she has been in so many newspapers recently. Both want to spread awareness about organ donation. “What greater gift to give than to save someone’s life?” Hannah asked. “It is the greatest gift of all.” s


Fact & Fiction FICTION: It will cost my family money to donate our loved one’s organs. FACT: There are no costs to the donor’s family for the recovery of organs. The procurement programs are responsible for those costs. FICTION: If doctors know that I carry a donor card, they may not make every effort to save my life. FACT: Emergency medical personnel have one mission - to save your life. The discussion of organ donation will take place only after all life-saving efforts have been exhausted. Making the decision to be an organ donor will not affect the quality of care you receive in the hospital. FICTION: Organ donation is against my religion. FACT: All major eastern and western religions either support donation or leave the decision up to the individual. If you would like additional information on the official position of your faith, please contact www.lifequestfla.org. FICTION: If I am an organ donor, then I can’t have an open casket funeral. FACT: Organ donation is not disfiguring and will allow for an open casket funeral. The donation process will not cause a delay in normal funeral arrangements. FICTION: I’m too old to be an organ donor. FACT: People of all ages should consider themselves potential organ donors. Age alone is not a disqualification for donation.

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Besides the demand for kidneys, more than 16,00 people need livers, 3,000 need hearts, more than 1,200 need pancreases, and more than 1,600 need lungs throughout the U.S. (New York Organ Donor Network) Since 1995, more than 100,000 people in the United States were removed from the waiting list because they died waiting for a live-saving organ. (OPTN) In 2012, more than 1,100 people have been added to the organ donation waiting list in Florida. (OPTN)

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COLUMN >> DONNA BONNELL

Embracing Life Embracing life begins when you are ready to live with intention. or many years, I have been the author of Embracing Life. Regular readers know that I reveal my personal stories of struggle and spiritual growth. I did not consciously plan to become a columnist. Embracing Life magically materialized when I subconsciously was ready to live my life with intention. During one of my many nights of insomnia, I wrote an entry for my diary. The true tale had a terrifying beginning, but turned into an unforgettable life-altering adventure. On a whim, I submitted the piece to a local newspaper. Much to my surprise, they printed my story. Even more amazing, the owner offered me an opportunity to write a monthly column. She said I had the potential to inspire others, by sharing my everyday experiences in a positive way. She even suggested the title, “Embracing Life.” Procrastination nearly prevented me from fulfilling my soul’s longing. Trite excuses, including not having enough spare time, were seemingly overwhelming obstacles. I justified my lack of self-confidence by rationalizing those negative beliefs. After all, I thought, things

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will slow down when my children are grown. Perhaps when I retire, I will have time pursue my passion. Mysteriously, an inexplicable force in my psyche eradicated my fears and I graciously accepted the challenge. I believe the encouragement came from my favorite elementary school teacher, who planted a vision in my mind, many decades ago. At an early age, I was an introvert and found it easier to write than speak. This intuitive instructor recognized my vice, yet knew how to motivate me to turn it into a virtue. She simply said I had the ability and compassion to become a writer or poet. While I do not remember her name, I will never forget the extraordinary educator who lived her life with intention. Her purpose was to encourage young students to utilize their strengths, rather than dwell on their weaknesses. Humans have a tendency to postpone satisfying their hopes and dreams. I know firsthand how difficult it is to take that giant leap of faith. Angelic individuals, such as my primary school teacher, and inspirational authors, like Mary Anne Radmacher, are my heroes. Radmacher’s poem is her purpose statement. Learning how to live with intention was emotionally energizing and spiritually stimulating. Defining clear objectives was a slow process, evolving with the passing of time. Even the content of my monthly column has

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changed over the years. It began as a personal therapeutic journal. Today I am convinced that publishing my private dilemmas comes with a divine obligation.

Live with Intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Laugh. Play with abandon. Practice wellness. Continue to learn. Choose with no regret. Appreciate your friends. Lead or follow a leader. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is. — MARY ANNE RADMACHER

Whining does not help anyone. Exploring the reasons for life’s detours and potholes is my responsibility. Helping readers understand how Yin and Yang (the two complementary principles of Chinese philosophy) interact to maintain harmony is my goal. My prayer is to inspire others to find their purpose. Every person is born with specific imperfections and talents. These inborn traits are gifts to help us achieve our unique reason for being. Sometimes you find your purpose when it is least expected. It may emerge during tumultuous times of economic strife or the death of a loved one. You may discover it during a divine intervention or an unexpected trip. It may simply surface, as it did for me, during a dreaded sleepless night when that little voice (maybe spurred by sleep deprivation) prompted me to press the send button. Once you realize your purpose, embrace it with your heart and soul. Take risks, live with intention and make a difference on our planet. s

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>> DOWN BY THE RIVER

Suwannee Kayaking Paddling Around the Bend

BY DEBBIE MEEKS acking down the boat ramp at dawn one day in the spring of 2011, much of my kayak extends past the tailgate, pointing at the water like a compass needle. This is the beginning. The keel of the boat digs a furrow into the sandy bank as I drag it from the car. The nose bobs impatiently in the river while the hatches are packed with no room to spare. Have I packed too much or is something missing? My feet get wet for the first time as I settle into the boat — the first of many foot drenchings on a long float downstream. I’m committed now. I start repeating the mantra words that keep me going and keep fear at

B

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bay: What’s around that bend? Primeval is the first word many people use to describe the Suwannee River when they are on it for the first time. In most of the country, it’s nearly impossible to evoke a primitive-river experience outside of a theme park, so the Suwannee is special. It is one of the least obstructed major rivers remaining in the United States, with no dams or locks. The river’s apparently unspoiled state is a mixture of nature and nurture. The river has an unsociable habit of rising as much as 40 feet, which discourages full-time residence on its banks so there are few houses. The Suwannee River Water Management District’s primary goal isn’t to nurture the

unspoiled feeling of the river, but by purchasing property for flood control, water quality protection and natural resource conservation, it inadvertently creates an opportunity for adventure. I heard about the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail Camps when the Peacock Slough camp was built in 2008 and I wanted to see it for myself. The camps, however, are only accessible by boat, which is both a challenge and an invitation. To get there I had to plan a boatcamping trip, so I started to look at the Suwannee River differently. With a skiff, the whole river can be traveled in a couple of days, but there’s something special about “slow travel.” I prefer richness and adventure: those kindred moments


PHOTO BY JANICE KLAUM

Canoes are beached for the night at Dowling Park River Camp.

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with the Paleo-Indians and the European pioneers, the private moments with river otters and birds when you feel invisible. The first hours of paddling feel like an accomplishment. Riding this wave of elation, I set a goal to kayak every inch of the Suwannee River under my own power. Sometimes with friends and family and sometimes alone, I paddle the whole river, in sections, a few days at a time, as commitments and weather allowed. It was a severe drought, with the river hitting record low water levels, so starting at the headwaters

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west of the Okefenokee Swamp would mean dragging as much as paddling. So, instead, my starting point on the river is Stephen Foster State Park near White Springs. I didn’t know that the drought exposes shoals that are normally deep underwater and so are not on any map. Paddling the whole river seems easy when the first shoal comes into sight. I stow the camera and pick an approach, nervous. I’m alone today; this better end well. Suddenly, a three-foot gator launches out of the water right in front of me. My heart races in

terror. Later, I reason that it must have been a sturgeon, belly towards me and pectoral fins outstretched. Funny, how imagination can add to my stress. The shoals are coming up and roaring now. Is that a boulder dead ahead or a deep wave of water? Either could flip me into the river. Paddle, paddle, paddle. The plastic boat bounces off a submerged rock and scoots me suddenly to the left. Paddle, paddle, paddle, don’t let the boat turn sideways. The bow is caught in an eddy and the boat is turning despite my struggles. Dig in, but don’t lean too far into the stroke, stay upright. The


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PHOTOS BY JANICE KLAUM

boat finally responds and starts to point downriver just as a standing wave breaks over the bow. It looks like that was the last of the churning water. With a calm river ahead, I let the boat turn slightly to snap a victorious picture. I point the boat down river again, wondering what’s around the next bend and planning to stop at all the springs on the way. The upper Suwannee runs through a “confined aquifer” so surface water tends to form rivers and streams; there aren’t as many springs as there are on the lower portion but there are enough to break up my trip.

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PHOTO BY JANICE KLAUM

Dragonflies will often hitch rides with kayakers as they make their way down the river.

Paddling alone, there’s a lot of time to think. For days before my trip the fears of friends and family echoed, so, between strokes, I list my personal fears and their weaker cousins: my dreads. After only a few days into the trip, they seem laughable — such as the fear that someone will steal my kayak. This seems to be one of the top fears of river travel; everyone wants to discuss strategies against theft. Regardless, my boat remains unmolested and unlocked on the bank every night. Then there’s the fear of fellow humans. In reality, the people I meet are wonderful and I’ve never heard any bad stories from fellow boaters. Finally, some people have a fear of animals — bears and gators top the list. People who don’t know the

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area are often afraid of camping where bears might be encountered, but black bears are rare in the Suwannee basin; raccoons are a bigger threat to camp food. As for gators, most will retreat to the bottom of the river when they see you, and those that don’t deserve a wide berth. It’s my second trip, somewhere above the Holton Creek River Camp, the sun is getting low and my friends are trailing behind. We are glad to finally see the camp, since some of us have some dust to shake off our camping skills. “Luxury camping” is how I rate the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail Camps — they have hot showers, flush toilets, screened camping platforms with ceiling fans and electricity for charging cell phones. We are camping but it isn’t rough.

Our group is up bright and early the next morning. I’m paddling along watching the swirling mist over the river as it forms into small vortices or “steam devils,” when a fisherman emerges from the mist. He’s close enough to speak and I’m curious about the fishing. He’s also curious about how far have I’ve come and why I’m not fishing. Occasionally, I’ve noticed, that a startled fish will roll under the surface close enough to bump the kayak. Can I grab one out of the water like they do in the movies? My fingertips drag over the cool surface of the water; it’s tempting. We set up camp at Dowling Park River Camp early enough to paddle across the river to Advent Christian Village for a stroll. Dowling Park is the only River Camp close to a town. The Village has a full grocery


BIG ORANGE: Junk mail, Magazines, Office paper, Catalogs, Newspapers, Telephone books, Brown paper bags, All cardboard (3’ x 3’ flattened) NO PIZZA BOXES

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Pitch In to Put Alachua County on n Top In our community, we do a lot of things really well. Our schools, hospitals and, of course, sports teams are among the best in the state. But in one critical area, we’ve come up short. Alachua County is ranked 21st in Florida when it comes to recycling. Strive to make Alachua County #1. Our Challenge: Recycle 75% of All Solid Waste by 2020!

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cares, just let me stop paddling! Trail mix doesn’t sound good anymore but there’s nothing else onboard that sounds any better. Then I remember music. My most rousing play list gives me new energy, and I’m ready for a final push. What’s around that bend? Although tired, I’m still determined to finish the whole river because it’s not just friendships and adventure that make traveling down the Suwannee special: it’s discovering what’s around every bend. s

THE 2012 GREAT SUWANNEE RIVER CLEANUP CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS! For two years running, Current Problems has collaborated with the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail to coordinate cleanups in the Suwannee River from the Georgia state line to the Gulf of Mexico. Each year, hundreds of volunteers work tirelessly along the shorelines, from boats, from kayaks and in scuba gear to remove tons of trash.

HOW TO SIGN UP PHOTO BY DEBBIE MEEKS

A trail leads to a campsite near Suwannee River State Park.

with prepared sandwiches and several other small shops. Back at camp, a friend is cooking what seems like a gourmet meal — everything tastes better when camping. After dinner, we watch the Boy Scouts run from cabin to cabin pranking each other. The troop leaders cast apologetic looks our way. The boys finally settle down to their deep sleep when, at three o’clock, the raccoon-cleanup-crew shows up. They set off the motiondetector operated bathroom lights and bang the trashcans, showing no courtesy for sleeping paddlers. The springs are located closer together after Dowling Park. My paddling companions on this

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section are also former cave diving buddies. It seems like we stop every mile between Dowling Park and the Santa Fe River to conjure up memories of past dives together: Lafayette, Telford, Royal, Troy, Little River. What’s around that bend: Memories or adventures? By now, I’ve paddled past the Santa Fe River, the last major tributary on the Suwannee. At this point, springs have contributed a quarter of the flow of the Suwannee and diluted the acidity of the “black water” from the Okeefenokee Swamp. I’m still almost 70 miles from the Gulf, tired, alone, and my mantra isn’t working anymore. What’s around the bend? Who

The 2012 cleanup will occur during a three-month window from September through November. If you or your group would like to clean up a section of the river, visit the event map at g.co/maps/qctyf to determine your section. You may also view a spreadsheet at tinyurl.com/83no2c2 to see what sections are taken and who to contact if you would like to join someone else’s cleanup. Register your group, the date of your cleanup and your river section online at tinyurl. com/cg6heur. Current Problems is available to assist you as you plan your cleanup and to provide supplies (grabbers, buckets, trash bags).

Questions? Contact Current Problems’ Executive Director Fritzi Olson at 352264-6827 or aar@currentproblems.org.


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Fletcher Center

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Conveniently located in Jonesville Come over today and visit the Fletcher Center! Minutes from Newberry and Gainesville, the Fletcher Center is conveniently located in Jonesville across from the Steeplechase Publix. 1 4 0 2 9 W. N E W B E R R Y R OA D N

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When Experience Matters… Dr. Reddy has been in this area since 2002, practicing in Gastroenterology and Hepatology, with a doctorate from Osmania University/ Gandhi Medical College; Residency & Fellowship at Chicago Medical School; an additional Fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio; and is Board Certified by the American Board of Gastroenterology, specializing in Hepatology. Dr. Reddy consults with patients needing care in Gastroenterology and/or Hepatology, treats Hepatitis patients, performs colonoscopies and endoscopies at Central Florida Endoscopy & Surgical Institute of Ocala, LLC as well as area

hospitals, with privileges at Munroe Regional Medical Center, Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital. The majority of Dr. Reddy’s patients have the convenience of traveling to only one location for consultation as well as any procedure that may be needed. Dr. Reddy’s experience makes him one of the leading xperts in physician experts rology Gastroenterology and Hepatology logy and is frequently ently consulted on n difficult cases. es.

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>> GET UP AND GO!

Gator Tailgating Campus Comes Alive with Timeless Tradition

BY ALBERT ISAAC t is that time of year. The time of year when thousands of people converge upon Gainesville, awakening it from the slow pace of the summer with revelry, camaraderie and the ubiquitous chants of “Go Gators!” Are you ready for some football? What began as people sitting on tailgates on game day has since evolved into everything from high tech portable satellites under tent canopies to the air conditioned comfort of large RVs with flowing frozen drinks waiting inside. No one really knows when the idea to gather on tailgates first began. Norm Carlson, UF Historian and former assistant athletics director said that it started

I

quite some time ago. “It was going on in the 1950s when I was in school,” Carlson said in a 2006 telephone interview. “Probably longer than that. I’ve seen pictures going back to the ‘20s and ‘30s with people sitting on tailgates drinking sarsaparilla or something.” On a home game day on and around the UF Campus, thousands of people populate nearly every square inch of real estate with tent awnings and chairs. Cars, trucks and recreational vehicles of all sizes and shapes fill parking lots and the front yards of neighboring homes. People set up on the Plaza of the Americas with canopies and hammocks and Gators cooking barbecue. The streets and sidewalks become packed with throngs of people walking or milling about everywhere, some on bikes or motor scooters. Portable generators

PHOTO COURTESY OF DELIA LANDER

Long-time Gator fans Michele Martin (left) and Delia Lander co-host tailgating parties (along with their husbands), gathering with friends for fun, food and fellowship.

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PHOTOS BY DELIA LANDER

This tailgating group includes a live band. (L-R) Mark Lander, Steve Jones, Jerry Bullard and Kerry Waldron. (Lower left) Gator fans Evan Jones and Kyle Lander, and Bryce Burton with the crazy hair.

are to be found all over campus, powering televisions and satellite dishes so Gator fans can enjoy a variety of sporting shows while awaiting the big event: Gator Football. Jeff Bell is a veteran tailgater. A few years back he designed and built a trailer for his bike he christened the “Trail-Gator.” He fastened this orange and blue device to the back of his bicycle and loaded up an ice chest stocked with his favorite beverages. This allowed him to move freely throughout campus to mingle with his buddies and meet new friends. Pedaling about campus he received many approving nods as he wheeled by his

fellow tailgaters. “He’s got the right idea,” they said, knowingly. “It’s something different every time,” Bell said of his love for tailgating. “It’s a time to share a common interest with a whole town. And I make a new friend at every game.” These days he and his wife have a different routine. With two small children, 3 1/2 and 2 years old, they attend the Alumni festivities and then return home to watch the game on television. “The kids love seeing the cheerleaders and Albert and Alberta, the face painting, and generally just getting out

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into the crowd,” Bell said. People of all ages can be found celebrating the Gator Nation. Senior citizens and young children alike can be found sitting in the back of pickup trucks enjoying the festivities, eating, drinking and cheering on the Florida Gators. Scott Stowell, Class of ‘89, has been tailgating at every home game — and Georgia — since graduation. “Basically, we have been tailgating on the Plaza of the Americas since 1997, and at our current spot for the past 11 years,” Stowell said in a telephone interview. “What’s nice is there are some folks from Chiefland that tailgate next to us. We’ve been doing this for a long time.” The routine has varied little, although he admits for some early games he will hire a student to set up prior to their arrival. “We have a couple of tents and a couple of tables and about 20 chairs,” he said. “We’ll bring games, too, depending on the time of the day.” They set up a satellite and television and watch pre-game shows and often leave everything up so that

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friends that do not have tickets can continue to tailgate while they attend the game. Stowell said that when they first started tailgating there were not many people tailgating on the Plaza of the Americas. “I think a lot of it has to do with the advance of technology,” he said. “You’re seeing trailers with builtin plasma TVs. You can even rent a tailgate spot and they’ll set up a TV. A lot has to do with the quiet Honda generators.” On the corner of Gale Lemmerond & University Avenue, the highway is closed off to traffic while throngs of people line both sides of the street for the Gatorwalk. A motorcade of police motorcycles cruise by, sirens screaming and lights flashing, escorting the buses of Gator football players. To the sounds of cheering fans the Gators disembark and walk the walk. So whether one visits on foot, or by bike, by car or RV, Gator Tailgating is clearly an event for people of all generations and all walks of life. Go Gators! s


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>> UNIVERSITY AVENUE

Continued Tradition The University of Florida Homecoming Parade

BY ALLYSEN KERR PHOTOS PROVIDED BY UF alking along University Avenue on Friday, November 9 will be a sight to remember. More than 100,000 students, locals, Gator fans and alumni, decked out in their best orange and blue regalia, are expected to line the street, but not for kick-off. That is on Saturday. No, this time everyone will be waiting for another great Gator tradition: the UF Homecoming Parade. The 89th Annual UF Homecoming Parade is the largest student-run parade in the nation. It is also the second largest UF Homecoming event. The event started more than 89 years ago but it was paused briefly during World War II, said Zachary Adler, the event’s director. Adler is

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expecting anywhere from 75,000 to 100,000-plus attendees for the 2012 parade. The parade route begins on University Avenue at the corner of Gale Lemerand Drive and ends two miles later at Main Street and University Avenue. It will kick off at noon. Adler, an Advertising and Business Administration junior at UF, said that spectators can expect to see marching bands, UF athletes, local businesses, Veteran organizations, student organizations, nonprofits and other special guest appearances. In the past, the parade has included a military fly-over, special appearances by government officials (including one who rode

on an ox), the Gainesville Police Department, local and state high school bands, Miss Teen Florida, The UF Football Team, and the Dazzlers. The point of the Homecoming events is to unite the Gator Nation. As such, this year’s theme is “United We Growl.” “The parade is really the opportunity for the students and the greater community to be actually involved in the event itself,” Adler said. Since Homecoming falls on Veterans Day weekend, the parade will honor all Veterans. As the University of Florida Marching Band warms up their horns, and parade participants place last-minute touches on their floats and costumes, spectators who love to run, walk or roll can


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participate in the SunTrust Gator Gallop. The event is a 2-mile race, which allows participants to walk or run along the parade route. SunTrust and Fit2Run will be the event sponsors again. “It’s a fun run,” said the event director, Daniel Levin. “It embodies the UF Homecoming spirit...it’s just a fun thing for people to do.”

