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Cell C sees the value and potential in the Tourism Industry and has partnered with SATSA to deliver value to the members. CELL C ALONG WITH SAMSUNG WILL BE SHOWCASING THE LATEST IN MOBILE TECHNOLOGY AT THE INDABA 12 – 15 MAY 2012. COME SEE US AT THE SATSA STAND TO SEE THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY AND SPECIAL OFFERS.


Contents Issue 3 of 2012 (May/June)

PUBLISHER Tourism Tattler (Pty) Ltd. PO Box 891, Umhlanga Rocks, 4320 KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Company Reg.No.: 2006/015252/07 Website: www.tourismtattler.co.za MANAGING EDITOR Des Langkilde Tel: +27 (0)32 947 2554 Cell: +27 (0)82 374 7260 Fax: +27 (0)86 651 8080 E-mail: editor@tourismtattler.co.za Skype: tourismtattler EDITOR Marjorie Dean Tel: +27 (0)11 886 9996 Fax: +27 (0)11 886 7557 E-mail: communications@satsa.co.za Skype: satsa-comms ADVERTISING MANAGER Bev Langkilde Tel: +27 (0)32 947 2554 Fax: +27 (0)86 656 3860 Cell: +27 (0)71 224 9971 E-mail: bev@tourismtattler.co.za Skype: bevtourismtattler SUBSCRIPTIONS Email: subscriptions@tourismtattler.co.za Skype: subscribetourismtattler Official Trade Journal of:

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Win one of two long-weekend breaks EDITORIAL 07 From the Editors Desk / Cover Story 10 About SATSA / About RETOSA 12 Letters to the Editor 28 Competitions ATTRACTIONS 14 Dinokeng Game Reserve 16 The Greatest Show on Earth AVIATION 18 Call for EU Emissions Moratorium BUSINESS 20 Embracing Job Creation 22 Tourism Industry Provident Fund CONSERVATION 24 Lawrence Anthony Earth Organization 26 Life with Lions ENVIRONMENT 30 Saving the planet on bottle at a time 31 Greening your tourism business EVENTS 34 Destination Conference Feedback 36 Lessons from ITB Berlin HOSPITALITY 38 Service Excellence Requirements HOSPITALITY 39 Featured Resort - Sani Pass Hotel

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How to tap into a $12 Billion Travel Channel 43 45 46 47 48 49 52 53 54 55 59 60 61 62

LEGAL Case Study - EC Directive & CPA MARKETING Mossel Bay Economy Results $12 Billion Travel Channel SATSA Market Intelligence Report Tattler Launches eJobs Portal PHOTO GALLERY Photographer Profile - Harry Stoker PROCUREMENT Soft Branding RISK & INSURANCE Risk Management in Hospitality TECHNOLOGY Gadgets & Gizmos TRADE NEWS Trade Snippets TRAINING & EDUCATION Customer Service Excellence TRANSPORT AARTO Quick Facts Setting the Benchmark RESPONSIBLE TOURISM Defining Responsible Tourism

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS The Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA) PO Box 7381, Half Way House, 1685 Tel: +2711 315 2420/1 Fax: +2711 315 2422 Webite: www.retosa.co.za

Martin Hatchuel Martin Jansen van Vuuren Monique Horwitz Ntombi Mashaba Pete Wilton Samantha Bartlett Skye Grove Yvette Taylor

Adv. Louis Nel Asenath Elizabeth Alves Des Langkilde Dr. Peter Tarlow Francoise Malby-Anthony Get Smarter Juergen Thomas Steinmetz Marjorie Dean

ADVERTISERS

The Southern Africa Tourism Services Association (SATSA) PO Box 900, Ferndale, 2160 Tel: +2786 127 2872 Fax: +2711 886 755 Webite: www.satsa.com

SATSA PROUD SPONSOR

02 Tourism South Coast 04 Cell-C 06 Linked 2 South Africa 06 Savage, Jooste & Adams Attorneys 08 Bromwell Mall 09 Amado 17 ABSA Bank 19 ABSA Bank

23 25 29 32 38 39 52 64

ABSA Bank SATIB Trust TransMedia Barter SATIB Insurance Brokers Pelican Collection Sani Pass Hotel & Leisure Resort Hotel Amenities Supplies Mercedes Commercial Vehicles

Disclaimer: The Tourism Tattler is published by Tourism Tattler (Pty) Ltd and is the official trade journal of the Southern Africa Tourism Services Association (SATSA). The Tourism Tattler digital e-zine, is distributed free of charge to bona fide tourism stakeholders. Letters to the Editor are assumed intended for publication in whole or part and may therefore be used for such purpose. The information provided and opinions expressed in this publication are provided in good faith and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Tourism Tattler (Pty) Ltd, SATSA, its staff and its production suppliers. Advice provided herein should not be soley relied upon as each set of circumstances may differ. Professional advice should be sought in each instance. Neither Tourism Tattler (Pty) Ltd, SATSA, its staff and its production suppliers can be held legally liable in any way for damages of any kind whatsoever arising directly or indirectly from any facts or information provided or omitted in these pages or from any statements made or withheld or from supplied photographs or graphic images reproduced by the publication.

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EDITORIAL

From the Editor’s Desk It’s Indaba time again, and our industry is heading for Durban, South Africa, and gearing up for the biggest marketing push of the year. In the food business, marketers “sell the sizzle – not the steak” and in tourism, the equivalent is to get our potential customers, who sell our region to their customers, to see, hear, taste, smell and enjoy Southern Africa. That’s why the Indaba Travel Trade Show is so important – it’s a close up experience of our wonderful region and all it has to offer. We can market ourselves as a fascinating region, with so much to offer from Cape Point to Mount Kilimanjaro, from the Namib Desert to the Indian Ocean coral reefs. Truly we have special and uniquely exciting experiences for everyone as our cover story on the Dinokeng Region (page 14) and report on the South Coast Sardine Run (page 16) go to show. We have learnt from the past (pages 34 and 36) and grown in other ways too, by embracing green principles (page 31), environmental and conservation ethics (pages 26 and 30), responsible tourism (page 62), and more. We are truly developing a much more sophisticated service ethic, (page 38) and upgrading resort and conference facilities (pages 39 to 42). Sadly, we have to report the unexpected passing of Lawrence Anthony but also the great news that he has received an important posthumous award and that his work will go on (page 24). We have a couple of interesting new sections – our recently

launched “eJobs” website portal (page 48) places potential employers in touch with jobseekers with the rights skills, and our barter trade section (page 46) reports on a hitherto unexplored travel channel that offers an added advantage of reducing cashflow expenses. And on matters financial, we have an update on the SATSA Umbrella Provident Fund (Page 22), which is doing a sterling job to enable those who work in an uncertain industry to provide for their later years. Our letters page highlights the multitude of “tourism surveys” that come up with nothing new, and seldom spur the action that is needed. As the letter writer says, we need “Less Yada Yada” and “more Ka-Ching Ka-Ching”, to quote a great advertising slogan. We also have an update on the ongoing Malalane Safari Lodge controversy, proposed for the Kruger National Park. As we go to press, the Gauteng e-tolling proposal is in court and the judge has just released a statement that the implementation date set for 30 April has been postponed pending a full review. This issue has galvanized both the South African public and commercial industry as has nothing else has done in years! SATSA has been among those taking up the cudgels, especially on behalf of tourism, as the proposed tolls would impact severely on tour operators particularly through hugely increased costs. It would seem that government is bowing to democratic pressure to reconsider this whole project. Marjorie

Cover Story

‘Africa in one day’

Our cover for this edition features an unusual angle of a Blesbok antelope photographed in Dinokeng - a Gauteng Provincial Government Blue IQ strategic economic infrastructure investment initiative, located in the northeastern quadrant of Gauteng, South Africa and managed by the Gauteng Tourism Authority.

The name Dinokeng - a place of rivers - is derived from the languages of the Batswana and Bapedi who traditionally made this region their home. Dinokeng lies in the catchment area of the Olifants and Limpopo Rivers - which means, according to some African cultures, that this is a sacred place with healing powers.

Blesbok are extinct in their natural highveld habitat but they have increased in population to the point where they are now abundant and avidly bred in the Dinokeng region.

Through development and management of Dinokeng as a tourist destination close to the metropolitan areas of Gauteng, the initiative aims to encourage economic growth, job creation and social upliftment. Sustainable development of the natural, cultural and historical heritage of the area provides tourists with an “Africa in one day” experience.

However a subspecies of the Blesbok, the Bontebok, is one of the rarest antelope in the world and endemic to South Africa occurring naturally in the Fynbos and Renosterveld areas of the Western Cape. Although the two species can interbreed, the offspring being known as the Bontebles or Baster blesbok, the two species do not share the same habitat in the wild. Bontebok were once extensively killed as pests, and were reduced to a wild population of just seventeen animals, but the species has since recovered.

Read more about Dinokeng on pages 14 and 15.

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EDITORIAL

About SATSA “SATSA has been the Hallmark of Quality Tourism in Southern Africa for more than 40 years”. Craig Dysdale - SATSA President Our Vision is to be the most recognised and sought after endorsement of good business practice in the Southern Africa Tourism Industry. Our Purpose is to provide domestic and international tourism buyers with quality advice and reliable information on credible tourism partners in Southern Africa.

SATSA has an Executive Committee (ExCo), elected by members, that is charged with making policy decisions concerning the running of the organisation. The National Office is managed on a day-to-day basis by an appointed CEO, COO and staff.

Our Aim is to help our members manage successful, profitable businesses that are part of a vibrant and sustainable inbound tourism industry.

SATSA is committed to enhancing quality in tourism throughout Southern Africa and has signed an MoU with RETOSA to facilitate this objective.

We achieve this by focusing on:

SATSA is committed to transformation in the industry and has signed an MoU with the Tourism Empowerment Council of South Africa to this effect.

LOBBYING – We champion the interests of our members with Government to ensure South Africa has a legislative and fiscal framework that allows their businesses to grow and prosper. PROFESSIONALISM – We promote best practice and encourage lifelong learning. We facilitate through mentoring of newcomers to the tourism industry, and other means, the provision of vocational and management training that will improve quality, encourage staff development and provide the prospect of a fulfilling and rewarding career path in inbound tourism. To ensure standards are maintained, SATSA members are required to update all their information every year. NETWORKING – SATSA is a trans-national organisation, but provinces in South Africa have their own Chapters, with a Chair and Committee. This allows members to be more involved in provincial matters at a local level. The chapter structure also enables SATSA to obtain detailed feedback from its members on issues affecting the tourism industry. Through our Chapter meetings and annual conference we provide opportunities for our members to develop relationships with tourism suppliers, buyers and partners both abroad and in Southern Africa through a programme of business and social events.

SATSA promotes Responsible Tourism SATSA is the only inbound non-government organisation whose members are bonded against involuntary liquidation of other members. SATSA offers members a variety of benefits from an excellent provident fund, insurance and specialist legal advice, to arbitration in case of disputes. SATSA looks after the interests of the private sector and private enterprise by lobbying government on behalf of its members - and others in the industry. SATSA works with other tourism organisations to promote and run various national recognition programmes. SATSA promotes education in tourism through its Annual Conference, its bi-weekly electronic newsletter SATSA RAP and its journal, The Tourism Tattler, which is available in both online and print versions. For more information visit http://www.satsa.com

About RETOSA

“RETOSA aims to foster tourism growth to the benefit of all SADC stakeholders”. Francis Mfune - RETOSA Executive Director The Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA) is a Southern African Development Community (SADC) body responsible for the development of tourism through marketing and promotion of sustainable regional tourism in SADC member countries. The organisation works closely with member states, institutions and societies to ascertain their interests and priorities, to help identify potential counterparts and to promote tourism growth and development by marketing the region as a multi–faceted but single destination. RETOSA believes that if sustainably developed tourism offers the SADC countries the opportunity to: • Drive economic growth and boost job creation throughout the economy; • Increase export earnings and attract inward investment; • Aleviate poverty and stimulate rapid economic development in rural and peripheral areas; • Assist with broader economic development by using Tourism related

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infrastructure networks;

and

transport

• Increase lobbying efforts in the transport and communication sector in liberalization of air transport and development of international hubs to allow direct air access to more destinations in SADC; • Work with the private sector in collaborative ventures with a focus on sustainable development, open markets and human resource development; • Draw on abundant natural and cultural resources in partnership with local communities and other stakeholders and improve the quality of life for all residents; • Draw on a strong core Brand already developed by the sector in communicating the Region’s tourism identity. For more information visit http://www.retosa.co.za/


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

with 271 and 305 respondents respectively. One of the more earthshattering key findings was “Consumers of heritage and cultural tourism products are concentrated at the younger, middle and elderly adult ages”. Well, yes…

Dear Editor, In my time at the Tourism Business Council of South Africa, I read a multitude of strategies from sundry government departments. Almost all of these were never followed through and most found useful service as doorstops. The better ones were later quoted in other strategies, which then just repeated the cycle. The truth of the matter is that too much time and money is spent on the peripheral information, and not enough on the heart of the matter. I would like to use the new National Heritage and Cultural Tourism strategy as an example. However, before I get into detail, I must stress that I have not seen the original terms of reference and I am assuming that the development was outsourced to a consulting firm. My comments are based purely on the main document as published. This report is 60 pages long, including the abbreviations and the references. The strategic focus, as it is termed in the document (I assume the actually strategy as requested by NDT) runs to six pages, with a further page of recommendations. The other pages are taken up by: • Table of Contents (3), • Standard Definitions (4), • Executive Summary (4), • Introduction (10), • Situation and Comparative Studies (18) and • References (2). It is always important to place things in context, explain the methodology and process involved in compiling the strategy but this report provides little that wasn’t already known and certainly nothing ground-breaking to assist NDT in the vital task of developing our cultural and heritage assets. The report relies heavily on a literature review that seems to focus on the 1996 White Paper, the NTSS and a few SAT Annual Reports. In fact, the consultant very kindly reprints Section 6 of the White Paper, just for good measure. THIS IS STUFF WE ALREADY KNOW. And then to add insult to injury, some information is patently incorrect. The list of abbreviations includes “DOP” for the Department of Sports and Recreation (SRSA) – whilst appropriate, probably not appreciated. Four pages of “key stakeholders” include THETA, (which is, of course, CATHSSETA these days), an arbitrary selection of theatres like Artscape, the Playhouse and the State Theatre, as well as duplicating the THETA listing as “an entity responsible for supporting the development and growth of small, micro and medium enterprises”. I assume they mean TEP, as they do at least give the correct web address. The Tourism Business Council of South Africa doesn’t get a mention. The primary research undertaken is extremely limited but, given that this is a costly and time-consuming undertaking, I am sure this was limited by the terms of reference and budget. In total, 39 cultural tourism products and 41 heritage tourism products were selected, 12

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While great pains were taken to segment the respondents into age, gender, race and education, there is no reference to national versus international visitors – something I would consider vital information. There is also “useful” information such as that most of the consumers knew about the products before their visit, and most recorded that the reasons for visiting cultural products were for a cultural experience and to learn more about the different cultures in South Africa. There are also direct contradictions – in one paragraph, the research refers to consumers suggesting prices be more affordable and in the very next paragraph, the report states “the cost to experience the products was seen as affordable”. One section grandly entitled “Policy Analysis and Legal Implications” lists a number of Acts that potentially could impact tourism development but gives absolutely NO interpretation or discussion of any legal implications. Whilst I cannot claim to be a legal expert, I am fairly certain that there could be tensions between the likes of the Tourism White Paper and the National Heritage Resources Act of 1999. If all of these acts do co-exist happily and peacefully, this should have been stated. Section 2.8 takes on the topic of “Funding and Resource Mobilisation”. Here, the consultant attributes the lack of investment opportunities by business and the private sector (sic) to the seasonal nature of tourism. In addition, no reference is made to any funding initiatives, not even small ones like the R9 billion Jobs Fund. In other sections, statistics (arrival, growth, value, etc.) were directly quoted from the NTSS under the heading “Statistics and Tourism Intelligence”. Statistics – yes, data – yes, but certainly no form of analytical thought or intelligence was presented. When discussing the development of industry and entrepreneurship, only one paragraph exists. This paragraph makes absolutely no mention of any business development initiatives, not even the Tourism Enterprise Partnership. So, for those of you who do not have my masochistic tendencies (and more sense than to wade through this document), here is the strategy: Five Strategic Themes: 1. Research, Information and Knowledge Management 2. Sustainable Development and Management 3. Marketing, Promotion and Raising Awareness 4. Cooperation, Partnership, Institutional Arrangements and Policy 5. Resource Mobilisation Each of these themes is broken down into strategic objectives and actions, which you are welcome to read at your leisure, should you wish. Here is a taster: Strategic Theme – Research, Information and Knowledge Management Strategic Objective – Audit of existing and potential heritage and cultural tourism products Action – Conduct a comprehensive audit of heritage and cultural tourism products However, this section is well structured and could assist greatly in the fleshing out of the strategy. This section is pages 42-48. In addition, the consultant recommends the following as priorities: • Further development and active promotion of the World


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Heritage Sites in South Africa as well as a number of projects known for their global significance and demonstrated feasibility. • Partnership between National, Provincial and Local Government • Sufficient allocation of resources • Implementation of monitoring and evaluation mechanisms Now this is where I really have a problem. According to Business dictionary.com, the definition of a strategy is: “A method or plan chosen to bring about a desired future, such as achievement of a goal or solution to a problem”. In South Africa, we seem to commission these documents called Strategies, but which are actually worthless pieces of paper until they are broken down into proper business plans, work-plans or whatever you would like to call them. Unfortunately, many never seem to get that far. I would like to think that with the new, re-invigorated NDT this will not be the case, but I do have one suggestion. Would it not be possible for the Department to commission one comprehensive situational analysis of the tourism industry on an annual basis for use by all researchers? This would mean that the information would not need to be repeated for each and every document and could even possibly just be included as an annexure. This would force consultants to look at information more specific to their brief and thus contribute to the body of knowledge available. And probably save some trees!

