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GUIDE TO AREA SPRINGS

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SUMMER ACTIVITIES

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CEDAR KEY PIRATES

Summer 2014

HIGH SPRINGS & ALACHUA

Passion for the Springs Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson — Artist and Advocate

HAUTE IN THE CITY

DEVIL’S DEN

Chef Hebler Brings a Unique Flavor to his New Restaurant

Discover an Underground Spring in Williston

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Palms Pediatrics 109 S.W. Savanah Ave., Branford 386-935-4081

Palms Medical Group 1010 N.W. 8th Ave., Gainesville 352-376-8211 Palms Medical Group 110-112 N.E. First Ave.,High Springs 386-454-0568 Palms Medical Group 550 W. Georgia St., Starke 904-364-2900

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page

64

CONTENTS SUMMER 2014 • VOL. 12 ISSUE 02

>> FEATURES 30

Fun in the Summer Sun A Special Sampling of Seasonal Activities and Entertainment to Escape the Summer Doldrums — and Stifling Heat!

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Artist & Advocate for Our Springs BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON

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BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON

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Bug Off A Guide to Local Summer Pests BY CRYSTAL HENRY

History’s Lessons The Springs Today Seem Altogether Different Than the One’s of Memory

Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson

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Not Business as Usual The Role of the Alachua Business League BY CRYSTAL HENRY


ON THE COVER

PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY / LOTUS STUDIOS

Meet artist, cosmetologist and water advocate, Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson. As President of Our Santa Fe River — among other things — Merrillee volunteers her time protecting the springs, the Santa Fe River, its tributaries and the Floridan Aquifer.

>> BEAT THE HEAT

42

Go with the

by Lindsey Carman

Flow

SUMMER GUIDE TO NEARBY SPRINGS

Splish Splash Springs Looking for a totally chill way to spend the summer months? Look no further than North Central Florida’s native springs — namely Poe, Blue, Ginnie and Rum Island Springs. Read on to learn about all these natural oases have to offer. You can dive, canoe or simply swim your summer away in these springs.

As the humid summer months approach, finding solace from the stifling heat can be challenging. However, there are some local springs that can quench the humidity — and they are almost in your own backyard. WRITTEN BY LINDSEY CARMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALBERT ISAAC

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Blue Springs bluespringspark.com 7450 NE 60th St., High Springs 386-454-1369 Open every day, 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Adults 13+: $10, Kids 5-12: $3, Kids Under 5: Free

orth Central Florida’s hidden gems, its natural springs, are an oasis from everyday life. They provide unique opportunities to explore the surrounding nature and to enjoy the beautiful outdoors without breaking the bank.

The Santa Fe River is fed by many springs, including Poe, Blue, Ginnie, and Rum Island Springs. These springs gush fresh, crystal-clear water into the river. For years, they have drawn people from all over Florida (and the world) to come swim in their beautiful waters. Our springs also provide a cheap (and sometimes free) day of fun for everyone. From swimming to camping, and from floating to picnicking, the array of activities is abundant. We encourage you to check out all the springs in our area this summer.

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>> ARRR

88

Shiver Me Timbers

by Larry Behnke

Land Ho, Matey! Prepare to walk the plank in Cedar Key for a good ole’ fashioned pirate takeover. The second annual Pirate Invasion Weekend is a treasure chest of activities: battle re-enactments, fire dancing, a parade, crafts and art will shiver your timbers! Dressed up or not — you won’t be disappointed.

Pirates Invade Cedar Key for a Weekend of Fun

WRITTEN BY LARRY BEHNKE here’ll be plenty of “Arrr-ing” and struttin’ and partying the weekend of September 12 through 14. Cedar Key will play up its island paradise with the second annual Pirate Invasion Weekend.

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re-enactments with swords flashing on the beach look more real with authentic costuming. Battles also take to the water in boats decorated in pirate style, blasting black powder cannons as they pass each other not far

Last year proved so much fun that participants are eager for a replay. During the weekend, tickets for several prize drawings will be sold. One prize is a quilt showing a pirate ship under full sail beneath the moon. The quilt was specially commissioned and created for the event by the Salty Needle Quilt Shop. Tickets for the quilt drawing are $10. Many other “cool booty” items will be available as prizes and one need not be

from shore. At night, the Dock Street is closed for the fire dancers spinning flames in circles while a nearby band rocks. Breakfast last year at the Eagles Club offered biscuits and gravy with sausage, but this year is still in planning. Sometime early Saturday, full dress pirate players will march alongside pirate kids in wagon boats pulled by moms in a parade that circles the main streets.

present to win. All proceeds will be donated to Cedar Key Pirates in Paradise for its Cedar Key High School scholarship fund. Good-hearted fun pervades the small community, whether people choose to dress as pirates or not. Battle

Cedar Key is a perfect place for this new event — it has an actual history of pirates. Years ago they tied up at Seahorse, one of the Cedar Keys. It has a high hill that allowed the pirates to scan the horizon for enemies and let them escape in time. Seahorse Key

PHOTO BY LARRY BEHNKE

Pirate Philthy Phil Reed strikes a pose after breakfast at the Eagles Club during last year’s festival.

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www.VisitOurTowns.com

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www.VisitOurTowns.com

Summer 2014 | 103

>> I WALK THE LINE

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Prescribed

by Justine Giancola

Rx: Controlled Fires Ever come across smoke while travelling the backgrounds of Alachua County? More than likely the fire was set on purpose — a controlled burn used in forest management. Fire is a natural part of both forest and grassland ecology that can stimulate the germination of some trees.

Controlled Fires Keep the Environment Healthy and Populations Safe WRITTEN BY JUSTINE GIANCOLA

S

etting fire to a forest on purpose may seem dangerous, harmful and completely nonsensical, but the list of benefits of prescribed burns goes on and on. O’leno State Park in High Springs conducts these burns year round. Park specialist Steve Eldredge, who calls himself a glorified park ranger and is known around the park as the “burn boss,” explained that these prescribed burns are incredibly beneficial to the forest and the animals that inhabit it. The number one reason for holding prescribed burns is to reduce the chances of a catastrophic wildfire. Eldredge said while you might think that keeping fire out of a certain area would be beneficial to its overall growth, you have to remember that if an unplanned fire were to occur, the area would be so large and dense it would create a huge, uncontrollable wildfire.

“Without prescribed burns, you are going to get bad wildfires that are hard to control,” Eldredge said. Prescribed burns also deter hardwood from encroaching and ruining natural habitats. If not for these burns, the plant communities would eventually become hardwood, meaning all large trees. By burning in a more contolled state, as Eldredge said, seedlings like those of the longleaf pine will continue to thrive and resist being overtaken by hardwood. Wiregrass, which provides necessary groundcover, is stimulated to seed by prescribed burns. The wiregrass then spreads throughout the plant community. Species such as the Florida scrub-jay, gopher tortoise and Red-cockaded Woodpecker would have significantly less space to inhabit if not for prescribed burns. “They help keep the plant community in a natural state and give them [the wildlife]

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The articles printed in Our Town Magazine™ do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Tower Publications, Inc. or their editorial staff. Our Town Magazine endeavors to accept reliable advertising; however, we can not be held responsible by the public for advertising claims. Our Town Magazine reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisement. All rights reserved. © 2013 Tower Publications, Inc.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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PHOTO BY TREVOR ISAAC

Published quarterly by Tower Publications, Inc. www.towerpublications.com

PUBLISHER Charlie Delatorre charlie@towerpublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Albert Isaac editor@towerpublications.com fax: 352-416-0175 OFFICE MANAGER Bonita Delatorre bonita@towerpublications.com

>> FEATURES 94

Such Great Heights Fun For All at High Springs BMX Track BY LINDSEY CARMAN

110 Haute in the City Meet Chef Hebler, the Culinary Mind Behind the Menu at a Fresh Restaurant BY LINDSEY CARMAN

142 The Seven-Year Itch My Battle With Lyme Disease BY HOLLY DONOHOE

150 Devil’s Den The Myth and Magic of a Williston Spring BY COURTNEY LINDWALL

156 Never Swim With Hippos …and Other Important Lessons We Learned In Africa BY LUCIE REGENSDORF

ART DIRECTOR Hank McAfee hank@towerpublications.com DESIGNER Neil McKinney neil@towerpublications.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Larry Behnke Lindsey Carman Holly Donohoe Justine Giancola Crystal Henry Courtney Lindwall Lucie Regensdorf Amanda Williamson INTERN Justine Giancola Shayna Tanen ADVERTISING SALES Jenni Bennett 352-416-0210 jenni@towerpublications.com Melissa Morris 352-416-0212 melissa@towerpublications.com

COLUMNISTS 38 60 116 130 164

Crystal Henry ............................................................ NAKED SALSA Kendra Siler-Marsiglio ..................................... HEALTHY EDGE Albert Isaac ................................................................ DIFFERENT NOTE Review by Terri Schlichenmeyer ........... READING CORNER Donna Bonnell ......................................................... EMBRACING LIFE

Nancy Short 352-372-3245 nancy@towerpublications.com Pam Slaven 352-416-0213 pam@towerpublications.com Helen Mincey 352-416-0209 helen@towerpublications.com Annie Waite 352-416-0204 annie@towerpublications.com

INFORMATION 118 Taste of the Town 122 Community Calendar 166 Worship Centers 14 | Summer 2014

132 Library Schedule 168 Advertiser Index

ADVERTISING OFFICE 4400 NW 36th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax


www.VisitOurTowns.com

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SPECIAL >> SANCTUARY

Field of Dreams taring across the 265-acre retirement farm for horses he built alongside his wife, Peter Gregory quietly passed away. In his memory, his family planted a red Camilla bush on the property, next to the graves of the horses he loved so much. After Peter’s death on March 18, his ashes were scattered across the Field of Dreams, a corner of Mill Creek Farm covered with oak trees, wildflowers and flowering trees. Peter and his wife, Mary, founded the farm about 30 years ago to create a place for horses to spend the end of their lives after years of abuse, neglect or hard work. The farm’s promise: None of its horses will ever be ridden or worked again. “Our goal in the future is to continue my father’s legacy,” Paul Gregory said. “My dad was 85, but he got up every day at 5 a.m. and

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went to bed at midnight. It takes three of us to do what he did.” The Gregory family placed everything they could into the farm, which was inspired by their youth in England. Everything was delivered by horse-drawn carriage on the cobble streets of London. So when horse owners got the chance, they took the horses out to the country for rest. According to Paul, his father and mother would visit the horses when they got the chance. They vowed to open their own farm one day. The property is now a nonprofit organization that runs entirely off donations from the public. Every Saturday, Mill Creek holds an open house to encourage interested locals and visitors alike to tour the farm. Admission: Two carrots. “It’s a labor of love,” Paul said. “My parents are the hardest

BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON working people I know.” Before his death, Peter spent every day of the last 20 years tending the farm. He would spend his long days feeding and petting the horses, driving around on the golf cart and writing letters. “He wanted this to go forward,” Paul said. “A lot of people wished they had done something with their life, but he did what he wanted.” To find out more information about the farm and its many residents, visit Mill Creek’s website at millcreekfarm.org or check out its Facebook page. The horses cared for on the property are not from private owners, but those handed over by government institutions. The farm also accepts horses from rescue organizations. It runs with the help of public donations and a dedicated group of volunteers, Paul said. s


MESSAGE >> FROM THE EDITOR

Rivers, Springs and Things I took my son and his friend to Poe Springs recently. They hopped into the Santa Fe River with an inflatable, floated downstream, and then paddled up into the spring. Over and over again. I was pleased to see the park was well attended with people celebrating family reunions and such while kids of all ages were floating, swimming and chilling in Poe Springs. Others were tubing and canoeing on the Santa Fe River. This was a welcome sight, as it wasn’t long ago that Poe Springs had stopped flowing. Lower than average rainfall had taken its toll on the springs — Poe in particular — and, just off Boat Ramp Road, a significant section of the Santa Fe River had dried up. Fortunately, rainy days have increased the flow to the rivers and springs, but this is not necessarily an indicator that all is well — our waterways are still imperiled. While the springs are still great places to swim and are truly beautiful sights to behold, they are not as pristine as they once were, — just ask anyone who’s been around them for the past few decades. They are in deep trouble, virtually ignored by policymakers and being attacked on multiple fronts — from over-pumping to pollution. If changes in policy don’t become a reality, I’m afraid we will reach a tipping point from which our most precious resource will never recover. A lot of us believe it’s not too late to save our springs, but it will require real conservation, citizen participation and strong leadership. Our summer issue offers, as it has for many years, an update on our rivers and springs — illustrating both the beauty of these precious gems and the threats they continue to face. I encourage you all to visit these incredible places. Take the kids. Show them the beauty of our local treasures and explain the importance of protecting these stunning natural resources. Let’s make sure the springs will still be here for future generations to enjoy. s

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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WRITING >> CONTRIBUTORS Justine Giancola

Crystal Henry

is a senior Journalism student at UF. When she isn’t outside soaking up the sun, she’s shooting pictures with her Nikon. She has a passion for style and fashion, and is always up on the latest trends.

is a freelance writer and columnist born and raised in West Texas. She received her B.S. in Journalism in 2006 from the University of Florida. She is in love with the Florida landscape.

jgiancola@ymail.com

ces03k@gmail.com

Lindsey Carman

Amanda Williamson

is a recent graduate from UF with a degree in journalism and English. When she isn’t buried in a book or drinking copious amounts of coffee, she enjoys getting lost in the woods, discovering folk music and writing poetry.

is a recent graduate of UF’s College of Journalism and Communications. She has been writing for as long as she can remember. She enjoys spending time with her friends, family and animals. awilliamson@ufl.edu

lindseyivone@gmail.com

Holly Donohoe

Courtney Lindwall

is an Assistant Professor of Tourism in UF’s College of Health and Human Performance. Born and raised in Canada, she developed a deep love for the natural environment.

is a Florida native, and recent graduate of UF’s school of journalism. She loves telling and hearing good stories. In her little bit of free time, she enjoys hiking, camping and eating delicious food.

hdonohoe@hhp.ufl.edu

c.lindwall@ufl.edu

Lucie Regensdorf

Larry Behnke

a trial attorney for years, decided to stop swimming with the legal sharks, and retire to start a B&B in High Springs. Her passion for serving magnificent meals nearly came to a halt on a recent trip to Africa.

is an artist, writer, photographer and a graduate of the University of Michigan in cinematography and painting. He has used solar electricity since 1984 and lives in a dome home. larry@towerpublications.com

gradyhousebnb@gmail.com

s Pins & Needles lie’local JuYour quilting parlor & more 904-214-6633

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CHARITY OF THE MONTH

Chi Omega’s Sandblast FEBRUARY 2014 WINNER – 2039 VOTES

It all began on April 5, 1895, at the University of Arkansas when four young women, with the help of a local dentist, established the secrets and symbolism that today bind over 260,000 women. This small band of women founded Chi Omega after realizing a need for an organization that would foster both friendship and respect for the potential and inherent value of women. Over the years, Chi Omega has provided its members with unique opportunities in leadership, scholarship and lifelong friendship, while striving to provide each sister with a commitment to personal integrity, excellence in academic and intellectual pursuits, community service, leadership opportunities and social enrichment. The Eta Delta Chapter of Chi Omega was born on September 11, 1948 and was one of the original five sororities on the University of Florida campus. Since 1895, six purposes have served as a guide for every Chi Omega chapter. Today, they remain as valid as ever. Those six purposes are: Friendship, High Standards of Personnel, Sincere Learning and Creditable Scholarship, Participation in Campus Activities, Career Development, and Community Service. One of Chi Omega’s biggest philanthropic charities is the Sandblast, an annual volleyball tournament that benefits the Make-a-Wish Foundation. The ladies of Chi Omega coach fraternities, sororities and independent teams. They spend the day in the sun

22 | Summer 2014

sand bumping, spiking and setting to raise money for the Make-A-Wish Foundation, which grants the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions. With the money raised at Sandblast, Chi Omega has granted wishes such as a trip to Disney World and a day playing basketball with Will Smith. In 2012-2013, the sisters of Eta Delta raised more than $14,000, which was enough money to grant four wishes. The sorority enjoys spending time at local charities in the Gainesville community. And the sisters do their part by tutoring children at the Boys and Girls Club, delivering food for Meals on Wheels, and donating supplies to Alachua County public schools. Around the holidays, Chi Omegas can be found wrapping gifts for Operation Christmas Child and also participating in community service projects, such as Ghouls, Goblins, and Greeks. As part of their mission statement Chi Omega strives, “to place scholarship before social obligations and character before appearances; to be, in the best sense, democratic rather than ‘exclusive’, and lovable rather than ‘popular’; to work earnestly, to speak kindly, to act sincerely, to choose thoughtfully that course which occasion and conscience demand.” Through Sandblast, it’s clear that UF’s Chi Omega is living up to their mission. s

TO NOMINATE A CHARITY OF YOUR CHOICE OR TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE NOMINEES, VISIT:

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CHARITY OF THE MONTH

Carson Springs Foundation MARCH 2014 WINNER – 1828 VOTES

Carson Springs Wildlife Conservation Foundation rescues exotic animals in need, housing and supporting conservation of endangered species. The Foundation also has a rehabilitation license for native wildlife. Its mission is to provide homes for abandoned and abused exotic animals, house endangered species and support continuing genetic diversity. It also provides education about nature and the role of large predators. Alachua County, Florida, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife, and the United States Department of Agriculture license the Foundation. Over 20 species and 53 exotic animals can be found at the Conservation. Species such as the African Lion, Cheetah, Tiger, Puma, Serval, and Emu all reside on the grounds. Tours are available to sponsors, donors and children’s groups. Founders Christine and Barry Janks founded Carson Springs Wildlife Conservation and provide their time and land to the animals with 100 percent of all donations going directly to animal care, food and housing. The Foundation provides educational opportunities and activities for a wide variety of people, including school groups, college and vet students, 4H groups and continuing education for veterinarians. The Foundation has very strict protocols for safety, optimal care, and their enclosures far exceed the minimum standard set by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The enclosures for the animals are all on natural grass, with trees and bushes. No animal is housed on concrete. The animals get a varied diet and vitamins for optimum health accompanied with clean fresh water at all

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times. Every cage is cleaned daily and several veterinarians are available to treat the animals as needed. A rescue animal such as Samer, the African Lion, has a second chance at life after the Conservation took him in and nursed him back to life. Samer is about seven and was brought to a vet to be euthanized. Known as a “wobbler” lion, he suffers from a neurological condition and is has trouble with balance. His condition has greatly improved through nutritional therapy and a good diet. He is also benefitting from a large enclosure where his muscle tone has greatly improved. Another rescue animal is Sunflower, a three-yearold Bengal Tiger. She was also brought to the vet to be euthanized. It was reported that she was having seizures and her original origins were obscured but clearly she was being discarded. Her happiness and joy of life is an inspiration to all who meet her. She appears to have had some training so it’s likely she came from a traveling circus. She is a bit cross eyed, most likely the result of inbreeding. Fortunately, through good diet and proper habitat, she is thriving and has become very healthy — another success story for Carson Springs Wildlife Conservation Foundation. s To schedule a tour: 352-468-2827 or contact@cswildlife.org.

TO NOMINATE A CHARITY OF YOUR CHOICE OR TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE NOMINEES, VISIT:

www.facebook.com/SunStateFCU and click on “Charity of the Month”.


www.VisitOurTowns.com

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CHARITY OF THE MONTH

Beauty’s Haven Farm APRIL 2014 WINTER – 3735 VOTES

They’ve done it again. Beauty’s Haven Farm and Equine Rescue is April’s Charity of the Month winner. Here’s the backstory: When Theresa Batchelor received a call about a young Arabian mare that had been seized by the county due to neglect, she knew the mare, now named Beauty, was not the only one in need of rescuing. After a surgery to remove a tumor that was growing inside Batchelor’s spinal cord, she had permanent nerve damage. Her life changed dramatically when she was left quadriplegic and was told she would never walk again. Through physical therapy, tenacity and faith, she did regain use of her limbs. However, Batchelor has no feeling or proprioception below her neck — she is what is called an incomplete quadriplegic. She has no idea where her arms and legs are unless she is looking at them. She was advised to give up many of her favorite activities, including horseback riding. Enter: Beauty. The mare had been traumatized by prior abuse, and to say she did not like people would be an understatement. Gaining her trust seemed impossible, but Batchelor has experience with overcoming impossible situations. She had a plan — she would spend each day with Beauty, teaching her voice commands. Over the course of a few months Beauty finally began to heal. She seems to sense that Batchelor is different. This has only helped to strengthen their bond, which developed into a beautiful and trusting relationship that led Batchelor to be able to horseback ride again. Because of this experience, Batchelor was inspired to start a non-profit organization in 2006 called Beauty’s Haven Farm and Equine Recue. The purpose is to help as many equine friends as possible when they are in

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need. The charity networks with other rescue organizations and individuals, and works to educate others about horse slaughter in an effort to make it illegal — not just in the United States but also in Canada, Mexico, and other countries. Horses that arrive at the rescue come from auctions and kill buyers; some are surrendered by owners who can no longer care for them and others are seized by authorities. The organization tries to help horses that are desperately in need of a safe place to go. Once a horse is at the rescue, then comes the costs of rehabilitation, training, proper feed and care. Expenses include initial care, grain, feed and other necessities, which are costly. Some horses with special needs will live out their days there. Jeanne Bartsch is on the board of directors for the rescue, and said this organization is unique because Batchelor takes in horses that other rescues might not because of the cost it would take to rehabilitate them. “If they need acupuncture they get it, if they need massage therapy they get it,” Bartsch said. “She never gives up on them.” s

TO NOMINATE A CHARITY OF YOUR CHOICE OR TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE NOMINEES, VISIT:

www.facebook.com/SunStateFCU and click on “Charity of the Month”.


SunState Federal Credit Union has been serving its members for more than 55 years. Visit us today to see the difference it makes to do your banking at the place where Jay works.

Meet Jay Hogan… ”I have spent over 20 years working at multiple credit unions. My time at SunState has by far been the most rewarding and satisfying! The management team and board here make it a true pleasure to come to work every day, because, like Joe Akins says, at SunState it’s all about the people!”

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A Lasting Tribute

for Veterans SunState Federal Credit Union matching funds to help expand the Kanapaha Veteran’s Memorial

F

rom locations in both the Gainesville and Lake City Veterans Administration Medical Centers, SunState Federal Credit Union has a long-standing tradition of honoring and helping area veterans. In its latest efforts, however, SunState is calling upon not only its members, but the community at large as well, for help. SunState has pledged $7,500 in matching funds for contributions toward the refurbishment of the Veteran’s Memorial at Kanapaha Park in southwest Gainesville. For every dollar contributed to the fund, SunState will match with a dollar of its own in hopes of raising at least $15,000 for the Alachua County Memorial Committee, the group which maintains the Kanapaha facility. “We want to encourage our members to contribute to this cause,” said David Nicholson, who served in the Marine Corps, is a past commander of Post 16 of the American Legion in Gainesville, and is a current board member for SunState. “We’re committing $7,500, and we really want to encourage the community to support this important endeavor as well.” The memorial is in need not only of refurbishment, but expansion as well, according to John Gebhardt, Chair of the Alachua County Memorial Committee. “The memorial is beautiful, but we cannot recognize in proper form veterans from current or future wars,” he said, explaining that the layout is based on a “walk through time” in which one

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foot of space equals one year. Currently the latest entries run into the parking lot, leaving no room for additional recognition. The plan is to reduce the length representing a year to three quarters of a foot, which will allow inclusion of veterans from current wars and still leave room for 80 more years of space – allowing for a more lasting tribute. New memorial stones will be made, with the existing stones being recycled via donations to other memorial gardens and facilities.

