Tower Hill Bulletin - Special Edition 2019

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Tower Hill Bulletin | Special Edition 2019

Celebration of the Century Centennial Weekend Brings Together Generations of Hillers Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign Launched


Tower Hill BULLETIN

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE Teresa Messmore Director of Communications and Marketing Amy Wolf Assistant Director of Communications and Marketing Kirk Smith Marketing Specialist ADVANCEMENT OFFICE Kristin Mumford Director of Advancement and Enrollment Management Julie Goldston Advancement Operations Manager Heather Weymouth Lowry ’97 Director of the Annual Fund Linda Palmer Administrative Assistant Melissa Pizarro Associate Director of Advancement Matthew Twyman III ’88 Director of Alumni Relations and Associate Director of Admission PHOTOGRAPHY Kirk Smith, Lead Photographer Erwin Chen ’20 Teresa Messmore Amy Wolf LAYOUT Amy Wolf The Tower Hill Bulletin magazine is published twice annually to share how alumni, faculty, staff and students embody the school’s motto Multa Bene Facta, Many Things Done Well. Send Class Notes to thsalumni@towerhill.org with a high-resolution photo. TOWER HILL SCHOOL 2813 W. 17th Street Wilmington, DE 19806 302-575-0550 | towerhill.org HEAD OF SCHOOL Elizabeth C. Speers 2019-2020 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Eric Johnson, M.D., Chair Benjamin du Pont ’82, Vice Chair Jack Flynn, M.D., ’81, Secretary Marna Whittington, Ph.D., Treasurer Kimberly Wright Cassidy, Ph.D. Régis de Ramel Robert DeSantis Charles Elson Heather Richards Evans ’80 W. Whitfield Gardner ’81 Laird Hayward ’02 Ellen Jamison Kullman ’74 Henry Mellon Catherine Miller David Nowland ’85 Lisa A. Olson ’76 Isabella Speakman Timon ’92 Carmen Wallace ’93 Gina Ward Earl Ball, Ed.D., Emeritus

Tower Hill School does not discriminate in its educational, admissions and personnel programs and policies or activities on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion or religious creed, sexual orientation, gender identity and/ Tower Hill Bulletin or2 expression, disability or any other Special Edition 2019 characteristic protected under applicable federal, state or local law.


SPECIAL EDITION CENTENNIAL 2019

IN THIS ISSUE 6 Through the Decades

STUDENTS SHARE HISTORICAL FACTS AT CONVOCATION

10 Centennial Photos

FOREVER GREEN AND WHITE RECEPTION, ATHLETICS, ARTISTS AND AUTHORS SHOW, GALA AND MORE

38 Tower Hill 100 Campaign THE LAUNCH OF THE CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN FOR PEOPLE, PROGRAMS AND PARTNERSHIPS

44 Ways to Give

SUSTAINING THS NOW AND INTO THE NEXT CENTURY

On the Cover During the Centennial Convocation on Saturday, Sept. 21, Cian Conaty ’33 gave the Centennial rose to Irénée “Brip” du Pont, Jr. ’38 after du Pont shared his Tower Hill memories with the community. Photo by Kirk Smith Tower Hill Bulletin

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Celebration of the Century From the Board Chair As Tower Hill celebrates its past and looks to its future, we all have a role to play. It’s a great honor to be part of this community. As a parent of two graduates of Tower Hill, my wife and I know the investment and the importance of a strong education. I thank our parents for your commitment and belief in Tower Hill. This is a very, very special moment in the school’s history, and I’d like to thank the current trustees, the former trustees and the entire community for their service to Tower Hill. We have much for which to be grateful right now: • We have talented and dedicated faculty and staff. • We have strong leadership in our head of school and a clear vision. • We have a robust strategic plan with much already accomplished and underway. • We have generous, engaged parents. • Most of all, we have talented students who are engaged in academics, the arts, athletics, service and so much more. We have good kids. • We have a community, and the ties that bind us all together, especially at this moment, are what make it so special. As board chair, I can assure you that Tower Hill will not rest on our laurels. We will continue to ask ourselves bold questions, and we will continue to be a school where many things are done well. Thank you, Eric Johnson, M.D. Chair, Board of Trustees This message was delivered at the Centennial Convocation on Sept. 21, 2019.

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From the Head of School Dear Tower Hill community,

I invite all of us to take pride in the magic of Tower Hill’s Centennial weekend. Whether you were under the Centennial tent with 1,500 Tower Hill friends or joined us in spirit, we hope this special Centennial Bulletin captures the magic—the love, excitement and awe—of this amazing weekend. As one alum said, “I just knew as I stood under that enormous tent that this moment was a once in a lifetime experience. You just knew you were part of something big and truly special.” After Centennial one may ask, “So what’s next?” or “Now what?” Centennial surely offered us the chance to celebrate our founders’ vision and the school’s past, which were highlighted in poignant ways, particularly at Centennial Convocation with the remarks of our wonderful alum Mr. Irénée du Pont, Jr. ’38. Following his remarks, Mr. du Pont was presented the Centennial Rose by one of our youngest students, Cian Conaty ’33. It was this very moment and exchange, featured on the cover of this Bulletin, that defines the power of a Centennial and answers the question, “So now what?” A Centennial is truly a launch into the next century—a call to action. It is an affirmation of Tower Hill’s mission and commitment to ensure that our academic program not only stays relevant, but is truly exhilarating in its level of excellence. Centennial is a promise to the next generation. It is an opportunity to invest and to pay it forward, showing gratitude for lifelong friendships, master teachers and an educational foundation that is second to none. As I said at Centennial Convocation: One hundred years ago, nearly to the day and maybe to the hour, on Sept. 22, 1919, Tower Hill’s founders began a school whose legacy, through its people, has impacted our country and the world. I ask you to set your clocks back to Sept. 22, 1919, and imagine … “11 men came together with a dream and a mission”... and no, students and faculty, I am not going to sing again! So imagine in 1919: • Fuel for cars was sold only in drug stores. • The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 m.p.h. • The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower. • The American flag had only 45 stars. • A dentist earned $2,500 a year. • More than 95% of all births took place at home. • Eggs were 14 cents a dozen. • Two out of every 10 adults couldn’t read or write. • Only 6% of all Americans had graduated from high school. We are here 100 years later to celebrate our founders’ conviction that education mattered and the intellects, hearts and souls of young people were important to the world. Through the pages of this Centennial Bulletin recap, you will read about some incredible people who have answered Centennial’s call to action and promise to the next generation; their investment in Tower Hill 100, our Centennial Campaign, has already made a significant difference. We thank all those who made early investments in Tower Hill 100, bringing us to $10 million toward our goal of $19.19 million. As we launch the public phase of the largest campaign in Tower Hill’s history, thank you for your generosity and for being part of the next 100 years! With gratitude, Elizabeth C. Speers Head of School Tower Hill Bulletin

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CENTENNIAL CONVOCATION Students, faculty, dignitaries and honored guests marked the moment when Tower Hill officially turned 100 years old at Centennial Convocation on Saturday, Sept. 21. The pomp and circumstance of an academic procession, student music and Tower Hill memories throughout the decades united Hillers of today and yesterday.

“100 years ago, nearly to the day and maybe to the hour, on Sept. 22, 1919, Tower Hill’s founders began a school whose legacy, through its people, has impacted our country and the world.” —Bessie Speers, Head of School

Clockwise from top left: Head of School Bessie Speers, Board Chair Eric Johnson, M.D., and Wilmington Mayor Michael Purzycki; Lieutenant Governor Bethany Hall-Long; fifth grade head class advisor Chris Theim processes into the Centennial Tent with students and faculty members; Ben du Pont ’20 sings a solo during the Upper School Concert Choir performance; Rev. Tom Speers delivers the invocation. 4

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“It is nearly impossible to contemplate what it was like in this exact spot one century ago. However, what we do know is that many people came together with one common goal in mind—a commitment to advance education for the students of Wilmington and the world. I think our founders would be beaming if they could be here with us today, because we have truly realized their wildest dreams.” —Thomas Zehner ’20, Student Body President

Clockwise from top left: Assistant Head of School Art Hall introduces student speakers; Middle School students process into the Centennial Tent; Kindergarten teacher Michelle Coulter receives the William L. Kitchel II Faculty Chair from Assistant Head of School Anthony Pisapia, left, and Bill Kitchel ’77, right; Upper School English teacher Coleen Hubler receives the Timothy B. Golding Faculty Chair in English, pictured with former Headmaster Tim Golding; Mike Castle ’57, Betsy McCoy and Randy Barton ’59 after Convocation.

VIDEO EXTRA

Watch the Centennial Convocation at towerhill.org/100

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THROUGH THE DECADES

At Centennial Convocation, students from each division shared reflections through the decades, highlighting what was happening at Tower Hill as well as around the world.

Thomas Zehner ’20

Jalyn Miller ’22

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1930s

While Americans experienced the roaring ’20s—some owning cars, radios and telephones for the first time—in 1924 Tower Hill and Friends played their first football game. We won by a satisfying score of 52-0. However, the victory was somewhat hollow, as Friends did not have a football team and had to dress their soccer team for the game.

Roshan Iyengar ’25

Subhi Yadav ’26

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1980s

A time period of accelerating change, the 1970s were filled with many firsts on 17th Street, including the first annual giving campaign, the first jeans day and the first Evening of the Arts all school art exhibit. All these traditions still exist today. 6

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The ’30s were a time of extremes. The country suffered through the Great Depression, and academia entered a new era of progressive education. In the 1936-1937 school year, the kindergarten tuition at Tower Hill was $150, and 12th grade tuition was $400.

As computers were beginning to become more prominent, the world was going through an information revolution. Students in the ’80s were able to experience brand new facilities, including a new Field House, a renovated cafeteria, refurbished art areas and a new computer center.

Sadie Sheppard ’28

1990s Disney movies, video games and Beanie Babies. The world was preparing for the turn of the century in the 1990s. Tower Hill continued to juggle a blend of tradition and innovation amidst the dawn of the internet.


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Archit Kambhamettu ’21

1940s World War II took our nation by storm. A number of senior boys were allowed to graduate early in 1942 in order to go into the military and go to college for a year while they did military training. The policy continued throughout the war.

Leyna Bidic ’23

James Farnan ’24

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1960s

In the 1950s, post war prosperity and its impact on the Wilmington area, along with the baby boom, led to a time of great physical expansion and growth. However, in 1957, there was only one traffic light between Tower Hill and Pennsylvania Route 1.

Stephanie Lucas ’29

2000s In the 2000s, NASA landed the Spirit and Opportunity Mars rovers. Back on earth, Tower Hill continued to offer amazing field trips to Williamsburg, Washington, D.C., and Cape Henlopen.

The ’60s were a time period of turbulence and discord, movements and changes. The longstanding eighth grade show was conceived to get away from sad shows and involved students in the writing, producing and staging of their own musical. It has always been a high point for the final year of Middle School.