Dear Editor, Further to my letter published in the March issue of the Tattler, I would like to inform readers that the draft Scoping Report for the proposed Malelane Safari Lodge in the Kruger National Park was made available for discussion as from Thursday 29 March 2012. Anyone interested in reading this report can visit the V&L Landscape Architects website at: http://www.vrl.co.za/ The report will only be available for discussion and response until approximately 9 May 2012. I have also been promised that a meeting with interested parties will be arranged after the comments have been handled. Thereafter it will be finalized and the final Scoping Report will again be made available to interested parties and only then forwarded to the Department of Environmental Affairs. The comments from the DEA will be handled and the Environmental Impact Assessment will be completed and a draft copy will be made available to interested parties, if required a further meeting will be arranged for the finalization of the EIA; prior to submission to the DEA. After all outstanding matters have been handled, the final EIA will be completed and made available to interested parties and it will be sent to the DEA for scrutiny.

In the words of a well-known advertisement, if we had less Yada Yada, we could certainly have more Ka-Ching Ka-Ching for the important things, like the actual implementation of these strategies.

Kind regards

Adrienne Harris Director Harvest Tourism (Pty) Ltd.

Note: The initial public participation process document can be downloaded at: www.tourismtattler.co.za/downloads/ knpMalelaneLodgeComments/ (1.1MB) – Ed.

Wi n

Gerhard Smit Convenor of the AIKONA GROUP

CONGRATULATIONS to Adrienne Harris who has been selected as our winning letter and has won two (4 Pack) boxes of Govino wine glasses with the compliments of Livingstones Supply Co – Suppliers of the Finest Products to the Hospitality Industry.

For more information visit: www.livingstonessupplyco.co.za

The winning letter published in the Tourism Tattler Issue 4 (Jul/Aug) 2012 edition will receive a copy of National Geographic’s ‘Eye of the Leopard’ DVD. Letters should be sent by 06 June 2012 to editor@tourismtattler.co.za This 55 minute film by Derek and Beverly Joubert follows the remarkable life of one small leopard from when she is just 8 days old every step of the way until she is 3 years old and on the brink of adulthood. Legadema, as she is named, works her way into your heart as she slips in and out of danger virtually every day, running from baboons and hyenas but also making landmark strides in hunting and surviving. It is the story of a mother and daughter relationship as well as that of an emerging huntress in Botswana’s magnificent Mombo region of the Okavango Delta.

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ATTRACTIONS

SOUTH AFRICA

Experience the magic of the African bush on the doorstep of South Africa’s largest metropolis In South Africa, visitors and locals alike are spoilt for choice when it comes to beautiful game reserves. The Dinokeng Game Reserve (DGR), however, offers something special – the opportunity to experience the quiet magic unique to the bush, all close to the hustle and bustle of the city.

Etienne Torien, CEO of the DGRMA, says: “We have worked tirelessly with the Dinokeng Project to see the DGR come to fruition and we believe that soon this malaria-free game reserve will be the first choice for visitors looking for an authentic bush experience close to the city.”

The DGR is situated in the north-east of Gauteng, just 90 kilometres from Johannesburg and 40 kilometres from Pretoria. It comprises 18 500 hectares of pristine African bush and with the introduction of Buffalo by the end of this year, will be the only free-roaming Big Five reserve in Gauteng.. It is with much pleasure that the launch of the DGR is celebrated at Indaba this year.

The goal was to establish a world-class game reserve in a previously economically depressed area in Gauteng, providing employment opportunities for members of the surrounding communities and uplifting the local economy by investing in tourism infrastructure.

This gem of a game reserve is a dream that has been a long time in the making and took many passionate peoples’ perseverance for the vision to materialise. It is an initiative of the Department of Economic Development, the DGR Management Association (DGRMA) and private landowners.

One such member of the Dinokeng community is Sina Meno, senior receptionist at the DGR Information Office. She is full of enthusiasm about the DGR and its unique offerings.“Dinokeng offers something special,” she says. “It’s very different from the city life. I say that we breathe a different air here. And people love it!”

Image courtesy of Brian Courtenay

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SOUTH AFRICA

ATTRACTIONS

Image courtesy of Brian Courtenay

Among the DGR’s offerings are an abundance of leisure activities, including game drives, guided bush walks and boat cruises. The range of adventure sports, world-class spas and fine dining options mean that visitors will never be at a loss for something to do. In addition, the large number of conferencing venues and teambuilding options in the DGR make the game reserve an ideal location for a conference or corporate getaway. The reserve is not a self-drive reserve and guests are required to book game drives with one of the many establishments in the area. This allows you to experience the thrill of spotting game from the advantageous height of an open Land Rover, and to feel the rush of wind through your hair as you move through the African bushveld, soaking up its unique sense of tranquility and peace.

In terms of accommodation, you are spoilt for choice in Dinokeng. From small and intimate guest houses and selfcatering chalets to luxurious five star lodges and boutique hotels, the game reserve caters for tourists on any budget. CEO of the Dinokeng Project, Dawn Robertson, urges visitors to take a short drive from the rush of the cities and experience the beauty of this game reserve. “Visitors will be amazed at the wonders that this gem of a reserve has to offer – so close to the city but a world away,” she says. For more information contact 0861 346 653 or email reception@dinokeng.co.za or visit: http://www.dinokeng.co.za/

Dinokeng is very easy to reach from Jo’burg and Tshwane on the N1 or the N4 highways. Dinokeng, located in the north eastern quadrant of Gauteng, is a Gauteng Provincial Government Blue IQ strategic economic infrastructure investment initiative.

Image courtesy of Brian Courtenay

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ATTRACTIONS

SOUTH AFRICA

The Greatest Show on Earth

The Sardine Run Image courtesy of John Lamberti: www.inspiredvision.co.za

It may be pure coincidence that the greatest marine migration on earth, the annual sardine run, just happens to coincide with the Indaba Travel Trade Show in Durban (12-15 May) but it is a coincidence that visitors to the show should take full advantage of, writes Des Langkilde. According to Wikipedia, researchers estimate that the sardine run could rival East Africa’s great wildebeest migration in terms of biomass. The shoals are often more than 7 km long, 1.5 km wide and 30 metres deep and are clearly visible from spotter planes or from the surface. The sardine run occurs from May through to July when billions of sardines – or more specifically the Southern African pilchard – spawn in the cool waters of the Agulhas Bank and move northward along the east coast of South Africa. Their sheer numbers create a feeding frenzy along the coastline. The run, containing millions of individual sardines, occurs when a current of cold water heads north from the Agulhas Bank up to Mozambique where it then leaves the coastline and goes further east into the Indian Ocean. The recent interest in the sardine run has had significant impact on the local economy. The run has become important to tourism and is considered to be one of the main attractions in KwaZulu-Natal during the winter holiday period. Both local and international tourists are attracted to the spectacle and are provided with opportunities to participate in activities such as dive charters and boat based predator viewing tours. The KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board and East Coast Radio, facilitate a ‘Sardine Run Hotline’ (082 284 9495), which provides information on the position and movement of sardine shoals. The Sardine Run Association has been formed to provide a link between tour operators, tourists, non-governmental 16

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- http://www.lesleyrochat.com/

organisations, scientists, and local and national governments. For more info visit: http://www.sardine.co.za/links However, the sardine run is much more than glistening shoals of sardines moving up the coast. It involves and affects many marine animals and can be witnessed from the shore, the sea or the air, and from above or below the clean waters of the Indian Ocean. The South Coast offers several vantage points to take advantage of the experience along its magnificent 120km long coastline. Marine charters operate out of Port Edward, Ramsgate and Shelly Beach, and Margate Airport boasts an active flying club and charters that follow the run to your hearts desire. Tourists can also dive with the sardines (including the reefs, wrecks and sharks) at Aliwal Shoal, Protea Banks and Rocky Bay as they migrate northwards along the KwaZulu-Natal coastline. An added bonus is that Ragged Tooth sharks congregate to mate during this period while Humpback Whales and Southern Right Whales migrate north over the same period as they mate off the KwaZulu-Natal coast. The South Coast has two world-class dive sites and none other than Jacques Cousteau himself rated Aliwal Shoal as one of the top 10 dive sites in the world. For more info visit: http://www.southcoasttourism.co.za/


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Pay In Your Currency™ makes budgeting and reconciling accounting expenses easy for tourist and business travellers alike, and is available to your Visa and MasterCard customers. Merchant benefits: • Earn and improve your profit margin on all card-based transactions paid back to you in South African rand • Attract new, international customers • Encourage repeat business • Offer superior customer service • Create a personalised pricing experience With Pay In Your Currency™ everybody wins! More reason to believe in better banking. For more information or to apply, please contact your Absa Merchant Services Sales Consultant, call the Absa Merchant Helpdesk on 0860 111 222 or e-mail contactmerc@absa.co.za Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.absa.co.za to view a full list.

PAY IN YOUR

CURRENCY™

Member of


AVIATION

GLOBAL

Call for moratorium on EU Emissions Trading Scheme There is an old adage that say’s there’s your view and there’s my view – and there’s the truth that’s somewhere in between. That’s where we seem to be on the increasingly heated story about whether airlines should be part of the European Union (EU) Emissions Trading System or a global scheme developed in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), writes Juergen Thomas Steinmetz.

The EU says we are only pushing it now because we have waited ten years for ICAO action. The industry says it’s complex, it involves sovereign states and we are finally achieving something in ICAO.

fundamentally international and which is now committed to a range of carbon reduction programmes, through smarter operating patterns, newW aircraft and engine technologies – with promising breakthroughs in clean biofuel on the horizon.

And both views as any objective analyst will tell you have some merit – the time has come for action, not talk at a global level and a big factor is the pressure of the EU regional scheme really coming into force.

Such a moratorium will not only encourage a global emission trading scheme – it will also give time for European States to avoid double dip green taxation and rationalize a trading scheme that collects money from auctioning permits to pay for carbon emissions with parallel action by key member states to collect taxes introduced allegedly to help reduce carbon emissions.

Which is why, as South African Tourism Minister Van Schalkwyk stated cogently in at the Air Transport Summit held in March, a moratorium would allow the necessary breathing space for aviation negotiators to go the last mile in harmony with evolving climate accords. The International Council of Tourism Partners (ICTP) supports this view because sustainable aviation growth is pivotal to global economic wellbeing and a trade war at a time of fragile economic recovery is in nobody’s interest. Above all a temporary moratorium will really only have a small carbon impact in a long-term battle to stabilize the earth’s temperature. Particularly for an industry which is so

So it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that a true leadership solution for Europe is to call “Time Out” and for ICAO to step up to the plate and deliver on a global scheme with the full support of the industry – not just talk about it. And if it fails to deliver then the EU has every reason to push forward – but hopefully with a clear leadership in avoiding double dip taxation and double standards for this important economic sector.

Juergen Thomas Steinmetz is the Chairman of International Council of Tourism Partners (ICTP) and publisher of eTurboNews. The ICTP is a new grassroots travel and tourism coalition of global destinations committed to quality service and green growth. The ICTP logo represents the strength in collaboration (the block) of many small communities (the lines) committed to sustainable oceans (blue) and land (green). ICTP engages communities and their stakeholders to share quality and green opportunities including tools and resources, access to funding, education, and marketing support. ICTP advocates sustainable aviation growth, streamlined travel formalities, and fair coherent taxation. For more information visit: www.tourismpartners.org and http://www.eturbonews.com 18

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46657/MortimerHarvey/E

Visiting South Africa? Explore our country with a SA Travel Card. To make your journey across our country more convenient and safe, Absa offers you the SA Travel Card. This card gives you instant access to cash and allows you to pay for goods and services while visiting South Africa. • •

Load spending money onto your SA Travel Card and have access to your local currency 24/7. Swipe your card to pay for goods and services (shops, restaurants, etc.) wherever you see the Visa logo. You also have instant access to your cash from any ATM across the country. All transactions you make with your SA Travel Card are free when you swipe or draw cash.

More reason to believe in better banking. If your card is lost or stolen, call the Absa Stop Card Contact Centre 24-hour, toll-free number immediately to block the lost/stolen card.

Absa Bank Ltd. Reg No 1986/004794/06. Authorised Financial Services Provider. Registered Credit Provider. Reg No NCRCP7.

A replacement card with the remaining balance can be obtained at any Absa Bureau de Change nationally. Before leaving South Africa you can exchange the remaining value on the card into the currency of your choice at any Absa Bureau de Change. To get your SA Travel Card, visit one of our selected Absa Bureaux de Change or call Absa International Banking on 0860 151 151 today. Terms and conditions apply. The SA Travel Card is only valid in South Africa and is only available to visitors from abroad.

Member of


BUSINESS & FINANCE

SOUTH AFRICA

embracing JOB CREATION The Southern Africa Tourism Services Association (SATSA) has entered into a strategic partnership alliance with the Absa Group. One of the aims of this alliance is to facilitate job creation by assisting in the growth and development of emerging enterprises, specifically in the tourism sector. STORY : Des Langkilde

O

ne of the initiatives that the Absa Group has launched to facilitate this objective is the Enterprise Development Unit. The Unit, which is a sub-section of Absa’s Business Markets division, aims to take on government’s challenge of job creation through entrepreneurship, says Marcel de Klerk. “The challenge of creating five million jobs by 2020 as a country is absolutely imperative and still remains a priority. We are mindful that in order to achieve this, government has to work in partnership with the private sector, and we, as Absa have to work with industry associations, of which SATSA is a key role player in the tourism sector ” he says.

While funding remains a perennial obstacle to the survival of SMEs, access to markets is a stated primary obstacle that stands in the way of sustainable SME success. Absa has therefore developed innovative solutions such as our Procurement Portal, Procurement funding, and a USAID backed guarantee scheme that supports funding, as well as Enterprise Development Centres to grow the SME sector.

Marcel de Klerk Head of Absa Business Markets

Mr De Klerk notes that entrepreneurship and small business have globally been proven to be the primary creators of jobs in any economy, both in developed and developing countries. “However unemployment remains a major problem for South Africa with current figures estimated at 40%. This is especially severe in the Youth category where unemployment figures are as high as 50%.” He emphasises that while Absa has been supporting small and medium sized enterprises for many years through various products and services, it had become imperative to Go Beyond Banking. “This means finding other ways of assisting with nurturing small tourism businesses from their start up phase right through their growth, development and expansion phases with the aim of ensuring that enterprises are sustainable,” says De Klerk. 20

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“Absa, therefore, does more than help small business owners to manage their own businesses. The bank also assists SMEs to identify potential opportunities for their businesses and also puts them in touch with other stakeholders such as corporates and parastatals that will enable them to excel and realise their full potential,” he concludes.