It’s easy to donate! Simply stop into any SunState branch with your donation. Cash or checks accepted. While there is no deadline to contribute funds, the committee hopes to have the work completed in time for Veterans Day, 2014. The new memorial will be dedicated with a ceremony that day, and the committee expects thousands of people to come out and help in the celebration. Gebhardt said that SunState reached out to them to offer their support for their project in the form of a matching-funds campaign, which lends a much-needed boost to the cause. To encourage the donations even more, the credit union has made it easy to give; anyone wishing to donate can simply bring a check or cash into any SunState branch and mention that it is for the expansion of the Kanapaha Veterans Memorial. Anyone can give to the cause,


be they a member of the credit union, a citizen of Gainesville, or even a traveler passing through. Gebhardt, who served with the United States Army in the Vietnam War, is heartened and encouraged by the campaign and looks forward to seeing the support come in. This is because he knows the importance of recognizing those who have served, and he appreciates the contribution that SunState is making to this cause. “We live in a complex time when there is rich diversity of opinions and activity. All that diversity is guaranteed by the constitution, and vets and current active duty personnel are sworn to protect the constitution. But while we enjoy this diversity, we need to step back and remember who paid the price for the freedoms. “It’s only right and proper that we recognize the service of all veterans and active duty personnel by erecting monuments in their honor,” he continued. “And it’s more important to remember those who have paid the supreme price and were killed in action. We live in a very patriotic community – and SunState has stepped up.”

www.sunstatefcu.org

OUR TOWN PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Count us in!

I think this is the first time I have ever done this, but after proofing the magazine and reading this particular commitment that SunState is making to the Veteran’s Memorial in our area, I wanted to offer them our support. As a life-long resident of Gainesville and Alachua County, my family and I are fortunate to call this area our home. As a business owner and publisher of several area magazines, Tower Publications has always supported the veterans in our area. Through the pages of Our Town and Senior Times Magazines, we’ve often written about the brave men and women who’ve served the country, and today I’m happy to be able to support them financially. On behalf of Tower Publications, it is my privilege to commit $1000 to this cause and look forward to seeing the expansion project begin. My hope is that our initial commitment “kick-starts” this campaign and gets SunSate closer to its goal of expanding the Veterans Memorial. Thank you for committing to this wonderful endeavor and we look forward to covering the grand re-opening of the Kanapaha Veterans Memorial. CHARLIE DELATORRE, PUBLISHER

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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>> SCHOOL’S OUT

There are all kinds of activities to enjoy in Our Town in the summertime. With that in mind, we pulled together just some of our favorite fun things to do to escape the summer doldrums — and stifling heat!

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race weekend at Gatorback Cycle Park in Alachua. And once those engines are fired up, spectators can rest assured that there will be non-stop action, high-flying races and mud-splattered athletes pushing the limits of their machines. The cycle park sits on 95 acres and features separate supercross, vintage and hare scrambles tracks. The popular Mini Os are held here as well as the Florida Gold Cup Series races and the Florida Winter AM Series. On race days, the lot fills with trucks, bikes, RVs, and children who can be seen running wild at the end of a long day.

Location: 20525 NW 46th Ave. in Alachua. Call 407-473-4373 for more information.

PHOTOS BY IMOTOONLINE.COM

MOTOCROSS

V

aroom! The sound of motorcycle engines is nearly constant during any

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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OUTDOOR SPORTS

The Hal Brady Recreation Complex offers year-round activities and facilities for its wide range of sports and fitness programs. From seasonal leagues — football, softball, volleyball, soccer and others — to the infrequent tennis player, there is opportunity for all to participate. Director Hal Brady has been the driving force for more than a decade, and is committed to continue offering the finest, most comprehensive program available locally. In August, both the Babe Ruth World Series (August 6 -14) and Cal Ripkin 12-60 Baseball Series (August 5-13) will begin at the recreation complex. Other activities to be enjoyed at the facility include basketball and a skateboarding at the skatepark. Want to beat the sweltering heat? Visit the Splash Park from 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Admission is free. Or rent a facility for birthday parties and such. Location: 14300 NW 146th Terr. in Alachua. Call 386-462-1610 for more information.

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HIKE, BIKE OR HORSEBACK RIDE Nestled behind the Progress Center off U.S. 441, you will find the San Felasco Hammock Preserve State Park, one of the few remaining mature forests in Florida. The park offers outdoor adventure to hikers, off-road bicyclists, horseback riders, and nature lovers. To ensure solitude and quiet for a true wilderness experience, the southern two-thirds of the park is designated for hiking only (located four miles northwest of Gainesville on State Road 232). The northern third of the park has horse trails, off-road cycling, and hiking (off U.S. 441, south of Alachua). Bobcats, white-tailed deer, gray foxes, turkeys, and many species of songbirds make their homes in the 18 natural communities found in the preserve. Location: 12720 NW 109th Ln. in Alachua. Call 386-462-7905 for more information.


ARCHERY AT EASTON NEWBERRY SPORTS COMPLEX The Easton Foundation’s aim is to keep archery a viable part of the sporting culture in communities across the United States. To that end, the Sports Complex facility includes a dedicated indoor archery range with 20 lanes shooting to 25 meters. In addition, the facility includes an adjoining indoor gym for basketball, volleyball and multi-use. Combined the two indoor venues can provide over 50 archery lanes for large indoor events.

A variety of activities can be found at the Easton Newberry Sports Complex. This shared-use facility combines the Easton Newberry Archery Center with a multi-use recreation facility. The archery program focuses on training archers and coaches, developing curriculum and in providing a world-class venue to host archery events. Location: 24880 NW 16th Ave. in Newberry. Call 352-472-2388 for more information.

LASER TAG

ASTRONOMY

BOUNCIN’

Ready for some laser battles? M2 Battlesports is now open for private group bookings Monday through Thursday and Sundays at the Newberry Easton Sports Complex. Players — who aren’t just kids but college students and businessmen, too — can choose from a variety of weapons made to resemble real-life counterparts such as AK-47s and assault rifles. Enjoy a variety of activities, from domination to capture the flag. M2 plans to be opening for Friday and Saturday games very soon.

Interested in some stargazing? Then check out the Newberry Star Park, Alachua Astronomy Club’s observing site at the Sports Complex. The Star Park had its grand opening in January of 2011, and includes a 12-foot x 28-foot storage building, eight observing pads and room for additional telescopes. Safe solar viewing equipment is also available.

Are you children bouncing off the walls? Well, kids of all ages can jump for joy at Bouncin’ Big, a place to experience year-round sports activities, obstacle courses, slides and concessions. It also offers parties and group events. Open Bounce Hours are on Wednesday through Friday from 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm, Saturday from 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm, and Sunday from 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm.

Location: 24880 NW 16th Ave. in Newberry. Call 386-965-5832 for info.

Location: 24880 NW 16th Ave. in Newberry. Call 352-472-5663 for more information.

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Location: 824 NW 250th Terr. in Newberry. Call 352-474-6356 for more information.

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PHOTO BY MARK LONG

CAVE DIVING High Springs is home to a multitude of underwater caves that attract divers from all over the world. Divers have described the experience as like swimming through the Grand Canyon. Out of the 900 known springs in Florida, 200 are close to High Springs’ geographic region. Ginnie Springs, Little River, Peacock Springs, Manatee and Hart Springs are among the most popular. But don’t go in unprepared – be sure you are cave certified.

CAMP KULAQUA During select Sundays each summer, Camp Kulaqua opens its River Ranch for Community Sundays at a discounted rate and no reservations are required. Bring the kids to splish and splash in the 15,000-square-foot Wave Pool, slip down the Water Slide and enjoy the Lazy River. There are also other recreation opportunities such as volleyball and aquatic (water) activities. In June, Community Sundays are held on June 22nd and June 29th. Check the website for future dates. Location: 23400 NW 212 Ave. in High Springs. Visit campkulaqua.com for more information.

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BOAT RAMP ROAD It might not sound like much, but this street runs right into the Santa Fe River. On a hot summer day it’s not uncommon to find people gathered at the end of the ramp, or fishing from the shore, or kids wading (and swimming – depending upon the depth) out to the old pylons in the middle of the river. It’s a great place to launch your canoe or kayak – or inner tube – and cruise down the river. Location: NW Boat Ramp Road Off U.S. 441 in High Springs.


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FLOMOTION FITNESS PRESENTS: OUR FALL 2014 TWELVE WEEK NUTRITION CLASS

Our first 12 week nutrition class this year was a huge success! Just listen to what a few participants had to say: “Yesterday I did an “InBody” measurement and for the first time ever (probably in my whole entire life) my muscle mass is higher than my fat mass. So excited, knew you would appreciate this Flo. So thankful you got me on the right track!” – Julie Corbett “Since working with FloMotion Fitness I have developed a sense of pride and a new self-esteem that I did not think possible over the age of 40. I feel great, sleep sound, and I am finally in control of my health. It’s not a diet, it’s knowing what to eat and when throughout my day. Thanks to Flo, I love me!” – Kristi Crane “Not only did Metabolic Precision help me feel better physically, but also mentally. Having Flo Bush as my consultant/instructor offered positive reinforcement, knowledge and accountability for my new healthy lifestyle.” – Paige Steele Adams

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SWIMMING, HIKING & CAMPING

About six miles north of High Springs on U.S. 441 is O’Leno State Park. Many facilities at the park were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s, and include the suspension bridge that still spans the Santa Fe River. Visitors can swim, hike, bike and fish — and even stay the night in its fullfacility campground. The park not only features sinkholes, hardwood hammocks and river swamps but also a spot where the Santa Fe River disappears underground. The river reemerges three miles away in the River Rise State Preserve.

LIVE MUSIC

Location: 410 S.E. O’Leno Park Road in High Springs. Call 386454-1853 for more information.

Come on down to City Hall and enjoy some free, live music. The Music in the Park Series is offered on the third Sunday each month from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm James Paul Park (near the sinkhole). So bring a chair or blanket and a picnic basket and socialize with your neighbors while local musicians fill the air with melodious melodies. Location: 110 NW 1st Ave. in High Springs. Call 352-275-4190 for more information.

INDOOR CLIMBING, DANCE & MORE Want to climb a wall? Take some swimming lessons? Learn some gymnastics? You should consider visiting Sun Country Sports Center West in Jonesville. The facility boasts a 25-yard, heated, saline pool as well as a retail area for goggles fins, baby swim diapers and even underwater cameras. Or scale the 2,500-square-foot wall. Sun Country offers a variety of classes as well, for climbers of all ages and skill levels. Sun Country also has afterschool programs, summer camps and birthday parties. As an indoor facility, kids can participate in gymnastics, cheerleading, martial arts, dance and other activities all year round. There are also great programs for adults and families of all ages. Location: 333 SW 140 Terrace in Jonesville. Call 352-331-8773 for more information.

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COLUMN >> CRYSTAL HENRY

Naked Salsa

Finding My Why

n Sunday I met a fabulous couple. She works in human resources and has the most sparkly blue eyes on the planet. He is a super friendly military hero. They’re one of those couples who are so deeply in love that you can’t help but notice when one gently reaches for the other one’s hand, or when they seem to communicate with just a subtle glance. The only thing that could distract you from their love for each other is the pain that crosses those baby blues when a young mother shuffles by carrying her newborn snuggled sweetly in his infant seat.

O

husband squeezed my hand under the table. I’ve talked about becoming a surrogate since the first time I gave birth. Pregnancy and childbirth have always fascinated me almost to the point of obsession. Once I got bit by the baby bug I was like a walking Wikipedia on pregnancy and childbirth. I wanted to know when the baby’s heart would start beating or when the child would grow eyelashes. I lost my first pregnancy at 13 weeks. It was twins, and they’d stopped developing at 10 weeks. But my uterus totally let it go to voicemail when my body

I lost my first pregnancy at 13 weeks. It was twins, and they’d stopped developing at 10 weeks. But my uterus totally let it go to voicemail when my body made the call. Years ago, this sweet woman with the gentle smile lost the most primal right bestowed upon a woman. Cancer robbed her of the ability to bear her own children. The cancer is gone, but the yearning for a child remains. As I sat across the table at a busy restaurant I listened as she and her husband told me their story. His eyes lit up as he talked about being a father, and she feigned a smile as she jokingly said she probably would make a terrible pregnant woman anyway. My

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made the call. Instead of waking up cramping in the middle of the night, I found out at my 13-week checkup through a routine ultrasound. I decided to wait a week to have another ultrasound just to be sure the twins weren’t playing a terrible joke on me. It was pretty surreal and horrifying, but on April Fool’s day the joke was over. The second ultrasound confirmed what we already knew, and I opted for surgery to expel the “products of conception” from my uterus.

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I always hated that they called my babies products. They even threw away my ultrasound pictures because who wants pictures of some busted products? I was completely devastated. I asked the doctor why they didn’t make it. But he had no answers. I asked my mom why this happened to me. She said it was God’s plan. It took all my strength not to fistfight my own mother over that comment. What sick plan would include this kind of pain? If God didn’t want me to have kids then just don’t let me get pregnant. Don’t let me get my hopes up and then smash them into tiny little products of conception. A month passed and I wasn’t pregnant. Two months passed and I still got a big fat negative. Three. Four. At five months a friend of mine announced that she was accidentally pregs. I felt numb. Six months went by and another friend gently told me she was also pregnant. I feigned a smile, but she knew. We didn’t talk about it as we walked through the bookstore. I tried to fake interest and put on the happy face. She always changed the subject. I was always grateful for the compassion she showed me, but the second I dropped her off I dissolved into a sobbing puddle of sadness. We talked about adoption, but apparently there isn’t actually this big playpen of tiny babies just waiting for a momma. Plus the thought of never having my own biological child was heartbreaking. I understand it seems selfish because there are orphans who need love, but I wanted my baby to get my daddy’s eyes or my husband’s dimpled cheek. Through my heartache I vowed that if I could just have a biological child of my own I would be forever grateful, and I would find a way to show it. The next month I got a little pink line that changed my life. Nine months later my dear little Sunny was born, and two years after that I was pregnant with my sweet Violet. I never understood why I had to suffer so much or why my babies were taken from me. I never understood why until I sat across that table this Sunday. I saw the same hurt and longing in her beautiful blue eyes. And I found my why. s

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>> BEAT THE HEAT

Go with the

Flow

SUMMER GUIDE TO NEARBY SPRINGS

As the humid summer months approach, finding solace from the stifling heat can be challenging. However, there are some local springs that can quench the humidity — and they are almost in your own backyard.

WRITTEN BY LINDSEY CARMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALBERT ISAAC orth Central Florida’s hidden gems, its natural springs, are an oasis from everyday life. They provide unique opportunities to explore the surrounding nature and to enjoy the beautiful outdoors without breaking the bank. The Santa Fe River is fed by many springs, including Poe, Blue, Ginnie, and Rum Island Springs. These springs gush fresh, crystal-clear water into the river. For years, they have drawn people from all over Florida (and the world) to come swim in their beautiful waters. Our springs also provide a cheap (and sometimes free) day of fun for everyone. From swimming to camping, and from floating to picnicking, the array of activities is abundant. We encourage you to check out all the springs in our area this summer.

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Blue Springs bluespringspark.com 7450 NE 60th St., High Springs 386-454-1369 Open every day, 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Adults 13+: $10, Kids 5-12: $3, Kids Under 5: Free

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Ginnie Springs ginniespringsoutdoors.com 5000 NE 60th Ave., High Springs 386-454-7188 Summer Hours Vary. Visit website. Adults 15+: $12, Kids 7-14: $3, Kids Under 6: Free

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Ginnie Springs A popular area in North Central Florida, Ginnie Springs is a hot spot for some cool tubing and picnicking. The springs are located about 9 miles from downtown High Springs. The privately owned facility has been open since 1976 and is home to over 200 wooded acres. The water temperature stays around 72 degrees year-round and the springs host underwater grottos, native fish and plants. The seven natural springs of Ginnie provide some of the best Florida scuba diving and the facility offers PADI certification and training in open-water, cave, cavern and advanced diving. Divers come from around the nation to explore the underwater caverns at Ginnie Springs. The surrounding scenery makes your journey memorable and relaxing.

Blue Springs Known for its crystal-clear blue water, Blue Springs is nestled 15 minutes from downtown High Springs. Just south of its neighbor, Rum Springs, this oasis includes all the essential summer amenities. A large swimming area, safe for the kids, lies next to a white-sand beach great for sunbathers. There’s even something for daredevils — a 24-foot diving dock, which provides a place for older children and adults to show off and perform tricks or jumps. A long boardwalk wanders off toward the Santa Fe River and allows nature walkers to explore the scenery. Several smaller springs, such as Naked Springs, Johnson Springs, Little Blue Springs and Kiefer Springs, funnel into Blue Springs, allowing you to explore their waters as well. Offered activities at Blue Springs include camping, canoeing, kayaking, tubing and swimming. Bring a picnic lunch to enjoy under one of the springs’ pavilions or stop by the concessions to satisfy your hunger. Fishing is also permitted if you have your state license. Hiking trails can be found along the spring and are welcome to all. Enjoy native flora and fauna in its natural habitat on each trail as well. Blue Springs offers a day of summery fun for not just the family but also the nature lover, too. Photos and information available on page 43.

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Poe Springs floridasprings.org/visit 28800 NW 182nd Ave, High Springs 352-374-5245 Open Th-Sun 8am – 6pm Free Admission

Rum Island Columbia County Parks and Wildlife CR 138, Fort White, Florida Free Admission

Poe Springs Poe Springs is one of the least crowded springs in High Springs and is located a mere 3.5 miles from downtown High Springs. Pumping an average of 45 million gallons of fresh water each day, this spring is managed by Alachua County and is well protected. A boardwalk winds through the woods leading to the spring that spills into the Santa Fe River. The shallow water depths are safe for kids to play and swim as well. Activities at the park include swimming, snorkeling, kayaking, canoeing and wildlife viewing. There are also picnic areas, a playground, volleyball, softball, soccer fields, and hiking and nature trails to discover. About 202 scenic woodland acres encompass Poe Springs, including native plants and animals. For a relaxing time, visit Poe Springs and enjoy the quiet nature and cool water.

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Rum Island Springs At Rum Island, you’re just minutes away from entering a natural springs paradise. Wooden steps lead into the spring, allowing for easy access for people of all ages to get into the cooling water. Activities include canoeing, grilling, snorkeling, swimming, fishing — and tanning. Owned by the Columbia County Parks and Wildlife, Rum Island is located north of High Springs in Fort White and is surrounded by other springs and places to explore. The cool, clear water and natural scenery will feel like you’ve traveled far for an escape from the office.


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Can you Canoe?

PHOTO BY WES SKILES

WANT TO PADDLE ON THE SANTA FE RIVER? HERE’S A FEW OPTIONS TO HELP.

Santa Fe Canoe Outpost The Santa Fe Canoe Outpost hosts canoe and kayak trips that include day, night and full moon trips. Specialized instructors take you down the Santa Fe River and various springs to show you native plants, animals and scenery. You can rent a canoe or bring your own.The full moon trip only happens monthly and allows you to view creatures and river scenery that you couldn’t see during the day. The shuttle service picks you up at several locations and ranges in different prices as well. Whether you’re canoeing by yourself or in a group, the Santa Fe Canoe Outpost promises to show you the best of the scenic river and the beauty of High Springs.

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Adventure Outpost Tucked away in the middle of “Spring Country,” Adventure Outpost in High Springs provides kayak and canoe tours through more than 40 waterways. Their unique, tailored tours allow kayakers and canoers to explore the beautiful, surrounding scenery. From guided tours to unguided tours, there is an activity for everyone to enjoy. Rental fees and tours are subject to change on a regular basis. Be sure to check out the hiking tours as well.

Rum 138 Rum 138 boasts a variety of options for paddling the river, including canoes and single and double kayaks. Rum 138 sits just down the road from Rum Island Park and offers pickup and drop off service. They also offer snacks, drinks, and sunscreen — and even an art gallery. s


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Dr. Stephanie Kirkconnell or over ten years, Alliance Pediatrics has served Gainesville’s children with care and compassion, and our team-led approach to patient care has resulted in a cohesive group of doctors, nurses and office staff. It has been our good fortune to experience a great deal of growth over the last decade, thanks in no small part to word-ofmouth recommendations from our patients.

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In our latest response to this never-ending growth, we have added yet another pediatrician by welcoming Dr. Stephanie Kirkconnell to the Alliance Pediatrics family! “I am excited to be joining the Alliance Pediatrics team,” said Dr. Stephanie. “Being your child’s doctor is an honor, and I look forward to serving my patients and community.” Dr. Stephanie grew up in Gainesville and completed her undergraduate studies and medical training at the University of Florida. During her residency she was selected to serve as Pediatric Chief Resident, a testament to the leadership and innovation that we hold in high regard at Alliance Pediatrics. But most importantly, she has a heart for ensuring that all families are given equal opportunity for high quality and comprehensive healthcare, and she embraces the patientcentered treatment model that has served our families well. She is accepting new patients and looks forward to creating lasting relationships with the both her patients and families. Pediatricians like Dr. Stephanie are one of the many reasons why Alliance Pediatrics has attracted patients from throughout the North Central Florida area. As we look forward to more “parent-provider partnerships” in the years to come, we wish for all of you to join us in welcoming Dr. Stephanie to her new practice home!