Mannie Esaka ’30

2010s As the world charges forward at warp speed in the 2010s, Tower Hill continues to lead the way with exciting classes, student centered learning and Many Things Done Well!

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FOUNDERS’ ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

The Founders’ Achievement Awards were presented to Pete du Pont Hayward ’66, Michelle Shepherd and Cecile Buckles. Established in 2009, the Founders’ Achievement Award is the preeminent award created to recognize and celebrate distinguished members of the school community for their exemplary service and significant contributions to the development of the school.

PETE DU PONT HAYWARD ’66 Pete du Pont Hayward ’66 served on Tower Hill’s board of trustees from 1994-2015, leading as board chair from 2003-2006. From 2006-2015, he chaired the Finance Committee and Executive Committee, the Committee on Trustees and the Building and Grounds Committee. During Hayward’s service on the board, Tower Hill’s campus was transformed with the addition of the Math and Science Center and the renovations of the athletic fields and the grounds that surround Tower Hill. In addition, Hayward was instrumental in the purchase and renovation of Hayward House, which was named in memory of his mother, Rosa Laird Hayward McDonald ’34. Hayward House provides a family residence for the head of school, as well as space for important Tower Hill events such as Graduation, alumni reunions, faculty retreats and community celebrations. Hayward’s legacy includes his family: His sons Laird ’02 and Brad ’04 are engaged alumni, and Laird currently serves on the board as chair of the Buildings and Grounds Committee. His wife, Tina, was actively involved in planning the school’s 75th and Centennial celebrations.

MICHELLE SHEPHERD Michelle Shepherd completed her term as board chair at the end of the 2018-2019 school year, having contributed to the school in many significant ways since joining the board in 2010. Among many other committees, Shepherd served as chair of the board’s Committee on Trustees, chair of the Head of School Search Committee, a member of the Institutional Strategy and Positioning Study Working Group and a member of the Strategic Planning Committee. Her daughters—Isabel ’20 and Ella ’22—attend Tower Hill. Shepherd’s exceptional work on behalf of Tower Hill School has strengthened the board and the school in a myriad of ways, and the school is extraordinarily grateful for her vision and leadership.

CECILE BUCKLES (awarded posthumously)

Cecile Buckles arrived in Wilmington in 1926 and retired from Tower Hill in 1965. Her life became merged with the school she served, and vice versa. Students in a yearbook dedication said simply: “You are as much a part of Tower Hill spirit as green and white.” Miss Buckles was a Middle School English teacher and eventual head of Middle School. Almost everyone who had Miss Buckles as a teacher remembers the dreaded diagramming, yet most also remember her with deep affection. She saw her students and the school as her family. She named Tower Hill the principal beneficiary in her will. She granted every pupil her respect. Her larger than life character and great spirit made her one of the most remarkable and influential teachers in the history of the school.

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The 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award and Young Alumni Award were presented to Alex Wise ’64 and Mona Yezdani Gillen, M.D., ’01, respectively, during Centennial Weekend at “Tower Hill’s Past, Present and Future” presentation. The Alumni Awards recognize alumni who exemplify the qualities of a Tower Hill graduate, have distinguished themselves among their peers and have been involved with the school through volunteer work, contributions or other ways.

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ALUMNI AWARDS

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD Alex Wise ’64 joined the Tower Hill community at the age of 4. While he attended boarding school from grades 9-12, his roots at Tower Hill ran deep. A true embodiment of the concept of community, Wise has served as a class agent for the Tower Hill Annual Fund for over 50 years, keeping in close touch with former classmates while fortifying significant financial support for Tower Hill. Wise attended the University of Delaware, where he joined the ROTC and became second in command his senior year of a brigade of 1,250 cadets. He was also the leading scorer in lacrosse for three consecutive years. Six months after graduating from the University of Delaware in 1968, Wise was deployed to Vietnam, where he served as a combat infantry platoon leader and company executive officer. Wise served Tower Hill as a trustee from 1981-1993, filling the roles of secretary and treasurer, as well as chair of the Finance and Long Range Planning committees—and inaugural chair of the Personnel Committee— during his tenure.

YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD Mona Yezdani Gillen, M.D., ’01 graduated from Tower Hill in 2001 and received a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania with a major in biology and a minor in the history and sociology of science. She went on to earn her M.D. from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, where she was in the Hobart Amory Hare honor society and graduated with cum laude honors. In 2015 she completed a residency in urology at George Washington University Hospital and went on to do a fellowship in minimally invasive urology at the University of Pennsylvania, where she further specialized in robotics and female urology. Yezdani is now a urologic surgeon practicing with Brandywine Urology Consultants and holds the special distinction of being the first female urologist in New Castle County, Delaware.

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FOUNDERS’ DAY AND PEP RALLY

The all school Founders’ Day celebration on the Friday of Centennial and Homecoming Weekend united all three divisions to celebrate Hiller History, followed by a pep rally full of school and Centennial spirit.

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1. A Lower School student high-fives Tower Hill’s white tiger mascot before the festivities. 2. Upper School students pose for a photo during the pep rally. 3. Lower Schoolers show their school spirit. 4. Head of School Bessie Speers poses for a photo with Middle School students. Photo by Erwin Chen ’20 5. A Centennial surprise, an airplane flew over DeGroat Field during the pep rally displaying a special Centennial message. 6. Science Department Chair Tim Weymouth dressed up as Tower Hill’s first headmaster, John D. Skilton, for a trivia style Hiller History lesson. 10

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6 3 1. Assistant Head of School and Dean of Student Life Art Hall assists with Hiller History. 2. Choir Director Zerrin Martin and the Upper School Chorus lead the student body in the singing of the alma mater. 3. Middle School students take part in the pep rally. 4. Faculty members Kevin Waesco, Steve Cacciavillano and Nicole Keith at the pep rally. 5. Lower Schoolers look up at the plane circling DeGroat Field. 6. Centennial Coordinator Julie Goldston and Associate Director of Advancement Melissa Pizarro pose in front of a 1920s-era firetruck. 6. Music Department Chair Drew Keim and the Upper School band lead the festivities.

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FOREVER GREEN AND WHITE RECEPTION Members of the THS community saluted all former Tower Hill teachers, trustees and board chairs, as well as reunion class years. Tower Hill’s commemorative book, 100 Years of Teaching Excellence at Tower Hill School, was dedicated in memory of former teacher and administrator Ernie Savage by the Casscells Family.

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5 1. Ellis Wasson, Ph.D., school archivist and former History Department chair, co-wrote the commemorative book with Harry Baetjer, pictured in 2. with Susan Miller. 3. Paul Stemniski ’99, Andrew Fong ’99, Josephine Finamore Harrington ’99, Rory Boulden ’99 and Giselle Johnson Booker ’99. 4. Lindsay Wise Tonderys ’96, Mark Smolko ’93 and Carmen Wallace ’93. 5. Matt Twyman ’88, Nancy Barlow, Bill Barlow and Linda Boyden. 6. Michelle Coulter, Pam Matsanka and Patty Vattilana. 7. Steuart Markley and Talley Brown ’81. 12

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CENTENNIAL

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3 1. Members of the Savage family pose with Bessie and Tom Speers and Chris ’71 and Susan Casscells after the dedication of the commemorative book, 100 Years of Teaching Excellence at Tower Hill School. 2. John Newlin signs a dedication to Ernie Savage. 3. Dyann Connor, Barbara Hoover and Kristin Mumford. 4. Jack Smith, Betty Richardson and John Robinson. 5. Former trustees Chris Saridakis, Michelle Shepherd, Linda Boyden, Beverley Wellford Rowland ’56, Robert McCoy ’54, John Osborn, Alex Wise ’64, Jim Holzman, Marc Greenberg ’81 and Josephine Bayard.

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TOWER HILL’S PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE Alumni, faculty and students joined Head of School Bessie Speers for the State of the School, Alumni Awards presentation (see page 9) and panel discussion.

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1. School archivist and former History Department Chair Ellis Wasson, Ph.D., leads a panel discussion with Fibbie Schoonover Smith ’59, Genelle Trader ’70, Chuck Durante ’69, Chris Byrne ’74, Kate Lemay, Ph.D. ’97 and former headmaster Tim Golding. 2. Alumni Council President Ashley Altschuler ’90 announces the Alumni Award recipients. 3. and 4. Mona Yezdani Gillen, M.D., ’01 and Alex Wise ’64 accept the Young Alumni Award and Distinguished Alumni Award, respectively. 4. Director of Alumni Relations Matt Twyman ’88 introduces the alumni on the panel discussion. 5. Head of School Bessie Speers gives the State of the School address. 14

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More than 150 Tower Hill alumni, faculty and parents displayed their books and works of art in this one-of-a-kind Multa Bene Facta extravaganza.

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ARTISTS AND AUTHORS SHOW

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1. Lisa Arrington Clossey ’94 views artwork displayed at the Artists and Authors Show. 2. Art Department Chair John Bartlett and Artists and Authors Show Chair Judy Setting. 3. Andrew Gates ’11 discusses his book, Iris, with Angeline May ’93. 4. Middle and Upper School art teacher Torrey Kist poses in front of her artwork. 5. Former Tower Hill parent Gloria Respress-Churchwell shares her book, Follow Chester!, with Dave Cundiff ’70.

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ATHLETICS AND CAPTAIN RECOGNITION

The Homecoming athletic games took place during Centennial Weekend. Former captains of all former sports were invited onto DeGroat Field during halftime of the football game to be recognized.

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1. Varsity volleyball defeats St. Andrew’s School 3-0 at the Centennial game on Friday, Sept. 20. 2. Upper School students cheer on the volleyball team. 3. Sean Beberman ’20 plays defense against a player from William Penn High School. 4. Cross country runners start their race in Rockford Park. 5. Upper Schoolers cheer on cross country runners. 6. Emma Peddrick ’20 dribbles the ball down the field in the Centennial game against Tatnall; the Hillers won 4-1. 16

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3 1. Aidan Donoho ’20 dribbles the ball down the field. 2. Isaiah Brown ’20 rushes the ball down the field in the football game against St. Elizabeth High School; the Hillers won 30-7. 3. Julian Jackson ’20 runs past the Vikings’ defense. 4. Gracie Bailer ’20 dribbles the ball down the field. 5., 6. and 7. Former captains of all former sports are invited onto DeGroat Field during halftime of the football game to be recognized.

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ALL SCHOOL BARBECUE

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6 1. Agnes Esaka, O.D., Monica Esaka ’32, Krishna White, M.D., and Danika White ’28. 2.The Knackstedt family. 3. Middle School students at the barbecue lunch. 4. Steuart Markley, George Stetson and Brad du Pont ’82. 5. Lois Miller, Diane du Pont, Henry du Pont and Anwar Miller. 6. Elliot Reese ’20, Landon Reese ’18 and Elena Attix ’18.

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Classes ending in “9” and “4” celebrated their reunion during Centennial Weekend. Congratulations to the Class of 1969 on your 50th reunion and to the Class of 1994 on your 25th reunion!