Procurement Portal – market place linkages A Procurement Portal has been established in partnership with Supply Chain Network (SCN) and aims to bring a solution to the market that will allow Corporate Buyers to find SMEs and for SMEs to be visible to these buyers. “Most importantly, among the Preferential Procurement challenges for Corporate Buyers is the inability to locate and identify suitable suppliers that meet their targeted profile. For the SMEs, the challenge has been accessing these corporates in order to secure supplier contracts. The market is there but the linkages do not exist,” says De Klerk The Procurement Portal is essentially an electronic market place that enables linkages between buyers and suppliers. The SMEs will be validated and verified, and they will be


SOUTH AFRICA

BUSINESS & FINANCE

searchable using various fields such as geographic location, size and BEE status among other critera. The Portal will not just be limited to a database but, in future, will provide eProcurement Solutions that will enable SMEs to have full eProcurement functionality such as electronic catalogues, accepting of purchase order and issuing of eInvoices. Procurement Finance – non-traditional funding Another obstacle for SMEs is funding, i.e. the inability to secure finance in order to execute on the contracts because of not meeting the normal banking requirements to get funding. Procurement Finance is a solution specifically developed to address these shortcomings. With a growing group of selected Corporates, Absa Bank is able to advance funding to SMEs that have been awarded valid and viable contracts. Cashflow principles are the primary lending drivers as opposed to the traditional collateral or security based lending. Cashflow is the most important financial consideration to SMEs. Guarantee Schemes – to support funding Absa Bank has partnered with a major global player in the form of USAID (http://sa.usaid.gov/). “Together, we have put in place guarantee schemes that will serve to share the risk in funding SMEs, especially start-ups. Essentially, the scheme will aim to plug the gap that SMEs are not able to meet, such as security. Again, the realisation here is that economies need a robust and active SME community in order to thrive which leads to job creation,” says De Klerk. Enterprise Development Centres – Non-financial support The last important challenge facing SMEs is one of a more structural nature given the history of our country and the general lack of an entrepreneurial culture in South Africa. “There is a very high failure rate amongst start-ups in South

Africa, figures as high as 80% failures within the first year of operation and a further 60% of the residual in the second year are often quoted. There is a realisation that money alone doesn’t solve the problem of high business failure rates. The reasons for failure are not because of technical inability of the SME (e.g. a bad plumber) but rather because of a lack of general business skills such as finance, business management, labour management and the like. To address this, Absa Bank has eleven Enterprise Development Centres (EDCs) located throughout the country with the sole purpose of providing a supportive environment for SMEs. Services offered are broad and include everything from providing a back office approach (access to computers and printers) to providing training seminars on various business topics ranging from SARS related, labour related to financial skills training. Mentoring services are also provided. The centres are equipped with machinery and computers as well as knowledgeable staff to assist where necessary. Our vision is to have these EDCs as the “Destination Point for SMEs”. Access to information is important – Absa’s view is that you do not need to own a computer but you need to have access to one,” concludes De Klerk.

For more information contact: 0860 040302 or email: ed@absa.co.za

About Absa Absa Group Limited (Absa), listed on the JSE Limited, is one of South Africa’s largest financial services groups offering a complete range of banking, insurance and wealth management products and services. Absa’s business is conducted primarily in South Africa. It also has equity holdings in banks in Mozambique and Tanzania, representative offices in Namibia and Nigeria and bancassurance operations in Botswana and Mozambique. At 31 December 2011, the Group had 718,2 million shares in issue and a market capitalisation of R101,27 billion. The Group had assets of R786,7 billion, 12,1 million customers, 990 staffed outlets, 9 541 automated teller machines and 35 200 permanent employees. Absa is a subsidiary of Barclays Bank PLC which holds a stake of 55,5%. Barclays is a major global financial services provider engaged in retail banking, credit cards, corporate and investment banking, and wealth management with an extensive international presence. For more information visit the Absa website: www.absa.co.za

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BUSINESS & FINANCE

SOUTH AFRICA

Umbrella Provident Fund Performs Above Average The SATSA Provident Fund is open to all South African travel and tourism trade operators, who do not need to be SATSA members to participate. The fund was established in 2003 and has consistently performed above average year on year. The fund enables tourism business owners to provide for their own retirement needs as well as for their staff, both permanent and temporary who are then insured for disability or death while working for the business. The following investment market summary has been provided by the adminstrator of the Provident Fund - WA Davidson - Ed.

2012 – the investment year so far … GLOBAL ECONOMIES The last 6 months have been a good period for equity markets with the ALSI up 14.89% and Global Equities up 11.58%. The effects of monetary easing in the Eurozone have also helped. In sharp contrast, the MSCI for emerging markets fell 3.5%, triggered by increasing concerns that the Chinese economy may be heading for a hard landing. Global inflation in the developed world is largely regarded as tame and trending downwards. From a valuation perspective, equities are globally still more attractive than bonds and cash, not necessarily because they are cheap, but because they are so unattractive while equities appear closer to fair value. The world is growing The world in general is still coping with the aftermath of the financial crisis. Although this began in 2007, the financial dislocation was so severe that the consequences are still very much in evidence. A sharp recovery in output and demand followed, and throughout last year, it became increasingly evident that the world was moving on to a more sustainable plane, helped by continued growth in emerging markets. But most importantly, in the US, the world’s largest economy, employment started to pick up. China is certainly a key source of commodity demand. It is attempting at present both to rebalance the economy and to contend with various cyclical issues. Rebalancing the economy so that it is less dependent on export demand, and more dependent on domestic demand. Consensus forecasts for China’s real GDP growth this year suggest a slowdown to about 8.3%, but for 2013, the numbers indicate a pickup again. Markets are concerned that China will end up in a “hard landing”, which appears to mean growth of 7% or less.

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW 1. As at 31 March 2011, the returns earned on the SATSA Fund vs. the Average Retirement Fund over 3 years was: SATSA 9% vs. Average Retirement Fund 7.5% 2. Competitive Risk benefits and Costings with an added benefit that there are NO exclusions on cover provided i.e Game Rangers & Bungee Operators are not excluded; 3. WEB Access offered to members (Monthly download to Employers); 4. The Fund continues to innovate & streamline the offering. is most likely that the Eurozone will record a negative growth figure for 2012 as a whole. SOUTH AFRICA At home, reasonable economic growth is likely in 2012 and stronger numbers are likely in 2013: partly a result of a recovering Europe, but also of continued domestic growth. It seems unlikely that under current circumstances of dull growth, there is much prospect of an early rise in interest rates, even though there are some inflationary pressures. Conclusion The world is growing, but it is not “normal” and it is not synchronised. Current market performance is a reflection of that unbalanced growth, but also of the risks that stem from it. So far this year, equity markets have mostly delivered very strong performances. In some cases, a large part of the returns many investors expected for the year as a whole have already been produced. This will both make them more cautious, and more sensitive to information that might undermine the outlook. This means that at current prices, even though the trend remains positive and valuations in many regions are still inexpensive, more volatility is likely if global growth enters a soft patch in the near term, whatever economists think about 2013. As the market ebbs and flows with short-term fluctuations, investors are reminded that investing should be a long-term exercise and, in the journey to their investment goals, these fluctuations often end up being mere ripples along the way. It therefore remains important for investors to stay invested in a welldiversified portfolio like the SATSA Pension Fund’s Portfolio, namely the Real Return Focus Fund that will mitigate the risk of any potential unforeseen events.

In the rest of emerging Asia, however, the numbers are relatively good. This is partly because the region is more correlated to US growth, and partly because domestic demand has been reasonable. To revert to the developed world, part of the reason 2012 is proving hard to predict is the uncertainty in Europe. How deep will the recession be? How long will it last? What impact will it have on the rest of the world? The fact that Europe is in recession, effectively on its own, is very unusual. It is usually led into a recession by the US, but that is not the case now. That makes it harder to predict, because there is no useful historical precedent. Although it should begin to recover later in the year and into 2013, it 22

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For more information contact Bruce Brown on 011 646 0290 or email bruce@wadavidsonfs.co.za


46655/MortimerHarvey/E

Absa Bank Ltd. Reg No 1986/004794/06. Authorised Financial Services Provider. Registered Credit Provider. Reg No NCRCP7.

Get the Travel Lodge Payment Programme that makes paying for business travel a pleasure Absa offers a flexible Travel Lodge Payment Programme that lets you easily manage payment of all your travel-related expenses. Get convenient access to detailed spending data from airlines, hotels, car rentals and more, all of which can be integrated seamlessly with your company’s existing financial systems. More reason to believe in better banking. To book yourself on a one-way trip to greater efficiency and control over your business expenses call (012) 317 3008 or e-mail corporate@card.co.za

Member o f


CONSERVATION

AFRICA

Lawrence Anthony Honoured Posthumously In a moving ceremony at the University of KwaZuluNatal on 18 April 2012, Lawrence Anthony posthumously received his Doctorate in Science (Honoris Causa) for his work in conservation, writes Francoise Malby-Anthony. When Dr Anthony, the world-renowned conservationist, known as ‘The Elephant Whisperer’, passed away on 02 March 2012 he left behind an impressive legacy of accomplishments, many on-going projects and still-to-be-achieved goals. Lawrence knew about the doctorate before he passed away and joked that he would buy a stethoscope so that he would feel like a real doctor. Lawrence and I started the Thula Thula Private Game Reserve in 1998 and opened the first lodge, the Elephant Safari Lodge, in June 2000. The tented camp opened in December 2006.

Lawrence was looking after the game reserve with a special love and passion for his elephants, then only 7. (Now 21). Thula Thula carries on after 12 years of operation with our loyal staff, now part of the management, as Mabona, food and beverage manager and supervising the lodges operation, Vusi our game reserve manager, Winnie and Tom as our superb French cuisine Chefs at the lodge. Thula Thula has now 70 staff members and most of them come from the local village of Buchanana. In memory of Lawrence, we at Thula

Thula have created “The Lawrence Anthony Rhino Conservation Fund” which will raise much needed funds to get more and better security around our rhinos. Thabo (our little male rhino) was shot at by poachers a month ago. Thankfully, he has recovered from his wounds but now walks with a limp. For more information or to pledge a donation to The Lawrence Anthony Rhino Conservation Fund contact Francoise at francoise@thulathula.com or visit: http://www.thulathula.com

Open your eyes - Save our Rhino

The Lawrence Anthony Earth Organization’s mission is to bring education to people all over the world and to effectively change man’s relationship with the plant and animal kingdoms, writes Yvette Taylor.

This year we are focussing on the issue of rhino poaching. Lawrence Anthony spent many years working to save the rhino in central Africa from extinction. His hard work came to naught and the northern white rhino is now deemed extinct with a non-viable population. This cannot happen again. Over 800 white rhino have been slaughtered for their horn in the past 2 years. Many conservation initiatives have been tried, many accusations have been made and many protection measures put in place, but the poaching of rhinos is continuing at an unprecedented rate. There is no silver bullet to stop this massacre; we have to implement a variety of solutions to stop the poaching of rhino. One of the key focuses needs to be education - which will create a better understanding of the devastating impact

that poaching is having on rhinos, the environment and on local African communities. Education will help to turn this dire situation around by explaining to people the true value that rhinos have and the benefits they provide to the environment and community at large. Call for Donor Support The Lawrence Anthony Earth Organisation’s Edu-Wild Chapter proposes to produce a short documentary DVD to promote a better understanding of nature across the world but most importantly, to the people of Asia, where the demand for rhino horn is driven by its use in traditional medicines to cure a variety of ailments; from a headache to cancer as well as being sought after as an aphrodisiac. The production of the DVD will be presented and voiced in Mandarin Chinese, Vietnamese, isiZulu and English to target all the communities associated with the rhino horn black market trade. The production will result in the completion of four short documentaries and four commercials.

For more information or to pledge a donation to The Earth Organization, contact Yvette Taylor on +27 31 266 2024 or visit: http://www.earthorganization.org/donate.aspx?Type=Donate&Cause= 24

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CONSERVATION

AFRICA

Life with Lions They are one of the world’s most charismatic big cats, but what does it take to understand the lives of wild lions? Someone who knows is Andrew Loveridge of Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), who has been studying lions in Zimbabwe for over a decade and recently won the SATIB Trust Award for his lion biology and conservation work, writes Pete Wilton. I asked Andrew a couple of questions about how he tracks and studies lions, gaining insights into lion behaviour, and how people can live alongside these iconic predators. What are the challenges of studying lions in the wild? Lions tend to live in the last wilderness areas of the planet and these are naturally remote and often fairly inhospitable to people. Hwange, the National Park where we work, is one such place being thickly wooded bushland-savannah with very few access roads. Lions in this ecosystem have home ranges in excess of three hundred square kilometres so they are typically tricky to find and study. Monitoring enough of the population to provide a meaningful scientific insight into population processes and behaviour presents quite severe logistical challenges. We overcome this by covering extensive areas in 4X4 vehicles - often spending weeks at a time camping in remote areas, by using technology such as GPS radio-collars (and recently GPS collars that return our data via satellite) and having access to a micro-light aircraft, which helps us locate lions more easily.

Image courtesy of Brian Courtenay.

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Dr Andrew Loveridge is a Kaplan Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall and a member of WildCRU, part of Oxford University’s Department of Zoology.

Of course all this requires considerable funding to put in place and maintain, so outside the field the biggest challenge is raising the funding to maintain the study. We have been very fortunate in recent years to have received substantial grants from Panthera, Thomas and Daphne Kaplan, and recently the Robertson Foundation, as well as ongoing support from the SATIB Trust. How can fieldwork studies help to inform conservation efforts? A common misconception is that lions are common and widespread in Africa. Whilst it is true that lions are commonly sighted in some of Africa’s well-protected photographic safari destinations they fare less well in areas with limited or no protection. In such areas they compete with burgeoning human populations for limited space and resources. In the last 50-100 years the geographic range of the African lion is thought to have declined by 80%. Surprisingly, for such an iconic and well-known species, even basic biological statistics such as


AFRICA

CONSERVATION

Hwange has just completed the first phase of a humanwildlife conflict project, focused on conflict with lions, but also including species such as the spotted hyaena in the research. This phase has focussed on understanding both the ecological and human economic and sociological factors that contribute to conflict situations. Understanding the root causes of human-wildlife conflict will hopefully allow us to implement locally suitable interventions in the next three-year phase of the project, funded by Panthera and the Robertson Foundation.

The specially fitted Land Rover Defender LWB that is to be donated to Hwange Lion Research at a function during the Indaba Travel Trade Show .

population size and crude population trends are unknown for many lion populations in Africa. What surprises about lion behaviour has your research revealed? Lions are probably one of the best-studied mammalian species, nevertheless, they still do things that surprise and intrigue our research team. Possibly one of the most intriguing aspects of lions is their wide-ranging behaviour. Understanding these movements is one of the key challenges in protecting lion populations because they frequently come into conflict with people. We have recorded extensive ranging movements in the past particularly in young dispersing males. A male lion that moved from Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe, to Livingstone town in Zambia - a distance of around 220km - is the longest movement recorded, and this particular study animal was 10 years old. This demonstrates how little we actually know about movements of lions between regional populations. This is crucial information if we are to avoid population isolation, which could spell disaster for the genetic health and longterm viability of large carnivore populations. The other unique aspect of lion behaviour revealed by our study is the lions’ unusual behavioural responses to the local ecosystem. In the dry season in Hwange National Park water is provided for wildlife at artificially pumped waterholes. These attract high abundances of prey species and our research has revealed that lions configure their ranges to ensure access to this rich prey resource. How can this research help people to live with lions? The

research

team

in

In the nearby Makgadikgadi ecosystem in Botswana, a recent WildCRU study discovered that lions feed almost exclusively on wild prey when it is seasonally abundant, but in periods of wild prey shortage they switch to killing perennially abundant domestic livestock. This pattern is mirrored in the Hwange ecosystem. There are two reasons for this: Firstly water is freely available in thousands of ephemeral waterholes, and wild prey disperses throughout the ecosystem. This makes wild prey more difficult and less predictable for lions to find. At the same time people in surrounding communities plant their crops in the wet season. Livestock guarding is neglected as people focus on tending their fields, leaving domestic animals vulnerable to predation. Understanding the underlying ecological processes is the key to putting in place appropriate and successful interventions to ease or eliminate human-wildlife conflict. How will the SATIB Land Rover help in your work? It is a huge honour to accept the 2012 SATIB Award, especially knowing how passionate and dedicated Brian Courtenay and the other Trustees of the SATIB trust are to conservation of African wildlife and wild places. It has also been a great opportunity to raise the profile of the lion project and what we are trying to achieve in conservation of the species and its habitat. Like the species we study, lion researchers have to cover extensive areas of remote and often inhospitable wilderness. Having a tough and reliable off-road-capable research vehicle is an absolutely essential part of undertaking research on this species. What’s next for the Hwange Lion Project/your research? The core of our effort is to maintain the monitoring work done over the past 12 years. This year we will be embarking on some exciting new initiatives to work with local communities to reduce levels of human-lion conflict. Another exciting component of the project is an initiative to identify and conserve habitat corridors that link the core Hwange lion population with other regional protected areas. We have already found evidence that these exist and it is important that habitat corridors are recognised and protected in the face of ever expanding human populations. My other research includes a three-year project, funded by the Darwin Initiative for Biodiversity, on the sustainable management of leopards in Zimbabwe. For more information visit: http://www.satib.co.za/SATIB_Trust.aspx 3/2012

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COMPETITIONS

READER COMPETITIONS Win a long weekend for 2 people sharing in

Knysna, Plettenberg and Oudtshoorn

Two long weekend prizes are available for this competition. To enter simply ensure that you are optedin to the Tourism Tattler mailing list by subscribing at http://www.tourismtattler.co.za/subscribe and answer the following question by email:

Visit the Garden Route stand at INDABA 12 - 15 May 2012 ICCG006

“Where is the Garden Route and Klein Karoo region situated?” Email your answer with Go Garden Route Competition in the Subject field to editor@tourismtattler.co.za by 13 June 2011. Remember to include your contact details (Name, company trading name, telephone numbers, City/Town, Province and Country). The first correct email received will win the two Prizes. NB: Read the Terms and Conditions of this competition at: http://www.tourismtattler.co.za /competition/gogardenroute Go Garden Route and Klein Karoo is a region situated in the Southern part of the Western Cape. It is a collection of the best activities from Family to High Adventure activities and attractions in the most beautiful part of South Africa.