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Levin, an industrial and systems engineering junior, expects about 1,500 attendees. The race begins at 11:30 a.m. at the Percy Beard Track. In-line skaters and wheelchair participants will have the opportunity to get a head start 15 minutes prior. Pre-registration is $15 and race participants will be able to pick up

their packets at Fit2Run a few days before the parade. Anyone e unable to register before the event nt can sign up the day of the event att 9:15 a.m. The cost is $20. Adler and Levin encourage rage anyone interested in participating icipating in either the parade or the e SunTrust Gator Gallop to apply online ine at www.GatorGrowl.org. s


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M I T C H P. F E A R I N G , M . D . , P. A .

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Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8-2 Open thru lunch for your convenience.

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Palms Medical Group Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352-463-1100 Palms Pharmacy Palms Medical Group Branford . . . . . . . . . . . . . .386-935-3090 Palms Medical Group Gainesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352-376-8211 Palms Medical Group Starke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 904-364-2900 Palms Medical Group Trenton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352-463-2374 Palms Pharmacy Palms Chiropractic

At Palms Medical Group, we make it easy for you to get the healthcare you need: Convenient locations A wide range of services— from well-baby exams to senior care Same day appointments through Open Access Scheduling Private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid accepted; sliding fee scale for those who qualify

Palms Medical Group Williston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352-528-0587 Palms Pediatric Care Palms Medical Group facilities dedicated exclusively to Pediatric care: Chiefland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352-493-7274 Trenton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352-463-6292 Behavioral HealthCare offered through Meridian Behavioral Healthcare, Inc. Available at: Bell, Gainesville, Starke, Trenton, and Williston

1-888-730-2374 www.palmsmg.org 90 | Autumn 2012


It’s time to reduce those interest rates Transfer your balance to a low interest credit card from SunState. When those credit card bills start rolling in, check your interest rate. Chances are you could be saving money this year with a credit card from SunState. Log on, call or visit us today to speak with a credit expert.

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www.sunstatefcu.org Autumn 2012

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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>> IT’S GREAT TO BE A FLORIDA GATOR!

Albert E. Gator A Brief History of UF’s Beloved Mascot STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM MORRISSEY BY ALBERT ISAAC lbert the Alligator walks down University Avenue and car horns blare. People cheer and call out his name, “Albert! Hey Albert!” “Go Gators!” A family visiting from Indiana for volleyball camp pulls to the curb on University and Lemerand Drive and a 9-year-old boy hops out. “Can we get a picture?” the mom asks from inside the car. Albert happily obliges, putting his arm around the youngster while the mom snaps a picture through the window of the car. “Thanks!” The boy hops back in the car and off they go. Strolling across campus this scene plays out time and time again. A young athlete calls out. “Yo, Albert!” Shirtless, fit and ripped, he poses with Albert while his

A

girlfriend snaps a picture. These days Albert the Alligator can be found practically ractically everywhere, it seems. But it was not always so. Imagine the University of Florida without female students. Without the orange and blue. And without Albert the Alligator. ator. Not easy to do. Albert and Alberta, those ubiquitous reptilians mascots, can now ow be seen at UF sporting events,, birthday parties, on television and at a myriad of other events throughout out Gainesville and the Gator Nation. n. But in the early rly 1900s this was not the case. In those days, the University of Florida orida had a fledgling football team, no o school colors and no Gator. The he advent of Albert E. Gator occurred ed in the mall on University Avenue nue directly across from the campus, us, when UF was only two years old, said UF Assistant

Athletics Director and Historian Norm Carlson. “A man named Phillip Miller had a sundry shop — today we’d d call it a pharmacy — and he was looking to sell pennants,”” Carlson said in a recent interview. “Miller’s son wentt to the University of Virginia a and knew of the Michie factory that made pennants, ts, so Phillip Miller asked his son to have Michie make a University of Florida pennant that he could sell in his store. “’What should it look k like?’” Miller’s son asked. d. “’What’s the mascot?’” “Alligator,” Miller replied, instinctively referencing the reptiles that hang out on the UF campus around Lake Alice, Alice ice,

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DIGITAL COLLECTIONS A very young Albert E. Gator, decked out in ribbons and bows, sits in front of a Florida megaphone.

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www.VisitOurTowns.com

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and in the Payne’s Prairie swamp wamp that extends well into Gainesville’s city limits. “They didn’t know what an alligator looked like,” Carlson recalled, “so the people ople at Michie went to the Yale library and researched it.” Thus, UF acquired one of the most famous mascots in the nation. “Several different live alligators gators assumed the role off Albert over the years, and even ven a robotic, motorized d reptile held the role,” states the UF website. Steve Orlando, UF’s News Bureau director, said the alligator as s a mascot possibly made its first print appearance pearance in a football program in 1911. 1. “From what I understand,, the first printed reference in relation n to a game of an alligator as a mascot was the e UF/Clemson game in October 25, 1911,” Orlando said. There may event be a connection nnection between Albert E. Gator and an early comic strip character, he said.

“It wasn’t until 1970 that Albert became personified on the field as a full-body vinyl costume. Alberta the Alligator was introduced in 1986 as Albert’s sidekick and friend.” “You may remember the comic strip “Pogo” back in the ‘50s and ‘60s,” Orlando said.. Around the time Albert the Alligator appeared in the comic omic strip, UF acquired Albert the Alligator. “So there may be a connection ection there,” he said. “We don’t know. Somebody might remember ember but we don’t know.” In the late ‘40s or ‘50s, the e alligator was made from various homemade items, including ncluding wood. “The mascot that you see e on the field now has evolved from that wooden thing, through rough home-made looking paper-mache kind of skinny y Alberts to cartoon-looking Alberts to the one we know and love today,” Orlando said. In the early 1950s, two live ve alligators were actually kept on campus. Ross Allen, founder nder of the Ross Allen’s Reptile Institute at Silver Springs, provided rovided these gators to UF, Orlando said. The gators resided ided on campus within a chain link fence. “There was a pen at the base of Century Tower,” Orlando said. “There was an Albert and nd an Albert II, all the way up p to Albert V sometime in the mid- to late-’60s.” Keeping live gators in a pen en on campus eventual eventually ually ly fell out of favor and the reptiles iles were removed. But Albert and his sidekick Alberta continue on..

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DIGITAL COLLECTIONS In the 1960s, Albert was a live alligator who lived on campus. In this 1960s era photograph, three women in bathing suits hold tight to the Gator while students look on.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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1

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The popular couple may make anywhere between 500-700 personal appearances a year. Now, nearly 100 years since Albert E. Gator made his debut, the University of Florida Gators are recognized as one of the premium college football empires in the country. “Today, Albert and Alberta can be seen around the world on clothes, cars, and even on television,” states the UF website. “They have come to represent one of the finest universities in the world, and are symbols of the entire Gator Ga ator Na Nation.” Go Gators! s

3

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DIGITAL COLLECTIONS

1) Two UF students hold Albert and Alberta on campus in 1962. 2) An odd scene of Albert the Alligator in a 1950’s dorm. 3) An early mascot made of wood moves across the field in 1940s or ‘50s. 4) In this 1960 photo, Albert the Alligator rings the Victory Bell. 4

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12 Questions with Albert the Alligator

FAVORITE COLOR

FOODS I CRAVE

Orange & Blue (and green)

Chicken (South Carolina Style)

ASTROLOGICAL SIGN

PEOPLE I ADMIRE

Scorpio (birthday Oct. 25, 1911)

University of Florida Athletic Director, Jeremy Foley

FAVORITE ACTIVITIES

Winning Championships

FAVORITE SONG

BEST CONCERT

“You Can Call Me Al” by Paul Simon

Tom Petty at the O’Dome GOOD FIRST DATE IDEA FAVORITE TV PERSONALITY

Dinner in Lake Alice at Sunset

Steve Irwin (R.I.P.) RELATIONSHIP STATUS PETS

In a relationship with Alberta

My bulldog UGA and my pet Tiger Mike (Yes, Tigers require

3 POINTERS OR SLAM-DUNKS?

a special permit to be kept as pets)

Slam-dunks... err 3 Pointers... err...

98 | Autumn 2012


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COLUMN >> BY KENDRA SILER-MARSIGLIO

Healthy Edge When Your Kid Skips School ant your kids to do well in school? Make sure they attend. At the Lawton Chiles Elementary School, “do everything you can to make sure your kids attend,” was the mantra of Principal Judy Black at the parent orientation. It was for good reason. One in 10 Florida students miss at least one month of school each year. In Florida, chronic absenteeism is defined as missing 21 or more days. (Florida is ahead of most states in the nation with its student absenteeism tracking system.) It may not seem like a big deal, but subjects like math are highly dependent on attendance. It’s hard to play catch up — whether the absences are excused or not. Kids’ scores are also worse on standardized tests if they miss too many days. Which kids miss the most school? Kindergarten through second graders and middle and high school students. A 2011 study of 640 3rd graders by Attendance Works showed that the students who missed 10 percent of kindergarten and 1st grade scored an average of 60 points and 100 points below similar students with good attendance on reading and math tests, respectively.

W

As you know, children miss for all sorts of reasons. A top reason: health issues. If your child is “catching things” at school, you may want to tell your school about this next study from the August 2011 American Journal of Infection Control. For three months students were required at one school to wash their hands three times a day. At the “control”

Which kids miss the most school? Kindergarten through second graders and middle and high school students. school, handwashing wasn’t required. Although it could have been because the kids just liked washing their hands as part of the study, absenteeism significantly decreased at the “handwashing” school. Have a child with asthma? According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), asthma is the number one cause of absenteeism. KidsHealth. org estimates that asthma causes 14 million absences

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nationwide per year. Asthma’s characterized by air passage inflammation that narrows the airways transporting air from the nose and mouth to the lungs. Charles Basch of Columbia University reported in 2010 that kids with asthma tend to have more problems with concentration and memory, disrupted sleep, and increased absenteeism. If you have a child with asthma, consider making sure that your child’s school is asthma-friendly, creating a safe and supportive learning environments for students with asthma. According to the CDC, here’s what school-based asthma programs should do: • Establish strong links with asthma care providers to ensure appropriate medical care • Have administrators supporting the program and include a full-time school nurse • Coordinate school nursing services, asthma education for students, and asthma-related professional development for school staff. Fortunately, a 2009 study in the Journal CHEST showed that proper management of asthma and on-site registered nurses reduce the school absenteeism rate for children with asthma to that of non-asthmatic children. The AAFA also points out that oftentimes asthma symptoms can be caused by allergens or irritants inhaled into the lungs. Is your school doing what it can to reduce indoor allergens? About.com has some other tips to help your kid with asthma stay in school: 1. Monitor your kid’s needs. When and where does your kid have to deal with asthma at school? Ask your child: how can we make treating your asthma at school easier? 2. Color code inhalers. Give the prevention inhaler a different color than the quick relief inhaler. It’s a good way to help your child learn how to manage his or her asthma. 3. Prioritize prevention. Have your child take his or her preventive asthma medication as part of the morning routine. 4. Education through simulation. Need for someone to understand what your kid feels like when coping with asthma? Have him or her exercise for a bit breathing through a straw. It will simulate what goes on in asthmatic lungs. For more tips on helping your child cope with asthma at school, check out asthma.about.com/od/ kidsasthma/a/Asthma_cope.htm. s Kendra Siler-Marsiglio, Ph.D. is the Director of Rural Health Partnership at WellFlorida Council.

DISTRIBUTION CENTER CAREERS We are looking for enthusiastic, dedicated employees who want to work in a teamoriented environment. Dollar General offers Health, Dental & Vision Insurance, 401K Plan, Stock Purchase Plan, Plus paid Holiday and Vacation Pay, Competitive Wage, Full Time, Day/Evening Shifts Must be 18 Years of age *Drug Free Workplace* Criminal Background Check *EOE

GENERAL WARESHOUSE POSITIONS ABILITY TO LIFT 65 POUNDS The distribution network is an integral component of our retail business operation, as nearly all items that reach our store shelves pass through one of our 11 distribution centers. Distribution Center employees are responsible for receiving, warehousing, and shipping the products you see in our stores every day.

Apply online at www.DollarGeneral.com Select > Select > Select > Select > Select >

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CALENDAR If you would like to have an event considered for publication in this calendar, please submit information directly. post 4400 NW 36th Ave., Gainesville, FL 32606 | e-mail editor@towerpublications.com | fax 352-373-9178

SATURDAY FARMERS MARKET First Saturday 9:00am - 1:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - Plantation Oaks Assistid Living Facility. You will find vinegars, herbs, backpacks, purses, pumpkin bread, banana bread, buttons, aprons, caricature by our local artist Corinne Gherna, fresh produce, fresh seafood, tropical snow refreshments, sweet chocolate dipped goodies, jewelry, dishtowels, berries, nuts, eggs, gifts, homemade jams, relish, pickles, soups, and much more. Maria Antela: 386-4548145 or Carol Rowan 352-275-6346

FARMERS MARKET Every Thursday Noon - 6:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - Plantation Oaks - 201 NE 1st Avenue. Local farmers and vendors offer their goods for sale. Organically grown fruits and vegetables, baked goods, food, oldfashioned kettle korn, crafts and more!

OTHER DESERT CITIES Through Sept. 23 Times Vary GAINESVILLE Hippodrome Theatre, 25 SE Second Place. The Hippodrome’s 40th anniversary season opens with one of Broadway’s

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most acclaimed productions of recent years, the Pulitzer Prize finalist and Tony award-winning “Other Desert Cities.” This fast-paced production brings together an unforgettable cast of characters, razor-sharp wit and a jaw-dropping plot twist. 352-3754477 www.thehipp.org

PICTURE / STORY 2 Through Sept. 29 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - The Thomas Center, 302 NE Sixth Ave. The collection of paintings in Picture/Story 2 is built upon the observational, figurative work of 10 artists. Displayed without titles, each artwork in the exhibition entices the viewer with a hint of narrative mystery. 352-393-8532 www.

gvlculturalaffairs.org

ALL MY SONS Through Sept. 30 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Gainesville Community Playhouse, 4039 NW 16th Blvd. Joe Keller is a thriving businessman who reveres the twin American gods: family and profit. That, ultimately, is his justification for his wartime action of allowing defective parts to be fitted to Air Force planes, and letting his former partner take the rap. But, in the course of a single day, Joe is confronted by the consequences of his moral abdication. 352-376-4949

www.gcplayhouse.org

THROUGH THE LENS OF THE GAINESVILLE SUN Through January 5 Times Vary

GAINESVILLE - Unity of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Featuring original oil paintings on canvas by Kate R. Sherrard. Her paintings are designed to bring the vivid colors of the garden indoors. She has painted all of her life and studied with her father, John Ropp, a well-known watercolorist in Jacksonville. 352-373-1030

GAINESVILLE - The Thomas Center, 302 NE Sixth Ave. Featuring more than 50 of the paper’s finest photographs documenting UF’s three National Championship football seasons. Taken by the Gainesville Sun’s team of photojournalists, the work on display will cover the vast range of human emotion that the athletes, coaches and fans experienced during the 1996, 2006 and 2008 football seasons. 352-393-8532

www.unityofgainesvillefl.org

www.gvlculturalaffairs.org

ART IN SANCTUARY Through Sept. 30 Times Vary

WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S Saturday, Sept. 15 9:00am GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Community Plaza, SE First Street. This is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. This inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities. 352-3937527 www.alz.org

DOWNTOWN LATINO FESTIVAL Saturday, Sept. 15 Noon - 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Community Plaza. The familyfriendly celebration attracts vendors and community members from all over North Florida to celebrate the positive contributions and achievements of the Latino community. The event consists of food vendors, informational booths, cultural performances, live music. 352-665-0019

OLD TIME DANCE Sunday, Sept. 16 2:00pm - 5:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - O’Leno State Park, U.S. 441. Family fun for all ages! Dance contra, circles and squares to live music hosted by the Flying Turtles String Band in the 1930s recreation hall located on the banks of the


Santa Fe River. A caller will guide new and experienced dancers alike through a variety of dances. 386-4540723 www.floridastateparks.org

Night Falls Through November 10

MUSICIAN CATHY DEWITT

Times Vary

Sunday, Sept. 16 11:00am

GAINESVILLE - Thomas Center, 302 NE Sixth Ave. Night Paintings by Melanie Peter will feature dozens of works by the celebrated regional artist whose unique paintings shed new light on the world long after the sun has gone down. Melanie Peter is a fourth generation Floridian. She paints the after dark neighborhoods near her North Central Florida home. 352-393-8532 www. gvlculturalaffairs.org