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>> SUBJECT TAG

The Springs Today Seem Altogether Different Than the One’s of Memory 52 | Summer 2014

he dark tannic water of the Santa Fe River snakes through the forests of North Central Florida, easing under busy overpasses, curling around karst rock formations and pushing into the clear blue water released by the constellation of springs dotting its pathway. Some would attribute the Santa Fe’s invasion of local swimming holes to the excessive rush of rains Florida has seen this year. Others, more knowingly, acknowledge the aquifer’s decline. As overpumping depletes

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WRITTEN BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON // PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAY CARSON

the Floridan aquifer, the springs have less force to push back against the river. Here in this lush Eden, many springs — such as nearby White Springs — have stopped flowing entirely. Within the last two years, first magnitude Poe Springs almost became the next victim. Its water level dropped to the lowest in recent memory, said Chris Bird, director of the Alachua County Environmental Protection Department. “There’s a complicated relationship between the

river and the springs,” Bird said. While the river and the springs continue to mingle in the multitude of spring runs along the Santa Fe River, a fact as clear as the water has emerged. Florida’s most abundant natural resource is threatened by human decisions. For many, the Ichetucknee River serves as the epicenter of what is currently happening to the water, said Annie Pais, president of Florida’s Eden. Every year, the state park hosts “Oldtimer’s Day,” where older residents can enjoy a

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“It’s not time to give up, It’s time to fight. Let’s not let it get any worse.” day on the water for free. As the oldtimers converge on the Ichetucknee, they usually remind each other what the beloved river was like when they were younger. Pais recalled a story told to her by two men who as children visited the Ichetucknee. In the days before the area was a state park, the two young men would walk a long dirt road on the way to their favorite local swimming hole. A half-mile from the spring, the two would begin to hear the roar of the water. Today, the spring barely gurgles. When Pais took her children to the spring about 30 years ago, they would put on fins and try to swim toward the spring vent. But the force of the water coming from underground was so strong, Pais said, they couldn’t get there. In the journals of William Bartram, a famous American naturalist, the springs were described throughout his texts as “bubbling fountains.” “When people see the springs who have never seen them before, they are just getting the power of what they are looking at,” she said. “They don’t know that five years before, it was different. And 10 years ago, it was very different. Twentyfive years ago, it bubbled underneath you while you swam over it. And 50 years ago, it roared.” But that’s all gone now, she added. As the aquifer declines, so does the force of the springs. According to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, springs form by a process called dissolution. Over millions of years, acidic rainwater seeped down through Florida’s soil, eroding the limestone foundation that covers the entire peninsula. Through

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this process, cavities slowly formed in the carbonate te bedrock, and the entwined network of caves eventually uallly became the Floridan Aquifer. Florida DEP estimates nearly two quadrillion gallons of water move through the aquifer. However, Bird said, the changes to the springs witnessed by so many locals stem from over-pumping and pollution. While water is seemingly a renewable resource, it is actually finite. ite. The water the world drinks today is the same water er the th he dinosaurs splashed in when they roamed the earth. h. Steadily over the decades, scientists have noticed iced a long-term decline in the flow rates of Florida’s approximately 700 freshwater springs. The waterr iss disappearing. Hornsby Spring in Alachua actually y has reversed its flow, and now dark tannic waterr pours underground. While it appears North Central Florida currently y has an abundance of water running through the rivers verrs and streams, most of it will not be able to recharge the aquifer before it evaporates, Bird said. As nitrates fuel the algae growth in the Ichetucknee kne ee River, the water’s clarity slowly diminishes. Particles es of of the algae break off to become free floating in the river’s verr’s current, and the greenish-brown slime taints the water. wate er. “The first time I went to the Ichetucknee was in 1969, before it was a state park,” Lu Merritt, a member of the e Ichetucknee Alliance, said. “I remember it being as clear clea ar as glass, with beautiful blue water all the way down from the headsprings to the takeout point. The eelgrass ras ss was a beautiful bright green, and it would wave in the he water. I was there last week, and the water is murky.” y.” The appearance of the river has definitely changed, ged d, she added, and not for the better. Even the wildlife diversity has seen a decline over er the years, said Bob Knight, founder of the Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute. The river used to o contain a higher diversity of plant life, which meant nt a snorkel down the river was a colorful experience. Back k then, the plant life varied from purple, dark green, light ligh ht green and orange. But today, Knight said, the eelgrass and the cape e grass have taken over the river. Even worse, the algae gae chokes even the invasive grasses, coating their blades de in a brownish-green gunk. Though there appears to be less fish in the river, Knight said his institution doesn’t have any data to prove the theory. But in Silver Springs, science has proven a decline in the water’s health has led to a decrease in the native fish populations. “It appears that a series of unfortunate events has occurred in the springs,” Knight said. “As development spreads across the

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land — either urban or agricultural — people use more ground water and more fertilizer. Those are happening simultaneously.” Overall, the springs seem to be in a downward decline: reduced flow, increased nitrates and reduced wildlife diversity. Lars Andersen, owner of Adventure Outpost in High Springs, said the rate of change seems to be exponentially faster than it was even 10 years ago. Perhaps the only thing that hasn’t changed is the temperature of the water, which stands

consistently at 72 degrees. “Once the water has been used through consumptive use permits, it’s really hard to get that water back,” Bird said. “But I don’t think for most of the springs in North Central Florida that it’s too late. There’s still time to reverse the trend.” Floridians must look upstream from the rivers and springs to see what is causing the problem within the water supply. The major problems affecting the springs actually occur in the springshed, or the recharge basin.

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“The major issues impacting the health of the springs include population growth, urban sprawl, growing demand for groundwater and introduction of fertilizers, pesticides and other pollutants to the springshed,” states the Florida DEP. While Poe Springs is probably no larger than an acre, its recharge area stretches hundreds of square miles. A spring cannot be isolated from that much larger geographic area, Bird said. For that reason, it’s hard to pinpoint the exact cause of the steady changes seen in the water. Individuals must realize that their life choices — from how much grass they want in their front yard to how long they take to wash the dishes — actually impacts the local water bodies. Every individual choice adds up to millions of gallons of water diverted from the aquifer and thousands of pounds of pollution seeping into the groundwater. But despite the changes, the springs are still an absolute miracle, Knight said. Certainly, their appearance now is better than the alternative of not having them at all. “It’s very possible the springs we are seeing now might not look that way the next time we see them,” he said. “Anytime you see something too beautiful to be real, then protect it. … We haven’t lost our springs yet. We’ve just lost a part of them — a part of their beauty.”

If Florida continues on the downward trend of excessive water use, Knight believes in 30 years the springs might not even be worth saving. “They will be so degraded that people won’t feel the magic,” he added. Water advocates across the state have tried to get legislation for the springs for years, but the recent session was one of the first times the legislative body took the issue seriously. Despite that, the proposal died. It was said that there were already enough laws to protect Florida’s water. “What happened this year with legislation didn’t save any springs, and they are getting worse as we speak,” Knight said. “We were handed a beautiful ecosystem in Florida, but we’ve been very careless with it. We’ve not valued it. We have people in place that are paid a lot of money to protect our natural resources, but they weren’t watching.” Unless Floridians are willing to give up the springs entirely, then the state has to turn around. Since water flows across county lines, it is really hard for one city or neighborhood to make all the changes necessary to stop the downward trend. The state of Florida must step in to provide a cohesive plan to return the water bodies to their former state — or to at least stop the continued decline. “It’s not time to give up,” he said. “It’s time to fight. Let’s not let it get any worse.” s

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COLUMN >> BY KENDRA SILER-MARSIGLIO

Healthy Edge Summer Time: Let’s Keep Kids Safe!

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t’s that time of year again, when kids can enjoy free (read as “non-school”) time. It’s also the time of year that adults have to remember that children are more likely to suffer from injuries and accidents. Help keep your kids’ summer an accident-free zone, with these tips. According to the National Safe Kids Campaign, one in four children under age 15 sustain injuries that need medical attention each year. About 40 percent of all injury-related emergency department visits and 42 percent of all injury-related deaths occur between May and August. Even with these dismal statistics, the vast majority of accident-induced injuries are preventable.

Here are seven ways to keep kids safe this summer: 1. Check pools and spas for hidden dangers. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, the number of children who drown in pools or spas each year is equivalent to about 15 preschool classes. Make sure your pool is enclosed or has a fence; there are reports about kids drowning in neighbor’s pools without even the neighbor knowing that the child was there. Also, one little

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known issue that causes injuries is “circulation entrapment.” Kids can get caught in pool drains and suction pipes. The level of danger increases if kids can’t swim well. Going to a lake or river? Have a life vest handy. The recommended age for kids to learn how to swim is 4-5 years. 2. Do sunshine in moderation. Its not only adults who can get heat stroke. The symptoms are: very red skin, irritability and sometimes listlessness. If your child is showing these symptoms, remove him or her from the sun and provide liquids every 30 minutes for fluid recovery. 3. Make sure helmets are protecting your kids on wheels. If your children are riding bikes or skateboards, make sure their helmets are approved by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) or Snell. Helmets work best when they fit just above the top of the eyebrows. Helmets should sit level on the head with the chinstraps fitting snugly under the chin.

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4. Don’t leave kids alone in the car. Cars can quickly heat up to lethal temperatures. We’ve all heard of tragedies where parents forget their toddlers in the car seat or kids trap themselves in the trunk or car. These points are common sense, yet parents aren’t always used to having kids around with such frequency as in the summer. 5. Childproof the house. Will kids younger than your own be visiting your home? Maybe your family or friends who pop by over the summer have younger kids? An inexpensive way to prevent emergency room visits (and strained relationships) is to install outlet covers, window guards, furniture corner bumpers and safety gates. 6. Keep toxins in original containers and in a secure location. A study in the June 2013 issue of Pediatrics shows that ingestion of hydrocarbons found in cleaning products or gas are among the top 10 causes of pediatric poisoning deaths. The deaths are most likely to occur during summer months and are related to lawn mowing, Tiki torch use, or lighter fluid use. 7. Minimize bites and stings. To keep insects at bay, repellents come in two basic categories: those with DEET and those without. Although DEET works well to repel insects and ticks, DEET can be toxic for kids. For older kids, repellents with 20 percent DEET can be used sparingly on exposed skin (NOT under clothing), on clothing and on shoes. Don’t put DEET on any child’s faces or hands. For a good low-level DEET alternative, the CDC recommends using repellents with picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Never use repellent on infants; keep them covered up. For ticks, the CDC recommends you check under the arms, between the legs, around the waist, inside the navel, and the hairline and scalp. To remove ticks, use fine-tipped tweezers to detach the tick. Holding the tick (as close to the skin that you can), pull upwards. If the tick’s mouth remains, soak the area in Epsom salt, and it’ll come out easily. s Kendra Siler-Marsiglio, Ph.D. is the Director of Rural Health Partnership at WellFlorida Council. For more safety tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics, visit www.healthychildren.org.

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>> DOWN THE STREAM

Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson Artist and Advocate for Our Springs

WRITTEN BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON ot far outside of Fort White, as the roads wind deeper toward spring country, Rum 138 sits tucked into the rural landscape — a bright yellow building with aqua trim that invites visitors to pull in for a break. Stacks of canoes and kayaks rest on the lawn. Inside, colorful artwork covers the walls, offering visitors a sneak peek into Florida’s unique natural settings. A meeting room provides area water conservation groups with space to gather and discuss issues threatening the environment — local and statewide. The business, formerly a vacant eyesore on the treelined street, now combines the many loves of one of its founders, Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson: art, recreation, water conservation and hair styling. “It’s been one of the best things my husband and I have done,” she said. “My background is in art and in the environment, so it is a natural merger of the two.” Rum 138 is a reflection of the creative life Malwitz-Jipson lived before and after settling in North Central Florida. When she was a child, her father would bring home

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art supplies from his job in the graphic design industry. Malwitz-Jipson would spend family daycations exploring art and natural history museums. Over time, her father handed down his love of Salvador Dali. While her father inspired her with the latest tools of the trade, Malwitz-Jipson’s mother helped foster a love and respect for the land. Over two decades, her mother, Mary Bradshaw, built a 4,000-acre wildlife preserve outside of Helmville, Montona, from the downtrodden leftovers of a cattle farm. Every summer Malwitz-Jipson spent in Montana, she learned a little more from her mother. Eventually, she took her mother’s philosophy to heart: “If you’re going to be a person on this planet, you need to learn to conserve.” When Malwitz-Jipson turned 10 years old, she left wide-open Montana behind to move with her dad and brother to Coral Springs, Fla., which sits on the edge of the Everglades. “Well, I’m used to riding my bike all over the mountaintops in Montana by myself when I was 8 and 9. So, when my dad wasn’t home, what would I do? I would ride


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PHOTO BY TJ MORRISSEY

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my bike to the Everglades,” she said. “I’m 10 years old, a blond-haired, tan, little girl riding to the Everglades down this nothing road. I think of the places I’ve been and I’m just so lucky I’m alive. I’m just so lucky.” Despite cultivating MalwitzJipson’s love of art, her father never encouraged her to pursue the hobby as a means of earning a living. Her father, a businessman, worked hard to provide, but that also meant he worked long hours. “Don’t do art, he would say,” she said. “You’re going to be poor. You won’t make any money.” So, ready to escape the preplanned neighborhoods of Coral Springs, Malwitz-Jipson moved to Tampa to pursue an Associates of Art degree in business from the University of South Florida. Then, despite her father’s warnings, she ended up at Ringling College of Art and Design. “I set a goal for myself that I was going to be in the Museum of Modern Art,” she said. Miami Beach offered a live-andwork space for artists on Lincoln Road. At the time, the island off the coast of Miami wasn’t exactly the safest place for a young woman to live, but Malwitz-Jipson knew that artists had a penchant for turning derelict places into something amazing. She stayed for about a year, churning out art, improving her skills and learning life lessons. Her studio allowed visitors to wander in off the street and watch her from above as she worked. Though Malwitz-Jipson said it made her feel like a caged animal, it was also a way to challenge herself. Over the next couple years, she once again called the Everglades her home. Then Sarasota, St. Petersburg, and eventually the Fort White area. On Malwitz-Jipson’s honeymoon with her husband, Doug Jipson, the couple stopped the first night at Ichetucknee Springs. Though she doesn’t remember if she actually got to see the spring that night, the area came to mind

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PHOTO BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON

Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson and her husband, Doug Jipson, sit outside of Rum 138, a bright airy building on the outskirts of Fort White. Rum 138 provides canoe and kayak rental, an art gallery and a hair salon studio.


www.VisitOurTowns.com

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PHOTO BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON

Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson holds a piece of artwork she painted of Rum Island, a spring that sits along the Santa Fe River and also shares a part of its name with her business.

when the two wanted to move away from the city. “There’s got to be a way to give back to a community,” she said. “It doesn’t matter if it is in Miami or Sarasota. Whatever community I’m living in, I need to find a way to give back to it.” And she has. For nearly three to six hours a day, Malwitz-Jipson studies the springs. She fights for them and she educates others to do the same. Since moving into the area in 2006, she has watched the springs change. Back then, water didn’t really have any protectors and definitely no legislation to help curb the environmental damage happening by overuse and contamination. Our Santa Fe River, a nonprofit organization, was founded in 2007. Soon, she used the organization’s

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collective influence as her backup during every legislation meeting, every water management district meeting and every springs working group meeting she attended. “It was the quality and quantity problems that drove me to have a voice for the river,” she said. “The Santa Fe River is just intrinsic for the whole community. But honestly, I think I started because it is in my backyard.” Malwitz-Jipson said it is important that every citizen has the right to get involved in the government. Since that right currently exists, people should exercise it. While so many people think their one voice doesn’t make a difference, Malwitz-Jipson believes she has influenced water legislation just by being present and a part of the process. Despite recent landmark provisions for water,


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PHOTO BY AMANDA WILLIAMSON

Merrillle Malwitz-Jipson sits inside her hair salon studio at Rum 138, a business that combines her many passions in life.

including last year’s $37 million for improvement projects, the rivers, lakes and springs still need help. “The telltale signs of improvement have not been showing yet in the river, but there is definitely growth in the industry,” Malwitz-Jipson said. In her free time, Malwitz-Jipson travels to various schools and education centers to instruct children in art lessons and springs protection. In the past, she has participated in Fort White Middle School’s Earth Day event by using a tie-dye experiment to show pollution in water bodies. As she drops the dark browns and greens onto the kitchen towels stained in aqua blues, Malwitz-Jipson would tell the children the darker colors represent the nitrates currently invading the springs. The kitchen towels she uses for the experiment, she hopes, will remind their future users of their connection to the spring. As people dry their dishes, wash their hands, boil their vegetables, they are connected to the springs. In Florida, everyone’s water is pulled from the Floridan aquifer — a large, but limited, reservoir of

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water that stretches under much of North Florida. As the aquifer is depleted, the remaining water can experience saltwater intrusion. Sinkholes begin to appear as their watery foundation slips away. “Artists are cultural creators, if you will,” MalwitzJipson said. “When I have an opportunity to teach kids art, I remind the up-and-coming artists that they are responsible for creating culture. Look at John Moran. Even the springs kitchen towel — that has relevance to today’s society.” Throughout the past year, Our Santa Fe River has been working alongside Channel 20 to create a monthly aquifer watch program. The goal of the group was to find a way that would place the springs into the average person’s life. Now, on the first day of the month, Channel 20 viewers can follow current aquifer levels, based on data pulled from the Turlington well on the University of Florida campus. Though Our Santa Fe River would prefer to do the aquifer watch at least once a week, the resources are not yet available. Eventually, Malwitz-Jipson would prefer every home to actually have a water meter attached in order to allow users to keep track of expended water. “When you start to see how much water you use, you won’t want to use it. The best protection we have is to know what hurts and what harms our water bodies,” she said. “The planet is going to take care of itself, but in the meantime, it would be nice if we all understood what we needed to do and did it.” But most people don’t actually understand what they can do to help the environment, she said. Overconsumption, one of the main issues threatening the quantity of water running through the aquifer, can be controlled. Among the many habits that reduce water use, people can take shorter showers, turn off the sink when brushing their teeth, and landscape with native plants. However, Malwitz-Jipson works to educate locals and tourists alike through her business at Rum 138. An information wall provides passersby tidbits on how to conserve water, how to help the local springs and how to navigate Florida’s fragile ecosystem. Customers can browse the gallery of water-related images while they wait for their canoe or kayak to be loaded onto the trailer. In the conference area, a white board contains notes jotted from the last Our Santa Fe River meeting. But what really draws Malwitz-Jipson to protect the environment around her? “The minute I step foot into the water or I’m standing on the edge,” she said, “it creates a sense of relaxation.” s


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>> GIMME THE DEETS

Bug

ff A Guide tto o Local Summer Pests

WRITTEN BY CRYSTAL HENRY njoying a nice dinner on the back deck, watching the sun go down is a great way to kick off the summer. It’s the perfect evening until you feel a sting on the back of your neck. Then your arm starts to itch, followed by your ankle. A swarm of mosquitoes can put an end to a lovely evening, but these pests are a sure sign that summer has arrived. Roberto Pereira, associate research scientist at the University of Florida, said Florida is plagued with bugs all year long. But some pretty pesky bugs tend to crop up in bigger numbers during those hot summer months, and people get more exposure because they want to be outdoors enjoying themselves. Mosquitoes are probably one of the first groups of bugs that come to mind when people think of annoying insects. But their impact can be more than just an itchy welt. Pereira said Florida residents are under the threat of some pretty serious diseases spread by mosquitoes, such as encephalitis. Although not often fatal, encephalitis is one of these dangerous illnesses

E

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because it causes headaches and flu-like symptoms especially in children and the elderly. He said this year entomologists are bracing themselves for a potential increase in another mosquito-spread disease called dengue. It is typically found in other countries and causes intense fevers and severe body aches. It can be very serious, and depending on the strain, symptoms can also include hemorrhagic fevers and sores. He said there isn’t anything that serious in Florida right now, but there have been cases in the past few years, especially in the Florida Keys. Native plants have sometimes been used as natural repellents, but it’s sometimes hard to access those plants. Instead, scientists have tried to isolate and synthesize the active ingredients in the plants to better serve humans. For instance, chrysanthemums produce an ingredient that is a natural insect repellent. So scientists have synthesized a group of chemicals with similar properties to be used in insecticides. Using only the plants as repellents is a good idea, but Pereira said it’s almost impossible to saturate the environment enough

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to completely repel these pests. Pereira said people should protect themselves from pests like mosquitoes by taking certain precautions. Keep windows closed while indoors, and make sure the screens are secured if windows are open. Many people think mosquitoes only bite at dusk, but some species are day-biters. Use long sleeves and pants when outside, and use mosquito repellents on your face and any exposed skin. Look for repellents with DEET for the best results, Pereira said. Ticks are another common Florida pest that can transmit diseases such as Lyme and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The lone star tick is the most common Florida tick that is a problem for humans. Females have a light-colored dot on their back. These ticks carry and transmit ehrlichiosis and a rash illness called STARI. STARI is similar to Lyme disease, but it lacks the chronic symptoms like arthritis and neurological problems. It is identified with a bull’s eye rash, erythema migraines, fatigue, fever, headache and muscle and joint pains.


The best way to avoid these diseases is to avoid ticks. Remove them as soon as you see them, and keep clothes buttoned and tucked in when walking through areas with ticks. Wear light-colored clothes, and apply repellents to uncovered skin. If you live in wooded areas, you should check for ticks daily, and your local extension agent can give you tick-free landscaping tips. A less painful, but still pesky summer bug is the fly. Flies are not as disease ridden as mosquitoes, but if they land on your dinner plate they can leave behind pathogens that lead to dysentery- type illnesses. Aside from the flying pests, Florida residents may be familiar with the scurrying ants found around the state. Some ants are just a nuisance because of their numbers. They don’t bite people, but instead get into electrical systems or water pumps and cause property damage. Others, such as fire ants, can be a literal pain because they will chew on humans instead of wires. Pereira said they’re found everywhere, and the best way to avoid their sting is to avoid them entirely. Be careful where you put your picnic blanket, and watch

out while doing yard work that you don’t inadvertently step on a mound. The danger with fire ants is that some people have an unknown allergy that can sometimes be fatal. The ants will sometimes attack older nursing home residents who are immobilized in wheel chairs. Even without an allergy, a large number of stings can cause a violent reaction. There are bait products to apply around structures or picnic areas to eliminate colonies, but it’s also wise to be aware and careful to avoid them. Pests like the cockroach aren’t necessarily exclusive to summertime, but the warm weather and abundance of food makes for ideal mating conditions and they tend to multiply. There is no doubt that these pests are a bother, but Pereira said their purpose is a matter of perspective. In nature every creature has its own function in the ecosystem. Ants are a pain, but they are good for pollinating, and fire ants are expert decomposers that remove carcasses from the environment. People don’t have much use for adult mosquitoes,

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but their larvae are a crucial part of the aquatic system as a valuable food source. “They certainly have their function in nature,” Pereira said. “But as humans we’re always thinking about our point of view.” He said even the diseases they spread can be seen as an advantage to the human race because they strengthen the human population by weeding out the weaker human organisms. Maintaining population control is a vital part of a balanced ecosystem. “You wouldn’t want the world to be taken over by cockroaches, right,” Pereira asked. “Well, why would the cockroach want the world to be taken over by humans?” He said even the smallest creature has a purpose. Completely eliminating just one species could cause a major upset in the food chain. “I don’t know that the world was created just to serve man,” he said. Pereira said we are a part of nature, and because we have more brainpower than other creatures we have a responsibility to use it wisely and not use it to destroy. In certain cases it is fine to eliminate pests, especially from places that we are occupying. But completely eradicating mosquitoes from the entire earth is not only unlikely, it could be dangerous. Instead, we have to develop ways to avoid the problems they bring. Malaria kills so many people in the world, and it is transmitted by mosquitoes. So scientists have developed vaccines and medicines, and people use malaria tents and mosquito nets. We can avoid outdoor activities at certain times of the day and take other precautions that don’t require complete eradication of these pests. Some pests like the love bug have only one purpose, and that is to reproduce. Mayflies only live a few hours, and adults don’t even have functioning mouth parts because they live just long enough to mate, lay eggs and die. He said it’s interesting that humans have such a long life span because in reality, as 55-year-old adult human with grown children, he is actually biologically dead. He has outgrown his natural purpose and is now just occupying space and resources. Insects on the other hand do most of their growing and resource consumption as larvae. They live just long enough to use up all of their eggs and reproduction, and they die when they are biologically dead. Still he is human, and getting attacked by mosquitoes isn’t a pleasant thought. Even with a global perspective, humans still have an instinct to protect themselves from these pests. Pereira said just taking proper precautions can prevent these pests from ruining a nice summer evening. s

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n some parts of the country, summer is marked by the flickering of tiny bugs known as fireflies — or lightning bugs. In Florida the weather is fairly constant, so these little beamers can be seen throughout the year in certain parts of the state. They tend to be more of a delight than a pest, and their flickering backsides are often a source of wonder. Insect scientist Roberto Pereira said their lights are caused by a chemical reaction. There are many chemicals in nature that emit light, and in certain conditions those chemicals are excited by something the bug does or something that happens to the bug. The same chemical reaction occurs in some deep sea fish. It’s similar to an adrenaline rush in humans. Lightning bugs use their beams as a means of communication and for mating rituals. Different species have different patterns of blazes, kind of like a bug Morse code. There is even a species of lightning bug that mimics the light patterns of other bugs in order to draw the bugs in as prey.