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REUNION LUNCH

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3 1. Debbie Rothschild, Lina Markley, Stu Markley, Jr. ’89 and Jeff Rothschild ’89. 2. Steve Hyde ’59, Mike Castle ’57, Stan Stager ’58 and Larry Beck ’58. 3. Jillian Noyes ’04, Susan Noyes and Rosalind Lynam ’04. 4. Emily Mackey ’09 and Madelyne Lynam ’09. 5. Andy Esposito ’09, Chris Kane ’09 and Mike Schmitt ’09. 6. Bob MacDonald ’79 and Gigi Mackey McDonald ’79.

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REUNION 2019 CLASS OF 1969

50th REUNION

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CLASS OF 1994

25th REUNION

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REUNION 2019

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SAVE THE DATE

Homecoming and Reunion 2020

Oct. 23-24

Visit towerhill.org/homecoming next fall for updated schedules and events.

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CENTENNIAL GALA This festive, fun celebration for the entire Tower Hill community capped off Centennial Weekend with sparkle. Parents, alumni, faculty, staff, parents of alumni, trustees and friends celebrated Tower Hill’s 100th birthday with a once-in-a-lifetime THS gathering that included cocktails, dinner, live music, dancing and fireworks.

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4 1. Chris Williams, Penny Rodrick-Williams, Zerrin Martin, Carmen Martinez and Armando Gomez. 2. Luciana Nunn and Bill Nunn. 3. Susan Casscells and Chris Casscells ’71. 4. Logan Weaver Read ’10, Tyler Read, Lucy Nutting ’10 and Laird Hayward ’02. 5. Head of School Bessie Speers presents gifts of appreciation to Centennial Gala co-chairs Linda Boyden, Erica Donoho and Isabella Speakman Timon ’92.

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1. 1,500 people attended the Centennial Gala on Sept. 21. 2. Joe Zakielarz ’20 and Reece Ratliff ’21 perform the Centennial song, “100 Years Green and White,” which they wrote. 3. Monty Hayman ’87, Genelle Trader ’70, Tony Garcia ’87, Carmen Twyman, Lori Garcia and Matt Twyman ’88. 4. Drew Brady, Evelyn Brady, Tracy Mack, Adrienne Allen, Belinda DuPree and James Allen. 5. Rolando Zamora, Scott Zeplin,5 Ida Leader and Sara Bush.

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CENTENNIAL GALA

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1. Meghan Donlon, Deb Stuebing and Amy Cuddy, Ph.D. 2. Megan Cover, Beth Anderson, Todd Anderson and Michael Ashley ’83. 3. Ronaldo Tello, Brett Brandau, Jason Jowers and Randi Jowers. 4. Lee Vosters ’69, Alletta Bredin Bell ’69 and Toni Bredin Massie ’73. 5. Wiz Montaigne Applegate ’79, Bob Applegate, Corbin Pierson Woods ’89, Stephen Woods, Katharine Maroney, Whit Maroney ’87, Jay Pierson ’87 and Heather Pierson. 26

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5 4 3 1. John Griggs, Jane Hobbs Griggs ’68, Michael Acevedo, Lindsay Hobbs Acevedo ’95, Anne Hobbs, Mary Hobbs Taylor ’09, Chuck Hobbs ’65, Jesse Taylor, Bill Hobbs ’78 and George Hobbs ’75. 2. Kate Lopez Weymouth, M.D., ’94 and Tim Weymouth. 3. Bessie Speers, Bob Bolling ’75, Martha Bolling, Don Fulton and Marlene Zeleny. 4. Lois Miller and Francine Davis-Motley. 5. Bobbi Callazzo, June Wang, Jinson Zhang and Nick Callazzo.

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CENTENNIAL GALA

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1. Hillers dance the night away at the Centennial Gala. 2. Bessie Speers introduces student performers. 3. Mihir Munshi and Shefali Shah. 4. Matthew and Megan Greenberg. 5. Nick Hidell ’04, Emily Hidell, Christine Murowany-Hidell, Tim Hidell, Jessica Hidell and Anthony Hidell ’03. 6. Mike Stepanic and Joe Quig in 1920s inspired attire. 7. Ben Greenberg ’15 and Jack Guan ’15. 8. Perry Beberman, Chris Donoho ’87 and Tracey Beberman. 9. Randolph Urmston ’62, Sally Beck Baker ’62, Lisle Baker and Eliza Davidson. 10. Roxanne Cecil ’12 and Erin Yatzus ’12. 11. Elena Attix ’18, Randall Attix, Ariane Attix ’15, Marina Attix and Richard Attix ’18.

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THE BIG PICTURE Fireworks at the Gala brought the Centennial Celebration to a close, ensuring that all alumni, parents, faculty and friends in attendance had a “blast.�

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CENTENNIAL BOOKS

COMMEMORATIVE PUBLICATIONS CELEBRATE TEACHERS Tower Hill has a long tradition of excellence in teaching. In celebration of teachers past and present, Tower Hill published two books for Centennial Weekend. 100 Years of Teaching Excellence at Tower Hill School, spearheaded by former History Department Chair Ellis Wasson, Ph.D., and former Headmaster Harry N. Baetjer III, profiles a sampling of the many outstanding faculty members who have taught at Tower Hill over a century. The book was dedicated by the Casscells Family in memory of former teacher and administrator Ernie Savage, who worked at Tower Hill for 30 years. Following on pages 33-34 are two excerpts from this keepsake publication. Current teachers were encouraged to write essays about their work in the classroom for the first volume of what will become an annual publication: Teaching Today at Tower Hill School. Faculty members in every division across many disciplines shared perspectives about what, how and why they teach a great variety of ages and subjects at Tower Hill. One of the essays can be found on page 52 of this Bulletin, written by Mandarin teacher Wendy Liu, Ph.D. Both books can be found at towerhill.org/100, and for hard copies, please contact the Advancement Office at 302-657-8353.

1YE0AR0S of Teaching E xcellence at

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YEARS TAUGHT: 1926-1965

Born in Missouri and raised in Iowa, Cecile Buckles arrived in Wilmington in 1926 and retired from Tower Hill in 1965 (although she continued to edit the Alumni Bulletin until 1978). Her life became merged with the school she served, and vice versa. Students in a yearbook dedication said simply: “You are as much a part of Tower Hill spirit as green and white.” Miss Buckles was a Middle School English teacher and eventual head of Middle School. She believed strongly in diagramming sentences, and her former students experienced a lingering dread for the rest of their lives about dangling a participle or splitting an infinitive. Her standards were high, and many pupils found her classes almost too demanding. Yet a frequently recurring theme in alumni recollections about her was epitomized by former U.S. Sen. Mike Castle ’57: “Her English lessons, so difficult for some of us at the time, are much appreciated now and will aid all of her students all of their lives.” Almost everyone who had Miss Buckles as a teacher remembers the dreaded diagramming, yet most also remember her with deep affection. She saw her students and the school as her family. She named Tower Hill the principal beneficiary in her will. She granted every pupil, however wayward or unprepossessing, her respect. She never raised her voice even amidst scenes of chaos during mass rehearsals involving the entire Middle School for her celebrated Christmas pageants. She authored and directed these annual productions with the same care and creativity that she brought to every extracurricular activity under her supervision. As with so many such projects, like the huge Easter egg painting event, she was the creator and chief source of energy behind the scenes. The “happenings” lived and died with her.

CENTENNIAL

CECILE BUCKLES Most famous of all the Buckles creations was Pooh Store. Students constructed the building (in the basement stairwell area near what is today the kitchen). A correspondence was launched with A. A. Milne and Christopher Robin. She rose at 5 a.m. to bake fresh batches of brownies to sell that morning. The bestpainted Easter eggs were made available for sale. Drums were beaten to exceed the profit records of previous years. As with all Buckles productions, students were central, however, both as consumers and sellers. They managed the books and ordered the stock. The money accumulated went to a class gift or other purposes such as the purchase of playground equipment for a segregated school in Georgetown. No alumnus of the Buckles years has a bad thing to say about Pooh Store. It was not grammar that was at the heart of what Miss Buckles taught. She valued children, not some academic subject. She modeled integrity and character. Her creativity sparked a response in others. Her enthusiasm for life flowed over students like a penumbra of electricity. Her acts of imagination and courage rubbed off as pupils struggled with the intricacies of English grammar. She worked hard to build self-confidence, to help students understand that they could overcome difficult challenges, that life was full of fun and joy. She laughed frequently. She could be frighteningly direct and even stubborn, but she was a towering force for growth and good. Miss Buckles took new faculty members under her wing and told them stories about individual students that helped them become better teachers. She also told them stories about Tower Hill. Consciously and unconsciously, she shaped the way the institution grew as a school. On the bridge, Headmaster Fowler preached a far more relaxed and progressive view of what teachers should do in the classroom. Miss Buckles down on the lower decks ignored that advice. This was a woman who carried a key ring with 28 keys on it. Everything was organized and diagrammed. However, Fowler and Buckles were deeply in accord on the importance of creativity, kindness, encouragement, integrity and learning by doing. Together they shaped a legacy that has survived a century of change. She once wrote to him: “I cannot tell you what it means to me to work and to live under the guidance of a man so capable as [you].” Her larger-than-life character and great spirit made her one of the most remarkable and influential teachers in the history of the school. —Ellis Wasson, Ph.D. Tower Hill Bulletin

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ERNIE SAVAGE YEARS TAUGHT: 1956-1986

It is fair to say that few more remarkable men ever taught at Tower Hill than Ernie Savage. He was a bundle of contradictions: scholar (Princeton and Harvard), teacher, coach and administrator with a golden sense of humor and absolute seriousness in the pursuit of his work. During his first year teaching, Mr. Savage was exasperated with students in his American history class. They were not engaged in the topic at hand. Mr. Savage threatened to hide under his desk and stay there until somebody started talking. Silence. Under the desk he went. The door opened and Headmaster Brooke Stabler entered to assess the quality of the new hire in the History Department. It is a tribute to both men that Mr. Savage survived this apparition and went on to be an incomparable department chair, dean of students, director of the internship program, head of Upper School, assistant headmaster, varsity baseball coach and friend and supporter of several generations of Hillers. Few teachers at Tower Hill have matched Mr. Savage’s versatility in job responsibilities. Successive headmasters felt comfortable departing for their summer vacations to remote locations and turning over the operation of the school to Mr. Savage. He was at ease with board chairs, parents, admissions, hiring and fundraising, and he was not above running full tilt after miscreants, chasing

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them down Rising Sun Lane, if necessary, despite a somewhat portly frame. He also sidled up to students in the hallways, with an ominous “Where’re ya goin?” locking arm under an arm and doing business, both good and bad, with a helplessly ensnared victim. Mr. Savage threw himself into school life whether it was in the classroom or playing a mean hand of gin rummy with seventh graders on the Cape Henlopen trip. His favorite expletive was “Yikes!” Nothing was above his talents or beneath his dignity. Although he demanded high standards of discipline, he could talk to students with a candor and compassion unequaled by any of his colleagues. What everyone remembers about Mr. Savage was his laughter and his kindness. His greatness as a teacher lay in his intense interest in the lives and needs of the students in his classes. He was constantly available to kids, however small the problem might be. His warmth, his encouragement, his humor and his joie de vivre were infectious and made him beloved. It was the students, he said, that “keep me hopping!” —Ellis Wasson, Ph.D.