GAINESVILLE - Unity of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Guest Musician Cathy DeWitt is well-versed in many musical genres. Cathy is singer/songwriter, pianist and harp therapist. She has been a Unity music director and touring New Thought musician for more than 20 years. 352-373-1030

www.unityofgainesvillefl.org www.cathydewitt.com

DUCK DERBY Sunday, Sept. 16 1:00pm GAINESVILLE - Westside Park, 1001 NW 34th St. A fun, family-friendly event. Featuring vendors, food, activities and a rubber duck race. Cheer for the ducks as they float down the course while enjoying quality time with the family. All proceeds will go to support Children’s Home Society of Florida and the Child Advocacy Center. Suggested $5 donations. 352-334-0955

www.gainesvilleduckderby.org

PALS PARTY Tuesday, Sept. 18 10:30pm GAINESVILLE - Rockeys Dueling Piano Bar, 112 S. Main St. The event will feature a dueling piano bar show, hors d’oeuvres, drinks and a silent auction. Tickets are $45 in advance or $50 at the door and include two drink

Sister Hazel Friday, September 21 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Gainesville’s own Sister Hazel returns to help kick off UFPA’s 2012-13 Season. The smash hit “All For You” spent 40 weeks on the Billboard charts, pushing the band into the spotlight. Since then, Sister Hazel has continued its success. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

vouchers-valid 21-plus ID required to purchase tickets. Benefiting the Shands Vista Partners in Adolescent Lifestyle Support program. 352265-7237 www.pals-party.com

ART OPENING FOR PAINT OUT Friday, Sept. 21 5:00pm - 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - Kanapaha Botanical Gardens, 4700 SW 58th Drive. Be the first to purchase a favorite

painting, perhaps wet off the easel, or at the reception and exhibition in the Summer House Gallery. A commission of 40 percent on art sales benefits Kanapaha Botanical Gardens. There is no cost associated with attending the art opening. The outside gardens will not be open at this time. 352372-4981 www.kanapaha.org

www.VisitOurTowns.com

UNITED DOWNTOWN Friday, Sept. 21 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - Downtown. A free, community event held on Friday night before Gator home games by United Way North Central Florida, a non-profit organization whose mission is to unite the community around issues of education, income and health. 352-333-0855

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are free and open to the public. 352-846-1575

www.bobgrahamcenter.ufl.edu

SPECTICAST: THE ROLLING STONES Friday, Sept. 28 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. The Rolling Stones: Some Girls, Live in Texas ‘78 is a rarely seen concert film featuring the classic British rock band at the height of their fame. The film was shot as part of the Rolling Stones’ 1978 U.S. tour, which is still hailed by many fans as their best to date. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

Noche de Gala Saturday, September 29 7:00pm - Midnight MICANOPY - The Besilu Collection. The Sebastian Ferrero Foundation’s annual fundraising event has become a standalone event, unsurpassed in the region. Following last year’s sold-out event, this year’s Noche de Gala promises to be packed with live entertainment, a silent auction featuring unique and extraordinary items, a Champion Paso Fino horse show, live cigar rolling, exquisite dining and much more! Guests are encouraged to dress black tie. www.nochedegala.org

ELAINE SILVER Sunday, Sept. 23 11:00am GAINESVILLE - Unity of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Guest musician Elaine Silver presents an experience of magic, love and blessings. “Faerie Elaine” has a voice stunningly clear and fine, magnificent, rich and supple; she sings A Capella or accompanies herself on guitar. 352-373-1030

www.unityofgainesvillefl.org www.elainesilver.com.

MEET AND GREET Wednesday, Sept. 26 8:00pm - 9:00pm GAINESVILLE Headquarters Library, 401 E. University Ave. Alachua County

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Sheriff candidate John Annarumma is holding a free, public town hall-style meet and greet for the residents of Alachua County. Come out and discuss the biggest problems facing Alachua County and the Alachua County Sheriffs Office. 326-266-9227 www.

annarummaforsheriff.co.

TANNAHILL WEAVERS Thursday, Sept. 27 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. As one of Scotland’s premier traditional bands, the Tannahill Weavers’ diverse repertoire spans the centuries with firedriven instrumentals, topical songs, original ballads and lullabies.

Among the most versatile groups on the Celtic music scene, the dynamic quartet has consistently received worldwide accolades. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

ALACHUA COUNTY HEART WALK Saturday, Sept. 29 7:00am - 11:00am GAINESVILLE - North Florida Regional Medical Center Duck Pond, 6500 W. Newberry Road. Three-mile walk route. 7:30 a.m. donation turn-in and company photos, 8:00 a.m. stage presentation, 8:30 a.m. walk begins. 352-3334970 alachuaheartwalk. kintera.org

IMMIGRANT RIGHTS AS HUMAN RIGHTS

CALEB’S PITCH GOLF AND POKER CHALLENGE

Thursday, Sept. 27 6:00pm

Saturday, Sept. 29 8:30am

GAINESVILLE - Pugh Hall-Bob Graham Center, Buckman Drive, UF. Immigration advocate Cheryl Little will present a frank and engaging talk on immigrant rights and immigration issues facing the U.S. and what these issues mean for American society. The event and parking

GAINESVILLE - Ironwood Golf Course, 2100 NE 39th Ave. Caleb’s Pitch Golf and Poker Challenge will be hosted by Jeff Cordozo and will offer the opportunity to golf and play poker with former gator athletes and current sports media personalities. 352-3931211 www.calebspitch.org


www.VisitOurTowns.com

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GFAA ART FESTIVAL AT THORNEBROOK Saturday, Sept. 29 10:00am GAINESVILLE Thornebrook Village, 2441 NW 43rd St. Festival features 140 spaces for fine arts and fine crafts in the Shopping Center, which is billed as shopping in a park. Lovely location, usually good weather. 30,000 attendees expected. 352-377-0996

conductorless ensemble of soloists comprised of the top alumni of the Sphinx Competition for young Black and Latino string players. Performing annually at Carnegie Hall, the ensemble is inspired by its mission to advance diversity in classical music, while engaging young and new audiences through performances of varied repertoire. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

RASCAL FLATTS Saturday, Sept. 29 7:00pm GAINESVILLE - O’Connell Center. Farmers Insurance presents Rascal Flatts. Special guests include Little Big Town and Eli Young Band. 800-745-3000

www.oconnellcenter.ufl.edu

PEANUTS ... NATURALLY Sept. 29 - Jan. 2 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Florida Museum of Natural History, 3215 Hull Road. Peanuts ... Naturally takes a light-hearted look at Charles Schulz’s exploration of the natural world through Peanuts comic strips, videos, objects and interactive stations. Visitors get a Peanuts-eye view of topics including the universe; “web of nature”; trees, birds; the elements of snow, wind, rain and clouds; gardening; and Charlie Brown’s Environmental Protection Agency escapade. 352-8462000 www.flmnh.ufl.edu

SPHINX VIRTUOSI WITH CATALYST QUARTET Sunday, Sept. 30 2:00pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. A

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GUEST SPEAKER REV. MARTY DOW Sunday, Sept. 30 11:00am GAINESVILLE - Unity of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Rev. Marty Dow is an ordained, nondenominational minister, spiritual teacher and author. 352-373-1030

www.unityofgainesvillefl.org www.martydow.com

RAGAMALA DANCE — SACRED EARTH Tuesday, Oct. 2 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Born and raised in south India, Ragamala’s artistic directors Ranee and Aparna Ramaswamy bring their culture’s unique sensibility of mysticism, myth and sanctity to the contemporary stage. Accompanied by live music, the evening builds from silent, meditative beginnings to a thrilling crescendo as the performers surrender to the beauty of this Sacred Earth. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

DAILEY & VINCENT

ANNUAL QUILT SHOW

Thursday, Oct. 4 7:30pm

Saturday, Oct. 6 10:00am - 3:00pm

GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. United in 2007, Dailey & Vincent — Jamie Dailey and Darrin Vincent — have quickly taken the bluegrass world by storm, piling up numerous awards and accolades. Their album, “Dailey & Vincent Sing the Statler Brothers,” spent nine weeks at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Bluegrass Albums chart and produced the Grammy-nominated single, “Elizabeth.” 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

NEWBERRY - Dudley Farm, 18730 W. Newberry Road. Traditional, appliquéd, vintage, art quilts and quilted wearing apparel. Skilled crafters would love to see visitor’s quilts. At 11 a.m., there will be a “Bed Turning,” when quilt experts will look at each quilt and discuss age, condition, colors and patterns. Admission is $5. 352-472-1142

UNITED DOWNTOWN Friday, Oct. 5 6 p.m. GAINESVILLE - Downtown. A free event held on Friday night before Gator home games by United Way North Central Florida, a non-profit organization whose mission is to unite the community around issues of education, income and health. Food, friends and fun highlight this free, family-oriented street festival. 352-333-0855

FALL HARVEST AND PEANUT FESTIVAL Saturday, Oct. 6 10:00am WILLISTON - Linear Park, Main Street. Great food, great fun, family events, something for everyone. Hometown fun with flair! Arts, crafts, entertainment, petting zoo and more! 7,000 attendees expected. 352-5285552 www.willistonfl.org

www.floridastateparks.org

CARRIE Oct. 10 - Nov. 3 Times Vary GAINESVILLE Hippodrome Theatre, 25 SE Second Place. A southeastern premiere! The king of horror’s telekinetic cult-classic about a girl and the worst prom ever, takes on a campy twist for the Halloween season. It’s a bloody good time. 352-375-4477

www.thehipp.org

ART, CRAFT AND LIFESTYLE SHOW Thursday, Oct. 11 10:00am - 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - Oaks Mall, 6419 W. Newberry Road. Visit exhibitors offering a selection of handmade art and craft creations and for the latest trends and ideas to enhance the home and lifestyle. Find products offered by popular home-based business representatives. Exhibitors located throughout the mall and available during regular mall hours. 352331-4411 www.theoaksmall.com


10% OFF

Up to 6 people admission, camping.

OTHS mag. Exp 12-15-12

PARK

COUPON NOT VALID ON MAJOR HOLIDAY WEEKENDS

• Covered pavilions • Concession stand • Large tiled bath house • Canoe & tube rentals • Nature trail • Volleyball courts • Horseshoe pits

• Playground • Picnic tables & grills • Campsites w/ electric and water • Primitive wooded campsites • Dump station

Located in beautiful High Springs

386-454-1369 www.bluespringspark.com

DIRTY BAR More than a bar, it’s an attitude. MONDAY Open Mic, $2 Drafts & $ 3.50 Wells. Free Pool TUESDAY Karaoke, FREE Pool, $2 Domestic Drafts, $

3.50 Wells, $ 3.75 House Wines, $5 House Martinis. Free Pool

WEDNESDAY Kinky Trivia - Adult Trivia $12 All You Can Drink 8:00pm - Close. Free Pool THURSDAY Ladies FREE Domestic Drafts & Wells 8-10. Live Music FRIDAY & SATURDAY The Best in Live Music $5 House Martinis. $ 3 Cover. SUNDAY Blues Sunday, the second Sunday of the month. North Central Blues Society Jam.

HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY 5PM TO 8PM (2 FOR 1’S) Free Tacos, Pizza & Hotdogs during Happy Hour (Mon - Thurs)

GOOD TIMES • GREAT MUSIC • SMOKE FREE

352.373.1141

THORNEBROOK VILLAGE - 2441 NW 43rd St. • Gainesville, FL 32606

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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AN EVENING OF ONE-ACT PLAYS Oct. 11 - Oct. 14 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Vam York Theater, 4039 NW 16th Blvd. This limited run will take place in a black box arrangement on the GCP stage and seating is very limited. Durang is known for his zany humor and off-center view of the human condition. Prepare for an evening of hilarity as the audience goes inside the twisted mind of one of America’s funniest and talented playwrights. 352-3764949 www.gcplayhouse.org

PALS GOLF TOURNAMENT Friday, Oct. 12 10:30am GAINESVILLE - Haile Plantation Golf and Country Club, 9905 SW 44th Ave. Enjoy a round of golf, entertainment, food and prizes to raise money and awareness for the Shands Vista Partners in Adolescent Lifestyle Support program. 352-265-7237

namigainesville.org

BUTTERFLYFEST

HALLOWEEN HOBBLE 5K RUN

Saturday, Oct. 13 10:00am - 5:00pm

Saturday, Oct. 13 8:00am

GAINESVILLE - Museum of Natural History, Hull Road and Southwest 34th Street. A celebration of wings and backyard things! ButterflyFest is dedicated to increasing awareness of Florida’s butterflies as fun, fascinating ambassadors to the natural world. Activities will promote inquiry and provide a call to action for the conservation and preservation of backyard wildlife and habitats. 352-8462000. www.flmnh.ufl.edu

GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. A 5K-race or 1-mile walk to benefit the UF Physical Therapy community service organization, including pro bono physical therapy clinic in Gainesville, annual mission trip to Nicaragua and multiple health screenings throughout Alachua County. Come ready for a costume contest, raffle, health screenings, massages, free food and more!

www.acrosstown.org

www.golf4pals.com

WALK FOR HEARTS AND MINDS

PAPA’S BLUES

Saturday, Oct. 13 10:00am

Oct. 12 - Oct. 28 Times Vary GAINESVILLE Acrosstown Repertory Theatre, 619 S. Main St. An African-American

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hope and recovery. Join for a day filled with family fun that includes food, music, an artist exhibition, guest speakers and community information tables. Registration begins at 10 a.m.; Walk begins at 11 a.m. 352-374-5600. www.

drama about a grandfather who lost his life during the civil rights protest era and whose descendants are struggling with reconciling continued involvement in that movement with the demands of their own personal domestic situations. 352-371-1234

GAINESVILLE - Westside Park, 1001 NW 34th St. NAMI Gainesville’s Sixth Annual Mental Health Awareness Walk celebrates

www.active.com

TAILGATEKICKOFF TO A CURE Saturday, Oct. 13 7:00pm GAINESVILLE Touchdown Terrace at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. While the Gators and the Vandy Commodores provide the entertainment from Tennessee via 24

big-screen TVs, guests will enjoy 18 of the area’s finest restaurants serving their signature dishes! 352-733-3560

FALL PLANT SHOW AND ORCHID SHOW Oct. 13 - Oct. 14 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Kanapaha Botanical Gardens, 4700 SW 58th Drive. In addition to viewing the botanical gardens, approximately 40 booths will be set up selling a wide variety of plants. The American Orchid Society’s judged orchid show will coincide with the Fall Plant Sale and will take place inside Kanapaha’s entrance building. Pets are not allowed. Admission is free. 352372-4981 www.kanapaha.org

DOWNTOWN FESTIVAL AND ART SHOW Oct. 13 - Oct. 14 10:00am GAINESVILLE - Downtown Gainesville. The 31st annual Downtown Festival and Art Show is a juried fine arts festival. Join 250 artists and marvel at worldclass paintings, vivid photography, unique sculptures, dazzling jewelry and more. Enjoy continuous, live entertainment on three


UNITED DOWNTOWN Friday, Oct. 19 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - Downtown. A free, community event held on Friday night before Gator home games by United Way North Central Florida, a non-profit organization whose mission is to unite the community around issues of education, income and health. 352-333-0855

Coon Hollo Corn Maze Oct. 5 - November 4 Times Vary MICANOPY - Coon Hollo, 22480 N. Highway 441. Enjoy a beautiful fall day on the family farm! Admission includes not only the five-acre corn maze, but also a hayride out to feed the cows, a ride on the farm train, pasture puttputt golf course, a hay fort, an obstacle course and more. Cost $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $7 for ages 4-12, and $6 for military, law enforcement and fire fighters. 352-591-0441 www.coonhollocornmaze.com

stages all weekend, including a downtown blues concert on Saturday evening. Bring the kids for free art activities at the Children’s Imagination Station. 352-334-5067

www.gvlculturalaffairs.org

ENSEMBLE BASIANI Sunday, Oct. 14 2:00pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. The ensemble, headed by George Donadze, sings folk songs and chants, reviving them from the ancient phonological

and notated recordings. Basiani has worked with many worldrenowned ethnomusicians, received international acclaim and performed in wellknown concert halls and festivals around the globe. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

ETHEL WITH TODD RUNDGREN Wednesday, Oct. 17 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Regarded as America’s premier postclassical string quartet,

Just 10 miles south of historic St. Augustine 6970 A1A SOUTH ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH

Call for reservations

ETHEL teams with rock legend Todd Rundgren for a special celebration of the 1970s. Rundgren’s string of hits include “Hello it’s Me,” “I Saw the Light” and “Can We Still Be Friends.” 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

SHOP-DINESTROLL Friday, Oct. 19 6:00pm - 9:00pm ALACHUA - Main Street. Come see Scare Crow Row, carriage rides, and music in Theater Park. 386-462-3333 www.

alachua.com

PHANTOM Friday, Oct. 19 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Featuring the brilliant Andre Valladon as the doomed Phantom, the ballet evokes old world drama with new world set design by Carlos Asse. Journeying through an opulent opera house, virginal boudoir and darkly chilling cemetery, the audience is drawn into the torn life of the Phantom, his beautiful and vulnerable protégé Christine, and Raoul, her desperate lover. 352-392-2787 performingarts.ufl.edu

GAINESVILLE SENIOR GAMES Oct. 19 - Oct. 21 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - The Atrium, 2431 NW

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www.beacherslodge.com

www.lifestylecruiseandtravel.com

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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COLUMBIA COUNTY FAIR

NOV. 2 TO

NOV. 10

LAKE CITY, FL

$$ VALUABLE COUPON $$

$

5 OFF COUPON

SATURDAY’S, NOVEMBER 3 AND NOVEMBER 10 GOOD BOTH SATURDAY MATINEES NOON TO 6PM ONLY. ARMBAND $10 WITH $5 OFF COUPON. Redeem at Carnival Midway Office — One Per Person NO EXCEPTIONS. OTHS