Enjoy Big 20 experiences in the most stunning setting in the heart of the Garden Route & Klein Karoo. It still allows you to include a beach holiday at the Indian-Ocean along our gorgeous coastline, as well as experience the indigenous Tsitsikamma-Forest and beautiful Outeniqua mountain-range and the Klein Karoo.

The unique activities and products that make up the tourism industry of this diverse area await you. George airport is situated in the middle of the Garden Route & Klein Karoo, with daily air shuttles to Johannesburg and Cape Town. Cape Town and Port Elizabeth are major airports and national road gateways, making our spectacular region very easy to access and explore. For more information call +27 (0)82 261 0542 or visit: http://www.gogardenroute.co.za/index.html

WINNER OF THE SANI PASS HOTEL & LEISURE RESORT COMPETITION CONGRATULATIONS to Joan Buckley of Sheilan House, Port Alfred, Eastern Cape, South Africa, whose competition e-mail entry was the first to be received by the Tattler’s Executive Editor on 06 March at 08h16 am. Joan has won a two night breakaway for two people sharing with the compliments of the Sani Pass Hotel & Leisure Resort. For more information visit http://www.sanipasshotel.co.za or book through reception on +27 (0)33 702 1320.

WINNER OF THE ‘ROVOS RAIL’ CROSSWORD COMPETITION Congratulations to Mark September of Small World Tours, whose completed crossword was the fist correct entry received on 07 March at 07h08 am. Mark’s prize is valued at R44,600, which consists of a three day excursion for two people sharing a Deluxe Suite on board Rovos Rail’s luxurious Pride of Africa train departing from Pretoria, South Africa to Vic Falls, Zimbabwe. For more information on Rovos Rail, visit: http://www.rovos.com Note: The Crossword Competition has been discontinued due to a lack of sponsorship - Ed.

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SOLUTION TO THE ‘ROVOS RAIL’ CROSSWORD COMPETITION


ENVIRONMENT

SOUTH AFRICA

SAVING THE PLANET one bottle at a time

The Protea Hospitality Group has started a roll-out across South Africa of a purified water system that will replace bottled mineral water in their conferencing venues and ultimately save millions of plastic bottles from ending up in landfills, writes Samantha Bartlett. an additional strategy or range of new activities, we have been sensitive to the environment and our responsibility in this regard for many years and are continually looking for ways to improve the environmental sensitive behaviour of our hotels and reduce the carbon footprint impact of our operations. It is also about influencing all corporate strategies – creating integration and deepening our work to bring effect to profit (Prosperity), society (People), and 100 Vivreau bottles environment (Planet). We recognise that this calls for a shift in the way per day, would replace more than we approach the very issues that face 73 000 plastic bottles in one hotel our business on a daily basis and that over a two-year period is what the move to Vivreau water is all about.”

Africa’s leading hospitality company has partnered with the international leader and originator of premium water systems, Vivreau (which sees to President Obama’s water needs in the White House as well as the finest Hotels and Michelin-starred restaurants across Europe and America), to introduce a system of on-site bottling of purified water served in stylish glass bottles. Protea Hospitality Group Operations Director William Ford said the roll-out would comprise approximately 20 hotels in the initial Dispensing just phase. “We will be serving complimentary Vivreau water, purified on the premises in our conference rooms, rather than bottled mineral water as is the case now” said Ford, explaining the changes. “We will also be offering complimentary chilled Vivreau water in our receptions and to diners in our restaurants as well as in the bedrooms of hotels where we currently offer complimentary bottled water. We will of course continue to make available for purchase bottled mineral water for those of our guests who would prefer to have this option. “We have been given to understand that the material from which the plastic mineral water bottles we currently use is recyclable, however there is a lack of facility nationwide, which is convenient and cost-effective for our hotels to expedite the recycling process, resulting in the majority of used bottles ending up in land-fill.” Ford said it took between three and seven litres of water to produce a one litre bottle of mineral water if one included the bottle manufacture and transport processes. “The Protea Hospitality Group doesn’t view sustainability as 30

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Charles Tapanlis, MD of Vivreau Advanced Water Systems for Sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian Ocean islands, said by providing an in-house purification system and endlessly sanitising and reusing the same glass containers, dispensing just 100 Vivreau bottles per day, would replace more than 73 000 plastic bottles in one hotel over a two-year period. Citing a National Geographic report, he said, “In America alone some 30 billion bottles of water were consumed per year. In order to make those bottles, manufacturers used 17 million barrels of crude oil – enough to run 1 million cars for a year. Vivreau’s mission is to offer the highest conceivable quality alternative to bottled water, whilst eliminating the carbon footprint, ‘water miles’, landfill waste and Bisphenol A (BPA) linked to health concerns from bottled water. “We are immensely excited to be partnering with the largest and leading hotel group in Africa on this project that will not only give guests a premium water product, but also massively reduce their environmental impact.”


ENVIRONMENT

SOUTH AFRICA

GREENING

Your Tourism Business The tourism industry is often subjected to fads and fashions, and businesses struggle to keep up with these rapidly changing requirements – often for naught, because customers quickly move on to the next craze. But environmental friendliness is a trend that is here to stay. People around the world have become very aware of environmental issues in the past decade, and many are looking for ways to reduce their impact on the planet and to live a more sustainable, responsible lifestyle, writes Get Smarter They also extend this thinking to their holidays. Eco-conscious tourists seek out destinations and businesses that have “green” practices in place, and even those who are not actively interested in the topic will prefer a sustainable establishment over one that is not. So, going green can have a direct impact on your bottom line, not to mention your reputation as a forward-thinking and responsible business.

Greening a business means putting policies in place that ensure efficient, reduced use of resources (like water, electricity and fuel), sustainable practices, community development, environmental protection and awareness. It is a multifaceted discipline that involves everything from building energy-efficient structures to switching off lights and reducing the frequency that laundry is done.

Many business owners are under the misconception that becoming environmentally friendly incurs many costs and is inconvenient – but a clever greening strategy will result in the opposite effect. Lower resource costs, sourcing local supplies and becoming resource-independent are just some of the benefits.

Here are some green practices you can put in place quickly and cheaply: Reduce your reliance on electricity-guzzling air conditioning by erecting shade netting over windows, adding shutters or planting trees near buildings – these will reduce the heat that comes in. Reduce, reuse, recycle. Reduce the amount of packaging and disposable products you use (don’t print out digital documents, for example), reuse containers and materials (empty jars make great flower vases, herb pots or stationery organisers), and recycle materials that are more energy intensive to manufacture from scratch (glass, tin and plastic are good candidates). Rethink the way you use transport. If your establishment offers guests transported tours by car, consider whether those could be conducted on foot or bicycle. Your guests may even appreciate being “closer to the ground” and more in touch with their surroundings. Source locally instead of purchasing imported goods. Make the most of the products and services available in the area – this not only results in fresher produce, but also makes your offering more customised and local. Tourists these days appreciate more unique, cultural and local experiences, so this can even become a strong marketing point. Be water wise. South Africa is largely a dry climate and water is a scarce resource. Plant indigenous flora on your grounds, catch rainwater for watering and cleaning, install water-saving shower, toilet and tap attachments, and avoid drinking water in plastic bottles – it’s costly and environmentally unfriendly. Rather provide jugs of fresh water with a slice of cucumber or lemon as a refreshment to guests. Cut down on excess services. Guests don’t change their sheets and towels every day at home, so they don’t need to have these replaced every day. Offer this as an extra service rather than as a basic feature, and explain your reasoning – guests will understand and appreciate that they can make a simple contribution like this. Educate your staff and guests about responsible and sustainable practices. Provide a leaflet to guests about some ways they can help protect the local environment – they will appreciate the information and your initiative. The part-time University of Cape Town Tourism Management short course is presented online throughout South Africa. Contact Tamsin on 021 447 7565 or tamsin@getsmarter.co.za for more information. Alternatively, visit www.getsmarter.co.za 3/2012

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EVENTS

SOUTH AFRICA

Tourism Conference Talks Bring Together The Past, Present And Future

The 7th Annual Cape Town and Western Cape Destination Conference, held on 27 March at V&A Pavilion, featured addresses by television presenter and wildlife expert Quinton Coetzee; Chief Executive Officer, South African Tourism, Thulani Nzima; Chief Executive Officer of BrandOvation, Dr Nikolaus Eberl; and Executive Director, Fair Trade in Tourism South Africa, Jennifer Seif, The conference was designed to share ideas and exchange knowledge, update the tourism industry on the latest trends and marketing intelligence as well as provide a global perspective on issues of competitiveness, writes Monique Horwitz.

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cluster to assist in creating the right environment in which tourism can flourish. This must include ensuring that more and more South Africans have the means to travel through increased income, that travelling in South Africa is safe and that the product supply matches the desires of consumers. Travelling in South Africa is a great way to explore the country and discover the many reasons why the rest of the world wants to visit. We should encourage South Africans to ‘act like tourists’ in their own country and to spend time discovering what is in their own backyard instead of simply using holidays to shop and laze around on the beach. Furthermore, the accessibility of travel should be emphasised by showing that travel is not out of the reach of the average South African, but something that everyone can do and enjoy in different ways. South Africa is a dream destination and should be envied as such. Our aim is for all CEO of South African Tourism, South Africans to see their world as the world Thulani Nzima sees it.”

icking things off with his presentation, ‘Back to basics - San solutions’, Quinton Coetzee illustrated how businesses should think and act by using examples from San culture. He said that the San people could be considered one of the oldest companies in the world. Their goals, like any other business, are growth and success. He urged attendees to recognize the power of partnerships as alliances lead to opportunities. “If we grow, build and hold on to partnerships and alliances we can become the masters of the marketplace, like the San have. We can only be successful if we use the combined skills of the whole industry. For cultural tourism to be a success we must go back to basics.” Looking at the present and towards the future, Thulani Nzima unpacked ‘SA Tourism’s New Domestic Tourism Strategy’. He stated, “It is important for all players in the tourism 34

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SOUTH AFRICA

EVENTS

Taking an international perspective, brand In his workshop titled, ‘Keeping History leadership expert Dr Nikolaus Eberl, Alive’, V & A Waterfront Oral Historian and deconstructed the formula behind one Writer, Willem Steenkamp, shared that, of the most successful cultural tourism “More unites us than divides us. We need products in recent times - the exhibition to keep history alive by storytelling and of the first polar bear raised by human keep it authentic by telling your own story. hands at the Berlin Zoo. In his presentation Cultural tourism is about the big picture ‘How Cultural Tourism Doubled Berlin’s and bringing people together with the past. International Arrivals in 100 days’, he Relating people and the past to culture is revealed the critical success factors that can our challenge for the sustainable growth turn cultural and heritage tourism products of history.” He also suggested that tourism into global attractions of note. Quoting stakeholders develop relationships with examples from his forthcoming book ‘The local site guides as this is the quickest way KNUT Factor: Making Culture Magnetic’, to become part of community tourism. Dr Eberl revealed how this formula has built Iain Harris, Managing Director of multi-million dollar brands out of cultural travel company Coffeebeans Routes Delaria (Baba) Festus, a ‡Khomani San woman and Operations Manager of !Khwa and heritage tourism. These have included ttu San Culture & Education Centre, provided some insight the Munich Oktoberfest, the Pike Fish Market in Seattle, on how cultural tourism benefits South Africa’s indigenous the Ice Hotel in Sweden and the 2014 Campaign for Brazil people. In her talk on ‘Meeting South Africa’s First People’, she Tourism. explained that, “In the 1990’s San leaders got together and Using her vast local and international experience, Jennifer Seif formed the San regional lobbying and advocacy organisation. explored the topic ‘Fair Trade Holidays: the next big thing in This we formed to negotiate our future, to consolidate our cultural tourism.’ She explained, “There is a shift in consumer people into one organisation and give us unity as well as to behaviour away from mass travel in cheap, inflexible groups, give us political and economic power. One very important towards independent, experiential travel. In addition, today’s objective was to gain economic power through tourism. consumer is increasingly ‘sustainability savvy’ and the demand My leaders decided to develop a San cultural and education for responsible travel is increasing. Responsible tourism is centre, where all could have the opportunity to learn about about more than green – it’s about improving the quality tourism so that we can restore and share our past, as well as of life of people in SA. Our roles in the tourism industry are who we are now and what we do today. This also enables us changing as a result of this ‘new tourism’. We need to assist to generate income for the future.” businesses to operate more sustainably, enable tourists to make sustainable choices and improve the quality of life for The most popular workshop of the day, ‘Tourism, the Key for Unlocking Economic Potential through Exploring Our Cultural people living in destinations.” Diversity and Legacy’, was presented by Managing Director of She continued, “Sustainable and responsible tourism are Coffeebeans Routes, Iain Harris. He stated, “Tourism is one a trend of the future. Fair Trade holidays are a world first - of the most regressive sectors in South Africa. It amplifies emanating from South Africa with the majority of Fair Trade the worst elements of our society, perpetuating myth and holidays currently on the market having a high Western Cape stereotypes about who we are and packaging them as truth. Content. Fair trade must therefore become a priority for It thrives on the 30 second sound bite, and discards nuance.” Western Cape tourism and be built into cultural tourism to enhance its development impact. Fair Trade holidays ensure He controversially stated that tourism has no desire to transform respect for culture and heritage, ethical interaction with the townships because it represents 30% of tour income communities and protection of human rights. Furthermore, and that the Cape Flats is an area that has most economic visitor experiences are enhanced by the guarantee that local opportunity in Cape Town and is the most under resourced. destination stakeholders are getting a fair deal. We believe He also called for a revolution in tourism education by saying, that tourists will buy sustainable holidays and that tourism will “Train people for vocation, but train them to think so they and we evolve.” He added, “Without visionary leadership, become a Fair Trade product.” tourism takes us backwards by putting visitor needs before To bring the conference to a close, three educational yet citizen needs. However, tourism also has incredible potential practical workshops were conducted by Oral Historian from for creating change and new narratives about who we are. the V&A Waterfront, Willem Steenkamp; Operations Manager Tourism can be storytelling and for a nation that was silenced of !Khwa ttu San Culture and Education Centre, Baba Festus; and is still uncertain about the right to share stories, tourism and Managing Director of travel company Coffeebeans can be a valuable canvas. Tourism, when built around stories, Routes, Iain Harris. The speakers shared their cultural tourism compels us to come together.” experiences and case studies, the ways that they have tapped into cultural tourism products and provided insights on For more information visit: leveraging these opportunities in an effective, efficient and http://www.capetownroutesunlimited.org strategic manner.

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EVENTS

GLOBAL

Lessons from ITB as world tourism bounces back This year’s ITB in Berlin (7 to 11 March 2012), the biggest travel trade show and travel insights convention in the world, saw 10,644 exhibitors from 187 countries exhibiting their destinations and trade offers. This was the 46th annual ITB Berlin and it attracted more than 110,000 visitors over the five days of the event, writes Skye Grove. The ITB Berlin Convention has earned itself a reputation as a key compass of the global tourism industry. Every year, the convention combines pioneering topics and surveys with internationally renowned speakers. The following trends and topics were highlighted at the ITB Convention this year: Internationally, the tourism industry is more political than ever before. National governments across the world are realising the severe impact of political instability on the tourism industry. The European debt crises, upheaval in the Arab countries, climate change and sustainability, as well as EU emissions trading were high on the agenda at ITB. World travel is bouncing back from the recession and looking to be in better shape, but travellers are changing. The global travel industry marked record figures during 2011, with international tourist arrivals growing by over 4% to 980 million. This amounts to 5.9 billion in outbound overnight stays during 2011. However, international travellers continued to take shorter average trips this year. Americans take the longest trips, just ahead of Europeans, while Asians take the shortest trips. The average long-haul trip per traveller is just under nine days. 36

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The travel industry is setting its sights on moderate growth again in 2012, with an increase of 3% expected. By the end of 2012, one seventh of the world’s population will have crossed international borders as tourists in a single year. Mr. Taleb Rifai, United Nations World Travel Organisation (UNWTO) Secretary General, remarked that this “extraordinary number will contribute to more jobs, higher income possibilities, and countless opportunities for development, so critical at this time of economic uncertainty.” The UNWTO stressed the importance of responsibility and sustainability. “With growth comes responsibility,” said Mr. Rifai, “Tourism, if properly planned and managed, can be one of the most promising sectors for achieving a more economically, environmentally, and socially-sustainable future.” 72% of EU citizens travelled in 2011, and more than 80% said that they would do so in 2012, choosing to go either on short trips or longer holidays. These are the results of the new Eurobarometer survey on the attitudes of Europeans towards tourism, which also sheds light on the preferences and travel patterns of EU citizens. The Eurobarometer revealed also that in 2011 more citizens chose to stay in Europe for their holidays; many more have said they will do so in 2012. This will impact long-haul arrivals in South Africa. Europeans have, however, indicated that they are willing to change destinations if offered tailored and authentic experiences. European travellers seek rest and recreation: 48% of those who went on holidays in 2011 had this objective in mind. 36% chose destinations for “sun and beach” breaks and 28% indicated that they will travel to visit family and friends. 17% of Europeans want to travel to cities and urban areas.