100 Voices of

Tower Hill Tower Hill School is collecting short videos of Tower Hill alumni, students and teachers sharing their favorite THS memories, which can be found at towerhill.org/100. Send your own one-minute video to Amy Wolf at awolf@towerhill.org. You may also email to set up a time for an in-person interview.

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ROUND THE

CLOCK TOWER

Centennial Weekend was a whirlwind of activity—a century’s worth of celebrations packed into just two days! When you’re the head of school, you’re required to be just about everywhere. We documented Bessie Speers’ whereabouts on the busiest Friday and Saturday of the century.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 36

Founders’ Day | Friday 2-3 p.m. Speers joined students and faculty to share history about Tower Hill’s founders and celebrate with a spirited pep rally led by Upper School.

Forever Green and White Reception | Friday 5-7 p.m. A salute to all Tower Hill faculty, staff, trustees and board chairs, past and present.

THS Artists and Authors Show | Friday 7-9 p.m. More than 150 Tower Hill alumni, faculty and parents in the arts and letters displayed their books and works of art.

Centennial Convocation | Saturday 10-11:30 a.m.

Speers joined students, faculty, dignitaries and honored guests to celebrate the moment when Tower Hill officially turned 100 years old.

Alumni Reunion Lunch | Saturday 12-1:30 p.m.

Reunion class years ending in “9” and “4” and alumni who already celebrated their 50th reunion were invited to a special luncheon at Hayward House.

Tower Hill’s Past, Present and Future | Saturday 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Alumni, faculty and students joined Speers for a State of the School presentation and panel discussion.

Tower Hill Football Game | Saturday 3-5 p.m.

Tower Hill’s football team defeated St. Elizabeth High School 30-7. Former captains of all sports were recognized during halftime of the game.

Gala Cocktail Reception | Saturday 6-7 p.m.

Alumni, parents, faculty and friends enjoyed “tower-tinis” and other cocktails in the St. Amour Garden.

Centennial Gala | Saturday 7:30-11 p.m.

This festive, fun celebration for the entire Tower Hill community capped off Centennial Weekend.

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Tower Hill’s Past, Present and Future

Forever Green and White Reception

6

Friday 5-7 p.m.

Saturday 1:30-2:30 p.m.

2 4 3

Convocation

Saturday 10-11:30 a.m.

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THS Artists and Authors Show Friday 7-9 p.m.

Centennial Gala

Saturday 7:30-11 p.m.

1

Founders’ Day

Friday 2-3 p.m.

8

Centennial Gala Cocktail Reception

Saturday 6-7 p.m.

Alumni Reunion Lunch 7

5

Saturday 12-1:30 p.m.

Football Game

Saturday 3-5 p.m.

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PEOPLE. PROGRAMS. PARTNERSHIPS.

TOWER HILL 100 The Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign will raise $19.19 million, in honor of the school’s founding year 1919, to fund initiatives critical to our success in the next century.

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TOWER HILL 100

From the Director of Advancement Dear Tower Hill families and friends, Tower Hill’s Centennial Weekend provided a magical opportunity for Hillers spanning the decades to reunite and celebrate their love for Tower Hill. Additionally, the Centennial Celebration has created a springboard for Tower Hill to launch into the next century, looking toward the future and considering important questions and solutions for the continued success of this extraordinary school in the next century. Informed by the work of the strategic planning committee, the collective vision of the Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign honors a longstanding tradition of academic and teaching excellence. The campaign also challenges Tower Hill to be innovative in ensuring an exhilarating, timeless educational experience for our students. The Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign aims to raise $19.19 million, in honor of our founding year, to invest in the priorities outlined in the strategic plan. This comprehensive campaign is a deliberate investment in Tower Hill’s most valuable assets: our students and faculty. Growing financial aid and professional development endowment funding, investing in programs that will enhance students’ skill sets in the 21st Century, and creating sustainable partnerships that truly make Tower Hill a school “of Wilmington and the world” are the top priorities of this campaign. We are incredibly grateful to our leadership supporters in the Early Investor Circle, whose commitments to the priorities of the Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign brought us $10 million toward the goal of $19.19 million. The Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign reaffirms one of Tower Hill’s founding priorities to “offer students an opportunity for education of the highest order” and to be a national leader in teaching excellence. Full realization of this comprehensive campaign’s goal of $19.19 million will ensure that Tower Hill’s tradition of excellence continues well into the next century. Please join us as we achieve new heights together! With appreciation, Kristin Mumford Director of Advancement and Enrollment Management

TOWER HILL ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE Régis de Ramel, co-chair Isabella Speakman Timon ’92, co-chair Ashley Altschuler ’90 Robert DeSantis John Gavenonis, Ph.D.

Rick Gessner Laird Hayward ’02 David Nowland ’85 Lisa Olson ’76 Logan Weaver Read ’10

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CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN INVESTING IN PEOPLE, PROGRAMS AND PARTNERSHIPS BY TERESA MESSMORE, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

One hundred years ago, Tower Hill was founded with the ambition to elevate education in Wilmington— and in the country. The school’s founders shared a bold vision for an innovative school, investing in exceptional people, facilities and curricula. A century later, Tower Hill is honoring that commitment to excellence with the launch of the Centennial Campaign: Tower Hill 100. This transformative fundraising initiative will augment the school’s endowment and enhance the educational experience of students and faculty. “The bedrock of Tower Hill in 1919 and in 2019 will always be the human side: the people, programs and partnerships,” Head of School Bessie Speers said. “We’re committed to raising $19.19 million, in honor of Tower Hill’s founding year, so that we can continue to be a school of excellence.”

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Tower Hill 100 is the school’s first fundraising campaign in over a decade—and first-ever comprehensive campaign. A comprehensive campaign bundles an institution’s multi-year Annual Fund goals over all campaign years with identified fundraising needs, including endowment support and capital and program initiatives. The result will be a single, integrated fundraising effort over multiple years that will strengthen and expand programs today and provide financial strength in the long term. “If you’re not ambitious and you’re not investing right now, you’re falling behind,” said Marna Whittington, Ph.D., treasurer of Tower Hill’s board of trustees. “So we have to do that, but we’re also very well positioned right now. We’ve got a strategic plan that has been extraordinarily well vetted and built over time, we know our strengths and weaknesses, and we have


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a clear understanding of what we’re preparing our young people for and what they need. So now is the time to invest in achieving that strategic plan.”

GOAL

$19,190,000

Tower Hill’s strategic planning committee developed broad, schoolwide goals three years ago focused on the forward looking needs of students and faculty. Dynamic discussion across various constituencies resulted in a cohesive vision to invest in faculty, build an engaged and diverse and inclusive community, and provide an exhilarating and timeless educational experience. The strategic plan honors the spirit of innovation championed during Tower Hill’s early years, when visitors around the globe toured the school as an example of best practices in education.

TO DATE $10,000,000

“We can look back at our founders and say, they took an enormous risk, and put an enormous amount of resources into building something that didn’t even exist: a world renowned school that wasn’t a boarding school,” said Trustee Laird Hayward ’02. “This is a unique opportunity for us to look at how they invested in the future and do the same.”

CAMPAIGN PRIORITIES

Tower Hill 100 provides a path forward to accomplishing goals identified in Tower Hill’s strategic plan. The campaign priorities are:

Investing in Faculty

PEOPLE Financial Aid and Affordability

PROGRAMS

Exhilarating Academic Program

PARTNERSHIPS

Building an Engaged and Diverse Community

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CAMPAIGN PRIORITIES Investing in Faculty Financial Aid and Affordability

Teachers are the heart of Tower Hill, and investment in the development of faculty is critical to the school’s continued growth as a national leader in independent school education. Tower Hill 100 will help increase faculty salaries above current levels, which currently sit at the 50th percentile mark of national averages. The campaign will further subsidize tuition for teachers pursuing advanced degrees and provide opportunities for faculty recognition such as endowed chairs, sabbaticals or distinguished teaching awards. Funds for faculty recruitment and innovation are also included in campaign goals. • Increase salaries • Subsidize graduate studies • Faculty recruitment • Establish faculty innovation fund • Expand recognition (endowed chairs, sabbaticals, teaching awards)

Tower Hill’s financial aid budget is smaller than a number of peer schools in the Wilmington area— despite having increased financial aid 48% from $2.1 million four years ago to $3.1 million this year. Recent market research revealed that the school is losing qualified students who are interested in a Tower Hill education due to their family’s concerns about affording tuition. Stronger admission outreach encouraging families to apply for financial aid is broadening the base of qualified applicants, and campaign gifts in this area will support further gains. “We need to give all the talent in the area access to Tower Hill,” said Trustee Jack Flynn, M.D. ’81. “Financial aid allows that talent to have that access and brings economic diversity to the classroom. Economic diversity, like all kinds of diversity, has powerful educational value. It is valuable to teachers, students and the whole mission of Tower Hill.” • Increase financial aid • Subsidize academic expenses for students demonstrating need (books, materials, trip fees)

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TOWER HILL 100

Exhilarating Academic Program

Building an Engaged and Diverse Community Curiosity, problem solving and a love of learning set students up for success later in life. Tower Hill is committed to providing an innovative, exhilarating and timeless educational experience that fosters these qualities. Building on the strength of a rigorous academic program, the school is expanding offerings and resources that complement existing coursework and make interdisciplinary connections while maximizing learning. “Faculty and students are excited to embrace real world learning that has every bit of rigor that Tower Hill is known for—and will always be known for— but also includes hands on, experiential aspects that ensure our students are engaged at the top level,” Speers said. • Further develop Global Initiatives • Provide experiential learning opportunities such as Tower Term • Expand the Teaching and Learning Center • Improve use of library space • Integrate Experiential Outdoor Classroom with Lower School curriculum

Tower Hill serves a public purpose as a school of Wilmington and the world. The Tower Hill 100 Campaign will provide funding for facility and programmatic improvements that will empower students to become community leaders and global citizens. The school is invested in creating programs and spaces that encourage collaboration and partnerships. • Create spaces for community and collaboration • Expand Social Justice Program • Build strong community partnerships • Strengthen Service Learning Program • Develop mentoring partnerships with Wilmington middle schools

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WAYS TO GIVE BY MELISSA PIZARRO, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT

Thanks to the generous support of trustees, alumni, parents and friends, $10 million has been raised through Tower Hill 100 so far. These gifts support campaign priorities through one of three giving channels: endowment, capital and program initiatives, or the Annual Fund. All are critical to the financial success of Tower Hill, yet they function very differently.