I

ne of the most talked about pests in recent news is the bed bug, said insect scientist Roberto Pereira. B Because they occur indoors and are protected from environmental conditions, these pests aren’t exclusiv exclusive to summer. However because people travel more during the summer, they do tend to be more of a problem. P People bring these bugs from hotels back to their homes in suitcases and dirty clothes. Although th these little critters suck blood, they don’t tend to transmit disease. They’re fairly harmle harmless in that respect, but people don’t often like the idea of sleeping with a blood sucker, and they are very hard to control or eradicate. They are small, but the there are ways to find out if you have bedbugs. They usually live right on the m mattress, and because they suck blood they leave black smears of defeca defecated digested blood on the bed. Many people think they are too small to t be seen, but adults are about a quarter inch long, and an infested ma mattress will have them in the folds.

O

Doing a quick five-minute inspection of hot hotel beds and rooms can be enough to avoid taking any extra passenger passengers home from hotels. And putting clothes and belongings into a clothes dryer on high heat when you get home should kill any that tagged along. If you do find a problem with bedbug bedbugs in your home, Pereira advises calling in a professional. G Getting rid of bedbugs from houses is not simple, and trying home remedies can make the problem worse.

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>> GET TOGETHER

Not Business

as Usual

The Role of the Alachua Business League

WRITTEN BY CRYSTAL HENRY PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEWIS MANN or more than a decade, twice a year the streets of Alachua have been filled with residents and visitors, shopkeepers and street vendors. The Alachua Main Street Festival is held once in the spring and once in the fall, and they are days filled with music, food and fun that help newcomers discover all that Alachua has to offer and allow residents to enjoy a nice afternoon out and about in their town. The goal of the festivals is to showcase Alachua and promote its businesses, and it’s all made possible through an organization called the Alachua Business League (ABL). The ABL got started by a group of small business owners who wanted to promote the beauty of Main Street Alachua and make it an inviting place for people to discover, said ABL President Kelly Harris. The idea was to help those local businesses draw people into

F

their shops by introducing them to the city of Alachua. “It’s such a hospitable community,” Harris said. “It’s such a joy to live in.” They started with a home and garden show on Main Street. Then that grew into a fall harvest festival. After the success of the fall festival they decided to try a spring festival, and it has continued ever since. A big part of the festivals’ success is the publicity that the businesses get. “The festivals are our way of giving the little guys a chance to shine, to get visitors to discover Alachua and to encourage residents to come downtown,” said Rosanne Morse, ABL treasurer. Since the main goal of the ABL is to strengthen those businesses, some people ask if the ABL is the same thing as the Chamber of Commerce, or they wonder why there

PHOTOS BY LEWIS MANN

Twice a year, the Alachua Business League organizes festivals — in the spring and fall. The focus is to bring people into the city, but the main benefit is to fund a scholarship to be given to a Santa Fe High School senior each year.

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Valerie Taylor was to be presented with the ABLe award, before she passed away in March. Valerie was a valuable part of the ABL as secretary, board member and festival chair for many years. As the award states, “She never knew what the word “no” was, she was always happy to be “on” a committee. She left a large hole in our hearts when she passed away, but she will never be forgotten. We LOVE you Val!”

are two different organizations that seem so similar. Harris said the ABL and the Alachua Chamber of Commerce are two different organizations working toward the same goal. Instead of having a rivalry or competing for support, the two entities complement each other, and each serves a purpose. They’re both working to promote the city and provide networking opportunities. The ABL was started to target the smaller businesses. They do their own work on things like marketing and sales, and they put their focus on people coming in and enjoying the city. She said the Chamber does a great job of bringing in businesses so people can actually live and work in Alachua. They’re more capable of bringing in that aspect, whereas the ABL is focused a little more on the hospitality and the warm fuzzies. We try to promote business-to-business support,” she said. One reason for the success of the festivals is the cooperation from the city government. “There aren’t a lot of towns you can just shut down main street to have a festival,” Harris said. The focus of the festivals is to bring people into the city, but the main benefit of the festivals is the funds that are raised. The proceeds from these festivals go toward a scholarship given to a Santa Fe High School senior each year. The scholarships have been handed out since 2006, and are intended to help pay for an aspiring entrepreneur to attend Santa Fe College in the hopes that he or she will one day open a business in Alachua. Last year they didn’t have any high school seniors apply for the scholarship, so this year they were able to award two scholarships to Alyssa Harris and Ian Sasser. The awards were particularly exciting for Harris this year because her daughter was one of the recipients. Harris said a separate scholarship committee decides who the recipients will be, so she didn’t have a hand in

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the decision. But going through the application process with her daughter gave her a new perspective on the impact of these awards. Each scholarship is worth $2,000, and ABL member Kathy Colson said they are almost begging for applicants each year. The scholarships wouldn’t be possible without the continued success of the festivals each year, and one ABL member in particular has been instrumental in that success. ABL secretary Valerie Taylor had chaired the festivals for the past three years, up until she passed away in March. Harris said Taylor worked with sponsors and was instrumental in getting people involved. “She’s always done it with a willing heart,” Harris said. Taylor had been an ABL member since 2005, and was nominated earlier this year for the ABLe award. The award was established years ago for a community member who embodies the goals of the ABL. The ABLe award stands for someone who is Active in the community, Believes in others, Leads with style and Exemplifies the ABL values. Because of her dedication, several board members nominated Valerie. Tragically, Valerie passed away just before the spring festival, but Harris said although she is gone the ABL would still like to honor her with the award. “Valerie had an infectious laugh, which she used to calm any situation,” Morse said. “And no matter what festival ‘catastrophe’ was going on she would always comment, ‘Isn’t this fun,’ followed by her great laugh, which of course made us laugh along with her.” Taylor will be sorely missed, but her hard work will live on each year with each Main Street Festival. The ABL will continue its mission of promoting the city of Alachua, and will fill its streets twice a year with music, fun and laughter in the hopes of promoting those small businesses that give Alachua its uniqueness and charm. s


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>> ARRR

Shiver Me Timbers Pirates Invade Cedar Key for a Weekend of Fun

WRITTEN BY LARRY BEHNKE here’ll be plenty of “Arrr-ing” and struttin’ and partying the weekend of September 12 through 14. Cedar Key will play up its island paradise with the second annual Pirate Invasion Weekend. Last year proved so much fun that participants are eager for a replay. During the weekend, tickets for several prize drawings will be sold. One prize is a quilt showing a pirate ship under full sail beneath the moon. The quilt was specially commissioned and created for the event by the Salty Needle Quilt Shop. Tickets for the quilt drawing are $10. Many other “cool booty” items will be available as prizes and one need not be present to win. All proceeds will be donated to Cedar Key Pirates in Paradise for its Cedar Key High School scholarship fund. Good-hearted fun pervades the small community, whether people choose to dress as pirates or not. Battle

T

re-enactments with swords flashing on the beach look more real with authentic costuming. Battles also take to the water in boats decorated in pirate style, blasting black powder cannons as they pass each other not far from shore. At night, the Dock Street is closed for the fire dancers spinning flames in circles while a nearby band rocks. Breakfast last year at the Eagles Club offered biscuits and gravy with sausage, but this year is still in planning. Sometime early Saturday, full dress pirate players will march alongside pirate kids in wagon boats pulled by moms in a parade that circles the main streets. Cedar Key is a perfect place for this new event — it has an actual history of pirates. Years ago they tied up at Seahorse, one of the Cedar Keys. It has a high hill that allowed the pirates to scan the horizon for enemies and let them escape in time. Seahorse Key

PHOTO BY LARRY BEHNKE

Pirate Philthy Phil Reed strikes a pose after breakfast at the Eagles Club during last year’s festival.

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PIRATE Invasion Weekend September 12 - 14 CEDAR KEY - on the Gulf at the end of State Road 24, which begins in Gainesville as Archer Road.

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is now home to a lighthouse and a marine biology lab. But it was also once used by pirates during the spring high tides when they would beach their ships long enough to scrape barnacles off the hulls before the tides re-floated the vessels. For decades Cedar Key residents have talked of legends of pirate treasure being buried somewhere on that key. Playing pirate has gotten big over the past few years. Events are held throughout the U.S., Canada and England. The actors coming to Cedar Key who portray pirates also appear elsewhere in the country, but they expressed delight at being able to perform in Cedar Key. At most places they perform, their antics are confined to a fairground or small section of a town, but because Cedar Key is so small, the whole town is their stage. Here are some of the motley crew who will be appearing during Pirate Invasion Weekend: Diego Bermudez, 22, hales from Gainesville and prides himself on wearing authentic period dress and always staying in character. He has been acting since age 15. Bawdy Anne’s Buccaneers can’t quite be called ladies, which is just fine with them as they show they are equals among the fighting men. James “Scorch” Chastain heads a returning crew of fire performers who are thrilling to watch. They use flames to paint shapes in swirls in the dark of night, and will be on Dock Street Friday and Saturday nights. Daytimes will find Big Red Pirate and the Amelia Island Hoppers roaming the streets. Hawkeye Jim is part of the Largo Krewe of the Scarlett Fortuna, which promotes literary education for elementary students “one R at a time.” William McRea has a 40-year career that includes a long-time

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magic act in Las Vegas, an actor in theater and TV and a motivational speaker who also creates anti-drug videos. Rascal Roberts, also known as Mark Pettey, is from Naples, Florida. He entertains using magic, puppets, stories and music. He bases his character on his great, great, great uncle William Marsh, an actual pirate. Locals are also a big part of the scene that enjoy their time together and work towards the welfare of the children in their community. All these characters will spend the weekend showing visitors a good time and lending an authentic air to the pirate invasion. “Thieves’ Alley is an outdoor area on Second Street where local craftspeople and artists will set up their wares, including pirate greeting cards, natural sponges, children’s tutus, herbal products and a variety of unique items. The Cedar Keyhole, an art co-op in existence for more than three decades, will be open to show local artwork, photography and more. Restaurants and live music venues add to the town’s offerings. And at the end of each day people gather to watch one of Cedar Key’s most spectacular natural wonders: a glorious sunset. One doesn’t have to come dressed as a pirate, but here’s some advice from PirateCon: Dress up; an eye patch alone will not suffice. Say “Arrr;” ye can’t be sayin’ it too much. Be jolly; don’t upset kids or ye be measured fer yer chains. Don’t be a bilge rat; disgrace not y’self nor us. No pirate left behind; look out for y’shipmates. So get away for the weekend or a day and experience the little island’s newest festival of invading pirate fun. s


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>> DIRT DON’T HURT

Such Great Fun For All at High Springs BMX Track hen it comes to BMX biking, most people assume that the extreme sport is only for reckless teenagers. From crazy jumps to living life on the edge, BMX racing may intimidate some people. However, at the High Springs BMX racing facility, there’s no such thing as that. From toddlers to adults, the BMX track encourages the whole family to come out and join in on the fun that the exhilarating sport brings. High Springs isn’t like most small, quiet towns. Known for its beautiful springs and parks, the town prides itself on community and provides great activities for locals and visitors to enjoy. When passionate locals and the High Springs city council collaborated to create a BMX racing facility, the community fell in love with the exciting sport. Throughout the year, the facility hosts practices and huge races, including the 2014 SSA Florida Cup Series Qualifiers 7 and 8 in March. The park’s main goal is to raise awareness of BMX racing and allow those interested to become USA BMX members.

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Heights WRIT WR TTE EN BY Y LIN NDS DSEY EY CAR A MA AN PH P HO OT T TOG OGRA OG OGRA APH PHY BY Y ALB LBER ERT ER T IS ISAA AA AC

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This summer, the park is hosting several events, including Olympic Day on Saturday June 28 at 5:30 p.m. This event allows newcomers to come try out the park for free and encourage them to ride BMX bikes. The High Springs BMX racing started out as a wish. More than a decade ago, a group of locals dreamed about building a BMX park for children and families to enjoy, said Jim Gabriel, the founder of High Springs BMX. His passion for biking led him and a few others to dedicate hundreds of hours to build a BMX racing facility in their town. Gabriel said that he

wanted locals to become more passionate about biking and thought that a facility would do that. “It just gives them an opportunity to, perhaps, do more and open their eyes to more,” Gabriel said. There are only about 20 tracks across Florida, so building a track in High Springs was advantageous not only to the town but also the surrounding communities. After persuading the city to build a BMX park instead of a cemetery on newly purchased land, Gabriel and his team made their BMX biking dream come to life. The city granted them $25,000, and the rest of the track

“BMX is like a way of life. I’m surprised that so many people aren’t aware of the track.”

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relied on donations. Leftover dirt was donated from a construction company, asphalt was poured for free and countless volunteers helped out, as well. The costs were cut in half, saving the town large sums of money. When the park first opened, the facility was affiliated with the American Bicycle Association and National Bicycle League but now is amalgamated with USA BMX. A national biking organization, USA BMX supports the extreme sport and racing. At the High Springs BMX racing facility, families now have a place to spend time with their children and even participate in the activities. Mountain bikers are also welcome to ride on the track to cross train. The park isn’t open for only races, said Lynda Schladant, the track operator and president of High Springs BMX. The 1,200-by-30 foot track is open from m 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays and sometimes mes

during the weekend for special events and races. On certain occasions, instructors come to the facility and teach new BMX bikers how to ride safely and answer any questions that they have. The facility’s volunteers are also always seeking new ways to help bikers and make their experiences memorable. Schladant is just one of the dedicated volunteers at the BMX track. After moving to High Springs nine years ago, Schladant became interested in the BMX facility once she heard about it. Her son previously loved BMX biking, so she soon became involved and now runs the track. Her countless hours of volunteer work show how passionate she is about the extreme sport and how she urges others to join. “You really do become like a family out there,” Schladant

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This year’s event will host an Olympic committee to promote the event and provide educational tips for all bikers.

said. “It’s really something. BMXing is a lifetime sport.” Schladant is hoping this year’s Olympic Day is bigger and better than last year’s event. The summer happening allows families to visit the track on the weekend and see what BMX biking is all about. Olympic Day is an international day that celebrates the Olympic ideals of perseverance, respect and sportsmanship. In 2008, BMX racing became an Olympic sport. Celebrated in more than 160 countries, new and experienced BMX bikers congregate to learn more and to encourage people to join. This year’s event will host an Olympic committee to promote the event and provide educational tips for all bikers. And, Schladant said, an Olympian might even make a guest appearance. During the day, there will be stations with different biking subjects ranging from simple bike pointers to advanced techniques. No bike? It doesn’t matter — there are bikes to borrow for the event. There are also programs for all ages. From toddlers to seniors, there is a station that everyone will enjoy at Olympic Day. The main goal of Olympic Day is to show people how it all works and perhaps encourage them to pick up the sport. Schladant hopes that people will foster a love for BMX biking and purchase a membership. For those who can’t make it to Olympic Day, there is a one-day pass to try out the track throughout the year. Riders wanting full access to the park year-round can purchase a USA BMX membership for $60 a year. This

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membership provides access to every USA BMX track across the country, not just the facility in High Springs. The High Springs BMX racing facility is thriving and is known as one of the best places to ride in Florida. The park not only adds recreational value to the community but also benefits the town’s economy and tourism. “BMX is like a way of life,” Schladant said. “I’m surprised that so many people aren’t aware of the track.” Volunteering is essential to the High Spring BMX racing facility. The track is always in need of more people to maintain and run the course. Most volunteers are family members of BMX bikers, but Schladant said the facility could use more help; prior experience is not needed to volunteer. “We are always in need of volunteers,” Schladant said. “They do the aspects of what it takes to run the track.” Now the owner of Santa Fe Bicycle Outfitters, Gabriel enjoys visiting the park and watches his son Jack, 15, take on the dirt course. Seeing the community enjoy the track makes Gabriel feel blessed about being a part of the building process. He’s glad that the BMX track became a reality and loves encouraging others to give the uncommon sport a shot. “We’re so fortunate to have the facility,” Gabriel said. “It brings families together.” s To volunteer or check out the facility, call Lynda Schladant: 352514-9735, or email: lynsch22@windstream.net.


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>> I WALK THE LINE

Prescribed Controlled Fires Keep the Environment Healthy and Populations Safe WRITTEN BY JUSTINE GIANCOLA etting fire to a forest on purpose may seem dangerous, harmful and completely nonsensical, but the list of benefits of prescribed burns goes on and on. O’leno State Park in High Springs conducts these burns year round. Park specialist Steve Eldredge, who calls himself a glorified park ranger and is known around the park as the “burn boss,” explained that these prescribed burns are incredibly beneficial to the forest and the animals that inhabit it. The number one reason for holding prescribed burns is to reduce the chances of a catastrophic wildfire. Eldredge said while you might think that keeping fire out of a certain area would be beneficial to its overall growth, you have to remember that if an unplanned fire were to occur, the area would be so large and dense it would create a huge, uncontrollable wildfire.

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“Without prescribed burns, you are going to get bad wildfires that are hard to control,” Eldredge said. Prescribed burns also deter hardwood from encroaching and ruining natural habitats. If not for these burns, the plant communities would eventually become hardwood, meaning all large trees. By burning in a more contolled state, as Eldredge said, seedlings like those of the longleaf pine will continue to thrive and resist being overtaken by hardwood. Wiregrass, which provides necessary groundcover, is stimulated to seed by prescribed burns. The wiregrass then spreads throughout the plant community. Species such as the Florida scrub-jay, gopher tortoise and Red-cockaded Woodpecker would have significantly less space to inhabit if not for prescribed burns. “They help keep the plant community in a natural state and give them [the wildlife]


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On average, Florida has the second-highest number of wildfires in the nation, according to the Florida Forest Service. During dry years, Florida experiences severe wildfires that can cause irreparable damage. Residents often don’t realize how close they truly are to nature and they may, in fact, be living on the edge of a wildfire disaster. If you happen to be close to a forested area, don’t worry! There are plenty of tips to help:

Reduce fuels, such as gasoline, around your home — they can help ignite a fire Eliminate flammable vegetation in contact with your home Don’t plant trees and shrubs too close together — leave 10’ - 15’ between crowns Use plants that have high water content Maintain a Lean, Clean, Green landscape within 30 feet of your home Lean - small amounts of flammable vegetation Clean - no accumulations of dead vegetation Green - healthy, green plants that are well irrigated

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“You don’t want to burn with a 20 mph wind because your fire is probably going to get away from you. You don’t want smoke in the highways or nearby towns, so wind direction is important.” areas they wouldn’t have without the fire,” Eldredge said. “The fire opens areas for the animals to forage. It kind of lets them get in there.” While it’s wonderful how beneficial these burns are to the environment, there is a lot of planning that goes into each burn. The most cruicial part can be simply picking a day. The burns are influenced by weather, and conditions have to be just right in order to go through with the burn. Important factors to take into consideration are wind direction, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity. “You don’t want to burn with a 20 mph wind because your fire is probably going to get away from you,” Eldredge said. “You don’t want smoke in the highways or nearby towns, so wind direction is important.” O’leno is sectioned into different zones, each zone with its own prescription of weather conditions. When the conditions for a given zone are just right, the park personnel will conduct the burn. Burns usually start around 10 a.m., before it gets too hot and dry, which isn’t until 2 to 4 p.m. Growing

season, April through the end of August, is the ideal time to hold a burn, rather than the dormant season when the plants are storing energy and are no longer growing, Eldredge said. The burn process is carefully orchestrated. The park has brush trucks that are equipped to light and extinguish the fire. One truck will be stationed upwind of the fire, and one downwind. Burn managers try to find a natural firebreak from which they set a downwind backfire, creating a buffer known as the blackline. Once the fire has been burning throughout the day, it will reach the blackline and progress no further, in order keep the fire controlled. Because of the risk involved with these burns, visitors are not welcome to observe. Each person on the scene must be fully equipped with fire-retardant clothing. “It is inherently dangerous, but we do encourage people to come and see the after effects,” Eldredge said. So much of the environment is dependent on these burns and they truly make a difference in wildlife communities. s

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PICK A PROPER SPOT FOR YOUR CAMPFIRE Make sure there are no dry or hazardous conditions nearby, and look for a site at least 15 feet away from tent walls, trees or shrubs. Also, be aware of low hanging tree branches that may catch fire. PREPARE YOUR FIRE PIT + BUILD A FIRE Fill the pit with small pieces of dried wood. Keep unused firewood upwind and away from the fire. Keep a bucket of water and shovel nearby. Now you’re ready to build your campfire. Start by gathering three types of wood: tinder — small twigs and dry leaves and needles; kindling — sticks smaller than 1 inch around; and fuel — larger pieces of wood. Loosely pile a few handfuls of tinder into the pit, then add your kindling and the larger pieces of wood. ONCE YOU HAVE ENJOYED YOUR FIRE, IT IS IMPORTANT TO EXTINGUISH IT PROPERLY If possible, let all of the wood turn completely to ash. Pour water on all of the embers to ensure they are all extinguished. Continue pouring until the hissing sound stops, then stir the remaining embers and ash with your shovel. Continue stirring until everything is cool to the touch, clean up your surroundings and then you’re finished! FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SMOKEYBEAR.COM

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>> TASTY WORLD

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Meet Chef Hebler, the Culinary Mind Behind the Menu at a Fresh Restaurant

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY LINDSEY CARMAN hef Gordy Hebler doesn’t follow the rules when it comes to cuisine creations. With an enthusiastic, fast-paced mindset, Hebler runs the kitchen in a fun atmosphere. With his jolly personality and humor, the average person wouldn’t believe that he juggles a plethora of businesses and hobbies. But Hebler isn’t your average guy. Being a chef is not only one of his passions but also one of his thriving businesses. The 56-year-old believes that ingredients should always come fresh from the neighborhood farm and onto your plate. This philosophy inspired him to open his own restaurant in north central Florida. In the heart of downtown High Springs, Hebler and his wife, Cynthia, recently opened a European bistro-inspired

C

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restaurant called 60 North Main. When the couple moved to High Springs a few years ago, they missed their favorite Pacific-Rim and European dishes. An epiphany popped into Hebler’s mind. He told his wife that, “there was room for another restaurant in this town,” so 60 North Main opened a year and a half later. From the decorative metal pieces to the dark French draperies, Hebler either handpicked or handmade every piece of furniture and decoration in the restaurant. His old theater days and welding hobby inspired him to put special touches in the restaurant. Hebler wanted his diners to have a unique experience at 60 North Main. When it comes to the small details, Hebler oversees everything. His signature goatee can be seen as he walks swiftly back and forth, making sure that every dish is perfected. From peeling potatoes


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For over 30 years, he ran Something New Catering, a national tour and festival catering company that made food for Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and countless other musicians.