GLOBAL

The Eurozone is still facing significant uncertainty and outbound travel from Europe will not grow significantly. Germany is the most economically optimistic country in the Eurozone, and German travellers are positive in their travel prospects. South African Tourism arrival statistics showed an increase of 9.9% of German tourists (211,000 arrivals) to South Africa during 2011. UK outbound travel will demonstrate almost no growth and Germany might overtake the UK as Cape Town’s most significant key source market during 2012. The USA outbound market is also showing some optimism and more Americans are expected to take long-haul journeys this year. Average spending per trip is expected to increase during 2012. Global outbound travel spending is rising faster than the number of trips, indicating higher spending per trip. In total, outbound travel spending grew 8% to €828 billion in 2011, according to the World Travel Monitor. Spending per night rose 4%, while spending per trip increased 2%. Asians spend the most per trip, ahead of Americans and followed by Europeans. China is poised to become a major force in world tourism as more Chinese travel abroad. More than 66 million Chinese travelled abroad during 2011, up 15% on 2010. Although the vast majority still visit neighbouring Hong Kong or Macau, the number of Chinese consumers travelling to destinations ‘beyond’ is growing fast. In 2011, Chinese travellers took more than 20 million outbound trips. Today’s (and, above all, tomorrow’s) Chinese tourists are young, affluent, well-dressed and hi-tech, and they want individual experiences combined with Chinese-ready services. Perhaps the most important characteristic of the new Chinese tourists, however, is that they are ‘digital natives’ who have grown up using computers, the internet and now mobile technology and social media. Subsequently they are using these digital channels to plan, book and share their travels. Tourism products in South Africa need to be geared towards Chinese travellers if we want to grow tourism from this market. Outbound travel from Sweden, Norway and Denmark is expected to grow, with up to 7% during 2012. South Africa receives close to 100,000 Scandinavian visitors per annum – 80% of whom visit Cape Town. The internet has clearly established itself as the world’s favourite place to book travel. This year’s World Travel Monitor supported these findings. Online bookings now account for nearly half of bookings, while (besides direct bookings with hotels or airlines) travel agents accounted for not even onethird of bookings. Leisure travel (holidays) continues to be the dominant reason (more than 70%) for outbound travel around the world, compared to business travel and visiting friends and relatives. Travel bloggers are gaining recognition as one of the most credible sources of online travel information. Word-ofmouth or advice from online friends often ranks as the most

EVENTS

influential source of pre-purchase travel information and the immediacy of interaction with travel bloggers through social media is being recognised as a powerful force. In order for destinations and tourism products to stay ahead of the game, it is important to build successful and profitable relationships with the new generation of pro bloggers and travel influencers. Cape Town Tourism will host four of the most influential international travel bloggers during July and August. The international tourism industry is moving towards a more sustainable business model but still faces many challenges and obstacles to reach this goal. External factors are placing growing pressure on the sector to increase sustainability but according to 19th World Travel Monitor Forum, customer demand for sustainable holidays is still relatively weak. Sustainable holidays are ‘nice to have’ but not a ‘must’ for most consumers around the world, and a majority of people remain unwilling to pay extra for them. About one in five tourists is actively interested in booking a ‘sustainable’ trip.

According to the 19th World Travel Monitor Forum, consumers rank sustainability only as the 7th most important factor out of eight when booking a holiday. (The top five factors were climate, price, destination accessibility, culture and landscape.)

Cape Town Tourism’s attendance at ITB 2012 peaked with the launch of the Cape Town Toolkit, an online information resource that was welcomed by European trade and media. Fruitful discussions were also had with travel bloggers, international trade and media. Experts at ITB agreed: Tourism destinations and products need to modernise their marketing strategies and follow customers online to engage and interact with travellers on social media. Competition is fierce and the tourism industry is vulnerable to external factors. Destinations and tourism products need to develop into brands in the new post-advertising era of wordof-mouth recommendations and buying decisions. A brand is much more than a logo or a slogan; it is your product and destination personality, a condensed expression of what you value and what service you offer to consumers. A brand should differentiate you from competitors, and be attractive and credible to your target audience. Destinations and tourism products that depend on traditional marketing techniques will lose out to their innovative opponents. For further information, contact Cape Town Tourism’s PR and Communication Manager Skye Grove, +27 21 487 6800, email skye@capetown.travel or visit www.capetown.travel.

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HOSPITALITY

SOUTH AFRICA

Postioning Tourism as a Service Excellence Driven Industry Deputy Minister of Tourism, Ms Tokozile Xasa launched the National Tourism Service Excellence Requirements (SANS 1197) in Johannesburg on 30 March. The requirements are aimed at improving and maintaining service levels at all service touch points in the tourism value chain, writes Ntombi Mashaba. Research conducted in 2009 identified inconsistent service levels and a lack of culture in complaining of poor service as critical challenges in the sector. The Service Excellence Requirements will provide a yardstick that will be used by all tourism service providers in the value chain to deliver quality service and experience that equals or surpasses world standards. Service delivery in the tourism sector is regulated in terms of the Consumer Protection Act, 2008 (Act No 68 of 2008), which places emphasis on the establishment of national norms and standards that relate to the protection of consumers by providing for improved standards of consumer information in order to prohibit unfair marketing and business practices. The standard is but one of the intervention tools of the National Tourism Service Excellence Strategy whose long term goal is to provide the tourism sector with an opportunity to transform South Africa into a globally competitive service economy and compliance with the Consumer Protection Act.

Home from Home

The requirements are comprised of four key focus areas namely: • Marketing – provides guidelines for organisations on the importance of providing constant information to customers and ensuring that the information provided is a true indication of what customers can expect from your establishment; • Products – provides guidelines on the state of tourism products, the TGCSA grading criteria has been taken into consideration in developing this section; • Delivery of Service – provides guidelines on provision of excellent service; • Monitoring and Evaluation – provides guidelines on the importance of conducting research and gaining more information about your customers so as to gain a competitive advantage. Deputy Minister Xasa also introduced a National Service Excellence campaign under the theme Excellent Service Starts with Me. The campaign is aimed at creating awareness and educating consumers and tourism product owners about the requirements. It will be rolled out in the nine provinces as from July 2012.

“The St. Lucia Wetland Park must be the only place on the globe where the world’s oldest land mammal (the rhinoceros) and the world’s biggest terrestrial mammal (the elephant) share an ecosystem with the world’s oldest fish (the coelacanth) and the world’s biggest marine mammal (the whale)” Former President Nelson Mandela. 10th August 2001. The Greater St. Lucia Wetland Park – South Africa’s first Natural World Heritage Site, was proclaimed on 01 December 1999 by UNESCO protocol. It was re-named in November 2007 as the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. The Park is situated on the northeastern coast of Kwazulu-Natal in the Kingdom of the Zulu, and is considered one of the world’s greatest eco-tourism experiences.

The Pelican Collection Bed And Breakfast Association

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We, the Pelican Collection members, invite you to come and explore the diversity of this World Class Park from the comfort of our homes.

MEMBER

TELEPHONE +27

EMAIL

WEB

African Ambiance African Dreamz Anna’s Bed & Breakfast Avalone Guest House Kwalucia Private Safari Retreat Santa Lucia Guest House St. Lucia Wetlands Guest House Whalesong Guest House Janet’s “Ukuthula” B&B Wendy’s Country Lodge

(0)35 590 1212 (0)35 590 1212 (0)35 590 1988 (0)35 590 2112 (0)35 590 1077 (0)35 590 1151 (0)35 590 1098 (0)35 590 1561 (0)83 638 4419 (0)35 550 0407

lejon@digitalsky.co.za info@african-dreamz.com annas@annasbnb.com info@avalone-guesthouse.com kwalucia@kwalucia.com rika@santalucia.co.za wetlands@iafrica.com info@whalesongstlucia.co.za goncalves@mtuba.co.za info@wendybnb.co.za

www.africanambience.com www.african-dreamz.com www.annasbnb.com www.avalone-guesthouse.com www.kwalucia.com www.santalucia.co.za www.stluciawetlands.com www.whalesongstlucia.co.za www.janetsbnb.co.za www.wendybnb.co.za

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RATING


SOUTH AFRICA

HOSPITALITY

Drakensberg’s Grande Olde Dame gets a facelift The Sani Pass Hotel and Leisure Resort located in the southern part of the Drakensberg mountain range in KwaZulu-Natal, a popular destination for generations of South Africans and in-bound tour, incentive and conference groups since opening its doors in 1958, is undergoing a major upgrade STORY : Des Langkilde

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The owner of this 800 hectare property, nestled in the Mhhomazana Valley bordering the Ukhahlamba Drakensberg World Heritage site at the foothills of the Sani Pass gateway into Lesotho, is Rand Merchant Bank who are ploughing millions into restoring the historical hotel to its former glory. “Phase one of the renovations, which included retrofitting all 28 bedrooms in the hotel and the mountain-facing portion of the 70 cottages with warm comfortable furnishings and select fittings is

already completed, says general manager Seulange Ezz-El Dine. Infrastucture such as the water lines, has been replaced while guest amenities and sport facilities such the golf course have been upgraded. Two new venues have been introduced into the hotel - the Sports Bar for guests who want to watch The Sharks beat the Blue Bulls in the Rugby Currie Cup final, and the Cigar Lounge, where sushi and exclusive whiskies are served to guests with discerning taste.” Tour operators will be pleased to know that the main road from Himeville leading up to the entrance of the hotel is now completely tarred. Visit the Sani Pass Hotel stand at INDABA 12 - 15 May 2012 DEC 1B10

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HOSPITALITY

SOUTH AFRICA

Having been invited to experience the new Sani Pass Hotel and Leisure Resort, my wife Bev, eleven year old son Chase and I headed off from Ballito with mixed feelings of trepidation after having been informed of the resort’s dilapidated state by a friend’s parents, who had celebrated their fortieth anniversary at the resort a few years back. Our fears soon turned to elation as we were checked into one of the sparkling new spacious double rooms by the friendly and competent staff. Environmental considerations My Saturday morning interview with Seulange on the

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hotel’s sunny balcony with views of the majestic mountain range continued; “We have upgraded the water-heating paraffin boiler and are installing heat pumps in the cottages to reduce electricity consumption, and are researching the feasibility of installing a waterfall turbine to further reduce our energy consumption. All light bulbs in the resort have been replaced with energy efficient CFL and LED bulbs. Solid waste is separated on site and we collaborate with other resorts in the area to optimise waste collection and recycling while our kitchen wet waste is collected by a local pig farm” says Seulange. Noise pollution is another area of which the resort management team are very conscious. “While in the process of renovating the resort we have managed to minimise


SOUTH AFRICA

HOSPITALITY

accountability, says Seulange. All staff are involved in regular progress meetings and training sessions and are motivated through incentive reward programmes such as ‘Employee of the Month’ and ‘Team of the Month’ awards in each of our seven departments, which culminates in our ‘Annual Award’ recognition programme.” Social responsibility

noise and disruption to guests by planning and cordoning off operational sections. We also plan our routine gardening and maintenance for week-days to ensure that our week-end guests are able to enjoy the peace and tranquillity for which Sani Pass is renowned” concludes Seulange. Staff welfare I commented on the friendly and positive disposition of the staff. “Our management philosophy is one of involvement and interaction with individual responsibility and

“We support the local Faith Christian School in Himeville by giving talks at the school and host the children for specific training and education programmes over holiday periods. We also support local community fund-raising initiatives by providing the venue for social meetings and have managed to provide jobs to the ‘Clouds of Hope’ charity organisation in Himeville by utilising their people as sub-contractors in our refurbishment programme” says Seulange. Conference and facilities It’s little wonder that the Sani Pass Hotel and Leisure Resort has been a favourite location for family reunions, weddings and corporate events over the past 54 years. With its convenient proximity to both Johannesburg and Durban, its scenic mountain views, three spectacular waterfalls, abundant facilities and diverse activity options the resort is able to cater to the most discerning requirements. Conference & Banqueting Table VENUE CLASS BOARD BANQUET U SHAPE CINEMA ROOM ROOM Maluti 40 10 50 30 40 Drakensberg 90 30 150 50 150 Mountain View 180

The newly renovated 9-hole (18 tee off) golf course and the resurfaced bowling green (inset) 3/2012

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The resort has two well equipped conference venues accommodating up to 150 delegates and offers a host of teambuilding activities, including a new obstacle course to be introduced later this year. Delegates can be pampered at the wellness and beauty centre or be challenged on the newly renovated 9-hole golf course. STO Rates While Special Tour Operator rates are set at 30 per cent off the rack rate for 2012, the resort has an open door policy and is able to negotiate special rates subject to volume and frequency of group bookings. Familiarisation (FAM) trips can be arranged by appointment. Exceeding expectations With the informal interview concluded, my wonderful wife had booked a picnic excursion for the afternoon, which proved to be an adrenalin loaded yet relaxing experience. After a brief quad bike safety orientation drill, my family and I followed our guide over lush fields and through verdant forest Facilities & Activities 4x4 Trips up Sani Pass

Games Room

Picnic Packages

Adventure Sports

Golf Course (9 Hole)

Quad Biking

Badminton

Horse Riding

Restaurants (3)

Bars (4)

Kiddies Dining Room

Rock Art Tours

Billiards Room

Kiddies Playground

Swimming Pool

Bowling Greens (2)

Kiddies Pool

Tractor Rides

Entertainment Prog

Nature Hiking

Volley Ball

Fly Fishing

Natural Waterfalls (3) Wellness Center

Accommodation Table Hotel: 09 Doubles (King size beds) 19 Twins (Garden facing) Cottages: 10 Doubles (Queen size beds) 19 Twins 03 Singles 15 Family (3-4 beds) Capacity: 75 Units sleeping 180 guests (conf dependent)

Meet the Management Team

Seulange Ezz-El Dine General Manager 42

Richard Pfotenhauer Assistant General Manager

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canopies to the edge of a secluded waterfall gorge where staff had laid out a blanket, pillows and delectable picnic basket in the shade of pine trees to await our arrival. The day ended with a superb three course dinner paired with the maître d’hôtel’s wine selection, notably a well structured shiraz from the Robertson region of the Western Cape. Being happily satiated I was keen to head off to the cigar bar for a Cognac when the dining room lights dimmed and virtually the entire staff and management approached our table bearing a candle-bedecked chocolate cake and singing “Happy birthday to you..” Clearly the news of my advancing years had preceded our arrival. We left the Sani Pass Hotel and Leisure Resort the following day, after a hearty breakfast and leisurely horse ride, feeling part of the resort family and will definitely be returning for a pampered holiday in the near future. For more information visit www.sanipasshotel.co.za where accommodation bookings can also be made.