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2 OFF COUPON

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 — SCHOOL DAY STUDENTS UNDER 18 FREE ADMISSION — 5PM TO CLOSE — ARMBAND $13 WITH $2 OFF SCHOOL COUPON Redeem at Carnival Midway Office — One Per Person NO EXCEPTIONS. OTHS

www.COLUMBIACOUNTYFAIR. www .COLUMBIACOUNTYFAIR.org org 114 | Autumn 2012


41st St. Hundreds of athletes ages 50 and over will compete in 13 sports events all around Alachua County and the City of Gainesville. Each athlete will be competing for gold, silver and bronze medals in their age group and a chance to qualify for the State Senior Games in December. Age groups for most events will be divided into five-year intervals. 352-338-9300

www.gainesvillesportscommission.com

ALLIGATOR WARRIOR FESTIVAL Oct. 19 - Oct. 21 Times Vary HIGH SPRINGS - O’Leno State Park, U.S. 441. Experience both a Native American gathering with dancers, musicians, artisans and traders, and a living history event that includes a reenactment of the Sept. 11, 1836, Seminole War Battle of San Felasco Hammock. 386-454-0723

www.floridastateparks.org

ALACHUA COUNTY FAIR Oct. 19 - Oct. 27 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Alachua County Fairgrounds, 3100 NE 39th Ave. New exciting things coming this year. General admission $5. Children 12 and under free with paid adult admission. 352-354-3708

www.alachuacountyfair.com

STAR GAZING Saturday, Oct. 20 7:30pm - 10:30pm NEWBERRY - Dudley Farm, 18730 W. Newberry Road. The Alachua County Astronomy Club with their high-powered telescopes will assist and direct viewing, explain the planets,

nebulas, constellations, moon, clusters and deep sky objects. Admission is $5. 352-472-1142

www.floridastateparks.org

FESTIVAL AND BBQ COOK-OFF Sunday, Oct. 21 TBA NEWBERRY - Downtown, along Seaboard Drive. The Annual Newberry Fall Market Festival and Bar-B-Q Cook-off offers fun for everyone, arts, crafts, entertainment, games for the kids and great BBQ.

www.newberrymainstreet.org

MICANOPY FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL Oct. 20 - Oct. 21 TBA MICANOPY - Downtown Micanopy, Northeast Cholokka Boulevard. A scenic location for a fall arts and crafts festival. Micanopy is “the town that time forgot.” About 38,000 attendees expected. 352-466-7026

www.micanopyfallfestival.org

UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN Sunday, Oct. 21 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. Armed with eight ukuleles and co-ed vocals, the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain finds its art in reinterpretation of all musical genres. Since 1985, the ensemble has revived the instrument’s hilarious, foot-stomping, twanging entertainment. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

FAIRYTALE WEDDING SHOW Sunday, Oct. 21 4:00pm - 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - University Air Center, 4701 NE

40th Terrace. A casual evening soirée where modern Cinderellas and their Prince Charmings can mingle with the best of the best in the wedding industry. Don’t miss the chance to meet a wide variety of wedding vendors and live happily ever after at this modern fairytale event. 352-270-8924

www.fairytaleweddingshow.com

RIOULT Thursday, Oct. 25 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Founded in 1994, RIOULT has quickly become an established name in modern dance with a reputation for creating and presenting the sensual, articulate and exquisitely musical works of founder and choreographer Pascal Rioult. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

HIGH SPRINGS ROTARY CAR SHOW Saturday, Oct. 27 Times Vary HIGH SPRINGS - Come enjoy a day of beautiful cars and trucks, old and new, and chatting with friends, old and new! Music, food and all around family run, donation breakfast in the morning, and sausage and pepper hoagies at lunchtime.

www.highspringsrotary.org

MOONLIGHT CLASSICS TO MIDNIGHT MADNESS AND MAYHEM Oct. 25 - Oct. 27 Times Vary HIGH SPRINGS - High Springs Lions Club, 26900 W. Highway 27. A haunted house and Halloween event. Admission for the haunted house is $10 per person, ages 13

www.VisitOurTowns.com

and up. Kids zone admission is two cans of food for charity. There will be food and drinks (soda, water), Halloween music and live band. Wear a costume, all ages. 386-984-6085

FLORIDA BAT FESTIVAL Saturday, Oct. 27 10:00am - 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Lubee Bat Conservancy, 1309 NW 192nd Ave. This is the only day of the year that the center is open to the public. This year’s event will provide a wide range of activities for the entire family, including bouncy huts, fun crafts, a prize raffle, live music and bat-themed merchandise for sale. 352-485-1250 www.

batconservancy.org

BOOK SALE Oct. 27 - Oct. 31 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - The Friends of the Library, 430-B N. Main St. Largest book sale of its kind in Florida — more than 500,000 books, records, games, CDs, DVDs, audio, video, paintings, posters, prints, puzzles and magazines have been donated for the sale! Most prices range from 25 cents to $4. All profits are used for the Alachua County Library District and for community literacy projects. Second to last day of sale is halfpriced day, and last day is 10-cents day. 352375-1676 www.folacld.org

TAKÁCS QUARTET Sunday, Oct. 28 2:00pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. With a unique blend of

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Title Town Hoedown down BBQ Showdown Sunday, October ber 14 ALACHUA - The Rembert Farm, m, 13126 NW 17th Ave. An evening of down home fun with dancing, entertainment, a live auction and more. The Early Learning Coalition of Alachua County strives to give children the best start in school possible by making ing sure they are prepared to enter kindergarten. 352-375-4110 ext.131 131 or 136 www.titletownhoedown.org org

HISPANIC LINGUISTICS SYMPOSIUM Monday, Oct. 29 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Hilton University of Florida, 1714 SW 34th St. UF’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies is excited to host the 2012 Hispanic Linguistics Symposium. 352-371-3600

TRICK-OR-TREAT ON MAIN STREET Wednesday, Oct. 31 6:00pm - 8:00pm ALACHUA - Bring the kids to Main Street as shop owners distribute candy. 386-462-3333

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BOO AT THE ZOO Tuesday, Oct. 31 3:00pm - 7:30PM GAINESVILE - Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo, 3000 NW 83rd Street, behind the Gym. Admission to the Trick or Treat Event is one can of food per person. Canned goods will be donated to local food banks. Admission to the Zoo: Age 3 and under free; 4 and up $3. Extended Zoo hours: 9:00am - 6:00 pm.

www.sfcollege.edu

THE WARSAW PHILHARMONIC Sunday, Nov. 4 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. From major concert halls to international festivals, The Warsaw Philharmonic enjoys worldwide popularity. For this performance, pianist Yulianna Avdeeva — first-prize winner at the 16th International Fryderyk Chopin Competition — joins the orchestra. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

HARVEST FESTIVAL Sunday, Nov. 11 11:00am - 5:00pm

4:00pm - 8:00pm

drama, warmth and humor, the Takács Quartet seamlessly combines four distinct musical personalities to bring fresh insights to the string quartet repertoire. For this performance, the ensemble welcomes world-renowned pianist Marc-André Hamelin, who boasts nine Grammy nominations. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

guitar and dance, and Broadway caliber sets. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

THE CAPITOL STEPS Monday, Nov. 5 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. The Capitol Steps put the “mock” in democracy and plans to bring down the house and Senate with their unique blend of music and political comedy. This is the only performance in America where one will find two presidential candidates onstage singing show tunes. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

BENISE — EN FUENGO! Wednesday, Nov. 7 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. The Emmywinning Benise’s fiery Spanish guitar and his international dance troupe perform their hottest show to date “En Fuego!” called “The Latin Riverdance” by The Los Angeles Times. “En Fuego!” showcases classic songs from artists such as Led Zeppelin, Queen and The Eagles and marries them with Spanish

ALACHUA - Main Street. Free and open to the public. Twice a year since, 2003, residents, visitors, and 200 vendors come together for a leisurely afternoon of music on two stages, lots of fun food, and many free child-friendly activities. Its purpose: to turn strangers into friends, friends into customers, and maybe customers into fellow entrepreneurs. www.

alachuabusiness.com

SIBERIAN VIRTUOSI Sunday, Nov. 11 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. Siberian Virtuosi — the State Ensemble of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)— is comprised of 12 violinists and a pianist and is increasing its popularity in Russia and worldwide. 352-392ARTS performingarts. ufl.edu

BÉLO Nov. 13 and Nov. 14 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Squitieri Studio Theatre. Haiti native BélO is a young author, composer, guitarist, singer and winner of numerous awards, including the prestigious Prix Radio France International Discoveries of 2006. His musical style, known as Ragganga, combines reggae, jazz, rock, worldbeat and rara — traditional Vodou rhythms. 352-392-ARTS


NEWBERRY MAIN STREET ORGANIZATION, INC.

EVENTS OF 2012 25435 W. NEWBERRY ROAD • 352-472-2112 • NEWBERRYMAINSTREETEVENTS.COM

September 1 & 2 Second Annual Luau Party

OCTOBER

Fall Market Festival and TH 20 Barbecue Arts & Cookoff Crafts 21 ST and

SATURDAY 9:00am - 4:00pm • SUNDAY 9:00am - 3:00pm

3 Chair-ity Fundraiser D RANNUAL WHIMSICAL

CHAIRS ON DISPLAY IN LOCAL BUSINESSES THRU NOV.

AUCTION OF CHAIRS - DECEMBER 8 th @ 6:00pm

FESTIVAL OF

LIGHTS

SANTA IN THE PARK + CHRISTMAS CRAFTERS

DEC15

TH

12 - 7 pm

SPONSORS: Acknowledgement: This event has been funded in part by a Tourist Development Tax Grant from the Alachua County Board of County Commissioners in Conjunction with the www.VisitOurTowns.com Alachua County Tourist Development Council www.visitgainesville.com Autumn 2012 | 117

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performingarts.ufl.edu

PIANIST CHARLIE ALBRIGHT Thursday, Nov. 15 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Squitieri Studio Theatre, 315 Hull Road. Winner of the prestigious 2010 Gilmore Young Artist Award and the 2009 Young Concert Artists International Auditions, pianist Charlie Albright made his Washington, D.C., and New York recital debuts to critical acclaim. Albright was hailed by The Washington Post as, “among the most gifted musicians of his generation.” 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

SHOP-DINESTROLL Friday, Nov. 16 6:00pm - 9:00pm ALACHUA - Main Street. Visit downtown Alachua for carriage rides, and music in Theater Park. 386-4623333 www.alachua.com

CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING Friday, Nov. 16 6:00pm - 9:00pm HIGH SPRINGS Downtown. Annual Christmas Tree Lighting.

HOLIDAY BAZAAR Nov. 16 - Nov. 17 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, 100 NE First St. Celebrate the holidays by attending a top-notch bazaar, located in the heart of historic downtown. The annual event features handcrafted seasonal decorations and toys;

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original art and jewelry; hand-painted furniture; and homemade jams, jellies and baked goods. The holiday shopping extravaganza opens with an evening of spirits, food, and music for a $5 door donation on Nov. 16 from 7 to 9 p.m. Shopping continues with free admission on Nov. 17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Nov. 18 from noon to 2 p.m. 352-372-4721

www.holytrinitygnv.org

SPECTICAST: GIUSEPPE VERDI’S AIDA Sunday, Nov. 18 3:00pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Aida revolves around the forbidden love story between the Egyptian leader Radames and the beautiful Ethiopian princess Aida. But this opera proves more than a love story. Thematic pyrotechnical effects, elephants and horses onstage and more than 400 participants bring this unique opera to life. The previously recorded production will be projected on the Phillips Center Main Stage in HD quality. There will be an intermission with concessions available. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

SING-A-LONG-A SOUND OF MUSIC Wednesday, Nov. 21 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Screening of the classic Julie Andrews film musical in glorious, full-screen Technicolor, complete with subtitles so that the whole audience can sing along. Then,

of course, there is the famous fancy-dress competition in which everyone who has come in costume is invited onto the stage to show off their fantastic tailoring skills. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

THE CHUCHO VALDES QUINTET

Musicians of the Year, cellist David Finckel and pianist Wu Han rank among today’s most esteemed and influential classical musicians. The talent, energy, imagination and dedication they bring to their multifaceted endeavors go unmatched. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

Friday, Nov. 23 7:30pm

RIDERS IN THE SKY

GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. Multiple Grammy-winning pianist Chucho Valdés is well-known on both the Latin and U.S. jazz scenes, producing more than 80 CD recordings throughout his career. Called “the dean of Latin jazz” by The New York Times, his works have been heard in esteemed venues, such as the Kennedy Center, Carnegie Hall and the Hollywood Bowl. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

Friday, Nov. 30 7:30pm

CRAFT FESTIVAL 2012 Nov. 24 - Nov. 25 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - O’Connell Center. Need a unique gift? Working on decorating the home? Need a splash of holiday spirit? The Craft Festival will meet all of these needs and more. Come visit North Central Florida’s largest indoor craft show and walk away with a much shorter holiday shopping list. 352-3927238 www.oconnellcenter.ufl.edu

DAVID FINCKEL AND WU HAN Sunday, Nov. 25 2:00pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. Selected as Musical America’s 2012

GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium. Multiple Grammy-winning Riders in the Sky’s presentation of Christmas the Cowboy Way blends a festive mix of western classics, traditional Christmas music and the Riders’ original yuletide carols in a holiday spectacular sure to delight Saddle Pals of all ages. The quartet returns to Gainesville for their third visit while still keeping true to the western genre. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

CANE DAY AT THE FARM Dec. 1 9:00am - 3:00pm NEWBERRY - Dudley Farm, 18730 W. Newberry Road. Commemorate Miss Myrtle Dudley’s birthday by grinding sugar cane and boiling cane syrup. Farm tours, craft demonstrations, wagon rides, children’s activities, music and vendors are featured on this living history day. A great chance to see an original Florida working farm from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Admission to event $8/vehicle up to 8 occupants. www.

friendsofdudleyfarm.org


www.VisitOurTowns.com

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TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT Wednesday, Dec. 5 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Known for its “fresh and forward-thinking choreography (The Washington Post),” the group is guided by Trey McIntyre’s unparalleled ear for musical structures, with a repertoire covering multiple genres including rock, classical, jazz and folk. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

SHOP-DINESTROLL

West Side Story ory November 27 and 28 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. More ore than 50 years ago, one musical changed theater forever. Now it’s back and mesmerizing irst audiences once again. From the first e note to the final breath, West Side tory Story soars as the greatest love story ul, of all time and remains as powerful, poignant and timely as ever. fl.edu 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

slide (Saturday night only) for an additional charge. 352-591-0441

Friday, Dec. 7 6:00pm - 9:00pm

www.coonhollocornmaze.com

ALACHUA - Main Street. Visit downtown Alachua for carriage rides, and music in Theater Park. 386-4623333 www.alachua.com

SHOP-DINESTROLL

CHRISTMAS PARADE Saturday, Dec. 8 6:00pm - 9:00pm HIGH SPRINGS Downtown. Come see the floats on Main Street.

COON HOLLO CHRISTMAS Thursday, Dec. 13 6:00pm - 9:30pm MICANOPY - Coon Hollo, 22480 N. Highway 441. Free admission includes outdoor Christmas classic movies under the stars, a nativity hayride, choirs, carolers, lights, gingerbread house contest and more. Also enjoy a horse-drawn “sleigh” ride, pictures with Santa and even an ice

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Friday, Dec. 14 6:00pm - 9:00pm ALACHUA - Main Street. Visit downtown Alachua for carriage rides, and music in Theater Park. 386-4623333. www.alachua.com

NUTCRACKER Dec. 14 - Dec. 16 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Dance Alive National Ballet presents its 47th Annual Nutcracker. Entrancing, enchanting and exciting, The Nutcracker is a ballet for the young at heart of all ages. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

SUGAR PLUM TEA Dec. 15 - Dec. 16 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Dance Alive

National Ballet presents the perfect ending to a perfect day! After enjoying The Nutcracker performance, meet the Sugar Plum Fairy and her court — touch a snowflake, tease a mouse, enjoy a tea party only a Sugar Plum Fairy could present. Holiday photos available. A wonderful memory for your child or grandchild. 352-392-ARTS. performingarts.ufl.edu

GAINESVILLE HARMONY SHOW CHORUS HOLIDAY SHOW Saturday, Dec. 15 7:00pm GAINESVILLE - Santa Fe Fine Arts Hall, Northwest 83rd Street. The Gainesville Harmony Show Chorus and the Gainesville Barbergators join to bring the best of Holiday Harmony. Please plan to join this event of joyful notes. 352-395-4181

www.sfcollege.edu

CHOCOLATE & CHAMPAGNE HOLIDAY GALA Saturday, Dec. 15 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center. Dance Alive National Ballet presents dining, dancing and shopping — all rolled into one great party! With the Nutcracker Winter Wonderland as the backdrop, dance onstage to the fabulous sounds of Gosia and Ali, dine on gourmet delights, sip on complimentary champagne and wine, indulge in decadent desserts, and enjoy exclusive holiday shopping at the silent auction. 352-392-ARTS performingarts.ufl.edu

NEWBERRY FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS Saturday, Dec. 15 Noon - 8:00pm NEWBERRY - Main Street. Vendors start in the afternoon for family fun. Christmas Parade begins at 5 p.m., followed by Santa and Mrs. Claus in the Pocket Park and music through 8 p.m. 352-472-2112

www.NewberryMainStreet.org


So cost effective that it practically pays for itself ASK YOUR OVERHEAD DOOR RED RIBBON DISTRIBUTOR TODAY TO LEARN MORE. *Ranked #2 in upscale remodeling projects for cost recovered at resale. Based on National Association of Realtors members included in 2011-12 Cost vs. Value study rather than actual sales data.

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352-468-2733 www.overheaddoorgnv.com Overhead Door of Ocala 352-622-5737 www.overheaddoorocala.com

There are a few sure things in life, but one thing is certain. Upgrading a garage door is one of the most cost effective renovations a homeowner can make. In Fact, according to the latest Cost vs. Value Report by Remodeling Magazine*, replacing a basic garage door with an upgraded one from Overhead Door returned a remarkable 71% on original cost - making it the second highest renovation in the study. Now, that’s a return on investment you can take to the bank.

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Taste of the Town

SPECIAL RESTAURANT ADVERTISING SECTION. CALL 352.372-5468 FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION.

Brown’s Country Buffet 14423 NW US Hwy 441, Alachua, FL 32616 Monday-Friday: 7am - 8pm Saturday: 7am - 2pm Sunday: 8am - 2:30pm

386-462-3000 Brown’s Country Buffet is country-style cooking at its finest, just like Grandma’s house! A buffet style restaurant, Brown’s Country Buffet is open seven days a week! Foods like fried chicken, grilled pork chops, real mashed potatoes, steamed cabbage, banana pudding and coconut pie, just to name a few, are served in a laid back, relaxing environment. In addition to their buffet, Brown’s also offers a full menu to choose from. You are sure to find something to satisfy any craving at Brown’s. Located in beautiful Alachua, Brown’s is open 7 days per week. Serving lunch and dinner daily and a breakfast buffet Friday-Sunday until 10:30am, you’re sure to leave satisfied, no matter when you go. So, when you’re in the mood for some good home cooking, Grandma’s style, visit Brown’s Country Buffet.