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to hand-cutting each steak, he believes that creating great dishes takes great care and work. With fresh ingredients and special dish creations, he hopes that people in High Springs will enjoy his cuisine. “I think I’m finding a natural evolution in myself as a chef, as a father and as a husband,” he said. Hebler always wanted to do a little bit of everything. From being a lighting designer and technician for the rock band Ambrosia during the late ‘70s to working for Hall & Oates afterward, music and cooking became his two main passions. So in 1982, Hebler’s cooking career began in “a little mobile kitchen built for rock ‘n’ roll.” For over 30 years, he ran Something New Catering, a national tour and festival catering company that made food for Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and countless other musicians. Hebler’s creations were different from regular tour food. From seared duck with plum port sauce to Mediterranean fig chutney, his food selections were anything but ordinary. Being on the road didn’t inhibit Hebler from creating gourmet meals for his customers. Instead, he broke all the rules and ran a successful catering company for three decades, feeding rock stars along the way. “I’m not going to say that I’m the know-all and end-all of food,” Hebler said, “but I don’t happen to think that anyone does the same work that we do.” Hebler has never been afraid to try something new. When the catering business slowed, Hebler and his family moved to High Springs. They experienced a slower pace of life but soon became busy again. A vacant space in downtown Main Street caught their eye, and Hebler knew he wanted to open a restaurant there. His catering days may have taken the backseat but

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COLUMN >> ALBERT ISAAC

Different Note The Joy of Travel Grousing h, summer of 2014, and I find myself writing about driving, as we have a weeklong family vacation to Virginia planned. I have a lovehate relationship with driving. But my wife, the Voice of Reason, doesn’t want to hear me grouse about it. When I was a teenager, I loved to drive. All that power at my control. Getting to school in a matter of minutes. Taking lots of girls on dates. (Not really.) Freedom! I learned to drive in Miami. How my parents survived that ordeal is beyond my comprehension. When my kids were learning, just one drive through Gainesville was enough to give me a coronary. I quickly discovered that sitting in the backseat brings a certain level of helplessness that’s hard to shake. Can’t hit the brakes. Can’t grab the wheel. Can only offer advice: “Yellow light. Yellow light! RED LIGHT!” Screeeeeech! OK, truth be told, it was my boss who nearly ran the red light. But you get the idea. Helpless. In high school, I drove a jet-black ‘64 Chevy station wagon with a red interior. Very sexy. When a buddy ripped out the headliner (thanks Pete), Dad and I glued red carpet onto the ceiling. We called it The Hearse — eerily foreshadowing that I would later spend decades working with the dead in the Medical Examiner’s Office. That old beast transported dozens of my high school friends, friends who very much enjoyed making fun of The Hearse even as it carted their sorry carcasses all over town. “You gotta big mouth for a pedestrian!” became a common retort I would level at the mockers. I would also, on occasion, kick them to the curb for their transgressions (right Pete?). I wouldn’t miss any opportunity to get behind the wheel. Mom needs some milk? I’ll drive! Back then I could drive endlessly. On one particular family vacation I drove all night. Not a problem. Dad told me he used to be able to drive all night. But not anymore, he said. He couldn’t stay awake. Well, I have now apparently reached that age. Drive

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all night? Are you crazy? It’s like bricks are affixed to my eyelids. Even if the wife is up and talking to me, I start to doze. I stick my head out the window to let the frigid air wake me up. That works. For about a minute. Then I’m nodding off again. So during a recent trip, I did something I very rarely do: I turned the keys over to the Voice of Reason. And it was barely noon. Egads! Suddenly I’m wide awake, scrutinizing every move she makes, eyeing every automobile within my view, and, much to her chagrin, offering my sage advice. “Hit the brakes! You’re following too close!” But she’s an excellent driver. Eventually, I managed to calm down enough to fall asleep. Staying awake was of no concern on the return trip because of a multitude of moronic motorists. I will not ever again travel on the eve of Christmas Eve (unless the Voice of Reason tells me to). The traffic was as thick as molasses in January. I found myself offering unrelenting commentary on the drivers around me. I can’t help it; I comment on what they are doing and what they are about to do. Idiots going too slow in front of me and maniacs speeding up from behind. And I comment on the fact that my safe following distance to the car in front of me is not an invitation to pass me in the slow lane and try to squeeze in ahead of me. Yet, one vehicle after another after another did this, shaving off perhaps a second of their travel time and raising my blood pressure to unsafe levels. And why is it they go so slow once they get in front of me? Maniacs becoming idiots, right before my eyes. Of course, my dear wife had had about enough of my non-stop complaining. I told her it helps me. My vocalizations keep me from experiencing road rage. She doesn’t see it that way. She reminded me that we were in her car and threatened to take over the wheel. So I told her I’d stop bellyaching. I even bet her a sizable sum ($5) that I would not complain about drivers for the rest of the trip.


But then it got dark. And started to rain. Not good timing for my bet. Oh man, it was killing me being unable to berate my bothersome brethren who continued to commit so many acts of stupidity. I was biting my tongue every three seconds. But then my higher consciousness overpowered my reptilian brain; the hippie within emerged. I began singing Kumbaya. Not really. But I did decide to become thankful for their driving skills, without which we would all be meeting by accident. It’s remarkable, really, the amount of faith we have with each other as we travel the bustling highways, separated by a mere strip of paint. They didn’t want to crash any more than I, despite their maniacal maneuverings and asinine attempts to save time. I relaxed. Felt gratitude for my highway companions. I became content to share the road with them. And then I saw a car decorated with Christmas lights. “Are those Christmas lights?” (Just a question, not a grouse.) “I’m pretty sure it’s illegal to have Christmas lights on your vehicle.” (Borderline grouse.) And then I spotted a car driving with no lights. I slapped my hand over my mouth. A speeding maniac raced by. I took to mumbling under my breath as one car after another conspired to break my silence. It took every ounce of willpower to keep my mouth shut. But I did. And although my wife and I haven’t mentioned our bet since the trip, I’d wager I won it. For now, it sure is good to be home. s

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Taste of the Town

SPECIAL RESTAURANT ADVERTISING SECTION. CALL 352.372-5468 FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION.

Gator Tales Sports Bar 5112 NW 34th Blvd (across from the YMCA) Mon-Tues 4pm - Midnight • Wed-Thurs 4pm - 2am Friday 11am - 2am • Sat 9am - 2am • Sun 9am - Midnight

(352)-376-9500

www.gator-tales.com

BAR & GRILL — GATOR TALES Sports Bar features 3 large separate entertainment areas! You can relax at our Tiki bar in a large covered outdoor patio with tropical tunes enjoying 3 large screen TV’s. If you prefer to be inside, visit the sports bar, where you can find large TV’s, a performance stage with nightly entertainment including karaoke, live bands and acoustical sets. We have a separate pool hall and offer two happy hours every day. Gator Tales has a variety of domestic and import beers including a local favorite Swamphead Stompknocker and BigNose. Appetizers black angus burgers, gator tail, and salads. Breakfast served all day everyday. Check our website for trivia, karaoke and other events.

Flying Biscuit Café 4150 NW 16th Blvd., Gainesville, FL 32605 Located in the Fresh Market Center Mon - Fri: 7am - 3pm • Sat - Sun: 7am - 4pm

352-373-9500

www.flyingbiscuit.com

BREAKFAST — The Flying Biscuit is out to reinvent breakfast in Gainesville! Maybe you’ve tried their soon-to-be-famous creamy, dreamy grits or their “moon dusted” breakfast potatoes, but did you know you can have them at anytime? With a unique open menu, all the items that appear are available throughout the day. With a variety of healthy and hearty dishes, The Flying Biscuit caters to a variety of tastes. With options ranging from the Smoked Salmon Scramble, the Bacon Cheddar Chicken Sandwich or the Tofu and Tater Salad, there’s something for everyone. Call us up to an hour before your expected arrival time to add your name to our call ahead seating list.

Copper Monkey West 14209 W Newberry Road, Jonesville, FL 32669 Across from the Steeplechase Publix Sunday-Thursday 11am - 11pm • Friday-Saturday 11am - 12am

352-363-6338

mycoppermonkey.com

Restaurant & Pub — Located in the heart of Jonesville, this All-American dining is convenient to all neighborhoods in Gainesville, Alachua, Newberry, High Springs and beyond. Our family-friendly dining features great food at a great price. Whether you come in for the “best burger in town” or try any one of our freshly made salads, pastas or sandwiches, you will not leave disappointed. Our USDA choice steaks, served with 2 sides, offer a great alternative for the perfect celebratory meal. We also feature a full-service bar with signature drinks and many options for your viewing pleasure. Great food, great price, we’ll see you soon.

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Great Breakfast SERVED ALL DAY!

NOW OPEN IN

Lunch & Dinner • Entrees & Baskets

High Springs

SANDWICHES • SALADS • SOUPS BURGERS • FISH & CHIPS

- Open Everyday 8:00am-9:00pm

386-454-5775 615 Santa 615 Sant Sa nta a Fe Blvd Blv lvd d • High High g Springs, Spr p in ings g , FL 32643 gs 326 643 www ww w.th thed th edin diner erhi high hi ghsp hspri ring ings s.co com m www.thedinerhighsprings.com

Tailgaters, we strive to provide excellent food and service to our customers. Your dining experience and satisfaction are our top priority. Among the amazing food we serve here, we are best known for our famous Stuffed Burgers, real New York Style Pizza, and delicious Deep-Fried Blueberry Cheesecake Ice Cream. We are conveniently located in High Springs, in the First Avenue Centre plaza, at 222 NE 1st Avenue, High Springs, FL 32643; and like the cherry on a sundae, e, e, Tailgaters Diner & Ice Cream delivers! Our doors will open in June 2014, so be sure to come on out to see us and enjoy some of the best food, friends + dining around! di d iini niing ni ng a ng ro r roun oun und d!!

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www.VisitOurTowns.com

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Taste of the Town

SPECIAL RESTAURANT ADVERTISING SECTION. CALL 352.372-5468 FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION.

Newberry’s Backyard BBQ 25405 W Newberry Rd, Newberry Monday-Wednesday 11am-9pm • Thursday 11am-9pm Friday and Saturday 11am-11pm • Sunday 10:30am-8pm

352.472.7260

newberrybbq.com

BBQ — The one and only Newberry’s Backyard BBQ is located in our historic building in beautiful downtown Newberry. Our pork, chicken, beef, and turkey is smoked to perfection daily. Our salads and sides are always fresh. If you are thirsty we have the best sweet tea in the South and a full bar as well. Make sure to bring your kids, we serve their meals on a frisbee that they take home. For your entertainment, we always have live music on Friday nights and Karaoke on Saturday evenings. Always remember big or small we cater all gatherings.

Brown’s Country Buffet 14423 NW US Hwy 441, Alachua, FL 32616 Monday-Friday: 7am - 8pm Saturday: 7am - 2pm Sunday: 8am - 3pm

386-462-3000 Brown’s Country Buffet is country-style cooking at its finest, just like Grandma’s house! A buffet style restaurant, Brown’s Country Buffet is open seven days a week! Foods like fried chicken, grilled pork chops, real mashed potatoes, steamed cabbage, banana pudding and coconut pie, just to name a few, are served in a laid back, relaxing environment. We offer AYCE fried shrimp on Friday nights from 4-8 along with whole catfish & ribs. In addition to their buffet, Brown’s also offers a full menu to choose from. You are sure to find something to satisfy any craving at Brown’s. Serving lunch and dinner daily and a breakfast buffet Friday-Sunday until 10:30am, you’re sure to leave satisfied, no matter when you go. So, when you’re in the mood for some good home cooking, Grandma’s style, visit Brown’s Country Buffet.

Northwest Grille 5115 Northwest 39th Ave., Gainesville 32606 Open 7 Days: 11am to 10pm (Friday open until 11pm) Saturday & Sunday: Serving brunch 10am to 3pm

352-376-0500

www.northwestgrillegainesville.com

SEAFOOD — Locally owned and operated, Northwest Grille has been providing the finest quality fish and seafood entrees in a friendly atmosphere since 1996. Whether it’s their fresh, local seafood and fish, or handcrafted sauces and specialty desserts, Northwest Grille has something to please your palate. Meat lovers will enjoy the hand-cut steaks and vegetarians will love the wide range of vegetarian options. Serving lunch and dinner daily, Northwest Grille, offers an extensive brunch menu on Saturdays and Sundays from 10am-3pm. Northwest Grille also features a full liquor bar with nightly drink specials. Happy hour is served daily from 3pm-7pm and all day on Wednesday – offering a wide assortment of craft beer, wine and $5 martinis.

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Chicken Coupe 102 NW 250th St. - Newberry Mon - Thurs 7am-9pm • Fri & Sat 7am-10pm Sunday 8am - ?

352-474-6565

website

SOUTHERN COMFORT — The new Chicken Coupe in Newberry is now open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Specializing in fried chicken and waffles, rotisserie chicken, the best burgers, catfish and sandwiches. fresh vegetables and our boneless grilled pork chop dinner. 50 cent wings every Tuesday and $1.50 pints of draft beer every day. Enjoy casual dining inside or sit outside on our screened in porch. Breakfast is served till noon on Sunday for you late comers. Try our omelets , corn beef and hash or biscuits and gravy. Its all sure to please. We are easy to find, just look for the bright red building!

Firefly 25461 W. Newberry Road, Newberry Across the street from from City Hall Monday - Saturday: 12 Noon to 10:00pm

352-472-7353

www.fireflyseafood.com

FUSION — Firefly restaurant specializes in southern style food and Florida Keys style seafood. With fine entrées such as sautéed lobster over sweet corn risotto, sliced beef tenderloin with tamarind red wine sauce, shrimp and scallop skewers, baby back ribs in mango bbq, conch chowder, stuffed avocado, black bean lobster quesadilla and real Keylime pie. We offer daily specials and Wednesday is $5 Martini night. Whether you’re looking for a great new place to take a date or a comfortable spot for a fabulous outdoor lunch, Firefly will exceed your expectations. Conveniently located in the heart of Newberry.

Dave’s New York Deli 12921 SW 1st Road • Tioga Town Center Open 7 Days

352-333-0291

www.DavesNYDeli.com

AUTHENTIC NY DELI — The Reviews are in and here’s what customers are saying about Dave’s NY Deli Tioga Town Center! “Best Reuben, Best Pastrami, Best Philly, and Best Wings” Dave’s continues to be the place to go for authentic NY Deli food and Philly Cheesesteaks. Owner Dave Anders says “Nothing beats quality ingredients combined with a friendly staff. We bring in all of our Pastrami and Corned Beef and Cheesecake from New York’s Carnegie Deli. In addition we offer Nathan’s Hot Dogs, NY Kettle Boiled Bagels, Nova Salmon, Knish, Cannolies, Philly Cheesesteaks, Wings, Cubans, Subs, Kids Menu and more.” Come out and enjoy Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner at Dave’s NY Deli. Now serving beer and wine.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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CALENDAR If you would like to have an event considered for publication in this calendar, please submit information directly. post 4400 NW 36th Ave., Gainesville, FL 32606 | e-mail editor@towerpublications.com | fax 352-373-9178

TIOGA MONDAY MARKET Every Monday 4:00pm - 7:00pm JONESVILLE - 13005 W. Newberry Rd., Tioga Center. Stop by and check it out this market featuring a selection of vegetables, crafts, organic food, fruits and local specialties.

HIGH SPRINGS FARMERS MARKET Every Thursday Noon - 4pm HIGH SPRINGS Downtown High Springs. Visit the market for arts and crafts, candles fresh, local peaches, blueberries, carrots, squash, watermelons, red delicious tomatoes, cucumbers, peas, sugar snap beans and green beans, all picked fresh from the garden. The list goes on.

MOVIE NIGHTS Second Friday of the Month 7:00pm - 10:00pm JONESVILLE - Town of Tioga. The second Friday of the month the Town of Tioga will host free movie nights. Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets for a flick under the stars.

FREE FRIDAYS CONCERTS Every Friday 8:00pm – 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Community Plaza. New

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for 2014 are musical tributes to Eric Clapton, Steely Dan, Bob Dylan, Bob Marley and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. Bands will play each Friday night through Oct. 24 for a total of 26 weekly concerts.

GUIDED WALK First Saturdays 10:00am GAINESVILLE - Kanapaha Botanical Gardens, 4700 SW 58th Dr. Guided tours with docent and master gardener Alicia Nelson. Regular admission price for non-members (members are admitted free of charge). 352-372-4981.

TOURS AT DUDLEY FARMS Every Fourth Saturday 10:00am NEWBERRY - 18730 W. Newberry Rd. Meet in the Visitors Center and take a walk with a ranger or volunteer around the farmstead home site.

MUSIC IN THE PARK Third Sunday 2:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - The City of High Springs will present a free Music in the Park series, June 15, July 20, August 17, Sept. 21, featuring local Country musicians and talent at James Paul Park, located behind city hall, 110 NW 1st Avenue in High Springs.

This a great opportunity to explore High Springs. Bring your own blankets, lawn chairs, refreshments!

LIFE IS A HIGHWAY Through August 17 Times vary GAINESVILLE - Harn Museum of Art, 3259 Hull Rd. “Life is a Highway: Prints of Japan’s Tokaido Road” will highlight a selection of more than 150 woodblock prints that depict the history of the Tokaido Road -- the most heavily traveled route in pre-World War II Japan. Works by such notable Japanese printmakers as Utagawa Hiroshige, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Utagawa Kunisada and Sekino Jun’ichiro will be included in the exhibition, which spans more than 100 years of Japanese printmaking traditions. “Life is a Highway,” signals the Harn’s commitment to the exhibition, study and preservation of Asian art, following the opening of the museum’s 26,000-squarefoot Asian art wing. 352-392-9826.

DEARLY DEPARTED June 13-July 6 Times Vary HIGH SPRINGS - David Bottrell joins Jessie Jones, one of the authors of Christmas Belles (2012-13 HSCT season) for this wacky

comedy at the High Springs Community Theater. This tale of the Turpin family proves that living and dying in the South are seldom tidy and always funny. Despite their efforts to get it together, the Turpins’ problems overshadow their father’s funeral. Ray-Bud drinks himself silly. Junior is in financial ruin with a pack of kids. Their sister, Delightful, copes by devouring junk food. Yes, it is a colorful, screwed up southern family.

MARJORIE HARRIS CARR Tuesday, June 17 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - Matheson Museum, 513 E. University Ave. Dr. Peggy Macdonald will make a presentation on her new book “Marjorie Harris Carr: Defender of Florida’s Environment” at the Matheson Museum. Discover one of Florida’s unsung environmental heroes, Marjorie Harris Carr. Macdonald will examine Carr’s campaigns to protect Paynes Prairie, Lake Alice, the Micanopy Historic District and the Ocklawaha River. Matheson Museum founder Dr. Mark Barrow will share historic postcards and take the audience on a photographic tour of the Ocklawaha River. 352-378-2280.


GAWN Third Wednesday 11:30am – 1:00pm GAINESVILLE Sweetwater Branch Inn, 625 E. University Ave. The Gainesville Area Women’s Network luncheon – third Wednesday each month. Attend for networking and a hot lunch. Register: GAWN.org

Young Girl by Daniel Hughes

GAINESVILLE NETWORKING CHALLENGE Third Wednesday 5:30pm – 7:00pm JONESVILLE - Sabore Restraurant, 13005 SW 1st Rd. Come network with business professionals in a casual setting on the third Wednesday of each month. Invite your friends! Enjoy complimentary delicious hors d’oeuvres!

HOGTOWN HOMEGROWN Thursday, June 19 3:00pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Alachua County Headquarters Library, 401 E. University Ave. Join local sustainable grower Stephanie as she teaches you how to make food with items found locally. Space is limited to 40 participants. 352-334-3900.

GENTLE CAROUSEL THERAPY HORSES Saturday, June 21 11:00am – 11:30am HIGH SPRINGS - High Springs Branch Library, 135 NW 1st Ave. Come meet the miniature horses Magic and Hamlet. Learn about their work and read along with their new book. Don’t leave without a horse hug. 386-454-2515.

Portraits with Presence Through September 20th GAINESVILLE - Thomas Center, 302 NE 6th Ave. Presenting work from both emerging and established artists, “ABOUT FACE Portraits with Presence” is one of the most expansive exhibits in the 35-year history of the Thomas Center Galleries. Curated by Anne Gilroy, the exhibit reaches broadly in defining “portraiture.” The collection of work combines classical and traditional work with unexpected interpretations of portraiture in the artist’s enduring quest to capture the presence of a person in both two- and threedimensional media. 352-393-8532. gvlculturalaffairs.org

Concert Series Last Fridays 7:00pm - 10:00pm JONESVILLE - Town of Tioga Bring your lawn chairs for a free concert series in the park held the last Friday of each month in the Town of Tioga. tiogatowncenter.com

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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HOGGTOWNE HOMEGROWN COOKING DEMO Tuesday, June 24 2:00pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Cone Park Branch Library, 2841 E. University Ave. Learn how to grow, harvest and create your own meals out of the items you have at home. Participants will make their own meals. This program is limited to 40 patrons. Please register in advance at 352-334-0720. aclib.us

JAZZIN IT UP Saturday, June 28 8:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - High Springs Women’s Club. Jazz concert hosted by “Jazzin It Up,” hosted by WUBA 88.1, featuring Jazz Artist Philip Thomas and guests. WUBA 88.1 is on the air, broadcasting local music and local events. General admission $10.00. 352-672-2122.

POLYNESIAN/ HULA DANCE CLASSES Tuesday, July 1 7:15pm – 8:45pm GAINESVILLE - Unified Training Center, 809 W. University Ave. Traditional Hula Dance classes offered every Tuesday. All levels welcome. Hawaii-born

instructor with professional Polynesian dance background. Hot Hula Fitness classes (cardio/ fitness based) offered every Tuesday from 8pm - 8:45pm First class is free. 352-641-0885.

BEGINNER SWING DANCING CLASSES Wednesday, July 2 7:00pm – 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - The Movement, 1212 N. Main St. Enjoy beginner West Coast swing classes and join an active community of friendly dancers. What is West Coast Swing? This ain’t your grandparents swing dance: you don’t throw the follower in the air, and you aren’t dancing at 2,000 beats per minute. This a midtempo dance that is sultry, sophisticated and playful -- and a fun way to get in shape. 352-514-4238.

GINNIE SPRINGS JULY CELEBRATION Saturday, July 5 After Dark HIGH SPRINGS - Ginnie Springs, 5000 NE 60th Ave. Celebrate at DarkThirty as with fireworks, music and friends at Ginnie Springs.