LEGAL

SOUTH AFRICA

The case of Qwerty Travel, EU Regulations & the CPA Relevance for South African Travel & Tourism

Background

This case pertained to a passenger who had booked a tour to Corfu, which had an unhappy ending. There were two questions: (1) Was what the passenger had bought a package holiday and thus fell within the ambit of the European Union Travel Regulations and (2) If the answer was ‘Yes’ could the travel agent Qwerty Travel (’QT’) be held liable for the errors and omissions of the resort, in which the passenger was booked? Facts The holiday was booked following an advertisement (Teletext Holidays) and the passenger phoned QT as a result. All dealings were telephonic and it would appear that no terms and conditions were brought to the passenger’s attention and, as the court would later highlight, ‘no proper discussion’ took place. The passenger (a boxer) and his girlfriend proceeded to the resort. At some point, there was an altercation between the passenger and his girlfriend during which he lost his temper, smashed a sliding door and was injured. The basis of his claim was that the vacation he had been promised and envisaged did not come to fruition. Package Travel Regulations (section in brackets) A ‘package’ is defined as a prearranged combination of at least two of the following at an inclusive price i.e. transport, accommodation or ‘other tourist service’ which must be a ‘significant portion of the package’ 1. The Regulations only apply to packages sold in the UK (3) 2. The negotiation and contract must not contain ‘misleading information’ (4) 3. The relevant information must be provided in writing, before the contract is entered into and include information regarding passport, visa and health (7) 4. Other information must be provided ‘in good time’ i.e. regarding time and place of intermediate stops and insurance (8) 5. Alterations of ‘significant terms’ must be advised to the passenger ‘as soon as possible’ (12) 6. The party selling the package (i.e. the travel agent or tour operator) to the passenger is liable to the passenger for the failure to perform or inadequate performance, regardless

of whether the latter is due to the fault of the seller or a third party (e.g. en route or at the destination/resort). The only defences are the following: • It is due to the fault of the passenger • It is due to the fault of an ‘unconnected third party’ and thus not foreseeable • The circumstances that gave rise to the claim were unusual, unforeseeable and beyond the control of the party relying on such circumstances, and could not have been avoided even if that party had ‘exercised all due care’ Limitation of liability is allowed provided it is in accordance with applicable international conventions and not unreasonable. It would appear however that due diligence alone (24) is not a defence. The Court Case The court seems to allude to the consumer that is referred to in the CPA as a consumer regardless of whether he was a party to the original contract (the so-called ‘end-user’ component of the CPA definition of a ‘consumer’) when they use the following wording: ‘..irrespective of whether he is a direct contracting party, a transferee or a member of a group on whose behalf another person has concluded a contract in respect of a package’ The court found that no proper documentation was presented other than an invoice, which it was agreed was inadequate. The court found in fact that the salesman gave the passenger ‘an elementary and simple breakdown of the flight, accommodation and service costs’. The court found that what had been sold was in fact a package, and the matter was sent back to the trial court to be decided on the merits, i.e. ‘QT is liable for the proper performance of the obligations under the contract’ Here is what they had to say about a package: • The services were sold as a pre-arranged combination and at an inclusive price’ • ‘The substance of the arrangements is not altered by invoicing the components separately’ • ‘If the services are sold or offered for sale as components of a combination, there is a package: if they are sold or offered for sale separately but at the same time, there is no package’ Package Travel Regulations and the CPA A ‘package’ – corresponds with the Consumer Protection Act (CPA ) provisions regarding choice of supplier and on so-called ‘bundled goods’ (13) i.e. suppliers may only sell additional goods or require the consumer to enter into an additional contract if it can prove price and convenience benefits to the consumer. The third party agreement must also be CPA compliant (51 (1)(e) & 51 (2)(a)) ‘Misleading information’ corresponds with the CPA provisions on misleading marketing (i.e. promotion and supply): Section 29 – addresses general standards and in broad terms 3/2012

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prohibits marketing i.e. promotion and actual supply that is in any way ‘misleading, fraudulent or deceptive’ re ‘nature, use, price, advantages’ or ‘any material aspect’

Implications & Lessons To Be Learnt

Section 41 – suppliers must not by ‘words or conduct’ (a) ‘false, misleading, or deceptive’ regarding a ‘material fact’ (disclose/ fail to), (b) use ‘exaggeration, innuendo or ambiguity’ or (c) ‘fail to correct apparent misapprehension’

‘No proper discussion’ – the sales process must be much more inquisitorial, so as to ensure that you sell the consumer what he wants and not what the sales person THINKS the consumer wants (section 27 and regulations 9 and 10). Make sure he/she understands the role and relationship with the parties, and avoid the following:

The relevant information must be provided in writing, before the contract is entered into and ‘in good time’. This corresponds with the CPA on disclosure of adequate information:

‘I doubt the consumer bothered to listen to or indeed would have understood (with all respect to him) the comment made about acting only as agents for third party suppliers’

Section 27 (1) (a) [‘disclose prescribed info’*] and (b) keep records] [*read with regulations 9 and 10] – this information includes the following: o the basis for calculating the fee o any other costs the intermediary is entitled to recover from the consumer o any information, at any relevant time, which may be relevant to the consumer o commission, consideration fees, charges or brokerages payable to the intermediary o any other information which may be relevant and which he or she may reasonably be expected to be aware of.

‘No documentation other than an invoice, which it was agreed was inadequate’ – Provide and complete in detail quotes, estimates and reservation forms (T&C’s – see below) and ask the consumer to check for correctness. If product selection is made off the Internet or a brochure, make sure the information is current and accurate (18 – match description and sample) and have back-to-back agreements and indemnities with third parties.

Regulation 9 (3): such information must be provided timeously so as to afford the consumer reasonably sufficient time to make an informed decision; [read with s 49: consumer must have an ‘adequate opportunity’ to comprehend] Alterations – corresponds with the CPA prohibiting ‘unilateral changes’ (Regulation 45 (3) (i)) and an ‘amended agreement’ is required if goods are substituted (46 (2)) Party selling the package (i.e. the travel agent or tour operator) to the passenger is liable to the passenger – defences: There is no corresponding (absolute liability for services) provision in the CPA and the same defences mentioned (above) would be available. I also believe that due diligence i.e. careful selection of a third party service or goods provider (such as a SATSA member) would be a defence. Limitation of liability – corresponds with the CPA prohibiting the exclusion for or limiting recovery to gross negligence (51) and excluding liability for injury or death for suppliers error or omission (Regulation 45 (3) (a)), bearing in mind that: • It must be fair, reasonable and just (48) • It must be drawn to the attention of the consumer is required (49 and 58) • Bear in mind the absolute liability provisions regarding goods (61). No proper documentation – corresponds with the CPA provisions regarding ‘keep record of transactions entered into via phone’ (50 (3)) and the obligation to provide copy of or electronic access to terms and conditions to consumer (50 (2) (b)).

‘No recording’ – There are many good reasons to follow up a discussion with an e-mail e.g. • It is a good business practice both from a risk management and marketing perspective (CRM!) • It gives you the supplier an opportunity to ensure that your perception of the customer’s needs is correct – as we know 90% of arguments arise from the gap between expectation and deliverable! • It is more often than not the first step in the critical transactional path (‘CTP’) and your offer or record of information exchange/negotiations can thus refer to your standard terms and conditions (‘STC’) from the outset – all your e-mails should have a standard sign off that ‘All business is conducted in terms of our STC which you agree to have read and comply/be bound with/by – available on our website www……………..’ (Electronic reference complies with the CPA). • It gives you the opportunity to point out to the court that there has been a course of conduct between you and the consumer. • If the consumer does not respond to your e-mail, it gives rise to a presumption that your ‘version’ of the discussion is correct – very useful if a dispute were to arise! • And now for the really good news! All of the above means that you meet certain of the crucial CPA requirements. ‘No T&C’ – ensure the consumer is given a copy of the relevant T&C (yours and that of any third party service or goods provider) as early as possible. Include it (or adequate reference thereto) in all communications. ‘Prescribed script’ – It transpired during the trial that the sales person was selling off a prepared sales process: there is nothing wrong with that, but then ensure it is comprehensive and includes all the elements mentioned above.

Disclaimer: This article is intended to provide a brief overview of legal matters pertaining to the travel and tourism industry and is not intended as legal advice. As every situation depends on its own facts and circumstances, professional advice should be sought in each instance. © Adv Louis Nel, BENCHMARK, MAY 2012.

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Mossel Bay presents results of its study into the local economy Mossel Bay’s Participatory Assessment of Competitive Advantage (PACA) team presented its findings at a public meeting at the Diaz Beach Hotel in February 2012, writes Martin Hatchuel. The study team included municipal officials working in conjunction with facilitators from the locally based consultancy, Interface by Goji. Its brief was to update the Municipality’s Local Economic Development and Tourism strategy. Lead facilitator Alewijn Dippenaar said that Mossel Bay’s Local Economic Development Charter (which was adopted in 2008) remained the founding document for taking the economy forward. “The Charter put forward a common vision for economic development in support of the Municipality’s own vision which is that, ‘We strive to be a trend-setting Municipality delivering quality services responsive to the demands and challenges of the community and our constitutional mandate, in which all stakeholders can participate in harmony and dignity.’ “The LED Charter takes a strategic approach to development through driving economic participation, broadening transformation, and broad-based black economic empowerment in Mossel Bay; by responding to poverty, income inequality and pro-poor development; by growing a sustainable and inclusive economy that benefits the people of Mossel Bay; by the creation of new ventures and developing small enterprises; through human capital development; by ensuring sustainable growth of the formal economy; through ensuring ecological integrity; and by creating jobs. “The LED Charter proposed concentrating on four Key Growth Sectors - construction and property; tourism; manufacturing; and agriculture and fishing - but our research has shown that, given the current economic situation, we should also place emphasis on arts and crafts; culture and heritage; the environment; and SMMEs,” said Mr. Dippenaar. “Tourism and the environment are the two most important themes which have come through in our discussions, and it’s clear that the town needs to concentrate on protecting them, above all else, if we’re to profit from our competitive advantage.” He said that the PACA Process highlighted a number of

key focus areas which need attention in order to grow the economy. “Service levels and friendliness; communication, information and marketing; the town’s logo; sport, festivals and events; the development of new and existing tourism attractions and infrastructure; a re-alignment of by-laws that restrict advertising and trading; a re-alignment of the outdoor signage and advertising regulations; the protection and sensitive exploitation of our cultural heritage; the provision of formal trading areas in kwaNonqaba; and the redevelopment of The Point and the revitalisation of the CBD will become priorities in the new local economic development and tourism strategy,” he said. Mr. Dippenaar said that the PACA process has been proven to provide an accurate snapshot of local economies, especially in communities of less than 200,000 people. “Mossel Bay’s PACA process was financed by the IDC and the Municipality of Mossel Bay, and got under way after the team had received training from SALGA’s Mr. Tim Hadingham. “The process began with a hypothesis workshop, during which we set the parameters for the study, and then went into a kick-off workshop (which was attended by about 85 delegates), followed by eighteen sector-specific workshops (which were attended by a total of about 172 delegates). “We also distributed 300 questionnaires by hand in the CBD, kwaNonqaba, Great Brak River, etc., and, of course, we’ve held this feedback workshop which almost wraps up the consultative process. “Our final step will be the compilation of a new LED and Tourism Strategy document - and after that, it’ll be up to the municipality to continue to create an enabling environment in which the various role players can carry the strategy forward. “Of course the strategy isn’t cast in stone, and it will need to be revisited from time to time in the future - but always with our PACA team’s slogan in mind: ‘Together we take responsibility for growing our economy’,” said Mr. Dippenaar.

The presentation (pdf 1.72 mb) can be downloaded at: http://www.visitmosselbay.co.za/media-releases/mossel-bay-presents-results-of-its-study-into-the-local-economy/ 3/2012

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MARKETING

AFRICA

$12 Billion Travel Channel gains momentum in Southern Africa According to the International Reciprocal Trade Association (IRTA) over $12 billion in barter trade was exchanged between some 400 000 companies worldwide last year - certainly an alternative travel channel that is worth tapping into, writes Des Langkilde. Given that most hospitality service providers are running at around 60% occupancy levels in the current economic recession, 40% of their inventory is going to waste. Why not offer this excess inventory on corporate barter? The barter credits earned can then be used to reduce cash flow by purchasing procurement needs on barter such as media or accommodation when attending overseas travel trade shows.

But won’t barter trade diminish existing cash clients? Not at all – in fact TransMedia are providing a hitherto untapped travel channel that would not have been available through traditional ‘cash booking’ travel channels. As a client your details are not plastered all over the web, so your usual cash clients will be none the wiser that you accept barter trade.

The way that TransMedia works is simplicity itself. A wellWhile there are many barter exchange companies and worded notice is sent to all barter brokers worldwide stating networks in the USA, Europe, Asia and Australia, very few that vacation and safari inventory is available in Southern can be found in Africa. Of these, most Africa for barter. The representing work as a “club” who charge their broker or their client will then visit the Barter transactions are members an annual membership and TransMedia website and complete a renewal fee, which implies that they credited immediately so there travel request. This information is then are more interested in making money are no receivables, collection sent to selected clients in Southern from membership fees than they are in Africa, depending on the nature of the efforts or bad debts earning revenue by facilitating barter travel request. The client has the option transactions. of either quoting for the business or declining the request, depending on the clients’ inventory TransMedia Barter SA has opened its doors to the Southern availability for the requested period. African travel and tourism trade, through a broker office in South Africa represented by the publisher of the Tourism The transactions between buyers are converted to trade Tattler. What makes TransMedia Barter unique is that they do credit or “barter dollars” (one barter dollar is equal to one not charge any fees to become a client, nor do they charge for US dollar at the current rate of exchange) and are reflected selling their clients inventory i.e. securing new clients for you. as balances in each clients ‘barter account’. The accounts They only make money when clients use their barter credit to are maintained and serviced, and transactions are credited buy something on barter by charging a nominal 10% cash immediately so that there are no receivables, collection efforts fee on the value of the barter transaction. To put it into travel or bad debts involved. Proprietary software is used as a service and tourism terms, they act as a travel broker by acting as an that provides reporting in accordance with GAAP (generally intermediary between international travellers (their clients with accepted accounting principles). trade dollars to spend) and local hospitality service providers Each client has a broker that is your point of contact, to serve (their clients who have excess inventory to offer). They then your needs. With over 19 years of brokering barter for their assist their clients to use the trade dollars earned through the clients, TransMedia understands that character, ethics and transaction by negotiating media or procurement purchases personal service are the key ingredients to mutual success. on 100% barter trade. Pretty much a win-win situation all For more information email des@transmediabarter.com or visit: ‘round! http://www.transmediabarter.com/

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Market Intelligence Report The information below was extracted from available data as at 11 April 2012, writes Martin Jansen van Vuuren.

ARRIVALS The latest available data from Statistics South Africa shows that South Africa received 2 176 719 overnight arrivals (excluding same day visitors) from overseas in 2011, which was a 1.8% decrease over 2010. South Africa’s main overseas source markets recorded a mixed bag of results with overnight arrivals from the UK declining by 7.4% (to 420 483 overnight arrivals) in 2011 over 2010. Overnight arrivals from Germany recorded 9.3% growth (to 235 774 arrivals) while the USA also achieved growth of 1.9% (to 287 614 arrivals) for the same period. Overall total foreign arrivals were up 3.3% to 8 339 354, with overnight arrivals from Africa being up 6.9% to 6 136 835.

HOTEL STATS Data from STR Global indicate that for the first two months of 2012, all hotels in South Africa achieved an average room occupancy (ARO) of 62.8% which was up 5.9% on the same period in 2011. The average room rate (ARR) increased by 3.4% to R949 while the RevPar increased 9.5% to R596. For January and February 2012 five star hotels achieved an average occupancy of 64.7% (up 9.1% on 2011), with four star hotels achieving 64.1% (up 5.8%) and three star hotels achieving 60.9% (up 5.5%). ARR for January and February 2012 were up for all star graded hotels. Five-star hotels were up 1% to R1 721, while four star hotels were up 4.8% to R912 and three star hotels were up 4.8% to R714. With both ARO and ARR being up for all star graded hotels the RevPar were also up. Five star hotels were up 10.1% (to R1 113), four star hotels were up 10.8% (to R585) and three star hotels were up 10.6% (to R434).

ACSA DATA The data from ACSA for the full year 2011 indicate increases in passengers arriving on international, regional and domestic flights for all three major airports. 2012 over 2011 (Jan & Feb)

International Passenger Arrivals

Regional Passenger Arrivals

Domestic Passenger Arrivals

OR Tambo

2.2%

2.0%

3.3%

Cape Town International

13.6%

22.2%

4.5%

Durban International

25.6%

N/A

-1.2%

The ACSA data seem to corroborate anecdotal evidence which indicated that Cape Town had a good festive season.