CAPITAL AND PROGRAM INITIATIVES

The Capital and Program Initiatives component of the campaign refers to specific projects that require dedicated and immediate funding in order to develop, such as the creation of the Experiential Outdoor Classroom dedicated in November 2018, as well as the upkeep and maintenance of existing facilities. Gifts to capital and program initiatives have an immediate impact and help enhance the school’s facilities to meet the evolving needs of teachers and students. The Middle and Upper School Library, for example, has not been upgraded since it was built in 1973 and no longer suits the technology-driven, interdisciplinary work required of today’s learners. The Campus Master Plan evaluated how the school can improve use of existing space, reconfigure classrooms, add new learning and presentation spaces and create more opportunities for students to collaborate, as they will be required to do in college and the workplace. “An investment in facilities directly impacts people and programs, and our students and teachers deserve updated teaching and learning spaces,” Head of School Bessie Speers said.

Savings Account Investment

Needs to Increase with the Growth of the School.

Lasting Security

Stability During Times of Recession

BUFFER

Long-term

FOUNDATION FOR THE FUTURE

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ANNUAL FUND Checking Account

Every Year ACCESSIBLE

Expenses Not Covered by Student Tuition

SMALL GIFTS MAKING LARGE IMPACTS

IMMEDIATE NEEDS

ENDOWMENT

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Available to Use Shortterm

Reoccurring

$

GOAL BREAKDOWN

Annual Fund

Endowment Support for Faculty and Students

Capital and Program Initiatives

$19.19 million ANNUAL FUND

Dollars committed to Tower Hill’s Annual Fund go directly to supporting Tower Hill’s operating budget and the highest day-to-day priorities. The Annual Fund encompasses all professional and volunteer efforts, ranging from online solicitation and direct mail asks to email and phone appeals and in-person requests for support. The Annual Fund makes up nearly 5% of the annual operating budget. In addition to supporting financial aid and faculty salaries, Tower Hill’s Annual Fund expands learning opportunities and provides components that enhance programs and activities in our school— such as team uniforms, computers, theater costumes, field trips and musical instruments. The Annual Fund is also part of the Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign; gifts to the Annual Fund allow us to keep tuition as low as possible, covering the gap between the real cost of educating a student and tuition. Last year Tower Hill reached a new threshold, meeting $1 million for the first time in school history. The total $1,023,310 raised included a 15% increase in leadership donors, defined as those who give $1,000 or more annually. This progress indicates growing philanthropic support for Tower Hill.


ENDOWED FUND YEAR 1 Establish your Endowed Fund $100,000 gift

YEAR 25

YEAR 50

$128,121 in cumulative grants and services $164,061 balance

Initial gift has grown and paid out:

$338,318 in cumulative grants and services

TOWER HILL 100

PROJECTED GROWTH OF AN

$269,159 balance

3 times

6 times Assumes 4% annual payout and 7% rate of return.

ENDOWMENT SUPPORT

An endowment fund is a permanent, self-sustaining source of funding. Composed of gifts and bequests generously donated by philanthropic individuals, families or organizations, endowment funds are vital to maintaining the quality and breadth of Tower Hill’s programs. After endowment funds are invested for one full calendar year, a portion of the income earned provides support to the operating budget, while the remainder is added to the principal to build the fund’s market value. This enables an endowment fund to grow over time, providing support for its designated purpose, which may include general operating support, in perpetuity. Endowment funds also safeguard institutions against market volatility. When you establish an endowment fund, you create a permanent legacy of support for Tower Hill School.

currently stands at over $41 million. The Investment Committee and school work with an outside investment advisor to ensure best practices and policies, including the endowment spending rate. Existing restricted endowment funds at Tower Hill support critical needs ranging from faculty salary support and professional development funds to student financial aid and special awards. Unrestricted endowment funds support general operating expenses. Endowed funds at Tower Hill can be created with a minimum of $50,000 (which may be payable over a period of time), or through a future gift, a bequest or from your estate. For more information, please contact a member of the Advancement team, who can work with you to ensure that your wishes and the needs of Tower Hill are simultaneously met. Endowment gifts can be used to honor a family, individual, teacher or program.

The Investment Committee of the Board has oversight responsibility for the school’s investment portfolio and reviews and evaluates portfolio composition and performance quarterly. Tower Hill’s endowment

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LEADING THE WAY

The Kullman family after Maggie Kullman ’08 earned an MBA from Northwestern University.

KULLMAN FAMILY DONATES $1.5 MILLION GIFT TO TOWER HILL 100 CAMPAIGN BY KRISTIN MUMFORD, DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

Tower Hill School is delighted to announce a transformational leadership gift of $1.5 million from the Kullman family—Trustee Ellen Jamison Kullman ’74, Michael Kullman, Maggie Kullman ’08, David Kullman ’12 and Stephen Kullman ’12. This generous contribution will significantly advance the strategic initiatives of the Tower Hill 100 Campaign, specifically to: •

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Invest in Tower Hill’s excellent faculty by endowing a faculty innovation fund that will subsidize faculty graduate studies and create a travel stipend program to recognize distinguished faculty. Invest in financial aid, which will enable Tower Hill to attract the best and the brightest students.

“Ellen Kullman’s dedication to Tower Hill as an alumna, parent and trustee of the school has been nothing short of exemplary, and her family’s loyal involvement has been tremendous,” Head of School Bessie Speers said. “This leadership gift will make a significant impact on Tower Hill’s ability to support faculty and students and further advance the mission of Tower Hill.”

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In recognition of this remarkable gift, the new dining commons will be named “Kullman Commons” in honor of the Kullman family. This new space, located in the heart of Tower Hill, will enable academic excellence at the highest levels, by unhinging the academic scheduling process from lunch, something the school could not do without this community space. Kullman Commons will be a community space that also represents the values Kullman and her family have exemplified throughout their decades-long relationship with Tower Hill—a belief in the power of community, intellectual curiosity and a closeknit family. “The foundation I received at Tower Hill prepared me for a successful career as a leader in the field of science,” Kullman said. “Each of our children benefited from the academic excellence and rigor of a Tower Hill education. As a family, we believe in investing in education, and in particular financial aid, which ensures access to a Tower Hill education for top students who might otherwise not be able to attend.”


After graduating from Tower Hill and Tufts University and earning a master’s degree in management from Northwestern, business executive Ellen Jamison Kullman ’74 climbed to the top of the corporate ladder as chair and CEO of DuPont. Ranked among Fortune and Forbes magazines’ most powerful women, she serves on multiple corporate boards and advocates for gender equity in the workplace.

Ellen Jamison Kullman ’74 and fellow members of the Class of 1974 in the 1973 Tower Hill yearbook.

Kullman shared her business and leadership expertise with students as part of the Forum Speaker Series during the 2007-2008 and 2014-2015 school years.

TOWER HILL 100

THE KULLMANS’ COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY

Kullman joined Tower Hill’s board of trustees in 2007, serving as vice chair from 2010-2019 and chairing the compensation committee from 2018-2019. Her three children, Maggie ’08, David ’12 and Stephen ’12, attended Tower Hill, and today Maggie serves on the school’s Alumni Council. The Kullmans’ generous philanthropic support has included leadership gifts to the Math and Science Center and the Campaign for Athletics, in addition to 35 years of consecutive giving to the Annual Fund.

Kullman received a Centennial Medal at Tower Hill’s Centennial Gala in September for her exceptional leadership and philanthropic commitment to the school, pictured with fellow recipient Bill Daiger.

A newly constructed dining space will be named Kullman Commons in honor of the Kullman family’s transformational leadership gift to the Tower Hill 100 Campaign. The family’s $1.5 million gift supports a faculty innovation fund and financial aid. Kullman Commons, which encloses a courtyard adjacent to the existing dining room, will provide dedicated meeting space conducive to teacher and student collaboration. Construction is scheduled for completion in May 2020.

Ribbon Cutting—May 2020

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DONOR SPOTLIGHT: CHRIS AND PENNY SARIDAKIS MAKING AN INVESTMENT NOW AND FOR THE FUTURE

Q&A WITH KRISTIN MUMFORD, DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

The philanthropically minded Saridakis family is actively involved in supporting health care, education and arts organizations in Delaware. Tower Hill is among the beneficiaries of their generosity, most recently through a leadership gift to the Tower Hill 100 Campaign in support of global initiatives and computer science. Their son Dean ’19 graduated last year; Sander ’20 and Harry ’20 are seniors; and their daughter, Nicole ’20, attended Tower Hill through eighth grade and graduates from St. Andrew’s this spring.

The Saridakis family at Graduation 2019. From left to right, Harry ’20, Penny, Dean ’19, Chris, Sander ’20 and Nicole ’20.

Why is Tower Hill important to you and your family, and what inspired you to give to the campaign? Penny: What has made the most impact on us is the sense of community. Our children have been here since PreK; the boys have attended from PreK all the way through, and there is a deep sense of gratitude for the school community. Tower Hill has instilled in them curiosity and a love of learning. We believe in paying it forward, so that all Tower Hill students can continue to benefit from an even stronger school with each passing year. We’ve seen a huge strengthening of the school in the past four or five years with Bessie’s leadership, and we just see it continuing to grow at a more rapid pace in the future. Chris: Another important factor for us is that this campaign’s focus is growing the endowment to support students, teachers and academic programs. Tower Hill has done a fantastic job building a university setting, and at this point, it’s important to fill the hallways with people who inspire children to learn. What excited us was the focus on how can we do more with resources coming from this community so we can build a better, more prosperous, flourishing school. We believe, from having lived in the state since 2002, that it’s incumbent upon Tower Hill to lead in this state from an educational standpoint. People look to it as a beacon of strength and an important partner within the community. 48

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So what are some of the areas—programs, clubs and new initiatives—that you feel have enhanced the experience of your three boys? Penny: So many things! I believe leadership opportunities, first of all, have played a huge role in their development. They have all risen to the occasion, and while everybody starts off slow in ninth and tenth grade, by eleventh and twelfth they really hit the ground running. They have the confidence and the knowledge to follow their passions and know what they can get involved with—and actually go and do it. So, Model U.N. has been an amazing thing for Harry. He started the Apiary Club this year. Even going back to Dean, they all started something, which has been a great thing. Chris: There are opportunities. It’s broader than a club and more than just a game. You can define your path within Tower Hill as an Upper Schooler. Sander is passionate about equities and investments. Dean was always excited about having a balanced conversation and started Hillside Chats and building up the Young Republicans Club. It was about, “How do we have a conversation—a dialogue, not a debate?” I think the openness of the school lets these opportunities occur, and they lead to students coalescing around ideas. That’s probably the best form of education they can have in the Upper School. Penny: I think that mirrors the state of Delaware, actually, because it’s small enough that you can make an impact. If you want to do something, you can either do it yourself or you can find someone to help you. So there’s a feeling of empowerment that comes out of this school. It is very forward thinking and allows people to explore and go down the path of their passions. What inspires you to give to the endowment? Chris: The endowment is truly an investment in the future because it will yield returns every year and compound. By making that investment now, we look at it and say, “What can the school look like in the next hundred years, and how can we support that vision?”