WOMEN’S SELFDEFENSE CLASS Saturday, July 5 2:30pm - 3:30pm GAINESVILLE - Global Mixed Martial Arts Academy, 4000 W. Newberry Rd. This class is offered free to the community every first Saturday of the month. You are welcome to come every month. 352-371-1007.

CAR SHOW Saturday, July 19 10:00am – 3:00pm GAINESVILLE - Take part in the official third annual High Heels and Hot Wheels Car Show. Donate new and gently used shoes on First Friday. pledge5.org

THE INS AND OUTS OF COPYRIGHT LAW Sunday, July 20 2:30pm - 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Millhopper Branch Library, 3145 NW 43rd St. Two attorneys, Katharine F. Rowe and Carolyn Herman from Jacksonville and Jacksonville Beach, will speak and answer questions at the monthly meeting of the Writers Alliance of Gainesville about the complexities of copyright law faced by writers. Rowe, as partner in her law firm, advises clients in

WEEKLY & BI-MONTHLY MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT REPAIR & DIAGNOSTICS POOL RENOVATIONS FLAT RATE BILLING INCLUDES CHEMICALS

Request a Free Inspection! Call to 124 | Summer 2014

copyright and trademark law in their Intellectual Property Practice Group. Herman, sole owner of her own law firm since 1993, practices almost exclusively in the area of entertainment, intellectual property, and small business. Her clients include musicians, music publishers, filmmakers, actors, authors, illustrators. writersalliance.org

PUCCINI’S ‘MANON LESCAUT’ July 24 and July 27 12:30pm and 2:30pm HIPPODROME THEATRE - 25 SE 2nd Place. The Royal Opera House presents this early Puccini masterpiece as it makes a welcome return to Covent Garden in a new production by Jonathan Kent. A consummate Puccini soprano, Kristine Opolais caused a sensation as Madama Butterfly in 2011, and with Manon Lescaut, the bold but impressionable heroine, we’ll see a different side of her character. This is a much-anticipated new production, and Kent’s vision of a young girl who faces temptation in the big city will surely resonate with today’s audience. 352-375-4477.

LICENSE #CPC1458505

352-262-1347 ASPGainesville.com


www.VisitOurTowns.com

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ARTWALK Friday, July 25 7:00pm – 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - 104 SE 1st Ave. Free monthly selfguided tour that combines exciting visual art, live performance, and events in downtown Gainesville. With many local galleries, eateries and businesses participating, Artwalk is an exciting, fun way to experience the amazing wealth of creativity the Gainesville community has to offer. 352-384-3950.

July 4th Celebration

FROM FIRST TO FINAL DRAFT

Friday, July 4

Sunday, August 3 2:30 pm - 4:00pm

3pm to 10pm

ALACHUA - Hal Brady Recreation Complex. The City of Alachua has dubbed its celebration “The Largest Small Town Fireworks Display in America.” The annual event draws more than 30,000 people to Alachua and has great economic impact on businesses in the area. There are dozens of activities for the kids, including a petting zoo, bounce houses and water slides, spray park and skateboard park. For adults there are vendors, bingo contests, dancing groups and live musical entertainment to name a few. cityofalachua.com

Reconstruction September 5th and 6th NEWBERRY - Dudley Farms, 18730 W. Newberry Rd. Encounter living historians from the year 1868. Everything these folks will know or talk about is from one of the hardest periods in American and especially southern history. The living historians take the events to heart and express the views of the day and the pains and anguishes. Come see, hear and feel what life was like during a hard period when this farm first came into existence.

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GAINESVILLE - Millhopper Branch Library, 3145 NW 43rd St. Mary Ann de Stefano, editor and writing coach, will speak to the Writers Alliance of Gainesville about the stages of manuscript development: when to go it alone, when and how to get help, and tips on revisions. Her company, Mad about Words, develops writing workshops, and she edits the Florida Writer’s Association magazine and newsletter. De Stefano has over 11 years’ experience in publishing with Harcourt Brace/ Academic Press and twenty years as an independent writing consultant.

writersalliance.org madaboutwords.com

YOUTH PRODUCTION August 6-17 7:00pm Friday and Saturday nights HIGH SPRINGS - High Springs Playhouse, 130 NE 1st Ave. Law & Order, Nursery Rhyme Unit. Each summer the


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Making summer plans for the dancer in your life? ballet intensive

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June 2 – June 6

summer workshop >> ALL AGES and SKILL LEVELS WELCOME! Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Contemporary and Hip-Hop

June 9 – July 26

dance intensive

>> Especially for intermediate to advanced level students, Ages es 10+ Master teachers in ballet, contemporary, conditioning, jazzz & repertoire ded. Performances held on August 3 and August 10. Lunch provi provided.

July 28 – August 8

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Celebrating 58 Amazing Years!

352-373-1166

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Jake Owen

with the Eli Young Band and the Cadillac Three

Sept. 4th

7:00pm

GAINESVILLE - O’Connell Center. Prices range from $24-$44 and can be purchased by phone at 352-392-1653 or in person at Gate 1 of the O’Connell Center.

Living the Gospel in Downtown Gainesville! The Rev. Louanne Loch Rector Dr. John T. Lowe Dir. of Music

Sunday Services 8:00am • 10:30am • 6:00pm

Wednesday Service 12:15pm

100 NE 1st Street Downtown Gainesville (352) 372-4721 www.HolyTrinityGNV.org The Episcopal Church welcomes you ...and we do mean YOU!

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High Springs Playhouse offers a youth production involving youth from 8 to 18 years of age in all aspects of the production. Auditions are June 23 and 24. Tickets are $5. For more information:

facebook.com/HSCTheater

ADULT RELIEF PAINTING August 9 and 10 10:00am – 4:30pm HARN MUSEUM OF ART 3259 Hull Road. Participants in this beginner workshop will be inspired by prints from the exhibition and create their own relief prints. Saturday’s class will create a small multicolor reduction print on flexible printing plates using water-based inks and a small color print on hard linoleum using a printing press and oilbased ink. Sunday’s class will produce prints with linoleum using Chine-collé, watercolor and monoprint techniques. Saturday, $100 nonmembers ($90 Harn members); Sunday, $50 nonmembers ($40 Harn members. 352-392-9826.

SUMMER FESTIVAL OF SONG Saturday, August 23 6:00pm - 7:30pm NEWBERRY - Church Of Christ, 25045 West Newberry Rd. Free to all Old Time Four Part Harmony. Singing from 6 – 7:30 – till you go home. Cookout in preacher yard. 352-472-4961.

A DREAM JOB, TALKING WITH WRITERS Sunday, Sept. 14 2:30pm - 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Millhopper Branch Library, 3145 NW 43rd St. Hank Conner, host and producer of the radio program “Conner Calling,” will speak at the Sept. meeting of the Writers Alliance of Gainesville about interviewing. Conner is retired from teaching courses in radio and television in the UF College of Journalism and Communications since 1966. His radio program, which airs Fridays from 1-2 pm on WUFT-FM, centers around the interaction between Conner and a literary guest. writersalliance.org


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> TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER BOOK REVIE REVIEW EW >>

A Big Fat Crisis written by Deborah A. Cohen, MD c.2014, Nation Books $26.99 / $30.00 Canada 263 pages ou feel as though you might have to quit your job. Yeah, you’re that desperate to get away from the treats that somebody’s been leaving in the break room. Nice gesture, but you’re totally incapable of resisting them and each bite ruins your diet. It’s a point of shame that you have no willpower, but there may be more to your weight problem than lack of the word “no.” Find out by reading the new book “A Big Fat Crisis” by Deborah A. Cohen, MD, and cut yourself some slack. It seems as though you can’t escape it: everywhere you look, you’re reminded to eat healthier, get active, and lose weight. But you also can’t escape the things that taste good but are bad for you, and sticking to

Y

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Dietary Guidelines “is neither easy nor fun.” In fact, most of us don’t eat right and just five percent of us get the recommended amount of exercise. But to say that we’re weak-willed is misleading, says Cohen. Most overweight people “appear to have plenty of self-control in most other areas of their lives.” They get to work on time, volunteer, pay bills, drive safely, and raise families. So why can’t they control what they eat? The reason, Cohen says, is twofold: we’re hard-wired to eat, and we’re exploited by our “food environment.” The good news is that the latter — “point of purchase and point of consumption” — are changeable. First, though, we must understand “that an individual’s ability to resist overeating is limited when excess food is constantly available.” In other words, for myriad reasons, the more we try to control our appetites, the less we can avoid that extra donut or large O-rings. The fixes are many: pay attention to what you eat; just seven extra calories a day will result in surprisingly big weight gain. Familiarize yourself with caloric content. Become aware of how marketing promotes overeating. And support government regulations on grocery stores and restaurants; after all, laws keep us safe from cholera and typhoid. They should be able to keep us safe from obesity too. So you say you need to lose 10 pounds — but they’re kicking your (well-padded) butt? It might not be your fault, and “A Big Fat Crisis” tells you why, but not without an extra helping of controversy. On one side of the table, this book should be a big comfort to anyone who’s shamed by weight and temptation. Author Deborah A. Cohen, MD takes the onus off dieters by explaining that it may be genuinely true that they can’t help themselves. Cohen doesn’t let them totally off the hook, though; she still scolds, but not terribly harshly. The controversy, however, lies in Cohen’s strongly-opinionated solutions. Specifically, restaurant owners, grocers, vendors, and retailers won’t like ‘em. Not one crumb. Obviously, this isn’t your usual diet-and-exercise book. There are conversation-starters on every page here, and lots to think about. But if you’re concerned about obesity, eating right, and your family’s weight, “A Big Fat Crisis” might give you the skinny. s Terri Schlichenmeyer has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives with her two dogs and 11,000 books.


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LIBRARY SCHEDULE Alachua Branch Library .....................14913 NW 140th St. .............................. 386-462-2592 High Springs Branch Library ...........135 NW 1st Ave........................................ 386-454-2512 Newberry Branch Library .................110 South Seaboard Dr. ..........................352-472-1135 For further information on scheduled events visit www.acld.lib.fl.us All branches are closed: DEC 24, DEC 25, JAN 1, JAN 20. Early closings: DEC 31.

ALACHUA PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN FIZZ BOOM READ! SCIENCE @ THE MOVIES Mondays at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Watch a summer science movie. Some go fizz, some go boom and they all are super fun! DOG GONE GUY! GOOD READING CORNER Mondays at 3 p.m. SNUGGLE-UP CENTER (5-11 YEARS) Come read to Guy, a registered therapy dog who needs some relaxation after his hard work. Children of all ages may stop by to read him a good book or tell him a good tail. LEVEL UP! TABLETOP GAMERS CLUB Mondays at 4 p.m. (5-11 YEARS) If you’re looking for a group to play D and D, Magic: the Gathering, Yu-GiOh! or even Munchkins with, look no further! Bring snacks, hang out, nerd out and have fun. HOMESCHOOLERS AT THE ALACHUA LIBRARY Tuesdays at 1 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Local homeschool students and parents meet monthly for interac-

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tive activities, educational programs and other interesting educational topics.

and other activities to make your summer fizz and boom. Caution: It could get messy.

LEGO CLUB Tuesdays at 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Meet to create challenging structures.

ARCHAEOLOGY WORKS: HOW OLD IS THAT? Wednesday, July 09, 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Archaeologists are detectives of the past who use the scientific method to solve mysteries about people who lived long ago. In this presentation, you’ll get to explore ancient artifacts under a microscope just like an archaeologist and the materials used to investigate the past.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME Thursdays at 11:15 a.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (1-5 YEARS) Come join in for stories, song and dance. MAD SCIENCE Wednesday, June 18 1:30 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Learn just how fun science can be when you try some crazy, hands on, fun experiments. Join us for the science and be ready for mad fun! KEEP LOOKING UP! A VISIT TO THE SKIES Wednesday, June 25 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Santa Fe Planetarium will present a fascinating look to our night skies. Sure to be a starry, starry event. FIZZ! BOOM! CREATE! Wednesday, July 02 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Join in for fun crafts, experiments

ORGANIC GARDENING WONDERS Wednesday, July 16, 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Local organic gardener Matt Bowman will present not only what you need to know for your garden but give you a chance to take home a seedling to plant. GREATHOUSE BUTTERFLY FARM Wednesday, July 23 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Learn about nature’s beauty firsthand in the library. Through demonstrations, will share how

the natural Florida environment and butterflies help our world. WHAT’S IT LIKE LIVING ON THE FARM? Wednesday, July 3 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) UF/ IFAS will present an engaging program about the horses, dairy cows, goats and other farm animals. SCIENCE OF ART AND LIGHT Wednesday, August 06 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Why did pirates wear eye-patches? Come discover fascinating facts about your eyes, color, and the full spectrum of light. Make-and-take a craft home too. TIMUCUAN PYROTECHNOLOGY Wednesday, August 13 12 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Discover the prehistoric Timucuan culture, focusing on ways that these local prehistoric people used fire to meet their daily needs. A hands-on experiment provides a BANG as students use balloons (and water balloons!) to explore how prehistoric people could cook prior to the advent of pottery.


Over 30 Years of K-5 Preparatory Programs

Summer Entertainment Camp May 27 - August 1 Kindergarten - 6th Grade

8:30-2:30 Extended Hours Available

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Preteen Club Wednesdays at 3 p.m. (8-12 YEARS) Afterschool group that explore stories and participate in story-related arts and crafts.

ZUMBA: THE FUN WAY TO FITNESS Mondays at 6 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Zumba mixes body sculpting movement with dance steps mainly derived from Latin music.

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS

HOMESCHOOLERS AT THE ALACHUA LIBRARY Tuesdays at 1 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (5-11 YEARS) Local homeschool students and parents meet monthly for interactive activities, educational programs and other interesting educational topics. Coordinated by library staff, these events are open to all homeschool students and parents.

FIZZ BOOM READ! SCIENCE at THE MOVIES Mondays at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Wow! Watch a summer science movie. Some go fizz, some go boom and they all are super fun! LEVEL UP! TABLETOP GAMERS CLUB Mondays at 4 p.m. (12-18 YEARS) If you’re looking for a group to play D and D, Magic: the Gathering, Yu-GiOh! or even Munchkins with, look no further! Every Monday afternoon gather at the Library to start up or continue your favorite tabletop games. Bring snacks, hang out, nerd out and have fun.

DOG GONE GUY! GOOD READING CORNER Tuesdays at 2 p.m. SNUGGLE-UP CENTER (12-18 YEARS) Come read to Guy, a registered therapy dog who needs some relaxation after his hard work. Children of all ages may stop by to read him a good book or tell him a good tail. Guy loves people, books and a good pat on the head.

TEAM ALACHUA BATTLE OF THE BOOKS Mondays at 4 p.m. (12-18 YEARS) Team Alachua meets each week to discuss and get ready for the Battle of the Books.

MAD SCIENCE Wednesday, June 18 1:30 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Learn just how fun science

can be when you try some crazy, hands on, fun experiments. Join us for the science and be ready for mad fun! ALACHUA CRAFTERNOONS Thursdays at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A (12-18 YEARS) Crafts in the afternoon at the Alachua Library! Bring your favorite needlecraft, hobby or ideas. TEENS CREATE AT THE ALACHUA LIBRARY Thursday, June 19 4 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Teens will have projects galore that will refashion that old T-shirt into a creative new garment, accessory or even a rug. JOHNSON STEPPERS Thursdays at 6 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Practice contemporary dance steps to learn the latest moves or to tone muscles. No experience required. Let’s move it, move it! KEEP LOOKING UP! A VISIT TO THE SKIES Wednesday, June 25 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Santa Fe Planetarium will present a fascinating

look to our night skies. Sure to be a starry, starry event. FIZZ! BOOM! CREATE! Wednesday, July 02 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Join in for fun crafts, experiments and other activities to make your summer fizz and boom. Caution: It could get messy. ARCHAEOLOGY WORKS: HOW OLD IS THAT? Wednesday, July 09 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) In this presentation, you’ll get to explore ancient artifacts under a microscope just like an archaeologist and the materials used to investigate the past. JEWELRY CREATIONS Sunday, July 13 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) This program will explore the basics of jewelry making. Materials will be supplied. ORGANIC GARDENING WONDERS Wednesday, July 16 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Local organic gardener Matt

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Bowman will present not only what you need to know for your garden but give you a chance to take home a seedling to plant. GREATHOUSE BUTTERFLY FARM Wednesday, July 23 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Learn about nature’s beauty firsthand in the library. Through demonstrations, will share how the natural Florida environment and butterflies help our world. WHAT’S IT LIKE LIVING ON THE FARM? Wednesday, July 30 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) UF/ IFAS will present an engaging program about the horses, dairy cows, goats and other farm animals. SCIENCE OF ART AND LIGHT Wednesday, August 6 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Why did pirates wear eye-patches? Come discover fascinating facts about your eyes, color, and the full spectrum of light. Make-and-take a craft home too.

TIMUCUAN PYROTECHNOLOGY Wednesday, August 13 12 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Discover the prehistoric Timucuan culture, focusing on ways that these local prehistoric people used fire to meet their daily needs. A hands-on experiment provides a BANG as students use balloons (and water balloons!) to explore how prehistoric people could cook prior to the advent of pottery. TEENS CREATE AT ALACHUA LIBRARY Thursday, July 17 4 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (12-18 YEARS) Teens come out and try some new recipes and share your own. Good food is guaranteed!

PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS ZUMBA: THE FUN WAY TO FITNESS Mondays at 6 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (19 AND UP) Zumba mixes body sculpting movement with dance steps mainly derived from Latin music. w or o ! ll r sh ay Ca ou tod t si m vi roo

Choose C hoose Local L ocall and See S ee tthe he Difference D ifference e 386

454-0295 454-029 95

ESOL (ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES) CLASSES Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (19 AND UP) ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes for adults who want to learn English. Classes focus on all domains of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Open enrollment format. Basic and intermediate levels. Materials provided. For more information contact Theresa Sterling, Literacy Coordinator, at tsterling@aclib.us or 352-334-3929. ALACHUA CRAFTERNOONS Thursdays at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A (19 AND UP) Crafts in the afternoon at the Alachua Library! Bring your favorite needle craft, hobby or ideas. Share and learn from other crafters in the community. JOHNSON STEPPERS Thursdays at 6 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (19 AND UP) Practice contemporary dance steps to learn the latest moves or to tone muscles. No experience required. Everyone welcome. Come on. Let’s move it, move it!

JEWELRY CREATIONS Sunday, July 13 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (19 AND UP) This program will explore the basics of jewelry making. Materials will be supplied. THE SCIENCE OF HOME BREWING AND WINE MAKING Sunday, July 27 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B (19 AND UP) Learn the science and craft of home brewing and wine making. Local business Hoggetowne Ale Works will explain the process behind home brewed drinks, what type of equipment is needed, and answer questions from the public.

PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES FAMILY AFTERNOON @ THE MOVIES Third Sunday of the Month at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM A+B Every third Sunday we offer a special movie for the entire family.

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POETS AND WRITERS AMONG US Thursdays at 4 p.m. MEETING ROOM A (19 AND UP) Poets and writers meet to inspire and be inspired.

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UF HEALTHSTREET Tuesday, July 01 12 p.m. Need your blood pressure checked? Medication counseling? Referrals for medical care services? HIV education? All services are FREE to the community!

4TH OF JULY CRAFTS Tuesday, July 01 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Three cheers for the red, white and blue! Come in and celebrate Independence Day by creating patriotic crafts to decorate our homes.

LITERARY ELEMENTS BOOK CLUB Second Tuesday of the Month at 12 p.m. MEETING ROOM A Bring your own lunch and let’s discuss some interesting books together.

AFTERNOON AT THE MOVIES First Thursday of the Month at 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Come watch a favorite movie or new release on the big screen. Refreshments will be served compliments of the High Springs Friends of the Library.

HIGH SPRINGS

PROGRAMSFOR CHILDREN MARY’S MARVELOUS STORYTIME Tuesdays at 11 a.m. MEETING ROOM (Infant to 5 years) Come join in the fun every Tuesday for books, songs, puppets and dancing. FIZZ, POP, YUM! Tuesday, June 17 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Get into food science! Find out why popcorn pops and why bread rises. Watch noodles swim and an orange float. Learn and have fun while you play with your food! DODADS LAB Tuesday, June 24 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) DoDads Lab is a live, interactive program that combines colorful props, science experiments, puppetry, and reading education. Professor DoDad will inspire and excite kids about wanting to read and learn more.

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MAD SCIENCE Tuesday, July 08 3:30 p.m. MEETING ROOM (3-11 YEARS) Learn just how fun science can be when you try some crazy, hands on, fun experiments. Join in for the science and be ready for mad fun! FIZZ, BOOM, IT’S ALIVE! Tuesday, July 15 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Explore Summer Reading Theme “Fizz, Boom, Read” through stories, activities and crafts from the world of plants and animals. SCIENCE MIKE Tuesday, July 29 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (3-11 YEARS) Science Mike shows off his collection of optical illusions, toys, and science demonstrations. You’ll see objects that you can pass your hand right through. You’ll see Magic Mike’s head blow up like a balloon and much more.

SCIENCE: SPECTRUM OF LIGHT Wednesday, July 30 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Explore the teen Summer Reading Theme “Spark a Reaction” with this hands-on science program that will enlighten your understanding of the light spectrum, color and how your eyes work. You’ll also get to make a cool craft. FIZZ, BOOM SPLASH! Tuesday, August 05 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Explore our Summer Reading Theme “Fizz, Boom, Read” through stories, activities and crafts involving water. BABYTIME! Wednesday, Sept. 10 11 a.m. MEETING ROOM (1 AND UNDER) A 20-minute program for pre-walking babies and their caregivers. An introduction to books, songs, finger plays and movement to enhance baby’s development and socialization.

PROGRAMS FOR TEENS AFTERNOON AT THE MOVIES First Thursday of the Month 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Come watch a favorite movie or new release on the big screen. Refreshments will be served compliments of the High Springs Friends of the Library. BATTLE OF THE BOOKS Wednesdays at 12 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Each summer teens around the county read 3

books and then face off at the end of the summer, to see who know the most fun facts about the books. There’s food, A/C, and hanging out with friends - basically good times. Plus your brain won’t turn to mush over the summer! CRAFTER’S CIRCLE Wednesdays at 1 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) If you embroider, quilt, knit or enjoy doing any other “non-messy” craft, this is the group for you. Regular attendance is not mandatory, just bring the craft you’re working on. Share what you know, or learn from someone else and enjoy chatting with other craft enthusiasts in the community. SCIENCE: SPECTRUM OF LIGHT Wednesday, July 30 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Explore the teen Summer Reading Theme “Spark a Reaction” with this hands-on science program that will enlighten your understanding of the light spectrum, color and how your eyes work. You’ll also get to make a cool craft. WASHI TAPE VASES Wednesday, August 06 11:30 a.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Washi tape is the latest thing for decorating and designing in many colors and beautiful designs. A roll of washi tape can turn a plain looking something into a gorgeous masterpiece. Materials provided by the High Springs Friends of the Library.


FUEL INJECTION CLEANING

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CITY BOYS APPRECIATES YOUR BUSINESS

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We Invite invite We you to You To come visit Come Visit our new Our New warehouse Warehouse and Retail retail and store in Store in Newberry! Newberry!