WHAT THIS MEANS FOR MY BUSINESS The data above indicate that the growth in 2011 has continued in the first few months of 2012. In order to place this growth in context, the following should be kept in mind: • Growth in arrivals does not necessarily translate directly into growth in bednights sold. Simply put, if the country received 100 arrivals last year and each of these arrivals stayed 10 days, then 1 000 bednights would have been sold. If the country receives 150 arrivals this year (growth of 50%) but each of these arrivals only stay 5 days, then 750 bednights would have been sold (a decline of 25%). • ARO of hotels are still below the levels achieved in 2007 and 2008 and in real terms (if inflation is excluded) the ARR are also below the levels achieved in 2007 and 2008 • Data from ACSA indicate all passengers arriving on a particular flight. Accordingly passengers arriving on international flights include tourists as well as South Africans returning home. During the holiday period there may be more South Africans returning home than tourists, who would stay in hotels, rent cars, etc The data are encouraging, but tourism enterprises are urged to remain prudent with cash flows and to continue to ensure that value is offered to tourists through high service standards. For more information contact Martin at Grant Thornton on +27 (0)21 417 8838 or visit: http://www.gt.co.za 3/2012

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an easy way to recruit or find a job The Tourism Tattler has partnered with the VJOBS Partner Network, a division of Virtual Human Capital (VHC), to provide Tattler readers with an online recruitment facility that gets results, writes Chris Holt. eJobs for Candidates For job seekers (candidates) registration is free of charge and the process of creating an interactive CV is quick, simple and effective. As each step in the CV building sequence is completed, a ‘Jobs Matching Your Profile’ window monitors your input as a percentage match against the database of company recruitment requirement postings. eJobs for Companies For companies seeking to recruit personel, the Tattler eJobs portal provides an afforable solution at just R650 per month plus R25 per job ad posted onto the site. The company registration process provides for multiple users to manage job postings while transaction history and reports are just a click away. Tourism and hospitality trade recruiters and employers now have the ability to more effectively manage recruitment and job applications. Recruiters can manage processes, client/ candidate expectations and present candidates professionally and accurately - all online and interactive. The evolution of online job portals has seen much advancement and the good ones are those that actually do some of the work for you. They are able to take your information and efficiently match it to the potential opportunities out there, across multiple locations, while still considering the skills and other assets you have to offer the lucky company that will be hiring you. The fact that the online job hunting industry is so competitive also means that you need to consider where you will get maximum results for minimum effort. This is a simple optimization of your resources and of course, it should not cost you anything. Any operation asking for payment simply to post your CV will soon prove to be a fly by night. Remember also to be honest in the information that you post on the web, it’s not worth being caught out for pretending to be 48

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something that you are not, regardless of how fantastic you believe your qualifications, skills and experience to be. If its reach you want, we have plenty, having partnered with numerous organisations across South Africa that are specialists at what they do, they connect with a focussed and targeted audience across all sectors. It furthermore creates a great opportunity for employers in the industry to post vacancies and find the freshest new talent, whether they are small boutique hotels or large multinational operations. Online recruitment can be an expensive exercise and this is why many job seekers don’t get the results they are expecting. Not because they are not attractive potential employees, but because the cost of online job advertising can be prohibitively expensive. Employers are often not prepared to risk the cost of online advertising without feeling comfortable that they will find what they are looking for. For this reason it has been imperative to ensure that the offering that Tattler eJobs brings to market is priced in such a way that employers don’t feel they are being exploited. These recruitment expenses in a business are very often a grudge purchase which delivers poorly against the investment required. So how do we solve this problem you may ask? Well it’s quite simple really. Give employers an avenue with which to advertise, that also does a lot of the preliminary screening for them. Give them the collective reach that adds up to millions of people across various segments of the market, making the cost thereof a no brainer. By doing this, it becomes a function of volume, which through advanced technology is made manageable. At the same time, there is benefit for job seekers in knowing that employers are prepared to take the leap of faith and explore the potential they have to offer an organisation. For more information, visit:

http://www.tourismtattler.co.za/component/content/article/50


PHOTO GALLERY

PHOTO GALLERY

I first met Harry Stoker at Thula Thula Private Game Reserve in Zululand, Kwzulu-Natal, South Africa, where he is a trainee game ranger and avid photographer. His images impressed me so much that I thought readers would enjoy them too – Ed.

Meet Harry Stoker - Wildlife Photographer at Large My name is Harry Stoker and I am a natural history photographer from Devon, England. I take photos of all things wild, from large mammals to insects and beautiful landscapes to interesting plants. I am also a keen environmentalist and aspiring conservationist, I hope to one day entwine that with my photography as pictures can speak a thousand words. I have been firmly behind the camera now for a little over three years. My passion has always been ‘all things wild’ and I just needed an excuse to submerge myself in nature. I tried going down the science route as well as the artistic route but the laboratories were not for me. So I decided to pursue my photography further and ended up in the heart of Zululand, South Africa, where the wild is truly wild.

Links to my work: www.facebook.com/wildmanphotagraphy www.wix.co/harrystoker/wildmanphotography www.flickr.com/photos/harrystoker www.wildmanphotography@blogspot.com Getting in touch: Email - harry.wildman.stoker@gmail.com Tel - +27727943978

Since my arrival in Africa, not only has my subject base grown considerably, I am also starting to get published in the odd magazine more often and have also sold a few prints of my work.

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AFRICA

PHOTO GALLERY

All images copyright - Harry Stoker

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PHOTO GALLERY

AFRICA

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PROCUREMENT

SOUTH AFRICA

According to Hotel Amenities Suppliers (Pty) Ltd, upgrading or matching the image of your hotel using soft branding is a world trend and is fast becoming part of the South African guest amenity market. The principle concept in soft branding is to match an independent product to the image you perceive your hotel or group, or rather your client’s profile, to be. Whilst the prime focus of the hotel remains the satisfying of your guests’ needs, the creating of a generous perceived value on the items provided in the bathroom remains one of the most flexible marketing tools available to management. The budget parameters are clearly defined around the room rate which also dictates the quality of your hotel or bathroom. • Toiletry and cosmetic companies see the benefit of sampling with a hotel, for example Chrysalis and Hermes. The hotel gets the benefit of using a REPUTABLE BRAND, adding perceived value. • Very successful soft branding occurs where the hotel or hotel group develops their OWN BRAND. An example is Protea Hotels, which has a registered trademark, “Earth Therapy”.

• Another way of branding is to choose from one of the many OFF-THE-SHELF ranges available from Hotel Amenities Suppliers, which create a mood or feel for your hotel. The hotel creates an image in the bathroom matching their location or decor. There are more than 12 Off-The-Shelf ranges available. • Prestigious IN-HOUSE BRANDS like “Duke & Forsythe” and “Pacale” from Hotel Amenities Suppliers are highly sought after. • Use of individual hotel logo on a toiletry range remains the most popular option. The hotel proudly uses their logo and in this way markets their own hotel with pride. Bottle selection can be made from over 90 moulds available and the designs and concepts are developed. Today there are more than 300 hotels in Southern Africa with their own logotised amenities supplied by Hotel Amenities Suppliers. Hotel Amenities Suppliers through their shareholding in the international companies, Luxury Hotel Cosmetics and Strategic Amenity Alliance, can offer over 40 world brands. Africa’s largest guest supply company would be glad to consult with you.

For more information visit: www.hotelamenities.co.za

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AFRICA

RISK & INSURANCE

Risk Management is critical to hospitality industry

“Good Risk Management fosters vigilance in times of calm and instils discipline in times of crisis.” Dr. Michael Ong (Enterprise Risk Manager for ABN-AMRO Bank)

Insurance cover is just one aspect of risk management. To properly embrace risk management one has to consider preparedess, response and recovery. Building capacity on the ground to mitigate risk is crucial – fire training, first aid training, general risk training, signage and practised response procedures are crucial components of risk mitigation. According to Gavin Courtenay, Managing Director at SATIB

Insurance Brokers, risk management coupled to appropriate insurance cover is critical to the hospitality industry. “Hospitality guests are generally in an environment that is foreign to them and anything can happen. They place their safety firmly in the hands of their hosts, so whether it’s a slippery floor, food and beverage standards, adventure activities, game drives or transfers, operators need to be vigilant when managing their risk.” Courtenay says that the litigation field is seeing record claims settled in the hundreds of millions. “A claim from a single slip-up can cripple a business, and financial penalties and reputational damage can be equally as damaging. The bottom line is to take risk seriously, be prepared and have an appropriate reaction and response strategy. Ensure you are supported by professionals that can help you recover from serious incidents.”

Risk Seminar at Tourism Indaba South Africa A comprehensive seminar titled ‘Mind the Gap’, to explore the risk management process and the importance of understanding risk in the tourism industry, will be held on Monday 14th May at the ICC, room DEFG at 2.30 pm. The audience will be addressed by Dr Simon King (The AIM Centre), Wayne Forrester (Savage, Jooste & Adams) & Andre du Toit (SATIB Insurance Brokers). Subjects to be covered include aspects of preparation, response and recovery, how risk management assists responsible tourism and what SATIB’s various risk management programmes are. The seminar wil be followed by a networking function at 4:15 pm. Exhibitors at the show will be pleased to know that the SATIB Beach Bash traditionally held at Joe Kools on Durban’s Golden Mile promenade will be back this year by popular demand. For more information on any of our events or to set up a meeting with one of SATIB’s consultants, contact Cindy Clokie on 0861 SATIB4U (728 4248) or marketing@satib.co.za 3/2012

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TECHNOLOGY

&

gadgets gizmo’s This edition’s selection has been sourced with acknowledgement to http://www.livingstonessupplyco.co.za/

GLOBAL

PELICAN EQUIPMENT CASE 1500


Made of Lightweight space-age resin: ultra high impact structural copolymer polypropylene, provides 4 times the strength to weight ratio over conventional injection molding, unaffected by dents, scratches or corrosion. Pelican Case meet MIL-STD 4150-J stacking (400 lbs.) Drop Test (48”), Immersion (2” at 160°F). They meet and far exceed the highest standards of industrial, airline, military and commercial applications. Multiple massive ABS Latches and .250 neoprene closed cell “O Ring” provides up to 30 feet watertight and air tightness for the ultimate protection. Interior Dimensions:
16.75” x 11.18” x 6.12” (42.5 x 28.4 x 15.5 cm)
 Price: R2,224.00
 ($284.39)

ASTROMASTER 70AZ TELESCOPE


 If you’re looking for a dual-purpose telescope appropriate for both terrestrial and celestial viewing, Then the Celestron AstroMaster Series is for you. Each AstroMaster model is capable of giving correct views of land and sky.

 Price: R1,286.00 ($164.48)

STAINLESS STEEL 8 CUP CAFETIERE PLUNGER

18/10 Stainless Steel Coffee Plunger/Bodum.1 Litre/8 Cup • Height: 24cm • Double Wall • 5 Year Warranty, Dishwasher Safe • Spare mesh available for purchase when replacement needed Price: R499.00 ($63.82)

COLEMAN 54QT STEEL BELTED COOLER BOX

SAFARI TRACKER 12V SPOTLIGHT

Product Specifications: • Holds 85 cans • Solid steel latch designed to seal securely • Stainless steel handles with rubber grips make it simple to carry • Rust resistant hinges and screws protect against rust and breakage • Easy to clean base, lid, liner • Rustproof, leak resistant channel drain for no tilt draining • 6 year limited warranty • Dimensions: 24.25” x 16.75” x 16.75” Price: R2,780.00
 ($355.54)

The features of the Safari Spotlight are: • 100W output (higher than other supposed “100W” products) • 170mm diameter • Includes red filter • 12V coiled power cord • Focusable beam • 2 year warranty • Solid feel and reliable switch Price: R876.00
 ($112.83)

SPOTTING SCOPE ULTIMA 65MM

Aperture: 65mm. Focal Length: 400mm. Power: 18-55x. Waterproof. Angular F. O. R. 1.7-7.3 degrees. Multi coated optics to provide exceptional clarity and brilliance. Performs extremely well under all light conditions which makes it ideal for all types of outdoor viewing activities including nature and wildlife. Zoom eye-piece, sighting tube, soft carrying case, no-fault lifetime warranty. Price: R2,138.00 ($273.51)

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TRADE NEWS

AFRICA

World Heritage Status for the Okavango Delta

Protea Hospitality Group drives expansion into Africa with 11 new hotels worth R1 billion

Minister for Tourism, Kitso Mokaila, has announced that Botswana is consulting with communities surrounding the Okavango Delta to get their support for an application for World Heritage Status.

The Protea Hospitality Group is forging ahead with extensive expansion plans on the continent this year. The total value of investment is US$130 million (approximately. ZAR 1 billion) and represents the biggest expansion on the continent this year of any hotel group in the world.

He said: “It is important for us to consult with Batswana. They need to be involved, to help us give the site the care it deserves, lest we lose it.”

Group CEO Arthur Gillis said the company viewed the African market with much optimism this year, despite the uncertainty facing the global economy. “As political stability and business opportunities increase, they create a greater need for the hotels, and we’re leading the charge,” said Gillis.

By signing the UNESCO World Heritage convention, Botswana pledges to conserve not only the Okavango Delta, but also to promote sustainable development contributing to improved livelihoods of communities living within the site. Angola and Namibia are also being consulted about the proposal.

The new hotels by country are as follows. Nigeria: Protea Hotel Ibadan; Protea Hotel Select Emotan - Benin City; Protea Hotel Select Ikeja, Lagos; African Pride Avalon Hotel and Spa, GRA Ikeja, Lagos, and Protea Hotel Asaba. Uganda: Protea Hotel Entebbe, with two hotels to open under the Protea Hotels banner late in 2012. Zambia: Protea Hotel Ndola, and Protea Hotel Mulungushi, construction just started.

Said Mokaila: “Angolan and Namibian rivers give us water. If these two countries decide to use water or build dams, we will lose the inland Delta. It is important that they agree to support us.”

These hotels will create an estimated 1 000 new direct jobs in the hospitality industry in those countries, and scores of indirect jobs in the supplier industries.

Gamewatchers wins Active Travel award

BOTSWANA Botswana empowers small tourism businesses The Botswana government has announced new tourism rules designed to encourage local citizens to become more involved in the tourism industry, especially at ownership and management level. There is a large foreign ownership of tour operator companies in Botswana. The announcement was made in the Government Gazette on December 30, 2011, and stated that, “guest houses (except corporate guest houses), mobile safaris, mokoros, motorboats, tourist transfers and camp and caravan sites are now reserved for Botswana citizens and companies wholly owned by citizens.” “The undertaking has been in the pipeline for a long time, so this decision is not a surprise to anyone. The reason for the decision is essentially to assist small to medium-sized businesses to break into the tourism industry. These enterprises do not require large capital investment, thus fall within the spirit of citizen economic empowerment,” said Grant Woodrow, Managing Director of Wilderness Safaris Botswana.

The Botswana government hopes that listing as a World Heritage Site will increase awareness of the area for tourism, bringing economic growth and employment.

KENYA Gamewatchers Safaris Adventure Camping Safari has been selected by Outside, as a recipient of its first-ever Active Travel Awards that recognize best new adventures, exotic retreats, and beaches. The Adventure Camping Safari in Kenya was honoured as Best Deal for 2012. The Adventure Camping Safari is a 7-day safari in Kenya that utilizes 2-person dome tents, sleeping bags and mattresses on the tent floor. A camp cook, safari showers and toilets are included at the camps, and game drives are done in 4x4 vehicles with top guides. Vans are used for road transfers between parks and at the end of the safari to minimize fuel costs. A 50-minute flight from Nairobi to the Mara shortens overall journey time. This safari departs daily from Nairobi with a minimum of two travellers. Campsites are located in private conservancies where Masai-led walking safaris and day and night game drives are available.

Cheli & Peacock a Runner Up at the 2012 Tourism For Tomorrow Awards The Tourism for Tomorrow Awards, one of the world’s most renowned and prestigious awards, revealed its 2012 results in Tokyo, Japan on 17 April that are aimed at highlighting prime examples of best practice in sustainable tourism. The Award recognises Cheli & 3/2012

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Peacock for their 26 years of innovation and leadership in conservation initiatives and community revenue-sharing tourism projects, having directly contributed to the conservation of biodiversity and protection of wildlife, the natural and cultural heritage of the areas they operate in, as well as to the welfare of local communities.

NAMIBIA Namibia to reinvent tourism strategies Newly rebranded Tourism Strategy Company (TSC), previously Fuller Frost & Associates, has been appointed lead consultancy to undertake a national tourism growth and development strategy for Namibia. Under David Frost, who was instrumental in developing and implementing the tourism growth strategy for the Namibia Tourism Board from 2003 to 2007, TSC will be working with AE Tourism Consulting, led by Jackie Asheeke and Oliver Bennett, an international tourism consultant based in the UK. The project aims to present the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism with a practical, competitive and focused Tourism Action Plan. The initiative is the result of the Namibian government’s recognition of tourism as a leading sector in job creation. “Against the backdrop of the international recession, Namibia has stagnated in terms of tourist arrivals. The Tourism Action Plan aims at achieving cohesion among all tourism stakeholders in Namibia to aggressively reposition it as a sought-after destination.”, says Frost.