WITH 45 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE IN FINANCIAL SERVICES, BILL DAIGER VIEWS TOWER HILL AS A SMART INVESTMENT Q&A WITH TERESA MESSMORE, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

Bill Daiger sat on Tower Hill’s board of trustees from 2006 to 2018, serving as treasurer and guiding the school’s investments and finances in prudent and insightful ways. Before retiring, Daiger was the president and CEO of Maryland National Bank, the vice chair and director of MNC Financial Corp, and chairman and CEO of MBNA Europe. He is the grandfather of Loring Weaver Knott ’08 and Logan Weaver Read ’10, and his major gift to Tower Hill 100 supports educational technology.

TOWER HILL 100

DONOR SPOTLIGHT: BILL DAIGER

Why are endowments important to institutions such as Tower Hill? Endowments are the capital base for an institution. It serves as a base against bad times. It also tangibly shows that those who have benefited from Tower Hill have been willing to pledge money to grow that endowment. The bigger the endowment, the more income it throws off, which then can be used by the school for faculty and for financial aid. The bigger the endowment is, the bigger the opportunity to expand financial aid and continue to attract well rounded, diverse students to the student body, which is healthy, I think, in the long run for the school. Why did you direct your gift to technology? I think giving the student body the opportunity to learn about technology and to use technology is helpful. So ensuring that every kid gets the opportunity to have a piece of technology that’s going to help them do their homework, help them learn more and help faculty to teach innovatively is important. In addition, I think a critical, critical factor for independent schools is cost management. I think that anything the school can do that uses technology to help reduce costs will keep Tower Hill extremely competitive in the future. What are some characteristics about Tower Hill that you think make the school special? Strong history. Willing to be innovative and change. Firm on the traditions that are part of its foundation. Well diversified in both curriculum and activities— sports, culture, music, etc. And a commitment over 100 years to continue to be an innovator, to be different, and to be at the top of the class, which it has done. Why are both the Annual Fund and the Tower Hill 100 Campaign important to a school’s finances? The endowment supports the critical strategic things that the school needs or wants to do. When you talk about financial aid, the spin-off from the endowment income is used primarily for that. The Annual Fund, in my mind, supports the shortfall between tuition and the operating expenses of the school. The reason,

I think, the Annual Fund has done so well is 1.) This administration has really focused on bringing attention to it, and 2.) The school’s costs aren’t rising so dramatically that people say, “Gee, without the Annual Fund they wouldn’t exist.” So they apparently and justifiably feel like the Annual Fund is enhancing and not just subsidizing, which I think is critical. You think of the innovation, the strategic plan, the fact that it’s been communicated across the board, the fact that you see what’s happening now and the opportunity for things that are going to happen in the future … People get excited about that. Is there anything else you think is important for others to understand as we move forward with the campaign? It’s a one-time opportunity for graduates to recognize the value they have gotten from their education at Tower Hill. This is one time to say, “Thank you, Tower Hill, for making me what I am!”

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DONOR SPOTLIGHT: LOUISE CUMMINGS-LEWIS

OUTDOOR CLASSROOM TO INSPIRE CREATIVE LEARNING FOR NEXT 100 YEARS Q&A WITH AMY WOLF, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

Louise Cummings-Lewis is a Lower School parent, and her major gift to Tower Hill 100 supported the Experiential Outdoor Classroom, which was dedicated in November 2018 in memory of her late husband, Delaware State Police Corporal Stephen J. Ballard. my daughter, Abigail, talks about really enjoying it. Her class goes outside every day for a mid-morning break, and they just get to get some fresh air. I think that’s really important for our children to not only focus inside the classroom and learn indoors, but to be outdoors as well.

What inspired you to make a gift to the Tower Hill 100 Campaign? What inspired me to make a gift to the Tower Hill 100 Campaign was really when my husband died two years ago. The community and Tower Hill rallied around us, and they were just so wonderful. We wanted to find a way at this particular celebration that we could give back and show our appreciation and also allow for something the school and its students could benefit from. I found out the teachers had wanted an Outdoor Classroom for about 10 years, and I knew it was the perfect fit. My husband was always in the community and giving back, and he went to a lot of schools to see lots of students in his line of work, so it was really perfect. It was the best situation for us where we could show our gratitude, and we could also do something that would help kick off the campaign in a positive way. How has the Tower Hill community benefited from the Experiential Outdoor Classroom so far? The Tower Hill community is benefiting from the Outdoor Classroom in so many ways. I’ve seen art classes out there, theater, music and in particular science. They’ve done so many great things in the gardening area, and the kids really get a hands-on experience. It’s one thing to read about something or watch a video in the classroom. But to be outside and be able to plant a seed and to see green beans and radishes grow ... It’s been really amazing. And I know 50

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How did your vision for the Experiential Outdoor Classroom compare to the finished playground? When I made the gift, I knew it was a vision. Just from loving the teachers and knowing the inspiration that they bring, I knew that it was going to be something that would be very beneficial. The area used to be just concrete and grass. It was a nice, big space, but very unused. I saw all the plans and all the different renderings, but I never could have imagined what it actually turned out to look like. It’s really amazing. It’s a big, lovely and bright space. It cheers you up. It makes you happy. I’m just really grateful I was able to contribute in that way, and it wasn’t one thing that could happen just one time. It’s something that can continue to live on for the next 100 years. Why is it important to invest in your child’s school? I think it’s important to invest not only in the school where your children attend, but also where you’re an alum. I went to a private school in Massachusetts, and when you’re a student or even a young alum, you don’t think that much about it. But once I actually got on the board of that school, I got to see the ins and outs of how the school operates and really what a school needs. There are always needs and things that can be improved, and the only way that we can do that is through investment. So whether it’s families—current parents and grandparents—or alumni, it’s just really important. You’re investing not only in the time that your child’s here, but you’re really buying into the institution and education for all. So that’s why I think it’s very important. We were happy to be able to invest and give a gift that students can benefit from for years. Abigail will be out of Lower School in two or three years, but this will carry on. I think that’s really important—once you understand, truly, where the money goes and that it is an investment that the school can build off of. So the Outdoor Classroom kicked things off, and now we have the ability to do other great things that the strategic plan wants to do.


“PAYING IT FORWARD” MOTIVATES GIVING FOR FINANCIAL AID BY KRISTIN MUMFORD, DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

Jack Flynn, M.D., ’81 was a recipient of financial aid while a student at Tower Hill. Today he is Chief of the Division of Orthopaedics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. A nationally recognized orthopaedic leader, Flynn’s primary clinical and research focus is scoliosis care for children and teens. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Johns Hopkins University and his M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Flynn joined Tower Hill’s board of trustees in 2017 and now serves on the Executive Committee. His family established and endowed the Flynn Family Scholarship in 2014.

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DONOR SPOTLIGHT: JACK FLYNN, M.D., ’81

Each year, incredibly talented and qualified students are admitted to Tower Hill but are unable to enroll due to financial reasons. A Tower Hill education has simply been unattainable for many middle class families. Over the past four years, in alignment with the strategic plan, Tower Hill has increased financial aid from $2.1 million to $3.2 million. Currently 35% of our student body receives financial assistance, with an average grant size of $11,500. Entering a second century, Tower Hill is committed to growing its financial aid resources as a top priority of the Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign. By establishing endowed financial aid funds, Tower Hill will expand its ability to attract prospective students and provide financial aid to all qualified candidates. Trustee Jack Flynn, M.D., ’81 shares his perspective on why the commitment to increasing financial aid resources is critical to Tower Hill’s success in the next century. Access for talented students: “We need to give all the talented students in the area the ability to access Tower Hill. Financial aid brings economic diversity to the school and the classroom. Economic diversity, like all kinds of diversity, has a powerful educational value—it is valuable to teachers, students and the mission of Tower Hill. We must find a way to level the playing field and to put an extraordinary education in reach for those students who have limited means, but not limited dreams. More talented students make Tower Hill better in every way.” Paying it forward: “With a strong financial aid program, Tower Hill will graduate more and more students who recognize somewhere down the road that their success is related to the transformative impact of their Tower Hill education. Then in Tower Hill’s second century, it’s going to have more and more people whose lives have been transformed. They’re going to look back and they’re going to feel a really strong desire to give back. I certainly can attest to that. As the oldest of six kids, not even one of us could have afforded to

Jack Flynn, M.D., ’81 and his wife, Mary, at the Forever Green and White Reception during Centennial Weekend.

go to Tower Hill on full tuition. All six of us were able to go to an independent school, four to Tower Hill, thanks to generous scholarship funds and the sacrifice made by our parents, Frances and Jimmy Flynn. It was absolutely transformative for us all.” Sustainability: “Financial aid strengthens a school’s admission outreach and also the retention of great students. Endowed financial aid resources also protect against the ever-changing economy and demographics of the Wilmington area. Making financial aid a priority now not only allows access, but strengthens the overall financial outlook for Tower Hill for the next 100 years.”

Inspired by the sacrifices of Frances and Jimmy Flynn, the Flynn Family Scholarship Fund was established and endowed in 2014 and assists with tuition for students entering or continuing in the Upper School at Tower Hill who have demonstrated academic excellence and ambition, with promise in athletics, music or the arts.

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FACULTY IMPACT

HELPING STUDENTS FIND SUCCESS LOCALLY AND GLOBALLY BY WENDY LIU, PH.D., MIDDLE AND UPPER SCHOOL MANDARIN TEACHER

Tower Hill has a vision to design programming around curricular innovation and global engagement so that our students can find success locally and globally in the 21st century. To support the school’s vision, I was privileged to participate in the Harvard Graduate School of Education Learning Think Tank on Global Education (2016), the Art of Leadership (2017) and Deeper Learning for All (2018). Those opportunities were eye-opening and heart-opening experiences that prompted me to bring the same level of inspiration to my students. We are teaching students of the future who are global citizens. Making those connections from local to global—and from self to the world—enables students to situate themselves in the fastchanging world and identify the role that they could play to make the world a better place.

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innovative tools to present their collections of information from different channels. 4) We take field trips to the Chinatown in Philadelphia and local restaurants so students can experience the culture and use the language beyond the classroom setting. 5) A project-based assessment system is introduced so that students can put into practice what they have learned in class and evaluate the impact and results. 6) An inquiry mindset is instilled in students, and various tools and learning platforms are introduced to students so they can continue to use those tools for exploration after school. Knowledge is not told but co-constructed constantly by the class in a collaborative manner.

I take the commitment of teaching very seriously at Tower Hill. I am determined to create an innovative learning environment where students are encouraged to be the thinkers, architects and leaders of their learning journey. 1) Students are paired up with same-age peers in China so that they can exchange language and cultural learning instantly with the aid of technology.