Gator Q 222 NE First Avenue, High Springs, FL 32643 Tuesday — Saturday: 11:00am - 9:00pm

386-454-9823

www.GatorQ.com

BARBECUE — Gator Q is under new management and has a new owner, Joe Southerland. All of our meats (beef brisket, pulled and sliced pork, and wings) are smoked on site. We offer hand-pattied, fresh, ground beef burgers, along with fried naked wings. Also try one of our many homemade sides including potato salad, cole slaw, B-B-Q beans, collard greens and fresh cut russet French fries. All of Joe’s special sauce recipes, include regular, sweet, and his house sauce, which has a surprising Texas kick. All platters include two side items and a drink with free refills. For game day specials, call one day ahead to place your order. We kept the old name, but have made some great changes. Come see us!

Pickled Pelican 14209 W Newberry Rd. Jonesville (Next to Bubba Que’s) Open Daily at 11:00am

352-333-2943

www.pickledpelicanonline.com

ISLAND — Welcome to the Pickled Pelican bar and Eatery! This is a happening place with excellent fresh food and seafood. We have a large menu with a variety of choices to suit many taste buds. Beginning with one of our appetizers such as escargot, fried green tomatoes, or loaded potato skins. We offer plenty of salad choices. And let’s not forget the best clam chowder ever! When you are ready to move on to the main coarse, try one of our signature dishes such as Chicken Alfredo, Grouper cakes or Salmon. If it’s a sandwich or burger you are craving, we have the best Grouper and Pelican burgers. Live entertainment on the weekends and a great place to catch all your favorite games!

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Los Aviña 14841 Main Street Alachua, 32615 • 386-418-0341 16654 SW Archer, 32618 • 352-495-1314 Mon - Sat 11am to 10pm • Sun 12pm - 3pm

Buffet Now Available For nine years Jorge Aviña has been serving delicious authentic mexican food. Originally located in Archer, Aviña opened a second location in High Springs, which is now relocated in Alachua. Los Aviña features all you can eat tacos Mon - Sat llam to 4pm for $6.95. All you can eat buffet Mon - Sat from 11am to 3pm for only $6.95. They also have combination dinner specials starting at $7.55 and lunch specials starting at $4.55 Mon - Thurs from 11am to 2:30pm. Aviña’s specialties include steaks, fajitas, chimichangas, burritos, taco salads and enchiladas. Live Mexican music every other Sat night from 6:30pm to 9:30pm. Los Aviña also serves beer and wine at the Archer location and a full bar at their new location in Alachua.

Granny’s Buffet 8877 SW US Highway 27, Fort White, FL Open Monday through Saturday Breakfast and Lunch hours 6:00am - 2:30pm

386-497-4703 SOUTHERN — Granny’s Buffet Restaurant is a traditional Southern style restaurant with the best recipes straight from Granny’s cookbook. Granny’s Buffet Restaurant is open Monday - Saturday serving breakfast and lunch with food made from scratch daily. Granny’s offers a lunch buffet as well as menu items including Philly cheese steak, burgers, wings and an assortment of other sandwiches. Granny welcomes you to come out and enjoy their friendly service, family atmosphere and of course, the food!

Northwest Grille 5115 Northwest 39th Ave., Gainesville 32606 Open 7 Days: 11am to 10pm (Friday open until 11pm) Saturday & Sunday: Serving brunch 10am to 3pm

352-376-0500

www.northwestgrillegainesville.com

SEAFOOD — Locally owned and operated, Northwest Grille has been providing the finest quality fish and seafood entrees in a friendly atmosphere since 1996. Whether it’s their fresh, local seafood and fish, or handcrafted sauces and specialty desserts, Northwest Grille has something to please your palate. Meat lovers will enjoy the hand-cut steaks and vegetarians will love the wide range of vegetarian options. Serving lunch and dinner daily, Northwest Grille, offers an extensive brunch menu on Saturdays and Sundays from 10am3pm. Northwest Grille also features a full liquor bar with nightly drink specials. Happy hour is served daily from 3pm-6pm and offers a wide assortment of beer, wine and your favorite cocktails.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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Taste of the Town

SPECIAL RESTAURANT ADVERTISING SECTION. CALL 352.372-5468 FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION.

Saboré 13005 SW 1st Road, Tioga, FL 32669 (Tioga Town Center) Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday: 11am – 10pm Fri. & Sat.: 11am – 11pm • Open Mondays for special events only

352-332-2727

www.saborerestaurant.com

FUSION — Saboré [sa-bohr-ay] is a world-fusion restaurant featuring a variety of European, South American, Mediterranean and Asian inspired tastes. Saboré’s namesake is from the word “sabor,” meaning “flavor.” Saboré’s menu features mouth-watering dishes that takes guests on a trip around the world, highlighting exotic flavors and ingredients from countries such as Argentina, Japan, Spain and Italy. Be sure to try the custom plates, desserts and signature cocktails you won’t find anywhere else in Gainesville.

O!O Tapas & Tinis 2725 SW 91st St., #100, Gainesville, FL (Haile Village) Monday to Wednesday 5:00 - 10:00pm Thurs. to Sat. 5:00 - 12:00pm

352-331-6620

www.ootinis.com

TAPAS — O!O Tapas & Tinis is serving up a New Menu from Executive Chef Patrick Maher which include: sushi, certified angus beef, fresh seafood plus great salads and flatbreads for lighter fare. Looking for great drink specials? Come see us Tuesdays and Thursdays for $5 Martinis and Live Music. Join us for Happy Hour from 5-7pm every night. Let us take care of the catering for your office parties or special events. Located in the Haile Village Publix Shopping Plaza.

Napolatanos 606 NW 75th Street Gainesville, FL Monday - Thursday & Sunday 4:00pm-10:00pm Friday 4:00pm-2:00am • Saturday 4:00pm-11:00pm

352-332-6671

www.napolatanos.com

ITALIAN — Napolatanos is the longest original owner operated restaurant in Gainesville. Nappys, the name the locals have given Napolatanos has the most extensive menu. Whether you choose pizza, calzones, salad, burgers, sandwiches, pasta, seafood, steak dinners or the best chicken wings in town, Nappy’s uses only the freshest ingredients. Open at 4 daily with early bird discount @ $3.00 off any regular priced dinner. They have Monday-Thursday dinner specials for $8.50 and Happy hour on cocktails all day. Nappy’s also has 3 private rooms, outside dining and their newest addition is an event garden.

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Ph P hot oto b byy: JJo osh sh Miilllilike ken

Small Town...

Big Flavor! - Tuesdays Kids eat free & All you can Eat - Boneless wings - Thursdays All you can Eat Wings - Sunday 50 cent wings & Happy Hour specials 2-6 All day Hand Cut Steaks Handmade Burgers Fresh Seafood Full Bar

14 TV’s NFL Sunday Ticket Live Music College Football

Hours : 11am - 11pm everyday 16135 HWY 441, Alachua • 386.418.8078

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LIBRARY SCHEDULE Alachua Branch Library .....................14913 NW 140th St. .............................. 386-462-2592 High Springs Branch Library ...........135 NW 1st Ave........................................ 386-454-2512 Newberry Branch Library .................110 South Seaboard Dr. ..........................352-472-1135 For further information on scheduled events visit www.acld.lib.fl.us All branches are closed November 12, 22 and 23; early closing at 5pm on November 21

ALACHUA PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN Preschool Storytime Thursdays - 11am Join for stories, songs and dance. Lego Club Tuesdays - 4pm Pre-teens meet to create challenging structures. Ages 5 to 11. Pre-teen Book and Craft Club Wednesdays - 2pm This after-school group for ages 8 to 12 will explore stories and participate in story-related arts and crafts.

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS Gaming @ Your Library Thursdays - 2pm Spend the afternoon with friends gaming in the SPOT. Board and video games are available. Yu-Gi-Oh Card Game Mondays - 4pm Friends meet to challenge each other over Yu-Gi-Oh. Talk Like a Pirate Day Wed., Sept. 19 - 4pm Come celebrate Talk Like A Pirate Day — learn pirate slang, watch a pirate movie, make a pirate craft and swing a Nerf cutlass. Ages 5 - 11.

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Teen Advisory Group First and Third Wednesdays - 4pm The Teens Advisory Group meets to discuss upcoming teen events and to discuss books. No session on Sept. 19.

Wednesdays - 11am Learn basic computer skills, from using a mouse and keyboard to e-mail and word processing. Class seating is limited. No session on Oct. 31. All sessions end on Nov. 28.

Winter Dance Thurs., Dec. 6 - 4pm Teens come celebrate the oncoming winter season with a winter dance.

Quit Smoking Now Tuesdays - 6pm Want to quit smoking? Take this free six-week class to quit any type of tobacco — cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, pipes and others. Sessions only in September. 386-4621551.

PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS Zumba Classes Mondays - 6pm Mix of body-sculpting movements with dance steps derived from Latin music. No sessions Nov. 5 and Nov. 12. Pilates Classes Wednesdays - 6pm Pilates focuses on building strength without bulk. Improve flexibility and agility, and prevent injuries. Alachua Needlers Thursdays - 2pm Meet and socialize with others who also share a love of needlecrafts. Bring any craft that involves a needle! Poets and Writers Among Us Last Wednesday of each Month - 4pm Poets and writers meet to inspire and be inspired. Computer Class

Law in the Library: Child Support Issues, Questions and Procedures Mon., Nov. 5 - 6pm Presented by S. P. Stafford, Esq., Judicial Hearing Officer.

PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES Int’l Gaming Day Sat., Nov. 3 - 2pm Come play at the library and celebrate gaming simultaneously with people all over the world. Chess, Clue, Dogopoly, and more!

HIGH SPRINGS PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN Mary’s Marvelous Story Time Tuesdays - 11am Come join every Tues. for stories, puppets, songs and dancing.

Ages 5 and under. Afternoon at the Movies Last Three Thursdays - 3:30pm Favorite movies and new releases on the big screen. Ages 5 to 18. What’s That Noise? Tues., October 9 2:30pm Find out who goes bump in the night during this familyfriendly program presented by Morningside Nature Center. Meet Molly: the Monarch Butterfly Puppet Tues., Nov. 13 - 2:30pm Come along with Molly and her caterpillar friend on their fun-filled adventure.

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS Marvel Hero Movies First Tuesdays 3:30pm Come enjoy movies about superheroes; Snacks provided. Rated PG-13. My Favorite Book Rocks! Tues., Oct. 16 - 4pm Celebrate Teen Read Week! Bring in a favorite book.Create a poster about the book Food and art materials provided. The Zombies are Coming Wed., Oct. 24 - 3:30pm The Zombie Apocalypse is coming! Join Patty Lipka from the Cade Museum as she shows the secrets to


FA MILY H E A LT H C A R E

Specialized Pediatric Care Dr. Nancy Worthington 352.371.3604 www.WorthingtonPeds.com

Allpoints Therapy, Inc Deeta Widmer Adkins AP, LMT MA 8292 352.375.0235

Dr. Nancy Worthington has an interest working with pediatric special needs. Identifying the possible medical issues that underlie a diagnosis of behavioral concerns or autism and offering an integrative approach can help children reach their true potential.

Deeta Adkins offers Acupuncture, Massage and Functional Diagnostics. Specialties include: Neck, Shoulder and Back injury rehabilitative massage, Post surgery recovery, Integrative Cancer support and Facial rejuvenation acupuncture.

Worthington Chiropractic, LLC Dr. James Worthington 352.377.3050

Dr. James Worthington is a University of Florida and Palmer Chiropractic College graduate offering preventative and corrective chiropractic care. Services include the “Palmer Package”, Applied Kinesiology, NAET and NET. Additional modalities for pain and infl ammation include ultrasound, E-stim, Cold Laser, Biomat and mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

We are Pleased to Announce our Collaborative Practices Located in Waterford Park at 5618 NW 43rd St Gainesville Fl, 32653

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using common items for zombie costumes! 352-371-8001. Terrific Teen Movie Marathon Oct. 25 to Oct. 31 Times Vary Six days of movies based on J.K. Rowling’s beloved character, Harry Potter. Fri.: 1 and 2, Sat.: 3, Sun.: 4, Mon.: 5, Tues.: 6 and Wed.: 7, parts 1 and 2. Treats provided. Rated PG and PG-13. Bead It! Tues., Nov. 20 - 4pm Come make a bracelet, anklet or necklace for personal enjoyment or as a gift for the holidays.

PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS Crafter’s Circle Wednesdays - 1pm Embroidery, quilts, knits or any other “non-messy” craft. Share knowledge or learn from someone else. Meets Oct. 30 instead of Oct. 31. The Rug Bunch First and Third Wednesdays - 3pm Crochet a rag rug with a group of fellow enthusiasts. Beginners welcome. No session Nov. 28 or Dec. 12. Mystery Reading Group Third Thursdays 6:30pm Join fellow readers for discussions of mystery novels. Bring any mysteries read that month to discuss. Newcomers welcome. Overcoming Life’s Obstacles Thurs., October 4 6:30pm Join Debra Wright, a licensed clinical social worker, motivational speaker and life coach. 352-222-4056.

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High Springs Friends of the Library Mon., October 29 10:30am Friends of the Library quarterly board meeting. 386-454-8616.

Midweek Movie Madness Wednesdays - 3pm Watch some of the latest movies and the best of some older ones. Ages 5 to 18.

DIY Holiday Decorations Thurs., Nov. 1 - 5:30pm Create Christmas trees and beautiful bows from old magazines. Materials provided but bring magazines.

Junior Panther Den First Tuesdays 2:30pm Go wild after school. Adventures and gaming await. Ages 9 to 12.

Happy Fest Thurs., Dec. 6 - 5:30pm Come learn how to give a foot massage for personal enjoyment or for someone else. Presented by Raven Moondance. 352-372-8594.

PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES WIC Clinic First, Second and Fourth Mondays 8:30am From 8:30am to 3:30pm in the meeting room of the library. Clinic closed on holidays will be made up on third Mondays. No appointment needed. 352-392-4493, ext. 250. Mobile Outreach Clinic Mondays - 10am Primary care clinics are offered by the UF College of Medicine Equal Access Clinic, Palm Medical and Alachua County Health Department. Margaret Langstaff: Acclaimed Author & Public Speaker Sun., Sept. 16 - 2pm Come enjoy this author event!

NEWBERRY PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN Preschool Storytime Wednesdays - 11am Stories, songs and activities for the preschool set.

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS Newberry Teen Book Club Third Thursdays - 4pm Read and discuss the latest and most popular books in this book club just for teens! Newberry Teen Advisory Group Second Thursdays 4pm Plan teen events at the local library. Earn volunteer hours and add to college applications. Last session Oct. 11. Senior Panther Den First Thursdays 2:30pm Go wild after school. Adventures and gaming await. Ages 13 - 18. Getting Hooked on Crochet Thurs., September 27 - 2pm Learn the basics of how to crochet, starting at the very beginning. 352-472-1135. Ducktivities: Crafting with Duct Tape Thurs., Oct. 25 - 2pm Learn how to make roses, and other cool crafts using Duct Tape. 352-472-1135.

PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS Newberry Needlecrafters Tuesdays - 1pm Embroidery, quilts, knits or any other

“non-messy” craft. Share knowledge or learn from someone else. 352-472-1135. No sessions in December. Tempting Reads Book Club Fourth Wednesdays 6pm Book club discussions feature popular and recently published books, including books recommended by participants. Computers for Beginners Second Tuesdays 4pm Learn how to use a computer in a relaxed setting. Last session on Nov. 13. Register in advance at 352-4721135. More than Basic Computer Skills September 25 - 11am; and October 25 - 4pm This class is designed for people who already have basic computer skills. Register in advance at 352-472-1135.

PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES Money Smart: A Series of Financial Education Classes Second and Fourth Mondays - 6pm A series of training programs to help consumers enrich their money management skills and banking knowledge. A new topic will be covered every other Mon.. Last session on Dec. 3. 352332-1137. Ghost Hunting Tues., Oct. 30 - 6pm Join the local ghost hunter this Halloween week. Hear about her experiences and learn what should be considered when dealing with “the other side.” 352-474-6287.


Your oral health is connected to many other health conditions beyond your mouth. Sometimes the first sign of a disease can show up in your mouth. In other cases, infections in your mouth, such as gum disease, can cause problems in other areas of your body. The Altschuler Periodontic and Implant Center is Gainesville’s family-based, high-technology practice dedicated to providing the highest quality periodontal care. We maintain the most advanced procedures, technology and equipment available to ensure that every patient achieves a healthy and beautiful smile.