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PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS CRAFTER’S CIRCLE Wednesdays at 1 p.m. MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) If you embroider, quilt, knit or enjoy doing any other “non-messy” craft, this is the group for you. Regular attendance is not mandatory, just bring the craft you’re working on. Share what you know, or learn from someone else and enjoy chatting with other craft enthusiasts in the community. WASHI TAPE VASES Wednesday, August 06 11:30 a.m. MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) Washi tape is the latest thing for decorating and designing. The tape comes in many colors and beautiful designs. A roll of washi tape can turn a plain looking something into a gorgeous masterpiece. It’s a great way to have fun and to turn something old into something new. Materials provided by the High Springs Friends of the Library. COMPUTER BASICS Third Friday of the Month at 10 a.m. MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) Learn how to use a computer in a relaxed setting at your own pace. Topics covered may include how to use a mouse, word processing, email, and the Internet. Registration required. Register online at www.aclib.us or by calling 386-454-2515. Registration Required THE SCIENCE OF HOME BREWING AND WINE MAKING Tuesday, July 01 6:30 p.m. MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) Learn the science and craft

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of home brewing and wine making. Local business Hoggetowne Ale Works will explain the process behind home brewed drinks, what type of equipment is needed, and answer questions from the public.

PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES GENTLE CAROUSEL THERAPY HORSES Saturday, June 21 11 a.m. MEETING ROOM Come meet the miniature horses Magic and Hamlet. Learn about their work and read along with their new book. Don’t leave without a horse hug! UF HEALTHSTREET Monday, June 23 11 a.m. OUTDOOR PROGRAM AREA Need your blood pressure checked? Medication counseling? Referrals for medical care services? HIV education? All services are FREE to the community! Stop by the HealthStreet table in front of the library. For more information check out the HealthStreet website http:// epidemiology.phhp.ufl. edu/healthstreet/.

NEWBERRY PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN PRESCHOOL STORYTIME Wednesdays at 11 a.m. MEETING ROOM (1-5 YEARS) Stories, songs, and activities for the preschool set. MIDWEEK MOVIE MADNESS SUMMER EDITION Wednesdays at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Relax and

join us on Wednesday afternoons for a midweek movie on the big screen. Watch some of the latest movies and the best of some of the older ones. “FIZZ, BOOM, POP!” PARTY Tuesday, June 17 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Safe, “expanding” chemical reactions will be demonstrated, then it’s time for a “Pop” dance contest featuring a bubble machine and bubble wrap. How many bubbles can you pop? BUBBLEGUM BUBBLE BLOWING CONTEST Thursday, June 19 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Who can blow the biggest bubble and win the prize? We provide the bubblegum. MAGIC MIKE Thursday, June 26 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) MAGIC MIKE’s stage show is all about amazement laughs and audience participation. His pet raccoon causes all sorts of trouble which drives Magic Mike crazy to the delight of the kids. TIMUCUAN PYROTECHNOLOGY Tuesday, July 01 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) This activity introduces children to Timucuan culture, focusing on ways that local prehistoric people used fire to meet their daily needs. A hands-on experiment provides a bang as students use

balloons (and water balloons!) to explore how prehistoric people could cook prior to the advent of pottery.” JONGLEUR JUGGLERS Thursday, July 10 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) The JONGLEUR JUGGLERS juggle balls, clubs, rings, knives, torches and kids. Well they don’t actually juggle kids but they do get a lot of kids from the audience up on stage and a lot of crazy and funny things happen. SUMMER READING CRAFTERNOON Tuesdays at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Let’s get creative and have fun, it’s Tuesday Crafternoon at the Library! Each week we’ll create a clever new craft to take home. SCIENCE MIKE Thursday, July 17 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) SCIENCE MIKE shows off his collection of optical illusions, toys, and science demonstrations. You’ll see objects that you can pass your hand right through. You’ll see Magic Mike’s head blow up like a balloon and much much more. M.C. ESCHER’S OPTICAL ILLUSIONS Tuesday, July 22 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (5-11 YEARS) Come learn about optical illusions, how science and art are related, and make an optical illusion of your own.


PROGRAMS FOR TEENS MIDWEEK MOVIE MADNESS SUMMER EDITION Wednesdays at 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Relax and join us on Wednesday afternoons for a midweek movie on the big screen. Watch some of the latest movies and the best of some of the older ones. BUBBLEGUM BUBBLE BLOWING CONTEST Thursday, June 19 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Who can blow the biggest bubble and win the prize? We provide the bubblegum. NEWBERRY TEEN BOOK CLUB Third Thursday of the Month at 4 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Read and discuss the latest and most popular books in this book club just for teens! YOGA FOR BEGINNERS Fridays, June 27, July 18 at 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Start the New Year off right with an hour of simple stretches and relaxation exercises.

TEEN CRAFT CLUB Thursday, July 10 4 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Create your own masterpieces with these fun crafts just for teens! M.C. ESCHER’S OPTICAL ILLUSIONS Tuesday, July 22 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Come learn about optical illusions, how science and art are related, and make an optical illusion of your own. FANTASY FOOTBALL DRAFT Tuesday, August 26 6 p.m. MEETING ROOM (12-18 YEARS) Join the Newberry Branch Library’s Fantasy Football League! Live draft! Real trophies for the winners! Great fun! See staff for details.

power, helps control weight, increase cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength. NEWBERRY NEEDLECRAFTERS Tuesdays, Times Vary MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) Have some fun with this crafting group that meets at the library Tuesday afternoons at 11:30 pm. If you crochet, knit, embroider, needlepoint, quilt, or enjoy doing any other “non-messy” craft, this is the group for you.

PROGRAMS FOR ADULTS

TEMPTING READS BOOK CLUB Fourth Wednesday of the month at 6 p.m. MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) We will have book club discussions (with refreshments) featuring popular and recently published books including books recommended by participants. Open to the public.

NEWBERRY WALKING CLUB Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9 a.m. (19 AND UP) Build a network of walking friends. A 30 to 45 minute walk five days a week can boost brain-

YOGA FOR BEGINNERS Fridays, June 27, July 18 at 3 p.m. MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) Start the New Year off right with an hour of simple stretches and relaxation exercises.

FANTASY FOOTBALL DRAFT Tuesday, August 26 6 p.m. MEETING ROOM (19 AND UP) Join the Newberry Branch Library’s Fantasy Football League! Live draft! Real trophies for the winners! Great fun! See staff for details.

PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES GAINESVILLE BIRD FANCIERS Wednesday, July 16 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM The Gainesville Bird Fanciers, Gainesville and North Florida’s resource for parrot and bird information will be bringing some of their favorite fine feathered friends to “show and tell” and possibly even some live performing. SUMMER READING CELEBRATION Thursday, July 24 2 p.m. MEETING ROOM PARTY! Let’s celebrate our summer of reading with food and fun. We’ll play crazy games, eat delicious food, and track our summer reading progress.

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>> TICK TOCK

The Year Itch My Battle With Lyme Disease WRITTEN BY HOLLY DONOHOE don’t know where or when I was bitten by the tick that gave me Lyme disease. It could have been on the local river where I spent the summer whitewater kayaking and camping, or the local park where I loved to go trail running in the spring and fall, or maybe it was in my yard where I regularly picked fresh berries and herbs. But I do remember when my first symptoms struck: July 2006. I was 29 and it was the summer my son turned 9, I began my doctoral studies, and enjoyed the best summer of my life. I was active, putting in long days on campus, playing with my son in the evening, fitting in a trip to the gym and the occasional all-niter dancing, only to wake and return to work with a clear head the next morning. My illness began one morning with a large and hot red rash on my lower leg. The doctor suspected a skin infection, prescribed a course of antibiotics, it cleared, and life went on. But when I returned two months later complaining that I had just not felt right since my leg infection — that I was tired and achy — my blood work came back normal and we played “wait and see.”

I

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In the months that followed, the fatigue intensified, my body hurt, I lost 20 pounds from my already small frame, and I developed a full-body rash that would keep me up all night crying in pain. I returned to the doctor and bounced between specialists who diagnosed me with everything from celiac disease, to eczema, to scabies. None of the treatments worked and my rash continued to worsen so I began wearing turtlenecks to hide my shame. Amid this health crisis, I started to retreat from my active and social lifestyle. I could no longer go to the gym for fear of breaking out in giant and embarrassing hives, dating became an impossibility (what with the full-body rash and all), and I began to spend more time with family who were sympathetic to my struggles. My friends stopped inviting me to get together because I was constantly canceling plans. While they were mostly supportive, one told me that I should see a psychologist because my symptoms were likely psychosomatic and an excuse for not spending time with her. Did all of my friends think that I had gone crazy?


PHOTO BY SABIN DONOHOE

Dr. Holly Donohoe examines a lone star tick collected in Alachua County. According to the CDC, the lone star tick does not transmit Lyme disease. Patients bitten by lone star ticks will occasionally develop a circular rash similar to the rash of early Lyme disease.

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PHOTO BY SABIN DONOHOE

This lone star tick was collected in O’Leno State Park. The lone star tick is a concern, but not for Lyme disease, according to the CDC. People should monitor their health closely after any tick bite, and should consult their physician if they experience a rash, fever, headache, joint or muscle pains, or swollen lymph nodes within 30 days of a tick bite.

On the recommendation of a family member, I went to see the leading local internist and was relieved when he took my symptoms seriously. But when my blood and urine analysis showed nothing alarming, he told me I suffered from “superwoman syndrome.” “What is that?” I asked. “Well,” he said, “between the stresses of this rash, being a single mother and working on a Ph.D., it is no wonder you are exhausted and distressed.” He referred me to a psychologist. Perhaps the doctors, my friends and family were right; maybe I was just sick and tired. I was prescribed an antidepressant and in the months that followed, I noticed some improvement. I stayed away from doctors and I quit complaining (I figured no one wanted to listen anyway). Somehow I managed to resume running and complete my first 10k, finish my Ph.D. (yes, I am a Dr. now), celebrated my son’s graduation from elementary school (when did he grow two feet?),

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and launched a successful international consulting company. Behind closed doors though, I bemoaned the strange symptoms that continued to wax and wane and keep me in bed for days to weeks at a time. More than four years after my symptoms started, I moved from my hometown in Canada to begin a professorship at the University of Florida. Perhaps it was being away from my family, or maybe it was the stress of a new job, or worrying if my son was settling in, but my symptoms worsened and I could no longer run or tolerate the sun (isn’t the sun why you move to the Sunshine State?). I found myself back in the doctor’s office after a long hiatus. I didn’t tell him much for fear that he too might diagnosis me as crazy, but I did tell him that my hands had seized up and I no longer could type or open my peanut butter jar (I had brought peanut butter with me from Canada — after all, Canadians invented peanut butter). He suggested some basic blood work as well as arthritis and Lyme disease tests.


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There is currently no vaccine, so when you’re outside, protect yourself an nd your family from tick bites and d reduce your risk k of Lyme and other tick-b borne diseases by following these tip ps:

1 Avoid high-risk areas in Florida with good ground cover and diverse wildlife (such as squirrels, birds, and deer).

2 Use insect repellent with DEET on skin and clothes.

“Lyme disease?” I asked. “That is from ticks right?” A week later, he called to tell me that my Lyme test was positive and that I should begin treatment immediately with his wife, the only tick-borne disease specialist in the area. As you can imagine, I was overjoyed and called my family (not crying this time) to share the news that I was not crazy. I finally had proof that I had a simple bacterial infection that could explain all of my symptoms! Though I was warned that it would get a lot worse before it got better, I was infallibly optimistic that my future was bright. I had escaped the serious memory loss, and heart and neurological problems that accompany late stage infection. I gladly took my pills every day and began to imagine my future — running the Disney marathon, a bike tour in France with my

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3 Wear lightcolored clothes so you can easily spot ticks. Tuck your pants into your socks.

4 Take extra precautions in May, June, and July. This is when most infections occur.

son, and gallery hopping in Miami. My rash cleared up (turtlenecks don’t work in Florida) but one month into treatment and while I was away for work, I became paralyzed with crippling pain, tremors, nausea and vomiting, dizziness and confusion. I was taken to the airport in a wheelchair — where they refused to let me board and return to Gainesville because I was just too sick. Little did I know that this was the beginning of a long and difficult battle. Over the next year, I suffered facial paralysis, seizures, fainting spells, hallucinations and incredible joint pain as my immune system launched a full-on attack. I returned to Canada to stay with family for the summer because I was unable to care for myself and my son. I saw one of the top Lyme specialists who began treating a number of disorders


For more information cdc.gov/ticks

5 Keep to the center of nature trails to avoid ticks in overhanging vegetation.

6 Check your body and your pets carefully for ticks after being outdoors.

— hypothyroidism, adrenal failure, amongst others — that had developed over the course of my illness. I improved some and returned to work that fall where I continued to hide my illness for fear of losing my job or worse — having my colleagues think that I was incompetent. But a few months later, I found myself back at the doctor with paralyzing back pain. After a battery of tests, including same day x-ray, MRI, and CT scan (unheard of in Canada), I was diagnosed with a “huge” ruptured disk in my lower spine. My Lyme doctors agreed that the damage was the result of my untreated infection and I found myself wondering if I would ever get better. I spent the next few months bedbound and dependent on my family who took turns flying in to shuffle me to doctors’ appointments, to get my son to his Friday night socials, and to make sure I

7 Carry a tick remover with you and remove any attached ticks as soon as possible.

8 Protect your pets by talking to your vet about tick treatments.

was eating more than just cheezies and ice cream (did I mention that I had gained 50 pounds?). After surgery to correct my spinal problem, I continued taking the 30+ rainbow-colored pills that had become a regular daily routine and, to my surprise, in the months that followed, I noticed that I was starting to feel better. On doctor’s advice, I took up walking. I got a dog to keep me from making excuses not to go (love my poodle). I resumed painting, which is something I had always loved to do but had not had the time or energy. I slowly regained my strength, went back to work, had a few art shows, and I was able to go paddling with my son. After two years of active treatment, I finally stopped the antibiotics and I’m happy to report that I lost 20 pounds and my health continues to improve. I am still being treated for joint problems,

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PHOTO BY ARIELLE GOUSSE

Dr. Donohoe organized the first Tick-Borne Disease Research Symposium at the University of Florida.

which I lovingly refer to as my Lyme souvenir (like it is a Disney keychain — maybe I really am a bit crazy), but overall I am grateful for every day that I am free from my battle with Lyme disease. I am not angry with the doctors who could have spared me years of agony. Lyme is commonly known as the great imitator because the symptoms can be so much like other diseases, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, muscular sclerosis, or heart disease. These doctors were simply doing the best they could with my complex symptoms and a patient that did not always come clean about their severity. Instead of feeling sorry that I suffered for seven years with a progressive and life-changing infection, the experience has taught me to trust my instincts. I knew I was sick and I would have given anything to have just gotten better. Today, I can say (still with a little trepidation) that I am better and ever the more grateful for the support and unconditional love of my family and the friends that stuck by me (despite the hot mess that I am). The experience has given me the strength, courage, and insight to appreciate the little things that for so long were physically impossible — such as enjoying a long hot bath, working a great pair of heals, wearing a sundress in the Florida sun, sitting passenger as my son drives to his first job (when did he turn 16?), and educating others on how to protect themselves, their loved ones, and their pets from the tiny scourge of a bug known as the tick. s


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>> A HOLE DIFFERENT WORLD

Devil’s Den The Myth and Magic of a Williston Spring

WRITTEN BY COURTNEY LINDWALL

n an unassuming grassy patch of Williston, a narrow wooden staircase leads underground to Florida’s limestone underbelly. It is the mouth of the Devil’s Den. It is a 50-foot-deep spring within a cave — a bubble of stone just beneath the surface. Visitors can climb down into its open den and dip into the clear blue of Florida’s underground aquifer. “We’ve had a few pretty cool parties down here,” said Ken Schwiebert, one of the Devil’s Den co-owners. Schwiebert recalled people playing music on the then-uncovered platform that stands in the middle of the cave, where scuba divers often launch. Lately, the water covers the platform entirely. “It’s the acoustics,” he said. But the legend of the unusual cave goes back to long before the Devil’s Den parties and even before it became a popular scuba diving spot. It goes back to before its past owners, who used the hole as a trash pit, and even before then, when it was

O

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known as a swimming hole for the local kids. The legend of Devil’s Den began first with its name. It is the legacy of rare cold Florida days, when the air dips low enough that steam from the spring pours through a hole at the top. It is the Devil’s breath, some say. Maybe it is smoke from the entrance to Hell itself. Even thousands of years ago, when the North Florida landscape was still untouched, steam billowed from the cave on cold mornings. Heidi Schwiebert, Ken’s wife, said she has yet to see the cave’s namesake at work. Now that the summer heat has arrived, there is no chance of seeing the Devil’s breath. Instead, by morning all one will see is the cave surrounded by groups of divers putting on gear and preparing for their trip into the den. Devil’s Den is almost better known to out-oftown diving enthusiasts than to locals, Ken Schwiebert said.Groups come from across the country to the privately owned geological phenomenon in Williston.


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PHOTOS PROVIDED COURTESY OF DEVIL’S DEN

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North Florida locals may take for granted the crystal clear springs that dot the region, but visitors haven’t seen anything quite like it. “I grew up in Ohio,” Schwiebert said. “We didn’t have creeks where I grew up, much less lakes.” The spot is also especially popular because it is one of the few “open water” dives that is inside a cave. Because of the patch of sunlight at the top of the den and constant access to the surface, the divers are never truly in an enclosed space. There are crevices and pathways where the aquifer flows in and out of, but divers are blocked from those areas. “It’s literally an underground river moving through all these channels,” Schwiebert said. The height and health of the water is a barometer for the health of the aquifer generally. Recently, the water has risen to the bottom few steps of the wooden staircase. At one point, the water was all the way up to the cave’s entrance and diving was prohibited.

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“Our goal is to keep it simple and natural, preserved as what it is — an opportunity to see a unique water feature.”

“It’s like looking at the bowels of Florida,” he said. The cave is also an archaeological goldmine. Signs remind divers to not disrupt any fossil they may find, and over the years, Schwiebert said, they’ve found a lot. “We find evidence all the time,” he said. “It’s been totally explored and researched.” One of the most famous discoveries now sits at the Florida Museum of Natural History — an ancient species of bear called Tremarctos Floridanus. Judging from the position of the remains, they guess that the bear found its way into the cave and was unable to ever find its way back out, Schwiebert said. Researchers have used the fossilized bear to date Devil’s Den to at least 10,000 years old, although it is likely to go back as far as 75,000 years. Other stand-out finds include a saber tooth tiger and human remains. It is “one of North America’s most prehistoric places,” its website states. Schwiebert, a fixture in Williston public life, is one of seven co-owners. Another, Ray Webber, is a former UF professor and now runs Cedar Lakes Woods and Gardens, a nonprofit botanical garden built along the

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edge of a limestone quarry next door. Ken and Heidi also live on a nearby property, selling Heidi’s crafts and running a horse stable where guests can ride. Visitors can become dive-certified at Devil’s Den itself, which uses a pool onsite to teach classes. They can also bring groups for overnight trips and stay at one of the Devil’s Den cabins. “Our goal is to keep it simple and natural,” Ken said, “preserved as what it is — an opportunity to see a unique water feature.” On a recent Saturday morning, groups crowded around picnic tables, adjusting masks and listening to instructions about their gear. There was no Devil’s breath and it was unlikely a diver would find prehistoric remains — but the den still had magic. Lit above by the morning’s sunlight, Devil’s Den is visible 50 feet down. It is a dive into the lifeblood of our water system, the hidden secret of Florida’s underground rivers. But more than that, it is a dive into small-town legend, a bit of Williston myth that runs as deep as the den itself. “For me,” Schwiebert said, “it’s a local treasure.” s


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>> TRAVEL

Never Swim With Hippos â&#x20AC;Śand Other Important Lessons We Learned In Africa

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUCIE REGENSDORF y husband, Paul, and I had travelled to the Mediterranean with our friends, Susan and Roger Beck and had a fantastic time. At the end of our cruise, while sitting at a cafĂŠ in Venice, we decided our next vacation would be an African safari. For one year, Susan and I researched, read books, talked to people, interviewed travel agents and planned our once-in-a-lifetime trip to Africa. After much discussion and consideration, we decided on a trip to Zimbabwe, and a safari that would consist of three different camps and a variety of activities. In planning the trip with our agent, Susan and I expressed the desire to experience different ecosystems and a variety of animals. The first stop was Matobo Hills, in the southwest section of Zimbabwe. This area is known for its unique granite rock formations, Bushman rock paintings and beautiful scenery. Matobo Hills has the highest concentration of white and black rhino in Africa. While on walking safaris with a guide and a ranger with an AK47, we got close to five huge white rhinos. It was amazing to be so close to a wild animal, lazily grazing

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in the grass, while watching us cautiously. We were told if the rhino charges to find the nearest tree and climb up it as fast as we could. The ranger with the AK47 became our new best friend. Our next safari was in Hwange National Park, the largest national park in Zimbabwe. The minute our bush plane landed on a remote airstrip, we began seeing animals. We set off each day in an open land rover and saw elephants, zebra, giraffes, Cape buffalo, baboons, monkeys, ostrich, wildebeest, impala, sable antelope, waterbuck, lions, a leopard, hippos and a variety of unique and colorful birds. Our camp faced a watering hole where several times a day, animals would come to drink. We were overwhelmed by the variety and abundance of game that we saw. Surely, we thought, the next camp could not be as exciting as this. After three nights in Hwange, we again boarded a small plane and headed to Mana Pools. A wonderful naturalist, Mark, picked us up at the airstrip. He reveled in the flora and fauna of the area and taught us a great deal about animal behavior. In addition to the many


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“Breathe, Lucie, stay away from the edge of the sandbar.” animals we had seen in Hwange, in Mana Pools we also saw wild dogs. Wild dogs are often called painted dogs because their coats have patches of black, beige and white. They have large round Mickey Mouse ears and a tail similar to that of a fox. We got out of our vehicle and walked into the bush and were rewarded by playful performances by the dogs. Mana Pools and our tented camp are situated on the

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Zambezi River, which separates Zambia to the north and Zimbabwe to the south. So on the second day, Mark decided we should go on a half-day canoe trip on the river. We thought that sounded great and we were anxious to set out on a new adventure. We had experienced driving safaris and walking safaris and had gone rock climbing in Matobo Hills. A canoeing safari would be different and we hoped to see animals coming to the river for a cool sip of water. After a wonderful lunch, we were transported up river with our canoes, which were placed on the riverbank while Mark cautioned us. “As you can see, there are a lot of hippos who spend their day in this river. We will allow them to become


comfortable before we proceed past them,” Mark said. “Hippos are most secure in deep water, especially if they feel threatened. Just follow my path and everything will be fine.” He said we should stay stay close to the bank if the hippos are in the middle, or head towards the middle of the river, if the hippos are on the bank. “In the unlikely event that you end up in the water, don’t panic and don’t thrash about,” he said. “In addition to hippos, there are crocodiles in the river and they are attracted to thrashing.” We briefly considered whether the river was also home to piranha. With that comforting and reassuring advice under

our belts, we got into our canoes and began paddling as Mark led the way. Boy, did we see hippos. They were in the water, out of the water, snorting and carrying on all around us. We maneuvered around them until after eight miles, the wind made paddling the canoes too difficult. We gave up and decided we would try again the next day when we were scheduled to canoe all day to arrive at a mobile camp for the night. Early that next morning, Susan and I sat around the fire, sipping coffee and discussing the plans for the day. We were not enthusiastic about the canoe trip after the difficulty we had paddling around the hippos and crocodiles the day before. Susan did not fear the hippos in the water she could see; it was the ones she couldn’t