7) Think cross-disciplinary approaches. For example, working with the Music Department to create the Jasmin Flowers show; working with the Visual Art and Design Department to compare art from the East to that of the West; working with the History Department to review historical documents in both Chinese and English to find commonalities and differences; working with a few international teachers to engage students in cultural studies through the lens of culinary art.

2) Community members who have personally and professionally engaged in traveling to and from China are invited to serve as classroom speakers to share their insights. Students have the opportunity to engage in research of the topics introduced by the guest speakers and dive deeper into areas of their own interest.

Within three years, the enrollment of the Mandarin program grew tremendously from 10 to around 100 students, from sixth to 12th grade. Nothing is more rewarding than teaching. The sparkles that I see in their eyes every day give me tremendous joy and energy to continue to do what I love to do.

3) A critically comparative lens of viewing world affairs, social issues and history is encouraged as students use

This essay appeared in Teaching Today at Tower Hill School.

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NANCY TATE TAKES INSPIRATION FROM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT BY AMY WOLF, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

Whether it’s renewable energy, climate change or too much plastic in the ocean, Lower School science teacher Nancy Tate never runs out of topics for classroom discussions or lessons. In fact, she’ll often use real world problems—whatever is going on in the news that week or that month—as inspiration for her curriculum.

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FACULTY IMPACT

She’s also inspired by real world problems that she sees are on the horizon—a big current issue being sustainable farming and food distribution. “There are ways to talk about it with kids so the light kind of dawns for them, and they realize that not everybody has a grocery store they can walk into that’s got full aisles of produce and lots of food and things to buy,” she said. “And then we can walk outside, and we can teach them how we can grow our food right here in our own gardens.” While there have always been gardens at Tower Hill, with the addition of the Experiential Outdoor Classroom in November 2018, the opportunity to grow tomatoes, cucumbers, herbs and even popcorn plants has become more abundant. Students are able to not only be a part of the process of growing a plant—from planting a seed to picking a vegetable off the vine—but they’re also able to see the benefits of their hard work. Oftentimes, the food grown in the garden is used by the kitchen staff for lunch. “You tackle a real world problem in a non-scary way by dividing it into steps so the kids can see that they can be part of the solution, and that is really exciting,” Tate said. “When you see kids start to become thoughtful and really offer ideas and suggestions, that’s when you know that kids are really starting to get it.” Much of what Tate has done in the Experiential Outdoor Classroom has been inspired by the professional development opportunities in which she’s participated. Two years ago, she attended the National Children and Youth Garden Symposium, which is put on by the American Horticultural Society. “It was very impactful to me, because I heard all these people talk about not just school gardens, but gardening in general and tips and ways to get kids involved. I went to sessions where they had some great ideas for kids,” she said.

“Kids learn they don’t have to buy a fancy watering can. They can be innovative and creative—and kids will learn that lesson.” Last year, Tate also had the opportunity to visit Princeton Day School to learn about its award winning school garden. While these professional development opportunities have been great, she said, there’s always more to learn. In fact, to make the Outdoor Classroom even more successful, she’d love to travel to California to sit in on a session by Eric Nelson, author of Cultivating Outdoor Classrooms, who offers outdoor classroom specialist trainings. For Tate, there’s always more the school could be doing, whether it’s adding more benches around campus, adding a greenhouse to the Outdoor Classroom or even finding the space for Tower Hill’s own farm. “What if somebody donated 20 acres and said, ‘We’ve got the perfect place to put in an apple orchard’? And I’m not only talking about plant-based things; a farm would include all the domains of science: Earth science, life science, physical science, engineering and technology.” While Tate has many ideas for the paths her curriculum could take, she always stays true to her belief that everything she does in her classroom has to remain student centered. “It has to be not what I want; it has to be what the kids think we should do,” she said. “The more they feel excited and passionate about what they’re working on, the more likely they’ll be committed to it. The possibilities really are endless.”

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Riley Cuddy ’20, Ryan Winston ’19, Baily Faller ’20 and faculty member Sharon Reynolds on their trip to Australia in 2018.

STUDENT IMPACT: BAILY FALLER ’20 A MODEL IN GLOBAL LEARNING AND LEADERSHIP BY MELISSA PIZARRO, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT

When Baily Faller ’20 entered Tower Hill School in 2011 as a fourth grader, she already held a deep appreciation for international travel. When she was 5 years old, her parents took her and her younger brother on a three-month, around the world adventure, which began in Japan, and introduced her to Southeast Asia and several parts of the European and African continents. In fifth grade, she was selected by CISV International (formerly known as Children’s International Summer Villages) to represent the mid-Atlantic region of the United States as part of a delegation being sent to Japan for one month in the summer. She joined 47 other 11-yearolds from around the world to learn about other cultures while creating lasting bonds of friendship among members of different countries. What Faller didn’t know then was that her love for international travel and cultural awareness would only grow from there—a love that was fueled by her passion for learning and the opportunities presented to her by the Global Initiatives program at Tower Hill.

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Tower Hill’s Global Scholar Certificate Program provides Upper School students with opportunities to explore global dynamics, leadership and cultural growth. Participating students complete academic coursework, language proficiency, travel, a senior project and extracurricular activities and service with a worldwide focus. For Faller, it was this very program that kept her at Tower Hill when she faced a decision on whether to transfer to another high school for ninth grade. “The Global Initiatives program embodied what I was looking for; it was compelling to me,” she said. “The ‘Of Wilmington and the World’ idea that we have a responsibility to our community and are encouraged to do service projects locally—and also learn abroad and take what we learn back home and apply it to our local community—all contribute to our roles as global citizens.”


“We went for three weeks, tried on their uniforms and really immersed ourselves,” she said. “I joined up with a partner who then came here to experience a co-ed school in Delaware. It was a homestay program, so we really got to experience the nuances in differences between Australia and the United States. I even learned some Aussie slang. We still keep in touch today. I’ve just really enjoyed all the international students who have spent time [at Tower Hill] as part of the Global Initiatives program and learning about their perspectives. They truly bring personalities to their grades and more to the overall Tower Hill experience.” Faller credits Director of Global Initiatives Eduardo Silva with her increased confidence and her taking on a leadership role in the program. “Mr. Silva has been so helpful and welcoming in the program, and [he] encouraged me to chair the Global Initiatives Board,” she said. “There are two Upper School student representatives per grade, and we meet every other week. We plan roundtable conversations and host international nights, where students and faculty set up presentations and/or booths that reflect their own culture. I especially enjoy the more ‘interactive’ stations, where we learn to make food and do cultural projects. [The program] requires a lot of support from teachers.” A host of the top colleges and universities in the United States now appear on Faller’s application list. After leaving Tower Hill, she intends to continue her language studies and interdisciplinary interests and wishes to major in international relations and economics. “Through Global Scholars, I’ve been inspired to think about how all my classes are globally impacted,” she said. “The certificate program makes me think about how even math and science are related to global studies. This semester I’m working on a paper analyzing whether the cultural identities of Azerbaijan and Georgia identify more with the continent of Asia or Europe. And is that identity subject to change in this globalized world? I’m interested in researching how that’s changed, particularly in this social media driven climate.”

Through the Tower Hill 100 Campaign, there are multiple ways to support the Global Initiatives program, including funding for faculty professional development, the global speaker series and expanded international exchanges and partnerships, as well as ensuring every student who seeks a global experience has the opportunity to participate. For more information, please contact a member of the Tower Hill Advancement team.

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In Middle School, Faller recalled hearing about the Australia exchange trip with St. Catherine’s School, an all-girls school in Melbourne, and she couldn’t wait to take part.

Global Initiatives at Tower Hill School Tower Hill values the importance of providing a global education, with international travel, exchange programs and multicultural coursework long interwoven into the school’s offerings. As part of this emphasis, language teacher Eduardo Silva also serves as director of global initiatives to enhance educational opportunities for students schoolwide. The aim is to develop global scholars in a rapidly growing international community by offering students crosscultural experiences with individuals from around the world in both social and intellectual settings. Providing students with the confidence to network and collaborate with people of different backgrounds helps inspire future global leaders. Guest speakers dealing with international relations are brought on-campus, and the development of new courses with global studies is underway.

Travel Opportunities in 2019-2020 • China • Quebec • France • Puerto Rico • Peru • Rome • Scotland exchange program • Australia exchange program

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STUDENT IMPACT: SEAN BEBERMAN ’20 APPLYING RIGOROUS ACADEMICS TO REAL WORLD PROBLEMS BY KRISTIN MUMFORD, DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

and apply information from one discipline to another. This interdisciplinary mindset and approach has helped me excel in classes where I may not have otherwise. Whether it is taking my knowledge of Roman culture and society from a Latin course and applying it to my Modern European History course when learning about the Renaissance, or applying my knowledge from history to contextualize novels in English class, I have acquired the skill to connect classes and apply knowledge in ways that increase the value of my learnings.”

As a distinguished academic scholar, a three-sport athlete and student leader, Sean Beberman ’20 has made the most of his experience at Tower Hill. He attributes his success to the challenge of Tower Hill’s academic program, the opportunity to collaborate with his teachers, coaches and peers, and the development of his strong work ethic and love of learning, fostered by every Tower Hill teacher he has had since fifth grade. “My teachers have always pushed me to solve problems, think differently, analyze and draw conclusions and have fun along the way,” he said. As an Upper School student, Beberman has taken advantage of Tower Hill’s Advanced Course offerings, such as Advanced U.S. History, Advanced Chemistry, Advanced Latin and English electives, Advanced Calculus I and II, Advanced Modern European History, Advanced Government and Advanced Calculus Based Physics. Beberman has been recognized as an AP Scholar with Honor by the College Board and has been named an Academic Scholar with Distinction for every term in the Upper School at Tower Hill. More importantly to Beberman, his Tower Hill education has enabled him to think critically across disciplines and apply his knowledge beyond the classroom. “My courses and my teachers have really challenged me to think in different ways and take an idea to the next level,” he said. “I have learned to make additional connections

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Beberman has benefited from the experiential learning opportunities at Tower Hill by enrolling in the Social Innovators Program in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania as well as participating in two Tower Term courses in his sophomore and junior years. In the Social Innovators Program, Beberman learned about design thinking and has leveraged this knowledge to build and establish a sustainable Youth Leadership Council (YLC) at the Ronald McDonald House of Delaware (RMHDE). “Through my research, I was able to create the foundation and rubric for the RMHDE YLC,” he said. “My goal was to get students involved from different grades from many surrounding high schools to expand awareness, and now we have established a council consisting of 10 diverse, talented students from five area high schools. It’s the most fulfilling thing I’ve done in the sense that I can see firsthand how I can take academic learnings and apply them to real world problems to do good.” Beberman is quick to acknowledge that his interests in academics, athletics and the arts have been nurtured at Tower Hill. He is also deeply appreciative of the “choices and variety of elective classes, Tower Term courses and student clubs, as they truly create a culture of excellence and provide opportunities to try new things.” After graduation, Beberman looks forward to continuing his pursuit of a liberal arts education. The Tower Hill 100 Centennial Campaign will provide funding for facility and programmatic improvements that will allow for the full implementation of the strategic plan, empowering students to become critical thinkers, passionate learners, empathetic leaders and global citizens. For more information about how to invest in these initiatives—in academics, athletics and the arts— please contact the Advancement Office.