“Keep your body healthy, have your head examined.�

of risk for any If you’re at ld ou sh ou y ons, these conditi : am ex l ta on have a period

  

    

  

    

Dr. Gary Altschuler, DMD

(352) 371-4141 altschulercenter.com

ALTSCHULER

PERIODONTIC and IMPLANT

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2012 UF Sports Schedules GATOR FOOTBALL DATE

OPPONENT

SITE

TIME

Sep 1

Bowling Green

HOME

3:30 pm

Sep 8

Texas A&M

College Station, TX 3:30 pm

Sep 15

Tennessee

Knoxville, TN

6:00 pm

Sep 22

Kentucky

HOME

TBA

Oct 6

LSU

HOME

TBA

Oct 13

Vanderbilt

Nashville, TN

TBA

Oct 20

South Carolina

HOME

TBA

Oct 27

Georgia

Jacksonville

3:30 pm

Nov 3

Missouri

HOME

TBA

Nov 10

Louisiana (HC)

HOME

TBA

Nov 17

Jacksonville State

HOME

Nov 24

Florida State

Tallahassee

GATOR VOLLEYBALL DATE

OPPONENT

SITE

TIME

Aug 25

Florida A&M

HOME

12:00 pm

Aug 25

Florida Gulf Coast HOME

Aug 31

Texas

University Park, PA 4:30 pm

Sep 1

Stanford

University Park, PA 4:00 pm

TBA

Sep 7

Jacksonville

HOME

7:30 pm

TBA

Sep 8

Louisiana

HOME

12:00 pm

Sep 8

Georgia Tech

HOME

7:30 pm

Sep 14

Arkansas *

Fayetteville, AR

8:00 pm

GATOR SOCCER

7:30 pm

DATE

OPPONENT

SITE

TIME

Sep 16

Kentucky *

Lexington, KY

1:00 pm

Aug 17

Miami

HOME

7:00 pm

Sep 21

Missouri

HOME

7:00 pm

Aug 24

North Carolina

Chapel Hill, NC

7:00 pm

Sep 28

South Carolina

Columbia, SC

7:00 pm

Aug 26

Duke

Chapel Hill, NC

1:00 pm

Sep 30

Mississippi State

Starkville, MS

2:30 pm

Aug 31

Florida State

Tallahassee, FL

7:00 pm

Oct 5

Arkansas

HOME

7:00 pm

Sep 2

Florida Int’l

HOME

7:00 pm

Oct 7

Kentucky

HOME

3:00 pm

Sep 9

New Mexico

HOME

1:00 pm

Oct 12

Ole Miss

HOME

7:00 pm

Sep 14

Kentucky *

Lexington, KY

7:00 pm

Oct 14

Auburn

HOME

1:30 pm

Sep 16

Auburn *

Auburn, AL

3:00 pm

Oct 19

Alabama

Tuscaloosa, AL

8:00 pm

Sep 21

Tennessee

HOME

7:00 pm

Oct 21

Texas A&M

College Station, TX 2:00 pm

Sep 23

Georgia

HOME

2:00 pm

Oct 24

Florida State

Tallahassee, FL

6:00 pm

Sep 28

Mississippi

HOME

7:00 pm

Oct 26

Mississippi State

HOME

7:00 pm

Sep 30

Arkansas

HOME

1:00 pm

Nov 2

Georgia

HOME

7:00 pm

Oct 5

LSU

Baton Rouge, LA 7:30 pm

Nov 4

Tennessee

HOME

2:00 pm

Oct 7

Texas A&M

College Station, TX 1:30 pm

Nov 9

Missouri

Columbia, MO

8:00 pm

Oct 12

Missouri

HOME

7:00 pm

Nov 11

Ole Miss

Oxford, MS

2:30 pm

Oct 14

Mississippi State

HOME

2:00 pm

Nov 16

LSU

HOME

7:00 pm

Oct 19

Alabama

Tuscaloosa, AL

8:00 pm

Nov 18

South Carolina

HOME

1:30 pm

Oct 21

Vanderbilt

Nashville, TN

2:00 pm

Nov 21

Auburn

Auburn, AL

8:00 pm

Oct 25

South Carolina

Columbia, SC

6:00 pm

Nov 23

Georgia

Athens, GA

7:00 pm

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Monday August 13 - Friday, August 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pre-Planning (5 weekdays) Monday, August 20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First Day for Students Monday, September 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday - Labor Day Tuesday, September 25. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send Interim Reports Home Tuesday, October 23. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . End of 1st Nine Weeks Friday, October 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pupil Holiday/Teacher Workday Monday, November 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send Report Cards Home Friday, November 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday - UF Homecoming Wednesday, November 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pupil Holiday/Teacher Holiday Thursday, November 22 - Friday, November 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thanksgiving Holidays Tuesday, December 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send Interim Reports Home Thursday, Dec 20 - Wednesday, Jan 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winter Holidays (10 weekdays) Thursday, January 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Classes Resume Monday, January 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . End of First Semester Tuesday, January 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Begin Second Semester Friday, January 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pupil Holiday/Teacher Workday Monday, January 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Holiday - ML King Day Monday, January 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send Report Cards Home Friday, February 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pupil Holiday/Teacher Holiday Monday, February 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday - Presidents’ Day Monday, February 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send Interim Reports Home Friday, March 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . End of Third Nine Weeks Monday, March 25 - Friday, March 29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring Holidays (5 weekdays) Monday, April 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pupil Holiday/Teacher Workday Thursday, April 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send Report Cards Home Tuesday, May 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send Interim Reports Home Monday, May 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday - Memorial Day Tuesday, June 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School Out - Last Day for Students Wednesday, June 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Post-Planning for Teachers Thursday, June 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Post-Planning for Teachers * THESE DAYS MAY BE USED TO MAKE UP DAYS CANCELLED DUE TO HURRICANES OR OTHER EMERGENCIES. FOR THE 2012-13 CALENDAR, THEY WILL BE USED IN THE FOLLOWING ORDER:

(1) November 21 (2) January 18 (3) February 15 (4) April 1 (5) June 5 (6) June 6

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COLUMN >> ALBERT ISAAC

Different Note Boys are Like Puppies. es. Wild little animals. They run around like little maniacs with boundless energy, they break their toys and ruin our furniture, and, like dogs — depending on their age — they eat anything they can get their hands on, especially cat food. Having raised a girl (girls are like kittens) and a boy, and now working on our second boy, my wife (the Voice of Reason) and I can attest to their canine-like qualities. For instance, our old dog Bo (may he rest in peace) reached a point in his life that he would not eat his dog food. But he would chow down on the cat food every chance he got. I figured if he got good and hungry he would eat the dog food. And he would — but only when he was half-starved. Both of our boys enjoyed the cat food as well. And no, we didn’t feed it to them for lunch (unless there was absolutely nothing else in the cupboard). When they were very young, crawling around on the floor at cat-eye level, they couldn’t resist plunging their little hands into the cat food bowl and stuffing their face full of Friskies despite our admonitions (Stop! You’ll spoil your lunch!). Why, there were times when I’d observe our oldest

Y

boy grab an eating cat by the scruff of the neck and pull her away from the bowl in order to get his share. He couldn’t even walk, but as soon as our backs were turned he could sure eat the cat food. Another time he ate a lizard. Spit out the guts. And yet another time I saw him grab what I thought was a clump of black string and pop it in his mouth. Knowing his propensity to eat insects I quickly intervened right as he was spitting out the black legs of a spider. Rolly-polly or pill bugs, quickly became his bug of choice (“Tastes salty,” he said, which was pretty sad that he was old enough to talk and was still eating bugs).

Not even my tools have escaped these rapscallions. I remember my father complaining that my brother and I had lost most of his tools. You can’t have anything nice in the house if you have boys or puppies. Most of the things in our home have been either damaged by the dogs or broken by the boys. From furniture (puppies chewed up the table and chair legs, the boys destroyed the fabric with their rough-housing ways) to remote controls, there is little that hasn’t been marred by these youngsters.

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Not even my tools have escaped these rapscallions. I remember my father complaining that my brother and I had lost most of his tools. While I have no distinct memory of losing them, I do know that now that I’m a father with tools, a good number of them have gone missing, as they say. Much like my brother and I, the boys won’t own up to it, but just last night I found a screwdriver on the kitchen floor not long after the youngster had asked me for double-A batteries for his night-vision goggles. A coincidence? I think not. As soon as my back is turned on any outdoor project, my dog runs off with my tools. I’ve had all kinds of things vanish while I’m hard at work checking off the items on my Honey Do List. One day my entire toolbox disappeared. Months later it resurfaced in the front yard, covered with soil and pocked with teeth marks. This behavior doesn’t seem to change any time soon. Now in middle school, we had a surprise birthday party for our now-11-year-old, complete with three of his good puppies, I mean friends. They are all alike, I can safely say. They ran about the house like crazed canines, barking and squealing and jumping on the furniture. Occasionally hurting one another, but never seriously, thankfully. And they listen no better than a scolded puppy. I know my dogs can be the sneakiest critters on the planet, making it difficult to actually catch them in the act, whether they’re burying my tools or devouring our table legs. Boys are no different. We set them loose in the pool, four wild boys, periodically keeping watch on them from the window. They try to get away with everything possible. “I see Mr. Albert looking at us,” one of them says. I didn’t actually catch them in the act of, well being little boys, but later I come to find that the maniacs were climbing up on the fence and leaping into the pool. Mean Mr. Albert put a stop to that reckless behavior. I like to think that some day these boys will outgrow their puppy-like behavior. But I know better. While a kitten will grow into a cat and settle down to a life of leisure, dogs — much like most men — remain puppies our entire lives. s

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WORSHIP CENTERS If we have left out a church or have incomplete / incorrect information, please let us know! Send your corrections by faxing 352-373-9178 or emailing editor@towerpublications.com. We welcome your contributions and suggestions.

HIGH SPRINGS ALLEN CHAPEL A.M.E. CHURCH 386-454-3574 10 S.E. MLK Drive Pastor James McDaniel ANDERSON MEMORIAL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 386-454-3433 935 SE Lincoln Ave. BETHLEHEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 386-454-1996 County Road 778 Pastor Clarence Desue CHRIST ANGLICAN FELLOWSHIP 386-454-1845 323 SW CR 778 Pastor Michael LaCagnina CHRISTIAN FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 386-454-2367 220 NE 1ST Ave. Dr. Lloyd S. Williams CHURCH OF CHRIST 386-454-2930 520 NE Santa Fe Blvd. CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 386-454-1015 US Hwy 27 THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS 386-454-4282 24455 NW 174th Ave. Pres. Keith Brown HIGH SPRINGS CHURCH OF GOD 386-454-1757 210 NW 182 Ave. Pastor Terry W. Hull

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FELLOWSHIP CHURCH 386-454-1700 16916 NW U.S. Hwy. 441 Pastor Jeff Powell FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 386-454-1505 20112 North US Hwy. 441 Pastor J. Eddie Grandy FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 386-454-1037 205 North Main Street Pastor Glen A. Busby FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH of HIGH SPRINGS 386-454-1255 17405 NW US Hwy 441 Pastor Benton Mangueira

MT CARMEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 386-454-4568 1230 NW 1st Ave. Pastor Byran Williams

THE SUMMIT 352-575-0786 610 NE Santa Fe Blvd Pastor Rick Lawrence thesummitchurch.info

MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST CHURCH 14105 NW 298th Street 386-454-2161 Pastor Dan Howard

ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 386-454-9812 1st Ave. (next to city hall) Rev. David Kidd

MOUNT OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH

SPRING HILL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Located at High Springs exit 79 off I-75 North of Gainesville (on Old Bellamy Rd.) Pastor James Richardson

386-454-3447 948 SE Railroad Ave. THE NORTH EAST CHURCH OF CHRIST 4330 NE County Road 340 nechurchofchrist.net

GRACE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 210 Santa Fe Blvd. Pastor Preston Ponce

SAINT MADELEINE CATHOLIC CHURCH 386-454-2358 17155 NW Highway 441

HOLY TEMPLE CHURCH WITH GOD 386-454-0313 615 SE ML King Drive

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 386-454-2360 230 NW 1st Avenue Pastor Mark Swaisgood

IMPACT FAMILY CHURCH 386-454-1563 16710 NW US 441 Pastors Edwin & Angela Anderson JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES 386-454-3509 330 SE 7th Ave. MIRACLE TEMPLE CHURCH 386-454-4298 605 SE 1st Place THE MISSION CHURCH OF HIGH SPRINGS Meeting at the Seventh Day Adventist Building 230 NW 1st Ave. 352-870-0247 Pastor Keith Helsel

SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH 386-454-4978 Shiloh Church Rd. Pastor Earl Tuten SHILOH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-454-3126 1505 NW Main St. SPRING RIDGE FIRST CHURCH OF GOD 386-454-3600 5529 NE 52nd Place Pastor Todd L Wymer SPRINGRIDGE FIRST CHURCH OF GOD 386-454-4400 420 Spring Ave.

VISION TABERNACLE 352-339-4942 220 N.E. 1st Avenue Pastor Lawrence R. Haley

ALACHUA ALACHUA CHURCH OF CHRIST 386-462-3326 14505 NW 145th Avenue Minister Doug Frazier ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH 386-497-3121 Jordan Road (Ft. White) BAHA’I FAITH 352-870-3097 Turkey Creek CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 13920 NW Hwy 4141 386-462-2966 Pastor Marty D. Basinger calvarybaptistgainesville.org CHRIST CENTRAL ALACHUA 386-418-8185 14906 Main St. www.ccalachua.com


CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 386-462-2549 13220 NW 150th Ave. CRUSADERS FOR CHRIST, INC. 386-462-4811 NW 158th Ave. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-1337 14005 NW 146th Avenue Pastor Doug Felton FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-2443 14805 NW 140th St. Pastor Lamar Albritton FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-1549 14623 NW 140th St. Rev. Virginia McDaniel FOREST GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-3921 22575 NW 94 Avenue GREATER NEW HOPE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-4617 15205 NW 278th Ave. HARE KRISHNA TEMPLE 386-462-2017 17306 NW 112th Blvd. LEGACY BAPTIST CHURCH 352-462-2150 13719 NW 146th St. Pastor John Jernigan LIVING COVENANT CHURCH 386-462-7375 Pastor Brian J. Coleman NEW OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-3390 County Road 1491 Pastor Terry Elixson, Jr. NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH OF GOD AND CHRIST 386-462-4891 1310 NW 155 Place Pastor R. L. Cooper

NORTH PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-3317 25330 NW CR 239 Pastor Edwin A. Gardner NEW SAINT MARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-7129 13800 NW 158th Ave. PARADISE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-0162 14889 MLK Blvd. Pastor Rev. James D. Johnson, Sr. SANTA FE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-7541 7505 NW CR 236 Pastor Richard Cason, II MT NEBO UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 386-418-1038 9975 NW 143rd St. Pastor Ricardo George Jr. NEW SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-2095 18610 NW CR 237 NEW ST MARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-7129 13800 NW 158th Ave. OLD SHILOH MISSIONARY BAPTIST 386-462-4894 16810 NW CR 239 RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 352-870-7288 14200 NW 148th Place Pastor Greg Evans ST LUKE AME CHURCH 386-462-2732 US Highway 441 S. ST MATHEWS BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-2205 15712 NW 140 Street Pastor Isaac Miles TEMPLE OF THE UNIVERSE 386-462-7279 15808 NW 90 Street www.tou.org

WESTSIDE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 386-418-0649 15535 NW 141st St.

MT ZURA FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH 352-472-4056 225 NW 2nd Ave. Pastor Natron Curtis

NEWBERRY ABIDING SAVIOR LUTHERAN CHURCH 352-331-4409 9700 West Newberry Rd. BETHEL AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 352-474-6215 23530 NW 3rd Ave. Pastor Theodora Black CHRISTIAN LIFE FELLOWSHIP 352-472-5433 Pastor Gary Bracewell CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 352-472-2739 610 NW 2nd St. Pastor: Jesse Hampton

NEW ST PAUL BAPTIST CHURCH 352-472-3836 215 NW 8TH Ave. Pastor Edward Welch NEWBERRY CHURCH OF CHRIST 352-472-4961 24045 W. Newberry Rd. Minister Batsell Spivy NEWBERRY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 352-472-4005 24845 W. Newberry Rd. Rev. Robert B. Roseberry, Pastor DESTINY COMMUNITY CHURCH 352-472-3284

THE CHURCH AT STEEPLECHASE 352-472-6232 Meeting at Sun Country Sports Center 333 SW 140th Terrace (Jonesville) Pastor Buddy Hurlston

420 SW 250th Street

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF NEWBERRY 352-472-2351 25520 W. Newberry Rd. Rev. Jack Andrews

UNITED METHODIST

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH 352-472-9200 22405 W. Newberry Rd. Pastor Ty Keys JONESVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 352-472-3835 17722 SW 15th Ave. Pastor Corey Cheramie JOURNEY CHURCH 352-281-0701 22405 W. Newberry Rd. Milam Funeral Home Chapel Dr. Michael O’Carroll, Pastor

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Pastor Rocky McKinley OAK DALE BAPTIST CHURCH 352-472-2992 Highway 26 and 241 S. PLEASANT PLAIN CHURCH 352-472-1863 1910 NW 166th St. Pastor Theo Jackson ST JOSEPH’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 352-472-2951 16921 W. Newberry Rd. Pastor Richard Pelkey TURNING POINT OF NEWBERRY, INC 5577 NW 290 Street 352-472-7770 Pastor Henry M. Rodgers UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 352-472-3845 6259 SE 75TH Ave Pastor Travis Moody

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>> HISTORY

Frontier Town Saga High Springs

BY ELLIS AMBURN ailroads, peanuts, tobacco, churches, and memorable characters — the City of High Springs has a storied past as a frontier town with perhaps more than its fair share of shootings and train wrecks. But it was also home to hard-working citizens with pioneering spirits and can-do attitudes. The late Cecil Kahlich ran such a successful grocery store that Winn-Dixie made him an offer he could not refuse. In 1966, the

R

supermarket chain moved into Kahlich’s then-state-of-the-art brick store on Highway 441, which is now a Dollar General, and later constructed one of its generic big boxes nearby. “High Springs is a great town to be part of,” said James Ponce, Winn-Dixie’s assistant grocery manager, as he stocked shelves during a recent interview. He likes the “friendly people and interesting, very fun characters.” Perhaps no one personifies these qualities better than High Springs’

historian Mary Lois Forrester. The High Springs website lists its population at 5,350, and small North Florida towns are Mary Lois’s passion. Some of them no longer exist, such as Newnansville, the subject of her latest book, “Lest We Forget.” “It’s my pet,” she said during an interview in her living room, referring to the latter title. One of the reasons she wrote “Lest We Forget” is because her parents, James Paul ‘Jim’ Douglas and Lette Nora Walker Douglas, are buried in Newnansville Cemetery.

PHOTO BY ELLIS AMBURN

In 1897, lumber was transported on wagons drawn by oxen and mules from a mill at O’Leno to construct the First Presbyterian at Main Street and Second Avenue. A 1947 renovation changed the exterior to brick, according to “First Presbyterian Church of High Springs, 1897-1999,” which was compiled by Rita Dardis and a church committee.

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www.VisitOurTowns.com

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Feted by 300 friends who attended her 90th birthday party in the fellowship room of the High Springs Church of Christ on August 21, 2011, Mary Lois is the mother of Jim Forrester, who runs Jim Douglas Sales and Services, formerly known as Jim Douglas Chevrolet, one of the oldest businesses in High Springs. She is the wife of the late Baxter

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Forrester, who went to work for her father in 1941. Jim Douglas had co-founded one of the first Chevrolet dealerships in the U.S. in 1926, starting in Alachua, but the Great Depression and Hwy. 441 deflected business away from the Main Street store. His partner Milas T. Wynn moved to Eustis, and Jim Douglas decided to try his luck in High Springs,

where his dealership flourished. Eventually, following Douglas’s death in 1952, Baxter ran the business until his retirement in 1993. Then it was time for their son Jim Forrester to lead the family firm. “Jim is following in the footsteps of his granddaddy and daddy and is doing a super job,” Mary Lois wrote in 2000.


PHOTO BY ELLIS AMBURN

TOP: Jim Forrester runs one of the oldest businesses in High Springs, Jim Douglas Sales and Service, formerly Jim Douglas Chevrolet.