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LUCIE REGENSDORF

Dinner at Vundu Camp with our guide, Mark, at Mana Pools National Park on the bank of the Zambezi River in Zimbabwe. From left: Mark, Paul and Lucie Regensdorf, Susan and Roger Beck.

see that she feared most. Susan and I reassured each other as Mark rushed us through breakfast, anxious to begin our canoe trip. The wind from the day before had subsided and the river was calm and beautiful. A gentle breeze was blowing as we climbed into the canoes. The mountainous Zambia side of the river was majestic as the sun lit up the landscape. The banks and river on the Zimbabwe side were dotted with hippos and we glided past them with ease. The four of us marveled at the fact that we were canoeing on the Zambezi River in Africa. What an adventure! Mark canoed ahead, followed by Roger and Susan, then Paul and me. We were careful to follow Mark’s track through the water. Suddenly, and without any warning, the canoe carrying Paul and me raised out of the water and flipped over, dumping us — and our belongings — into the river. “What did we hit?” I screamed. “We didn’t hit anything!” Paul exclaimed. “Something hit us!” Frightened, we all wondered if the 7,000-pound hippo was still below. The canoe rolled over in the water as Paul and I scrambled to stay calm, hold on and not thrash about. How long ago did we last see a crocodile? Susan and Roger were immediately upon us after retrieving their bags, which had begun floating downstream. Mark, too, was there in a flash. He instructed Paul and I to grab his canoe, let go of ours and tuck our legs up

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close to his boat as he guided us to a sandbar for safety. “Breathe, Lucie,” Mark instructed as I hyperventilated in fear and shock. “Stay away from the edge of the sandbar,” Mark shouted. We never asked why. After warming us with hot coffee from his thermos, Mark gave me the option of continuing the canoe trip for another six hours to get to our mobile camp, or calling a vehicle to transport us by land. As I looked into Susan’s eyes for confirmation, I chose the latter. The land rover arrived; we piled in under warm blankets and returned to our camp for warm showers, dry clothes and fortification. “This is only the second time I have seen that happen in 24 years,” Mark said. We laughed, labeled it an experience, and drove off to our mobile tent for the night. Our mobile tent was set up on the banks of the Zambezi and we could hear the hippos at night making their way from the river, passing our tents, into the bush for food and then back to the river again in the early morning hours. Hippos seemed to be everywhere — or was that just a nightmare? Two days later, we flew to Victoria Falls to spend a few nights in civilization before returning home. As we walked through the park enjoying the beautiful falls, we recounted the tale of the hippo encounter to our guide. “You were lucky,” she said. “Hippos kill more people in Africa than any other animal.” Somehow, we had missed that piece of life-preserving data while conducting our research. s


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COLUMN >> DONNA BONNELL

Embracing Life Summer Vacation

(Leave our Egos Behind)

ummer is here — time to retreat from reality, if only for a brief vacation. Since outdoor temperatures are too hot to do anything physical, it is the perfect season to refresh our minds and souls. Sunbathing at the beach, lounging by the pool or tubing down the river will provide the perfect opportunities for much needed mental breaks. While refraining from focusing on professional commitments or meeting financial deadlines, we can turn our thoughts inward. By reassessing what is truly important, we may be able to reduce stress and return to realism with a bit more peace. To successfully make that change, we need to analyze the importance of our daily duties. How much time are we burdening ourselves fulfilling the desires of our egos? In order to answer that question, I studied the meaning of ego and developed my personal simplistic definition. Most of my life I struggled with low self-esteem and have worked hard to boost my level of confidence. In that process, I slowly began to realize (if used in a positive way), a small dose of ego is necessary to exist in a superficial society. With maturation and increased confidence, my ego evolved into a protective mask. This shield provided me with the ability to deal with individuals who are consumed with deceit and callous competition. Today my ego is the mediator between my unconscious mind (feelings, memories and thoughts) and external daily events. In a strange way, it seems to have taken on its own identity. As a child and young adult I felt inadequate and my ego was at the bottom of the scale. Others (narcissists) are at the opposite extreme. Narcissists are constantly in pursuit of gratification from vanity and are preoccupied with their own aspirations, needs and successes. Those arrogant individuals thrive on admiring their own physical or mental attributes. We are all situated somewhere on the ego gamut based on personal experiences. An egotistical individual has essentially an exaggerated sense of self-importance and a feeling of superiority. Folks, like me, constantly fight off having an inferiority complex. I don’t believe our egos are evil, but we should evaluate

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their value. There is a fine line between maintaining a healthy helping of assurance and keeping our egos in check. I admit, this is a confusing concept. While pondering the dichotomy, I ran across the motto of CrossFit Lakewood Ranch, “Leave your ego at the door and your sweat on the floor.” That is a fascinating notion! Can egos be left behind? Perhaps they are evanescent characters, whose acting roles can be eliminated or modified. If so, how do we accomplish that task? Dr. Wayne W. Dyer, prominent author and speaker in the field of self-development, suggests the following seven steps for overcoming ego’s hold: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Stop being offended. Let go of your need to win. Let go of your need to be right. Let go of your need to be superior. Let go of your need to have more. Let go of identifying yourself on the basis of your achievements. 7. Let go of your reputation. Letting go of judgment is not specifically on Dyer’s list, but is an important item on mine. The actions I judge most harshly in others are secretly the behaviors I would like to allow myself to do. Basically, I resent the need to always act responsibly. I take on too much and cannot say no. My ego wants me to be the martyr and do everything without asking for help. On the rare occasion when I request assistance and am let down, I find it very hard forgive that person. Letting go of my reputation is by far the most difficult task. Because I work so hard on being dependable and doing everything right, I find it tough to stomach the thought of disapproval. Dyer states, “Your reputation is not located in you. It resides in the minds of others. Therefore you have no control over it at all.” Dyer is correct! My intentions this summer are to stop judging others and worry less about what people think. When I accomplish those goals I will be disappointed less and have more time to fulfill my divine assignments, without my ego getting in the way. s


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WORSHIP CENTERS If we have left out a church or have incomplete / incorrect information, please let us know! Send your corrections by faxing 352-373-9178 or emailing editor@towerpublications.com. We welcome your contributions and suggestions.

HIGH SPRINGS ALLEN CHAPEL A.M.E. CHURCH 386-454-3574 10 S.E. MLK Drive Pastor James McDaniel ANDERSON MEMORIAL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 386-454-3433 935 SE Lincoln Ave. BETHLEHEM UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 386-454-1996 County Road 778 Pastor Clarence Desue CHRIST ANGLICAN FELLOWSHIP 386-454-1845 323 SW CR 778 Pastor Michael LaCagnina CHRISTIAN FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 386-454-2367 220 NE 1ST Ave. Dr. Lloyd S. Williams CHURCH OF CHRIST 386-454-2930 520 NE Santa Fe Blvd. CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 386-454-1015 US Hwy 27 THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS 386-454-4282 24455 NW 174th Ave. Pres. Keith Brown HIGH SPRINGS CHURCH OF GOD 386-454-1757 210 NW 182 Ave. Pastor Terry W. Hull

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FELLOWSHIP CHURCH 386-454-1700 16916 NW U.S. Hwy. 441 Pastor Jeff Powell FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 386-454-1505 20112 North US Hwy. 441 Pastor Derek Lambert FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 386-454-1037 205 North Main Street Pastor Glen A. Busby FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH of HIGH SPRINGS 386-454-1255 17405 NW US Hwy 441 Pastor Benton Mangueira

MT CARMEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 386-454-4568 1230 NW 1st Ave. Pastor Byran Williams MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST CHURCH 14105 NW 298th Street 386-454-2161 Pastor Dan Howard MOUNT OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-454-3447 948 SE Railroad Ave. THE NORTH EAST CHURCH OF CHRIST 4330 NE County Road 340 nechurchofchrist.net

GRACE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 210 Santa Fe Blvd. Pastor Preston Ponce

SAINT MADELEINE CATHOLIC CHURCH 386-454-2358 17155 NW Highway 441

HOLY TEMPLE CHURCH WITH GOD 386-454-0313 615 SE ML King Drive

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 386-454-2360 230 NW 1st Avenue Pastor Mark Swaisgood

IMPACT FAMILY CHURCH 386-454-1563 16710 NW US 441 Pastors Edwin & Angela Anderson JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES 386-454-3509 330 SE 7th Ave. MIRACLE TEMPLE CHURCH 386-454-4298 605 SE 1st Place THE MISSION CHURCH OF HIGH SPRINGS Meeting at the Seventh Day Adventist Building 230 NW 1st Ave. 352-870-0247 Pastor Keith Helsel

SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH 386-454-4978 Shiloh Church Rd. Pastor Earl Tuten SHILOH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-454-3126 1505 NW Main St. SPRING RIDGE FIRST CHURCH OF GOD 386-454-3600 5529 NE 52nd Place Pastor Todd L Wymer SPRINGRIDGE FIRST CHURCH OF GOD 386-454-4400 420 Spring Ave.

THE SUMMIT 352-575-0786 610 NE Santa Fe Blvd Pastor Rick Lawrence thesummitchurch.info ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 386-454-9812 1st Ave. (next to city hall) Rev. David Kidd SPRING HILL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Located at High Springs exit 79 off I-75 North of Gainesville (on Old Bellamy Rd.) Pastor James Richardson VISION TABERNACLE 352-339-4942 220 N.E. 1st Avenue Pastor Lawrence R. Haley

ALACHUA ALACHUA CHURCH OF CHRIST 386-462-3326 14505 NW 145th Avenue Minister Doug Frazier ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH 386-497-3121 Jordan Road (Ft. White) BAHA’I FAITH 352-870-3097 Turkey Creek CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 13920 NW Hwy 4141 386-462-2966 Pastor Marty D. Basinger calvarybaptistgainesville.org CHRIST CENTRAL ALACHUA 386-418-8185 14906 Main St. www.ccalachua.com CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 386-462-2549 13220 NW 150th Ave.


CRUSADERS FOR CHRIST, INC. 386-462-4811 NW 158th Ave. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-1337 14005 NW 146th Avenue Pastor Doug Felton FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-2443 14805 NW 140th St. Pastor Lamar Albritton FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-1549 14623 NW 140th St. Rev. Virginia McDaniel FOREST GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-3921 22575 NW 94 Avenue GREATER NEW HOPE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-4617 15205 NW 278th Ave. HAGUE BAPTIST CHURCH 6725 NW 126th Ave Gainesville, Fl 32653 Pastor Sam Brown HARE KRISHNA TEMPLE 386-462-2017 17306 NW 112th Blvd. LEGACY BAPTIST CHURCH 352-462-2150 13719 NW 146th St. Pastor John Jernigan LIVING COVENANT CHURCH 386-462-7375 Pastor Troy Rumore NEW OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-3390 County Road 1491 Pastor Terry Elixson, Jr. NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH OF GOD AND CHRIST 386-462-4891 1310 NW 155 Place Pastor R. L. Cooper

NORTH PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-3317 25330 NW CR 239 Pastor Steve Hutcheson NEW SAINT MARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-7129 13800 NW 158th Ave. PARADISE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF ALACHUA 386-462-0162 14889 MLK Blvd. Pastor Rev. James D. Johnson, Sr. SANTA FE BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-7541 7505 NW CR 236 Pastor Scott Brown MT NEBO UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 386-418-1038 9975 NW 143rd St. Pastor Ricardo George Jr. NEW SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-2095 18610 NW CR 237 NEW ST MARY BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-7129 13800 NW 158th Ave. OLD SHILOH MISSIONARY BAPTIST 386-462-4894 16810 NW CR 239 RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 352-870-7288 14200 NW 148th Place Pastor Greg Evans ST LUKE AME CHURCH 386-462-2732 US Highway 441 S. ST MATHEWS BAPTIST CHURCH 386-462-2205 15712 NW 140 Street Pastor Isaac Miles TEMPLE OF THE UNIVERSE 386-462-7279 15808 NW 90 Street www.tou.org

WESTSIDE CHURCH

MT ZURA FULL GOSPEL

OF GOD IN CHRIST

BAPTIST CHURCH

386-418-0649

352-472-4056

15535 NW 141st St.

225 NW 2nd Ave. Pastor Natron Curtis

NEWBERRY

NEW ST PAUL BAPTIST CHURCH

ABIDING SAVIOR

352-472-3836

LUTHERAN CHURCH

215 NW 8TH Ave.

352-331-4409

Pastor Charles Welch

9700 West Newberry Rd.

NEWBERRY

BETHEL AFRICAN

CHURCH OF CHRIST

METHODIST EPISCOPAL

352-472-4961

CHURCH

24045 W. Newberry Rd.

352-474-6215

Minister Batsell Spivy

23530 NW 3rd Ave. Pastor Theodora Black

NEWBERRY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

BRONSON ROAD CHURCH

352-472-4005

Located on 337 Between

24845 W. Newberry Rd.

Newberry and Bronson

Dr. Gary Brady, Pastor

On the County Line

DESTINY

352 486-2898

COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Andy Cook

352-472-3284

CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 352-472-2739

420 SW 250th Street Pastor Rocky McKinley OAK DALE

610 NW 2nd St.

BAPTIST CHURCH

Pastor: Jesse Hampton

352-472-2992

THE CHURCH AT

Highway 26 and 241 S.

STEEPLECHASE

PLEASANT PLAIN

352-472-6232

UNITED METHODIST

Meeting at Sun Country

CHURCH

Sports Center

352-472-1863

333 SW 140th Terrace

1910 NW 166th St.

(Jonesville)

Pastor Theo Jackson

Pastor Buddy Hurlston FIRST BAPTIST

ST JOSEPH’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

CHURCH OF NEWBERRY

352-472-2951

352-472-2351

16921 W. Newberry Rd.

25520 W. Newberry Rd.

Pastor Richard Pelkey

Rev. Jack Andrews

TURNING POINT OF

JONESVILLE

NEWBERRY, INC

BAPTIST CHURCH

5577 NW 290 Street

352-472-3835

352-472-7770

17722 SW 15th Ave.

Pastor Henry M. Rodgers

Pastor Corey Cheramie

UNION

CHRISTIAN LIFE

BAPTIST CHURCH

FELLOWSHIP

352-472-3845

352-472-5433

6259 SE 75TH Ave

Pastor Gary Bracewell

Pastor Travis Moody

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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ADVERTISER INDEX 4400 NW 36th Avenue • Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax AUTOMOTIVE

EDUCATION & CHILD CARE

City Boys Tire & Brake ............................... 137

Alachua County Tools for Schools .......107

Gainesville Harley Davidson ..................... 69

Forest Grove Christian Academy ..............4

Jim Doglas Sales & Service ...................... 87

Gainesville Country Day School ............133

Newberry Auto Repair ..............................145

Millhopper Montessori School .................. 17

Sun City Auto Sales..................................... 63 Tuffy Tire & Auto Service .............................2

MEDICAL / HEALTH Affordable Dentures ................................... 93

REAL ESTATE

Alachua Dental ............................................ 109 Alliance Pediatrics ....................................... 49

The Atrium at Gainesville .......................... 62 Forrester Realty ...........................................139

Caretenders .....................................................73 City Drugs Pharmacy................................ 140 Cohen & Montini Orthodontics ..............155

FINANCIAL / LAW

Douglas Adel, DDS ....................................... 71 Gainesville Dermatology ....................58, 93

Allstate Insurance, Hugh Cain ............... 108

Gainesville OB/GYN ...................................170

Brightway Insurance ...................................161

Gentle Dental Care .........................................3

Edward Jones - Ed Potts........................... 39

Dr. Greg Borganelli Pediatric Dent. ....... 47

Ference Insurance Agency .......................80

Hunter Family Dentistry ............................80

ProActive Tax & Accounting .................... 85

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery ................ 25

State Farm - Tish Oleksy ..............................2 Sunshine State Insurance ........................... 61 SunState Federal

Palms Medical Group ................................... 10 Smart Smile Dentistry ................................ 99 UFHealth - Plastic Surgery ........................ 15

Credit Union .................................... 27, 28, 172 Three Rivers Insurance ............................... 92

RETAIL / RECREATION Alachua Farm & Lumber ...........................115

FITNESS and BEAUTY

Bambi’s Organic Country Farm ..............141 Beacher’s Lodge........................................... 39

Anytime Fitness ............................................ 59

Blue Springs ..................................................149

Charisma for Hair .........................................115 Emerge .............................................................131

Cootie Coo Creations ................................. 39

FloMotion Fitness Studio .......................... 35

Family Jewels & Purse Strings ................80

Frogz on a Lilypad......................................153

Fletcher’s Center West...............................80

Hair & Nail Depot.........................................149

Gary’s Tackle Box ........................................145

Jonesville Traditional Barber ...................80

Gator Fine Wine & Spirits .........................171

Nails-N-Spa................................................... 140

High Springs Farmers Market ................ 140

Salon Eye Candy ........................................ 108

Hippodrome State Theatre......................125 Julie’s Pins & Needles .................................. 18

Bed & Biscuit Inn .........................................162

Klaus Fine Jewelry .......................................40 Legoland Florida .............................................6 Lentz House of Time ...................................60

Pampered Paws ............................................141

Liquor & Wine Shoppe ...............................171

Susie’s Pet Sitting & Grooming ..............134

Morrell’s Home Furnishings .......................37 New 2 You ....................................................... 38

MISCELLANEOUS

New Smyrna Beach ........................................7 Oaks Pawn ...................................................... 86

Destiny Community Church ..................... 23

Paddywhack..................................................153

Holy Trinity Episcopal Church ................128

The Sleep Center Superstores .................72

Replace Your Income .................................. 38

Valerie’s Loft Consignment ......................131

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HOME IMPROVEMENT Al Mincey Site Prep .....................................115 America’s Swimming Pool Co. ...............124 Bloominghouse Nursery ...........................129 Cook’s Portable Warehouses ................... 87 Floor Store ......................................................161 The Green House Nursery............................8 Griffis Lumber.................................................72 H2Oasis Custom Pool & Spa .................. 104 Overhead Door .............................................101 Red Barn Home Center .............................. 117 United Rent-All.............................................163 Whitfield Window & Door.......................... 61

Dance Alive! .................................................. 127

Jewelry Designs by Donna ..................... 140

PETS and VETS

SERVICE Alachua County Big Blue .........................165 Alachua County Hazardous Waste.......148 Alachua County Waste Watchers ........ 100 A&K Outdoor Services ..............................129 A-1 Pest Control ............................................80 Alpha Bytes Computers ...........................149 Chimney Sweeps of America..................163 Computer Repair ........................................ 140 Craft Cleaners ................................................ 117 Creekside Outdoor Improvements ..........50 Gainesville Regional Airport .................... 92 Gonzalez Site Prep .....................................134 Grease Busters .............................................135 Growers Fertilizer ........................................ 137 GRU Natural Gas............................................ 19 Lotus Studios Photography ..................... 20 Oliver & Dahlman .........................................141 Southern Land & Lawn..............................162 Stewart Pest Control .................................... 61 Stitch In Time Embroidery ........................60 William Weseman Construction .............. 51

DINING & DRINKS 60 North Main ................................................. 11 The Blend Coffee.......................................... 23 Brown’s Country Buffet ............................120 Chicken Coupe .............................................. 121 Copper Monkey West ............................ 5, 118 Cracker House Coffee & Mercantile ......115 Dave’s NY Deli ............................................... 121 The Diner .........................................................119 El Toro............................................................. 108 Firefly Restaurant ......................................... 121 Fluid Lounge ................................................... 41 Flying Biscuit Café .......................................118 Gator Tales Sports Bar ...............................118 High Springs Coffee Company ................ 41 Newberry Backyard BBQ .........................120 Northwest Grille ...........................................120 The Talented Cookie Company...............141 Tailgator’s Diner & Ice Cream ..................119 TCBY .................................................................131 World of Beer ................................................ 69


PHOTO BY RAY CARSON

page

52 >> WATER ON THE KNEE

Framed by cypress knees, a trio of turtles basks in the sun on the Santa Fe River. Our rivers and springs are crucial to all we hold dear â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from the native wildlife to anyone who enjoys a sip of fresh, clean water. Learn more about their plight and the struggle to protect them.

www.VisitOurTowns.com

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If you’re looking for an Ob/Gyn,

let’s get to know one another.

Come in and meet

Dr. Ashley Walsh Specializing in Obstetrics & Minimally Invasive Surgery

Call today and schedule your free consultation.

6400 West Newberry Rd., Suite 207 • Gainesville Medical Arts Building ~ next to North Florida Regional Medical Center

352.371.2011 • www.GainesvilleOBGYN.com We deliver more than expected.

Michael Cotter, MD • David Stewart, MD • Ashley Walsh, MD • Ronnie Jo Stringer, ARNP, CNM • Cynthia Vista, ARNP, CNM • Padi Sutherland, ARNP, CNM

OBSTETRICS

170 | Summer 2014

MIDWIFERY

GYNECOLOGY


Create your own

paradise!

the

Gator Spirits & Fine Wines

Liquor & Wine Shoppe at Jonesville Mon-Thurs 9:00am - 9:00pm Fri & Sat 9:00am - 10:00pm Sunday: Noon - 6:00pm

CVS

CR 241

Y BE.R R N E WR D

o Kangaro

14451 Newberry Rd. Jonesville Turn at CVS in Jonesville and come straight to us.

352-332-3308

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOR TASTINGS, EVENTS AND EXCLUSIVE PRICING SPECIALS!

5701 SW 75th St. Gainesville

I-7 5 ER WAD TORO

The or Liqu WineSh&oppe

Mon-Thurs 10:00am - 9:00pm Fri & Sat 10:00am - 10:00pm

ine Gator F Spirits Wine &

A RC H

AD

E R RO

Conveniently located in the Tower Square shopping area.

352-335-3994

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOR TASTINGS, EVENTS AND EXCLUSIVE PRICING SPECIALS!

www.VisitOurTowns.com

Summer 2014 | 171

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To us... It’s more than a nickel.

It may only be worth five cents, but this nickel represents much more then it’s value. It represents our commitment to always finding ways to improve the lives of our members. Since starting the Nickel-Back promotion, SunState Federal Union has given over 11 million nickels back to our members. We’re committed to the financial well-being of our members and make decisions based on what’s best for them, not our bottom line. That’s the SunState difference. Dedicated to you, with all we do, even one nickel at a time.

Proudly serving our members and our community since 1957

352-381-5200

www.sunstatefcu.org

Oths summer2014  

http://www.visitourtowns.com/file_download/37/OTHS-Summer2014.pdf

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