YOUNG ALUM WORKS TOWARD CAREER AS FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICER Q&A WITH AMY WOLF, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

Nasir Wilson ’15, a recent University of Delaware graduate, is currently working at the U.S. Department of State in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, which includes countries in Northern Africa and the Middle East. He is also in school full time at American University working toward a master’s degree in U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security. He is currently actively engaged in fulfilling the requirements for the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship, which he was awarded in November 2018, and preparing himself to enter into the Foreign Service. As part of his fellowship, he is also in the process of selecting a summer internship in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs.

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ALUMNI IMPACT: NASIR WILSON ’15

What interested you in U.S. Foreign Policy? I love my country and have a strong passion for public service. Since high school, I always wanted to serve my country and make a positive impact in the world, no matter how small. I believe that it is important to leave the world a little better than I found it, and I hope that I can not only make lasting impressions in the U.S. Government and the Foreign Service but also in the lives of the people that I may encounter in the future. What was your experience like at Tower Hill? My experience at Tower Hill was very enlightening. THS not only prepared me well for college, but it also helped me interact with people from a variety of different backgrounds and understand their unique contributions to society. It was my first time entering into a space that was unlike my own cultural background, which is important for any person entering into corporate America and the real world. How do you feel that Tower Hill influenced your life and career? Tower Hill helped influence my life and career by helping to establish the strong foundation I would need to lead to a career in public service. I was always fascinated with all of the history, English and Spanish classes that I took because I knew I would eventually pursue a career in the government, and my teachers helped broaden and encourage my interest in those subjects. Attending THS helped me significantly improve my writing skills, gain a better understanding of the world and learn another language, which are all important for my future career as a Foreign Service Officer and future diplomat.

What do you enjoy doing outside of school and work? Outside of school and work, I enjoy traveling, trying different foods and learning about the histories and cultures of the people and places I visited or will visit. I think it is important to learn about various places and cultures around the world because it makes me a more informed global citizen. It is also nice to get away and relax occasionally.

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CURRICULUM IMPACT: K-12 TECH

ANTHONY PISAPIA ON HOW TECHNOLOGY SETS STUDENTS UP FOR SUCCESS Q&A WITH AMY WOLF, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

In the 2019-2020 school year, the Computer Science Department brings four classes to the Upper School: Introduction to Computer Science, Programming and Algorithms, Data Structures and Advanced Computer Science Principles. Below, Assistant Head of School for Academics and Chief Innovation and Information Officer Anthony Pisapia explains how Tower Hill is bringing computer science principles to its curriculum schoolwide. Why is it important that Tower Hill invest in a computer science program? Today and in the future, there is no future job— there is no component of one’s professional life— that will not be touched by, influenced by or directly changed by computer science. Whether it’s a surgeon using a robot for surgery as they do at Christiana Hospital today, or a first-year lawyer spending their time delving through electronic databases to find case law that is pertinent and useful, most careers involve technology. Certainly if you aspire to be a CEO or entrepreneur, you need to be facile with technology. There are very few disciplines—very few professions—that will not be or are not touched by computer science and technology. So, I think, in

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the spirit of Multa Bene Facta, Many Things Done Well, at this point we exclude computer science at our peril. We include it because we recognize that fluency in the language and the terminology and the approach to problem solving is going to help set our students apart. How does Tower Hill differentiate its computer science program from those at other schools? There are many computer science programs that focus on the language, the syntax and the mechanical components of computer science. What you can wind up with is a broad survey of different concepts. Where I think we differentiate ourselves is in making these skills practical, no matter if you


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K-12 COMPUTER SKILLS A sample of the technology skills students learn in each grade at Tower Hill

Aa KINDERGARTEN

GENERAL TECH AND ORGANIZATION SKILLS

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FIRST GRADE

SECOND GRADE

WORD PROCESSING AND GRAPHIC DESIGN

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND DIGITAL IMAGERY

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FOURTH GRADE KEYBOARDING SKILLS AND DIGITAL TOOLS

SIXTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

TOWERMAIL AND PRESENTATION SKILLS

INTERNET AND INFORMATION LITERACY

©

EIGHTH GRADE

ONLINE SAFETY/ETHICS AND COLLABORATION

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KU

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SEVENTH GRADE

SPREADSHEET SKILLS AND PRESENTATION SKILLS

GRADES NINE - 12

ONLINE RESEARCH AND TROUBLESHOOTING HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE

want to pursue computer science as a career or if you want to pursue a humanities career, our experiences with computer science are ones that help us create, problem solve and deliver the kinds of products and solutions that will be valuable to people. We’re not focused solely on the content that you need to learn to get the AP credits; we go beyond that and really turn it into a powerful tool for young adults. It’s kind of the difference between speaking a language conversationally versus only knowing grammar and syntax. Both are good, but one makes you more powerful as a communicator, more powerful as a practitioner and ultimately more capable in life. You don’t need to know six languages. You need to be adept. If you know a few words in 10 languages, that’s not nearly as valuable as being able to speak one or two fluently. What is the potential for the computer science program at Tower Hill? The potential would be that we’re integrating computer science—in a way that’s meaningful—in

THIRD GRADE

INTERNET SAFETY AND SPREADSHEET SKILLS

every grade. I think we’re going to see an evolution where the typing, computing, word processing, PowerPoint and other tool usage will be taken as a given, and we’re going to integrate some of that into our classroom work and then really focus on how we separate out computer science to give kids a head start. So there will be less of a focus on the old way of teaching technology, because kids are raised with this technology. They have an intuitive understanding we can certainly reinforce, but we aren’t necessarily teaching those basic skills anymore. I envision a future where we have Middle Schoolers who are able to look at a data set from NASA and find a planet, or Upper Schoolers who can prototype apps for businesses while they’re here. In the Lower School, that might mean really providing a base for that kind of problem solving. I think there’s a lot of great potential. We will certainly be connecting it in an interdisciplinary way with the sciences. Those integrative approaches are ripe with possibilities.

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THANK YOU

to our Tower Hill 100 early investors who have committed $10,000 or more to the strategic priorities of the Centennial Campaign.

Anonymous (3) Anthony E. Weymouth Foundation Inc. Aware Foundation Mrs. Sally Beck Baker ’62 Dr. Laurence H. Beck ’58 Dr. William W. Beck Jr. ’57 Ms. Margaretta S. Brokaw ’95 Mr. Thomas C.T. Brokaw ’64 & Mrs. Margaretta Bredin Brokaw ’66 Dr. G. Mark Bussard ’90 Dr. Christopher D. Casscells ’71 & Mrs. Susan Warren Casscells Dr. Kimberly Wright Cassidy CSP Family Foundation Dr. Anthony R. Cucuzzella ’82 & Mrs. Lucinda Cole Cucuzzella Ms. Louise E. Cummings-Lewis Mr. & Mrs. William H. Daiger Jr. Mrs. Phoebe Brokaw Davidson ’97 & Mr. Charles B. Davidson Mr. Régis A. de Ramel Mr. & Mrs. Joseph DeSantis Robert & Suzanne DeSantis Mr. Christopher R. Donoho III ’87 & Mrs. Erica Reedy Donoho Mr. Benjamin F. du Pont ’82 & Mrs. Laura Lemole du Pont Dr. John M. Flynn ’81 & Mrs. Mary Flynn Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. Franta Mrs. Amanda Walker Friz ’92 & Mr. Robert W. Friz Mr. & Mrs. E. Thomas Harvey III Mr. Bradford L. Hayward ’04 Mr. Laird R. Hayward ’02 Drs. Robert & Rachel Heinle Dr. & Mrs. Eric T. Johnson Mrs. Loring Weaver Knott ’08 Mrs. Ellen Jamison Kullman ’74 & Mr. Michael E. Kullman Mr. David R. Kullman ’12 Ms. Margaret O. Kullman ’08 Mr. Stephen J. Kullman ’12

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Marmot Foundation Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Henry C. S. Mellon Mr. & Mrs. Jay R. Miller Mr. James W. Morris ’73 Mr. David T. Nowland ’85 Dr. Mehmet C. Oz ’78 & Mrs. Lisa Jane Lemole Oz Mrs. Sumitra Patel Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Pettinaro Mrs. Logan Weaver Read ’10 Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Saridakis Dr. Christopher J. Saunders ’80 & Mrs. Alice M. Saunders Judy & Joseph Setting Mr. & Mrs. David M. Shepherd Mr. & Mrs. John P. Sheppard The Rev. & Mrs. Thomas G. Speers III Stratus Foundation Edna M. Sutton Trust in memory of Charles S. Sutton ’31 The Curran Foundation The Edward E. Ford Foundation The Lemole Family Charitable Trust The Starrett Foundation Tower Hill School Class of 1966 Global Studies “Of Wilmington and the World” Fund donors Tower Hill School Faculty Fund to Aid Students (FFAS) Mrs. Isabella Speakman Timon ’92 & Mr. Philip C. Timon Mr. Randolph W. Urmston ’62 Ms. Anne A. Verplanck ’76 Mr. Carmen M. Wallace ’93 Mr. Rodman Ward III ’83 & Mrs. Gina Farabaugh Ward Mrs. Susan Hill Ward ’54 & Mr. Rodman Ward Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Thomas D. Whittington Jr.


CENTENNIAL SPONSORS DIAMOND

Wilcox Landscaping CulinArt Catering Collection

PLATINUM

Hord Coplan Macht, Inc.

GOLD

Eisner Amper LLP ModernControls Inc.

SILVER

Delaware Today Fairfax Discount Liquors Hagley Museum and Library Whiting-Turner Contracting Company

BRONZE

Breakwater Accounting and Advisory Corp. Chester County Life First Choice Cleaning Services TD Bank, N.A.

PATRONS

Hy-Point Dairy Farms Lyons Companies McClafferty Printing Rockland Bakery Sobieski Life Safety, LLC

Tower Hill thanks our Centennial sponsors, who underwrote a total of $200,000 of the Centennial Celebration. Tower Hill Bulletin

Special Edition 2019 61


Tower Hill School 2813 West 17th Street Wilmington, DE 19806

Upcoming Events Tree Trim—Dec. 20 Young Alumni Gathering—Jan. 10 Palm Beach Alumni Reception—Feb. 19 Grandparents’ and Friends’ Day—April 9 NYC Alumni Reception—April 21 Tower Hill Today—April 24 Spring Musical Into the Woods—April 24-26 Evening of the Arts—April 29 Field Day—May 22 Graduation—June 5 Tower Hill Golf Outing—June 8 Summer Alumni Reception—July 2020