LEFT: High Springs author Mary Lois Douglas Forrester with the story she published about running away at 10 on “Peggy,” a local train that stopped in Bell so she could buy Orange Crush and Baby Ruths.

In General Motors’ recent, recession-driven downsizing, GM decided “it could have only one dealership in the area,” Mary Lois said, explaining how Jim Douglas Chevrolet abruptly became Jim Douglas Sales and Service. Business was brisk one morning in early August when Jim Forrester was interviewed in his

glass-enclosed office overlooking 441. He said his grandfather had moved to High Springs in the late ‘30s because “the railroad was here — a big deal. The railroad had a thousand employees.” High Springs was built on “railroads, peanuts, and tobacco,” his mother added somewhat later the same day in her home about a mile up the road. “The tobacco auctioneers would come down from North Carolina to the warehouses here.” The Big Dollar Warehouse handled local tobacco exclusively. One of the Big D’s owners, Nelson Dykes, claimed the Alachua variety was “more robust, more aromatic, has more body,” Mary Lois wrote in her book “Our Town.” After having a significant impact on the area’s economy for decades, the warehouse closed in 1987 because

www.VisitOurTowns.com

of government regulations and cancer-related litigation. In its glory days, High Springs was a boomtown. Mary Lois portrays the city as “an important rail center from about 1898 until after WWII... The railroad built shops, two hospitals, a roundhouse, and offices.” Of these, all that remains today is the depot building, which has morphed into the Station Bakery & Café on Railroad Avenue between Main and NW 1st Streets. Sonny Richards operates the café with his wife Suzanne and dessert chef Laura Janicki. He said that the 1910 depot “was moved from one mile up the track in 2001. It had been the station master’s office.” From the café’s wooden Victorian ticket window, Laura, Suzanne and Sonny have been serving food for

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the past 11 years. Meals ranging from sandwiches and soup to home-cooked comfort-food dinners like roast turkey and chicken divan are some of the items on the menu. In Mary Lois Forrester’s home, set on acres of verdurous lawn, she reminisced about High Springs’ pioneering days, characterizing them, in a word, as “reckless.” “Summers Funeral Home had people who’d been shot,” she said. As portrayed in “Our Town,” early High Springs could almost be mistaken for Pecos, Texas, home of the “hanging judge,” Roy Bean. Davy Crockett had helped settle the area in 1817, spying on Seminole and Creek Indians for General Andrew Jackson. Crockett Springs, on County Road 18 approximately 1 1/2 miles from High Springs, is named after the legendary coonskin scout. High Springs emerged later in the 19th century “from two town sites, Santaffey [as the American Indians called Santa Fe] and

Haven’t you

waited long enough?

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Fairmont,” Mary Lois wrote. They joined forces on May 24, 1888, borrowing the name High Springs from a body of water on Spring Hill, “behind Lowman Beville’s house on Northeast 3rd Street.” The spring supplied water for the old railroad shops established by the Savannah, Florida and Western Railroad. High Springs retained its Wild West atmosphere, replete with robberies, gunfights, and lynching, well into the 1900s. When a fire broke out, someone would shoot off a pistol to sound the alarm. “A bucket brigade was formed,” Mary Lois wrote, but “the place on fire generally burned down.” Will Summers, a member of one of the town’s founding families, ran Summers Brothers Undertaking, where business was good, because of the many murders and the steady stream of train wrecks, an occupational hazard High Springs dreaded as much as coalminers fear a cave-in. Engineer James Roach was killed

in the great train wreck of January 17, 1901 after someone pried the spikes from the ties, hoping to execute everyone onboard and plunder the corpses. When the locomotive jumped the tracks, Mary Lois recounted, quoting The High Springs News, “the engine turned over and the tender... mounted the cab, emptying tons of coal upon the faithful engineer, while the other cars piled on each other in grand confusion.” The town was thrown into near panic as word of the tragedy reached relatives and friends. Meanwhile, the suspect was tracked down and apprehended. “This man was lynched,” the News reported, referring to the AfricanAmerican accused of the crime. Another wreck occurred on December 12, 1950, when two trains collided head-on between High Springs and Leesburg, killing an engineer and a brakeman, and injuring an engineer and two firemen, all from High Springs. According to a railway spokesman


to whom Mary Lois referred in her book, the engineer who died “was running his train on the main line without authority.” A wreck in Pineola, Florida, took the lives of two brakemen and injured a fireman, an engineer, and two conductors. No. 118 out of Lakeland and No. 237 out of Thomasville slammed into each other at 45 mph on October 18, 1956, toppling 24 cars, some carrying lumber. Splashed with flaming fuel from the engines, 40 cars burned that morning, some “piled four deep, jutting upward for 60 feet,” Mary Lois noted in her book. In High Springs on the morning of the tragedy, relatives and neighbors converged on Mayor Juanita “Skeet” Easterlin’s gas station and café (now the patio of The Great Outdoors Restaurant). Others crowded into the post office or Kahlich’s Grocery. Mayor Easterlin arrived at 10:30 a.m. and said, according to Mary Lois, “I am shocked and grieved.

Several of my close friends are involved, and the news has left me upset.” Then, with her customary grit and guts, she added, “It’s too bad the railroad doesn’t have radio communications on its trains. The accident never would have happened then.” The carnage was caused by contradictory train orders, a railway official told Mary Lois. “Those trains were supposed to pass side by side on the two main tracks,” Mary Lois wrote, quoting an engineer who asked to remain unidentified. “But they both wound up on the same track instead.” That’s what newspapermen call a scoop. This petite and feminine woman is full of surprises. “Baxter and I owned five airplanes over the years,” Mary Lois said. “I’d take over the flying if he was sick, and I’d use the railroad tracks and towns to guide me, but one night I had to land for fuel in Cross City, thinking, If I’m going to fly all over the country I’d better get

Now is the time.

some gas. They put smoke pots out for me, and I glided right in there. Baxter later called them and asked, ‘Have you seen a woman pilot?’ The man on duty said, ‘Yeah, and she’s headed the right way.’” Thirty-six years old when she became a pilot, she gave up flying after a close call when she was pregnant with her daughter Mary. “I went into a stall and kinda went nuts, going down, down, down,” she said. “I turned loose the wheel and the plane straightened right out.” After that, Mary Lois confined herself to driving motor homes. She and Baxter bought their first one for $60,000 from a man who was going out of business in Live Oak. “We worked our way up to a 42’ Holiday Rambler, with a queen-size bed, two TVs, and a refrigerator. The TV shows me how to back up.” She has covered all 48 states and seven Canadian provinces in motor homes. In Georgia one day she was listening on her CB radio to what

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PHOTO BY ELLIS AMBURN

The only building left standing from the old train town now houses The Station Bakery & Cafe,” said owner Sonny Richards.

the truckers were saying about her driving. When they slowed down, she passed them. “’Did you see that little old lady whiz by us?’” she said she overheard one of the truckers say on her radio. “’She was going over the speed limit just to pass us!’ They tried to catch me but they couldn’t.” With such people as Mary Lois Forrester, the frontier town of High Springs gradually grew stronger and safer. Her book explains why: “The town was made up of phosphate miners and railroad workers — some of whom were a tough and rowdy lot. Therefore churches were certainly needed.” And the churches came — in such abundance there seems to be

146 | Autumn 2012

one on every other corner. One of the oldest, the First Presbyterian Church, began to rise on Main Street and Second Avenue in 1897 as heart pine lumber was brought on wagons drawn by oxen and mules from a mill at O’Leno. Mikesville Presbyterians contributed more lumber as well as the sand necessary for concrete, Mary Lois noted in “Our Town.” A renovation changed the exterior to bricks in 1947, according to the “First Presbyterian Church of High Springs, 1897-1999,” the church’s official history compiled by Rita Dardis and a church committee. The town’s African-American population already had a brick church long before that. As

reported in “Our Town,” after the Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church, founded in a frame structure in 1886, was demolished in the windstorm of 1896, the congregation decided to replace it with a more durable brick structure. “The studying of God’s word,” Mary Lois wrote, “... helped mold this rough town into a community.” But High Springs still recalls its checkered past every year in a weekend celebration called Pioneer Days, which features staged robberies and simulated Old West gunfights. The French have a saying for it: “Plus la change plus la meme chose” — the more things change, the more they stay the same.” s


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The homecare nurse also looks for potentially hazardous situations in the client’s home. A pet cleanliness issue could increase the chance of infection; stairs into a sunken living room can be a safety concern for someone recovering from a broken bone. A doctor at the hospital might not know about such factors, but Caretenders personnel make sure that they are addressed. Concierge care does not stop, however, after that four-hour window. The days that follow can still bring uncertainty, so Caretenders makes its nurses available 24/7. “If something happens during the night – if they get scared because they’re bleeding or they’re in pain – they can call and talk to a nurse, and the nurse can go out and see them if they need us there,” said Morgan. The concierge service is not a separate charge and falls under standard home care, with Medicare covering the costs. It’s yet another way that Mederi Caretenders helps Seniors to ensure their independence. “After a surgical procedure or day stay, you don’t always hear the important things you need to hear,” said Morgan. “We’re an extra set of eyes and ears to make sure they’re watching for any complications that they could have.”


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>> AT YOUR SERVICE

Giving Back Changing the Community, Changing the World

BY ALLYSEN KERR hether it is reading programs, fundraising events or back-toschool drives, the civic service organizations in the High Springs/ Alachua area are creating a ripple effect of change that can be felt locally and abroad. Rotary International’s main objective is service “in the community, in the workplace and around the globe,” states its website. Since its inception in 1926, the High Springs Rotary has been dedicated to the mantra of “Service above Self.” It accomplishes this goal by sponsoring several events in the area throughout the year. Most recently the club participated in cleaning up

W

152 | Autumn 2012

the High Springs Community School just in time for the new school year. The club aims to be in the forefront of the community and to help out in any aspect, said the club’s president, Valorie Cason. The Annual Car Show, which takes place October 26 and 27 this year, and the Annual Duck Race at Camp Kulaqua are the largest fundraising events for the organization. The funds raised from these events go to support education, training, and other non-profit organizations. These include the Boy Scout Troup 69, the Rotary InterACT Club at Santa Fe High School, Friends of Alachua, Stop Children’s Cancer and other organizations. This year, the club was able to sponsor a Closed Closet event,

which provided polo shirts for children whose families could not afford uniforms. They also teamed up with other Rotary Clubs to participate in the Dictionary Project. Cason, a professional and a parent, holds these types of events near and dear to her heart.


“We had several kids that were like, ‘this is the first book that I’ve ever had’ and I’m sitting here looking at my kids’ side of the bookshelf full of books and you don’t realize that sitting right next to you could be somebody that has never had a book in their life,” Cason said.

Since the Rotary club is an international organization, members and the community can feel its affects overseas and on the home front. “We’re helping with water projects overseas, we’re helping to eradicate polio, but you’re also seeing the effects of what the Rotary does right

www.VisitOurTowns.com

PHOTO BY ALBERT ISAAC

High Springs Rotary Club member Heather Clarich holds up the winning rubber ducky during the Annual Duck Race fundraiser at Camp Kulaqua in 2011. Also pictured are Micky Milam (left) and Rotary Club President Valorie Cason (right).

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PHOTOS BY LARRY BEHNKE

LEFT: New members of the High Springs Lions Club are blindfolded and walked around to help them understand being blind. BELOW: High Springs Lions Club members in the High Springs Christmas parade.

in your own backyard,” Cason said. She wants the organization to do more but finds it difficult because of the lack of members. Cason believes that this is due to time commitment, money and lack of knowledge of the organization’s objectives. “Sometimes when you can’t

154 | Autumn 2012

touch something and know that it’s real, it’s hard to be involved in it,” Cason said. Tom Weller, President of the Kiwanis Club of Santa Fe, experiences the same issues within his organization. “I know every civic organization always wants more members,”

Weller said. “There are just some things you can’t do with so few hands. The more hands you have, the more service you can do.” Although the Kiwanis Club of Santa Fe only has 23 members, their impact in Alachua County is largely felt. Chartered in 2004, the Kiwanis Club of Santa Fe seeks to “Change the world one child at a time.” “With our focus on very young children, we’re able to get to the core of when life starts,” Weller said. For example, when the organization learned that the Alachua Police Department was converting a substation into a safe home in the Merrillwood subdivision, the club’s members stepped in to help spruce it up. Today the substation is more than a safe haven and a child education facility. It is an active beacon of hope for the children who frequent it. Weller, an attorney since 1979, finds being involved in Kiwanis extremely satisfying and has been a member since 1984. “Hopefully when you join a civic organization, you get several things from it,” Weller said. These things should include an appreciation for what the organization stands for and the friendships that are developed over time, he said. Both Weller and Cason would agree that joining a civic service organization is a rewarding experience. “It’s something you would join if you want to give the community your time, your energy and you want to get back more than you ever imagined, Cason said.” Another civic organization making a difference is the High Springs Lions Club. The mission of


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PHOTO BY ALBERT ISAAC

Children in Alachua’s Merrillwood subdivision line up for food at the safe haven’s grand opening.

the Lions Club is to be “the global leader in community and humanitarian service,” states its website. The High Springs club sponsors a local Leo Club for children ages 12 through 18. This August it held the Mission Back to School drive to provide children in the community with free backpacks, school supplies, haircuts, eye exams, hearing screenings, and lice checks, according to the website. They also sponsor several events for the community. Anyone interested in joining any of the organizations or finding out more should visit the websites. All organizations host open weekly meetings and welcome visitors. “Just show up, we have no problem with that,” Weller said of Kiwanis. Cason said it is the same for the Rotary club. “We would love to have guests.” s

156 | Autumn 2012

HIGH SPRINGS ROTARY www.highspringsrotary.com Meetings: Mondays at 6 p.m. Location: First United Methodist Church of High Springs Contact: Valorie Cason, President

KIWANIS CLUB OF SANTA FE www.kiwanisclubofsantafe.com Meetings: Thursdays at 7:30 a.m. Location: Brown’s Country Buffet, Alachua Contact: Tom Weller, President

ALACHUA LIONS CLUB alachuafl.lionwap.org Meetings: 2nd and 4th Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. Location: 15115 NW 142nd Terr., Alachua Contact: 386-462-7178

NEWBERRY LIONS CLUB newberrylionsfl.lionwap.org Meetings: 2nd and 4th Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. Location: 24845 W. Newberry Rd., Newberry Contact: 352-472-6558

HIGH SPRINGS LIONS CLUB www.e-clubhouse.org/sites/ highspringslionsfl Meetings: 2nd and 4th Monday of every month Location: 26900 W Highway 27, High Springs Contact: 386-454-4521 (after 3 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m. on Saturdays)


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COLUMN >> DIANE E. SHEPARD

Mama Musings One Foot in Front of the Other He Walks With Me “A good dog never dies. He always stays. He walks beside you on crisp Autumn days when frost is on the fields and Winter’s drawing near. His head is within our hand in his old way.” — Mary Carolyn Davies own the street, around the duck pond, across the road, skirting the edge of the woods, he knows the way... We have walked these steps for years. Thousands of steps together in all seasons. Fall is my favorite: the time of change, of letting go. This is my first fall without him. I usually write about my children — my two-legged children — but this time, it’s about my four-legged child: my Siberian Husky, Kodi.

D

No matter how tight you try to hold onto something, there will come a time when you will have to let go. As a young girl, I remember thinking if I could just hold on tight to my dog, Shadow, I could keep him with me forever. We’ve been heading for this impossible place for a long time. Knowing it would be Kodi’s last Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, birthday, marking each occasion in our own way, together. So many memories... When my daughter, Elizabeth, was a baby, anytime she made a sound, Kodi (aka “Nana” Kodi), would run to the bassinet to check on her, then he’d find me to let me know she needed something. At playtime, Kodi was my third child. Playing in the sprinkler, he tried to bite the water, and jumped up to pop or chase bubbles, right alongside the kids. His comical attempts over the years to join us in wading pools, slipping on the water slide, and taking it in stride when they accidentally squirted water in his eye. Happily sharing popcorn and “101 Dalmations” with his humans. His trademark “Whoo-whoo-whoo!” The way he would back up into people and wiggle, as if to say, “Join my sled team!” His wet, sloppy kisses...

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The last time we took a walk together, it was brief, cut short like our time together. Kodi hesitated, struggled, his back legs and hips no longer able to keep up with his front. He looked up at me as if to say, “Mama, what’s happening to me?” I remember telling him, “You can do it, boy, it’s okay. Just put one foot in front of the other...” Despite my coaxing, he could only make it five houses down before we had to come back. I never took him for a walk again. I could not bring myself to walk alone without him, so I stopped walking too. I remember when Kodi could run down the street at top speed like he was pulling some invisible sled in the Arctic, but he was actually pulling me. He was born to run! I prayed that it would not come down to this, to me having to decide when was the RIGHT time. For me, there is no RIGHT time. I listened to advice from wellmeaning friends and family, but I realized I needed to listen to only one: Kodi.

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“No matter how tight you try to hold onto something, there will come a time when you will have to let go.” “Mama,” he seemed to say, “It’s time.” A Husky who can no longer run — much less walk — is not a happy dog. Kodi taught me many things over the years, but the most significant was how to let go with dignity and grace. Fall is the time of change. This one will be bittersweet for me, but there are a few things that will never change. I will always hold in my heart my sweet Kodi and all the fun we had together. He reminded me that you are never too old to play. There is something to be said for trying to live up to the unconditional, pure love of a dog. You become a better person for having loved this special creature. It took me a long time to walk again. I still miss Kodi so much. But one morning, a few months after he’s gone, I stepped outside, and that familiar comforting feeling enveloped me. The air felt fresh, cool, crisp, and alive again, like fall. I suddenly felt like taking a walk — then hesitated. It’s the first time I’ve taken this walk without Kodi. The first time I’ve wanted to. Memories flood my mind. I am sad, but I don’t feel alone. I know he is with me. As if he is now telling me: “You can do it, Mama, just put one foot in front of the other; you know the way.” Down the street, around the duck pond, across the road, skirting the edge of the woods... He walks with me, always, in my heart. s

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ADVERTISEMENT

Welcome Home The Atrium at Gainesville gives seniors a place to call home

M

retirement communities often make their money from services. In the end, this provides residents with little choice on services or options when disagreements arise.

“It is a difficult subject, so a lot of times, people put it off. But there are a lot of misconceptions because they have not done their research,” Prem Paul Murrhee, director of sales and marketing at The Atrium, said.

On the other hand, retirement communities using the housing model offer all of the same services, with one key difference: choice. The Atrium at Gainesville is based on the housing model and features a wide array of services and businesses available on-site, such as a pharmacy, rehabilitation, home health care, chiropractors, a salon, etc. But the community does not directly make money from them nor are the residents forced to use them. In fact, with many more practices and services within a quarter mile of the community, The Atrium is in a unique location to offer competitive options.

oving from the comfort of a familiar home to a retirement community or nursing home is often a frightening step; however, it is never a step that should be taken lightly. With as many misconceptions about retirement homes as there are types of resident services, those considering retirement living should explore their choices.

As a Holiday Retirement senior independent living community, The Atrium at Gainesville regularly clarifies the many misconceptions and concerns from prospective residents, families and the community. By addressing these issues at the start, The Atrium strives to make residents feel at ease and at home before they even move.

In addition, The Atrium provides husband and wife teams who not only act as managers, but neighbors and residents. One of the biggest differences between retirement communities is whether they are based on the medical model or the housing model, Murrhee said. With a medical model, which is what most people are familiar with, a person moves from one stage in retirement living (i.e. independent living, assisted living, medical care) to another as needed. However, such progression is usually decided through community assessments and not by the resident. In addition, medical model

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“When you have 237 residents concentrated in one area, you have a lot of business willing to go the extra mile,” Murrhee said. “As a resident, they have the freedom of choice to use those services or choose someone close by.” In reality, choice is the core misconception concerning retirement homes and the basis for The Atrium’s success. One of the most common misconceptions Murrhee hears from prospective residents is concern over losing their routine: Can they eat when they want? How long can their grandchildren stay? Is the community too active and noisy for an afternoon nap? “It is not us dictating to the residents what we want them to do. It is the resident telling us what they want to do,” Murrhee said. Although The Atrium provides three meals a day


for its residents in a dining room with servers, it doesn’t stop residents from taking food to go or having it delivered to their room. In between meals, The Atrium provides a coffee bar with refreshments and snacks. In one case, Murrhee recalls a resident who always had coffee and a muffin for breakfast at 10 a.m. As a resident at The Atrium, he still has this option, as well as other breakfast choices. Built for seniors from the beginning, residency includes transportation, cleaning services and utilities. The Atrium also provides many safety features, such as concrete walls, floors and ceilings. The construction even acts as a noise barrier, allowing for those afternoon naps.

may be interested in. From the start, The Atrium promotes a close knit community inside and out. The community does not require a buy-in or a lease, it is month-to-month, yet many residents have chosen to live here for over 20 years. The Atrium’s methods work. “The social connections and family feel at the Atrium is what sets us apart, it is why our residents stay with us for decades,” Murrhee said. “Let’s face it. You can hire a chauffeur, hire a chef and hire a maid, but you can never hire friends.”

In addition, The Atrium provides husband and wife teams who not only act as managers, but neighbors and residents. Fostering such relationships provides a friendly environment for residents from the start, and a familiar face to help during emergencies. The Atrium encourages visits from family and friends from the start by allowing them to eat for free at the community during the first month of a new resident’s stay. Grandchildren are also welcome to visit and stay at the community. In one case, Murrhee remembers a resident hosting his great grandchild for a month--playing in the pool, doing crafts and spending quality time together. The retirement community also hosts a welcome party in the community and invites other residents, as well as clubs and organizations the new resident

Gracious Retirement Living The Atrium at Gainesville features beautiful and spacious studio, one and two bedroom apartments. Your month-tomonth rent virtually includes all of your living expenses, with absolutely no long-term commitment or entrance fees.

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Bush Auto Repair of Alachua is your Local Parts Plus Car Care Center! DID YOU KNOW? The Parts Plus Car Care Center North American Warranty protects you from unexpected repairs on most services performed by our shops for 12 months or 12,000 miles, no matter where your travels take you. If you have a problem with a covered repair performed at a Parts Plus Car Care Center simply call 1-877-252-4609 (toll-free). The Warranty Administrator will direct you to a Car Care Center in the market for repairs. If there is no Car Care Center in the market, they will direct you to one of more than 35,000 participating repair facilities for service. The repair facility will obtain authorization from the Warranty Administrator and perform the repair on your vehicle. Once the repair is completed, the shop will contact the Warranty Administrator. You pay nothing for covered repairs.

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>> MUCHO MACHO

Amiable Alpacas Not Your Typical Farm Animal

BY JEWEL MIDELIS oyce Simpson and her husband, Mike, always dreamed of traveling after they retired. The two ex-firefighters raised two boys in Miami and, after 34 years of marriage, decided it was time to see the world. The only obstacle in their way was money. Their adventurous nature led Joyce Simpson, 65, to research ways to fulfill their dreams. “People were retiring and moving north,” Simpson said as she drove to their alpaca farm in Suwannee

J

County, a 30-minute ride from their home in High Springs. “I wanted to make money and do something fun and different.” The couple discovered that investing in alpacas could provide a way to have a lifestyle that they had always wanted. “We toured alpaca farms in Ohio and Florida,” Simpson said. “We only had dogs before, so it was exhilarating. We went to seminars and met new people.” Alpacas are often mistaken for llamas, and for good reason: they are part of the camelids species,

making them cousins to camels, llamas, vicunas and guanacos. Alpacas are about half the size of llamas, weighing between 100 to 180 pounds. Alpaca owners and breeders consider this animal gentle, kind and easy to manage. In 1984, the United States imported the first alpacas through Key West, Simpson said. By 1997, the U.S. banned the importation of alpacas in order to control breeding. There were about 100,000 to 150,000 alpacas in the U.S. at that time. The ban gave American alpaca farmers a chance to be

PHOTO BY JEWEL MIDELIS

Alpacas are known to have one of the world’s best natural fibers. They have about 22 different colors of fibers, making them the most colorful fiber-producing animal.

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www.VisitOurTowns.com

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PHOTO BY JEWEL MIDELIS

Alpaca Ambassador owner, Joyce Simpson, and Gainesville-resident Alexandria Candelario, feed carrots to the African Watusi. The Watusi’s horns can reach up to eight feet from tip to tip.

“Alpaca owners and breeders consider this animal gentle, kind and easy to manage.” competitive with the world. “Peru, Bolivia and Chile have hundreds of thousands of alpacas — too many,” Simpson said. “They butcher and eat them. I can’t eat something that cost me $20,000.” The Simpsons started investing in alpacas, and in 2006, the first babies were born. Unlike other farm animals, alpacas can be financed. The Marsh Menagerie, an alpaca farm south of Palm Bay, Fla., “offers financing to all of our clients,” according to its website. “People that initiated buying

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alpacas had political contacts,” Simpson said. “They worked with the government, so the government reimburses you every penny on an alpaca. No other animals have that tax advantage.” During the Simpsons first couple of years, there were no veterinarians for the alpacas so they had to bring them to the University of Florida for medical care. Some of the students who have since graduated have now moved out to the country. Joyce and Mike are “thrilled to have them.” The Simpson’s veterinarian,

Dr. Eric Hiers, who owns Trenton Animal Hospital, has been working with alpacas for about seven years. “Alpacas account for less than five percent of my practice,” Hiers said. “I have been spat on a few times. They can kick also, but for the most part, with the proper restraint, they are easy to work with.” The farm currently has nine female or “hembas” suris and six male or “machos” suris, according to its webpage. “There are two styles of alpacas,” Simpson said. “Suris with dreads, and huacayas with fluffy, teddy bear-like fur.” In Florida, there are currently 1,176 suris and 2,426 huacayas, according to the Alpaca Registry Inc. statistics. An alpaca’s average life


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PHOTO BY JEWEL MIDELIS

Approximately 99 percent of the world’s three million alpacas live in Peru, Bolivia and Chile, according to the Alpaca Owners and Breeders Association website.

expectancy is 20 to 25 years. Female alpacas begin breeding at two years of age and have an 11-month gestation. Males begin breeding when they are closer to three years in age. “The boys are always ready to breed, and the girls know if they’re pregnant,” Simpson said. “About

The Choice For

two weeks later after the girls are healed, they will do it again.” Simpson said that pregnant females spit at the males to ward them off. This cycle continues until the female is around 18 years old. “We breed so the babies are born

in the winter — January, February and March,” Simpson said. “Up north, babies are born in the summer.” After birth, alpacas are weaned. “We would bring babies to the house and train them,” Simpson said. Continuously breeding the alpacas allows the Simpsons to make a profit selling the newborns. When alpacas are sold, however, they should have at least one companion because they are herd animals. “Most [sell] for $20,000,” Simpson said. “The highest price paid for a male was $624,000.” In addition to breeding the alpacas, Joyce and Mike also shear them once a year during late April or early May. Unlike its cousin the camel, whose fur can be pulled off,

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alpaca’s fleece is removed with clippers. This process does not harm the animal. Simpson said that the shearing takes about 10 minutes per alpaca. They sell the fiber across the country, where it is made into batting or yarn. Then, the material is transformed into blankets, trinkets and all sorts of different garments, such as socks, sweaters, shirts and more. “I am just now getting into to working with the fiber,” she said. “I go to shows and farmers markets to learn how I can work with it.” Although the alpaca fibers come in 22 different colors, Simpson believes that the most valuable is the white-furred alpaca because their fleece can be dyed any color. Simpson said that once the fibers from the alpacas have been transformed into materials like blankets and clothes, they are superior to anything. “After all of the services, it is all of the year’s salary in three

“They are also very quiet, and they hum when you feed them.” months,” she said. Besides the financial incentives, alpacas are also easier to maintain then other farm animals. “I refer to alpacas as the ‘green animal’ because they are easy to take care of,” Simpson said. “They are inquisitive, and they like to be in a herd. They are also very quiet, and they hum when you feed them.” Coyotes and dogs are the alpaca’s main predator at the farm. Simpson said that the alpacas alert one another when an animal enters their territory. In January, Mike and Joyce hired Roger LeSarce, 68, to manage and reside at their 15-acre farm that also has cows, pigs, camels, emus and llamas. Having LeSarce take care of the animals allows the couple to travel. LeSarce said that he and the

Simpsons are also trying to breed pigs back to their original roots. He called their collection of about fifteen pigs piney wood rooters. When the Simpsons first began their business there were only three alpaca farms in North Florida, now there are 20. “We would like to see more alpaca farms,” Simpson said. “I want to see the alpacas in the FFA [Future Farmers of America] and 4-H. I would also like to spend more time with mine. They are so cute, and we really enjoy them.” Last year, Mike and Joyce traveled on a cruise around the world. After years of hard work, they were able to fulfill their dreams, visiting 72 different ports in a matter of 110 days, from Vietnam to Egypt. “Alpaca pays,” Simpson said with a grin. s

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ADVERTISER INDEX 4400 NW 36th Avenue • Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax AUTOMOTIVE Bush Auto Repair ........................................166 City Boys Tire & Brake .............................. 104 Jim Doglas Sales & Service .................... 105 L&S Auto Trim ..............................................159 Newberry Auto Repair ............................... 68 RPM Automotive .......................................... 68 Sun City Auto Sales.................................... 174 Tuffy Tire & Auto Service .................. 2 (NB)

REAL ESTATE Atrium ..............................................................164 Forrester Realty ............................................ 67 Horizon Realty ..............................................138 PRO Realty ....................................................162 Savannah Station ................. (HS), XX (NB) Spring Hill Village ......................................... 99

FINANCIAL / LAW Alarion Bank..................................................138 Allstate Insurance, Hugh Cain .................151 Campus USA Credit Union ....................... 25 Ference Insurance Agency ....................... 78 LegalShield ..................................................... 64 State Farm - Tish Oleksy ...........................50 Stephen K. Miller Law Offices.................155 Sunshine State Insurance .......................... 58 SunState Federal Credit Union ....................... 91, 144, 180 (NB) Three Rivers Insurance ............................... 47

FITNESS and BEAUTY All Creations Salon .....................................163 Audrey’s Flair for Hair ................................ 82 Charisma for Hair ......................................... 38 Emerge ......................................2 (HS), 6 (NB) Hair & Nail Depot.......................................... 39 Jodie’s Beauty & Barber ...........................162 Jonesville Traditional Barber ................... 78 Nails-N-Spa..................................................... 67 Salon Eye Candy .........................................135 Underground Fitness Revolution ...........151

PETS and VETS Archer Pet Resort ........................................ 82 Affordable Vet Clinic................................... 68 Animal Health Center ............................... 150 Bed & Biscuit Inn .......................................... 99 Dancin’ Dogs Boarding .............................. 68 Flying Fish Aquatics...................................162 Pampered Paws ...........................................162 Pamper Your Pet .........................................135 Springhill Equine ........................................ 160 West End Animal Hospital ........................171

EDUCATION & CHILD CARE Alachua Learning Center ..............180 (HS) Forest Grove Academy .................................5 Gainesville Country Day School ............. 23

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MEDICAL / HEALTH 1st Choice Immediate Care ....................... 39 Affordable Dentures .................................. 157 Alachua Dental .............................................167 Alachua Family Medical Center ..............90 Altschuler Periodontic ..............................129 Caretenders ...................................................148 Clear Sound Audiology.................................9 Community Cancer Center ...................... 157 Douglas Adel, DDS ...................................... 99 Gainesville Dermatology ............................ 17 Gainesville OB/GYN .................................... 45 Hunter Family Dentistry ............................ 78 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery ...................8 Palms Medical Group ..................................90 Samant Dental Group ................................. 36 Vishnu Reddy, M.D. ...................................... 79 Worthington Pediatrics............................. 127

RETAIL / RECREATION Alachua Farm & Lumber ........................... 58 Alachua Harvest Festival ..........................139 Alachua Pawn & Jewelry .......................... 175 Amelia’s Things ............................................163 Auto Swap Meet ........................................... 67 Beacher’s Lodge...........................................113 Bennett’s True Value ............................58, 131 Bits & Spurs Tack.......................................... 39 Blue Springs .................................................... 111 Coin & Jewelry Gallery ...............................161 Colleen’s Kloset.............................................. 61 Columbia County Fair.................................114 Cootie Coo Creations .................................90 Dance Alive! ...................................................119 Dirty Bar ........................................................... 111 Fabulous Coach Lines ................................. 15 Family Jewels ................................................ 78 Gainesville Cultural Affairs..................16, 112 The Garden Gallery.....................................138 Gary’s Tackle Box ........................................159 Gator Fine Wine & Spirits ........................179 High Springs Farmers Market .................163 High Springs Pawn & Jewelry.....................7 Hippodrome State Theatre..................... 109 Jewelry Designs by Donna ......................162 Klaus Fine Jewelry ........................................ 51 Lady Bug Florist ..........................................147 Lentz House of Time ................................... 82 Lifestyle Cruise & Travel ............................113 Liquor & Wine Shoppe ..............................179 Music Junction .............................................139 A Newberry Indoor Mall ............................ 69 Newberry Main Street ................................ 117 Noche De Gala ............................................... 18 Old Irishman’s Pawn Shop ...................... 104 Paddywhack................................................... 47 Pawn Pro ........................................................158 Radio Shack ...................................................101 Rum 138 ..........................................................166 Sapps Pawn, Gun and Archery ............... 85 The Sleep Center Superstore .................. 49 Tioga Town Center........................................ 13 Valerie’s Loft Consignment ..............82, 139

MISCELLANEOUS American Diversified ................................ 100 Cash for Cars ................................................178 Dollar General ...............................................103 Juice Plus .......................................................139 U.S. Casting ...................................................178

SERVICE A&K Outdoor ................................................. 33 Alachua County Big Blue ..................75, 133 Alachua County EPD .................................135 Chimney Sweeps of America................. 100 COX Business..........................................33, 131 COX Communications ................................ 63 Creekside Outdoor Improvements .. 62, 129 Gainesville Regional Airport ..................... 111 Gonzalez Site Prep .................................... 100 Grease Busters ..............................................90 Growers Fertilizer .........................................171 High Springs Woman’s Club .................... 47 Heritage Mechanical ........................... 6 (HS) Jack’s Small Engine Repair..................... 100 Lotus Studios Photography ..................... 26 Oliver & Dahlman .........................................131 Quality Cleaners ..........................................134 Southern Land Services............................. 77 Steeplechase Storage................................. 66 Stitch In Time Embroidery ........................ 68 Suburban Cleaners ...................................... 78

HOME IMPROVEMENT AHA Water.........................................................4 Al Mincey Site Prep ..................................... 67 Bloominghouse Nursery ........................... 172 Cook’s Portable Buildings ....................... 105 Copeland Quality Construction .............. 34 Floor Store ...................................................... 69 H2Oasis Custom Pool & Spa .................... 56 Overhead Door ............................................. 121 R&M Construction & Development ...... 127 Red Barn Home Center .............................. 85 Rosenboom Construction .........................101 Santa Fe Stone Works ................................ 97 Thurston Garden Design ..........................139 Toby Pugh Fenceing & Barns..................102 Tri-County Fence .........................................133 United Rent-All............................................. 173 Whitfield Window & Door......................... 35

RESTAURANT Brown’s Country Buffet ............................ 122 Conestogas ....................................................138 El Toro...............................................................151 Gator Q ........................................................... 122 Granny’s Buffet ............................................123 KB Kakes.........................................................138 Los Aviña ........................................................123 Main Street Pie Co. ....................................138 Mason’s Tavern .............................................125 Napolatanos ..................................................124 Northwest Grille ...........................................123 O!O Tapas & Tinis ........................................124 Pepperonis .....................................................163 The Pickled Pelican ............................... 3, 122 Saboré .............................................................124 Sweet Jane’s Whoopie Pies ....................139


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86 >> HOMECOMING PARADE

“United We Growl.” Since 1923, Florida Blue Key has produced the University of Florida’s Homecoming festivities. This year’s Homecoming Parade will showcase spectacular bands, floats and special guests from UF student organizations and community groups. More than 100,000 spectators are expected to pack the streets for this annual tradition and one of the nation’s largest homecoming parades. www.VisitOurTowns.com

Autumn 2012 | 177

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ACTORS AND MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles

LIGHTS RA CAME ! N O I T C A

$

150 - $300 PER DAY

Compensation varies depending on C job requirements. No experience needed, all looks welcome.

CALL TODAY FOR CASTING TIMES AND LOCATIONS.

1-800-579-2031

1-888-420-3807 178 | Autumn 2012

OTNB-Autumn2012  

http://www.visitourtowns.com/file_download/16/OTNB-Autumn2012.pdf