MALAWI Malawi joins International Council of Tourism Partners The International Council of Tourism Partners (ICTP) has announced that Malawi has become a destination member and the 6th African country to join ICTP. Malawi “the Warm Heart of Africa” has a natural vegetation mix of miombo woodland and savanna, sharing borders with Tanzania to the north, and northeast, Zambia to the west, and Mozambique to the east and southwest. About 20 percent of the country is covered by Lake Malawi, the third largest lake in Africa. Sosten Yobe Lingwalanya of the Malawi Department of Tourism, said: “ Malawi is delighted to join the International Council of Tourism Partners. Malawi will benefit from the experience of ICTP and its members and learn from them to make Malawi a truly wonderful holiday destination and also work with colleagues in the region who are members of ICTP, forging links to see tourism grow and benefit these countries.” For more information, go to: www.visitmalawi.mw

between the Indian Ocean Commission and the AU, particularly in the area of piracy in the Indian Ocean. “The IOC is becoming an important voice in the region and welcomes the opportunity to engage with the wider African continent, particularly when it comes to piracy, whose effects are not exclusive to Indian Ocean islands,” said the Minister. Among issues discussed, the increased engagement of the African Union in fighting piracy featured prominently. The Minister briefed Mr. Ping on recent developments in the region. It was agreed that as the issue of piracy and instability in Somalia is of importance, due attention would be given to these in the run-up to the AU Summit. It was also noted that there was a need to strengthen the African Mission in Somalia (AMISSOM), possibly developing a naval element to the operation.

(L to R): Mr. Jean Ping&Mr. Jean-Paul Adam / Photo from Seychelles Tourism Board

Routes Africa 2012 Set To Rally Airline Companies, Civil Aviation Authorities & Tourism Boards In Seychelles The Seychelles Minister for Tourism and Culture used the 48th RETOSA board meeting of Tourism Ministers and the SADC meeting held in Mauritius to call on Africa’s Civil Aviation Authorities and their Tourism Boards to rally alongside the airlines of the world flying into Africa for the ROUTES AFRICA 2012 which will be held in Seychelles between 8th to the 10th July. Elsia Grandcourt, CEO of the Seychelles Tourism Board, said “the forum would be beneficial for Civil Aviation Authorities, Airlines and Tourism bodies of the African region and also to members of the Indian Ocean Vanilla Islands within the Indian Ocean.” Executive Vice President of UBM Aviation routes, David Stroud, had the following message for RETOSA members. “We would be delighted to welcome the members of SADC and RETOSA to routes Africa 2012 to meet directly with decision makers within the air service development arena. Tourism boards are taking an increasingly targeted and strategic role in aviation, using partnership with airlines and airports to help built demand and grow competitive aviation capacity within their regions.”’ ROUTES AFRICA 2012 will also see the involvement of cruise ship companies, as Africa is one area where flycruises do work,and that the possibility for such activities does really exist.

SEYCHELLES Seychelles and the African Union: stepping up the fight against piracy Seychelles Foreign Minister, Mr. Jean-Paul Adam, met with African Union Chairperson, Mr. Jean Ping, to discuss increased cooperation 56

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SOUTH AFRICA SA VIP Airport Lounge Voted Best In Africa And Middle East VIP airport lounge, the Shongololo Lounge at OR Tambo International Airport, has been voted the best lounge in the Africa/Middle East region. Lounge owner Menzies Aviation, responsible for ground handling at eight airports in South Africa, recently expanded its business in South Africa, by creating the lounge, after identifying the need for the provision of world-class luxury lounges in 2009. The announcement that the Shongololo VIP lounge has won the prestigious Priority Pass award is significant. It was one of just 19 awards worldwide out of 40 000 rating submissions in the process of determining the Lounge of the Year. In addition to the usual business and first class lounge facilities, the contemporary Africanthemed lounge also boasts the last word in understated African hospitality, friendliness and service. The concept of the Shongololo Lounge was moulded on “prestige” – a quality that had previously been lacking in the South African airport lounge market.

the Garden Route. It has captured the hearts of visitors with efforts to rehabilitate and free previously caged primates. The long term aim of the sanctuaries is to provide groups of selected species of primates and birds that are genetically pure, wild and healthy, that can be reintroduced into their home ranges. The combined sanctuaries have an annual expenditure well in excess of R8 million directly into the local economy. They employ 50 full time staff, who have more than 150 dependents. The sanctuaries attract local and international visitors to Plettenberg Bay and the area.

World’s first baby rhino orphanage established in SA The first specialist, non-commercial centre for baby rhinos orphaned and injured by rhino poaching will be established at the Wildlife and Cultural Centre and Legend Golf & Safari Resort in Limpopo. A R4-million campaign to fund the project, has already gained support from a key organisations involved. The centre will not be open to the public and will be protected by state-of-the-art security. “The orphanage will have specialist medical facilities to care for these young and badly injured creatures, from an intensive care unit to, we hope, a special ambulance to transport them under proper medical supervision. The public will only be allowed to view them via CCTV,” said Arrie van Deventer, who runs the Centre. To help, or for more information, please contact: pete@theazaleagroup.com

Avis Donates Child Safety Seats To Save Childrens Lives Avis continues to stand behind one of their brand promises ‘people are more important than cars’ by providing nonprofit organisation Drive More Safely, with child safety seats. The tragedy of losing her eldest son in a motor vehicle accident left Alida Jones, CEO and founder of Drive More Safely, with an unrivalled determination to make a difference on South African roads. After the accident Jones started a non-profit organisation, ‘Drive More Safely’ with the aim to train and educate road users through the production of a magazine, a learner driver training centre and providing affordable learner and driver license training to the underprivileged. Avis operations executive, Corne Langenhoven, adds “Avis is humbled to help where possible and to provide support in making travelling safer for children and salutes Alida Jones in her honourable and dedicated work.” ‘Drive More Safely’ collects used children’s car seats and makes sure that all the car seats are in good repair before distributing them to less fortunate families. “I am so grateful for the support from Avis as they have been very supportive and generous in assisting and making this campaign a success,” concludes Jones

Monkeyland Primate Sanctuary and Birds of Eden are certified by FTTSA Monkeyland Primate Sanctuary and Birds of Eden are the newest additions to the FTTSA-family in the Western Cape. Monkeyland Primate Sanctuary is the world’s first free roaming multi-specie primate sanctuary and currently the top eco-tourism attraction on

Shamwari and Wilderness fight rhino poaching The Shamwari Group has joined forces with the Wilderness Foundation’s Forever Wild campaign to help raise awareness and funds for endangered rhinos. Guests at each of the Shamwari Group properties who donate R100 per person per night will receive a special rate per person per night sharing. The Shamwari Group will donate R500 to the Wilderness Foundation for every room night sold and the proceeds will be audited by Grant Thornton. The funds will help the Wilderness Foundation purchase much-needed equipment and create resources to help save the rhinos and at the same time create ongoing awareness. Each month the funds will be presented to the Wilderness Foundation and a report back will be presented on the Shamwari Facebook page so guests can follow the progress. All donations are payable at the time of booking and will not be refundable on cancellation of booking. For more information visit www.shamwarigroup.com to track the proceeds.

Investment opportunity with Signature Hotels Signature Life Hotels is offering private investors and consortiums the chance to buy a stake in three of its prime resort developments. Investors have a choice of hotel rooms, penthouses, villas and serviced stands at Jozini Tiger Estate in northern KwaZulu Natal, Likweti Hotel and Conference Centre in Mpumalanga and Fun Club Mauritius. 3/2012

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Says Signature Life Managing Director Alan Vels: “There are a number of encouraging signs that the tourism market as a whole is bouncing back from the recession. We are looking to grow our portfolio of quality hotel space, and are thus seeking like-minded investors to share our success by buying into three of our top destinations. Purchase options include outright sectional title ownership, fractional ownership and a variety of ‘Vacation Allocation’ timeshare style options.”

The ‘See Durban Attraction Pass’ can be purchased by calling 086 199 4439 and will soon be available for purchase online at www. seedurbanpass.com, which is a major advantage to tourists planning their holiday. Durban Tourism Offices, located at uShaka Marine World, Gateway Theatre of Shopping, King Shaka International Airport, Florida Road and North Beach (OR Tambo Parade) are used as collection points.

New Cape Town Toolkit Gives Global Tourism Traders Instant Access to Cape Town Cape Town Tourism launched the new Cape Town Toolkit at travel trade exhibition, ITB, in Berlin. Living online, as an adjunct to Cape Town Tourism’s official website (www.capetown.travel), the Toolkit includes diverse itineraries, high quality images and information about Cape Town that allows registered users in the travel, tourism and marketing trade to access promotional material and resources at the touch of a button. Users can download packaged information in order to put together customised itineraries, using Cape Town Tourism collateral. Users are also able to share content in accordance with Cape Town Tourism’s new marketing theme; “You don’t need a holiday, you need Cape Town!” The travel trade will be able to adopt campaign elements and promote their own packages under this umbrella theme. Content will be kept continuously up-to-date and relevant. There will be useful links for agents, resources for visitors when planning their trips and information around business tourism and meeting organisers. In addition, the unique log-in for registered users will allow personal themes and information sharing.

ZAMBIA The Boma - Place of Eating still drumming up a storm at Victoria Falls On Sunday 25 March 2012, The Boma – Place of Eating restaurant in Victoria Falls, won the prestigious Most Imaginative Dining Experience award for the third time running in the annual Zimbabwe on a Plate national restaurant awards.

Tourism trade members interested in signing up for the Cape Town Toolkit should visit www.capetown.travel/toolkit and register as a user.

The Livingstone Room at Victoria Falls Hotel won Most Imaginative Menu and the Palm Restaurant at Ilala Lodge won Most Imaginative Menu claimed these sought-after titles respectively.

Call for Cultural Organisation participation

These series of awards, launched in 2005 by The Cheeseman, are open to restaurants and coffee shops throughout Zimbabwe. To achieve fairness and objectivity a team of anonymous reviewers, drawn from the ordinary Zimbabwe dining public, evaluates the restaurants and awards marks for food, menu, service, decor, theme, cleanliness and ambience.

This year ‘Diwali in Jozi’ will be held mid November and Indianspice is seeking input, proposals and cultural organization support for the festival of Diwali. The committee wishes to ensure a balanced participation and active inclusion of cultural organizations into the planning and implementation of a cultural programme that represents the tapestry of Indian culture and religion. All organisations across South Africa and India will serve as cultural ambassadors and active participants in the festival. The objectives of this Call for Proposals are to encourage the development of sustainable partnerships and networks among cultural organisations in order to contribute towards an increased involvement of the general public in the cultural field. Proposals and enquiries may be submitted to Lakshya Malhotra on email: lakshya@indianspice.co.za or fax to 0865 301 787.

Durban’s Major Attractions Join Forces April 18th marked the launch of a dynamic new way to experience the cosmopolitan city of Durban, a way that is fun, affordable and for the whole family to enjoy. Smartvisit Solutions (Africa) and iVenture Card International announced the Durban launch of the iVenture Card “See Durban Attraction Pass”. This iVenture Card - though the first of its kind in South Africa - is derived from an international model that is already in successful operation in many cities, including Sydney, Melbourne, Singapore and Hong Kong. 58

Steve Crory, CEO of Smartvisit Solutions displays the “See Durban Attraction Pass” infront of one its included tourist attractions, the Moses Mabhida Stadium.

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ZIMBABWE Meikles gets multimillion-dollar refurbishment A US$7,5-million refurbishment of Harare’s five-star Meikles Hotel started in March. The north wing will be closed for about nine months for a complete refurbishment of all the suites, bedrooms, gymnasium and public areas, as well as substantial renovation of working areas and equipment such as kitchens, laundry, elevators and generators. In due course the south wing will also be refurbished. The refurbishment programme was based on a belief that travel and tourism would expand and grow in the medium term. “We look forward to increased interest in Zimbabwe as a destination for travellers of all kinds, especially in the upper end of the market, which is where Meikles is positioned.” says Karl Snater, Managing Director of the hotel.


TRAINING & EDUCATION

SOUTH AFRICA

The Benefits of

Excellence in Tourism Tourism is a people-focused industry, so interpersonal skills are a must for almost anyone who works in it, writes Get Smarter. Many tourism businesses have discovered, sometimes painfully, that customer service is a vital part of a tourist’s experience of their establishment. A customer who has a bad experience won’t come back – and will probably warn their friends and colleagues away too. But a good customer experience can lead to praise, repeat visits (and repeat earnings), an excellent reputation and better conditions all round. Here are four reasons why it’s essential for any tourism organisation to prioritise excellent customer service. 1. It’s easy and affordable to implement For a start, good service doesn’t cost any more than bad service – a smile and polite greeting don’t demand more effort than a surly glance. Implementing good customer service can be surprisingly easy if it is treated as an ongoing, all-day goal to achieve, rather than just an attitude adjustment. It also doesn’t cost the organisation more to insist on polite behaviour, courteous service and overall friendliness. There’s no risk or cost incurred. 2. Customers remember good and bad service Today’s tourists are well travelled, better connected and more demanding than ever – and they will expect a good service experience from any establishment. Courtesies like being addressed by name are no longer added touches – they are expected. Customers will notice and remember the details

of how they were treated – good and bad. To preserve your company image, encourage repeat visits and help spread positive word of mouth, ensure that your customers’ positive memories far outweigh any problems or issues. 3. Distinguish your establishment It’s difficult for any hospitality establishment to stand out these days – there’s simply too much noise and competition. One way to ensure that you distinguish yourself is by providing excellent, memorable and consistent customer service. If your establishment becomes renowned for quality service, personal touches and “going the extra mile”, it will do wonders for your company profile and boost your reputation – which leads to more guests and higher earnings. 4. Keep employees happy It’s easy to forget that you don’t just have external clients – the guests at your establishment; you have internal clients too. Your staff are a vital component of your offering. Promoting good customer service not only makes for friendlier internal working relationships, it also makes people feel better about their jobs and the impact they have on people’s lives. Happy staff are likely to work harder and longer, be more engaged in the business, and remain at the company – cutting down on labour relations and training costs.

The part-time University of Cape Town Tourism Management short course is presented online throughout South Africa. Contact Tamsin on 021 447 7565 or tamsin@getsmarter.co.za for more information. Alternatively, visit www.getsmarter.co.za

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AARTO

Quick Facts 17 Points you absolutely have to know about the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences It is in your interests to know as much about AARTO and the National Road Traffic Act & Regulations as possible to ensure that you abide by the law and do not fall foul of AARTO and the points-demerit system, writes Asenath Elizabeth Alves of Sechaba Executive Transfers. 1. There is nothing glamorous about AARTO and “fine toolkits” and the like will be of little use to you. In fact, they will probably land you in more hot water than you would like to imagine. Your only defences against the effects of AARTO are to behave yourself on the road and to get competent professional help if and when you need it. 2. AARTO does not replace the National Road Traffic Act of 1996, it merely replaces its practical enforcement and administration. It also adds a points-demerit system to driving licences. 3. Traffic fines under AARTO no longer involve summonses or warrants of arrest. Waiting for a summons to arrive, as has been the practice of many motorists in the past, will land you in hot water that severely affects the amount that you will have to pay. 4. You have 32 days from receipt of an AARTO infringement notice to take the 50% discount. At 33 days, 100% of the fine, as well as any other fees AARTO charges you, become payable. 5. Paying a fine at any stage constitutes admission of guilt and the associated points will be added to your licence. Nothing whatsoever compels you to simply admit guilt if you are not guilty of the infringement and you must follow the procedures if you feel that you are not guilty. 6. You absolutely cannot be arrested or detained at roadblocks for outstanding AARTO fines. Traffic authorities may not force you to pay at roadblocks since none of them are appointed as the Sheriff of the Court. You must, however, be aware of the fact that not dealing with your infringement notices will cost you in the end. 7. Execution of Warrants of Execution can only be exercised by the Sheriff and not by police or traffic officers. If you are ever detained in any way at a roadblock on the strength of an outstanding AARTO infringement notice, this will constitute unlawful arrest. 8. Procedures for exercising your right to representation, nomination of the driver etc. have been legislated,

and you must follow these procedures to the letter. Do not even attempt to take short-cuts, or not follow the instructions for submission of these documents. A letter will no longer suffice. 9. Any AARTO fine not issued to you in person must be issued within 40 days of the alleged offence. These must then be sent by registered post or delivered in person. 10. Not collecting registered post is not at all advisable since the Act presumes and deems that delivery has taken place after 10 days from date of posting. 11. Every driver starts off with 0 points on their licence and points are accumulated to a maximum of 12 points. 12. Every point over 12 constitutes a suspension of your driving licence for 3 months. So if you accumulate 15 points for example, your driving licence will be suspended for 9 months. 13. Points that have been accumulated reduce at a rate of 1 point for every 3 months that you receive no further infringement notices. If you have accumulated 6 points, it will take you 1½ years to get back to zero. 14. There is no other way to reduce the points on your driving licence. AARTO makes no provision for driver education or errant behaviour correction in any other way than you educating yourself and staying infringement-free. 15. Driving whilst banned (your driving licence is suspended) is a criminal offence for which you will be arrested. If you are caught and arrested for this you face a hefty fine and possible imprisonment and will also receive an extra 6 demerit points – which represents a further 1½ years suspension of your licence on top of it. 16. Only a court may sentence you to a fine in excess of R1500 (one thousand five hundred rand) and points over 5 points. Any traffic officer who tells you otherwise is most probably looking to solicit a bribe. 17. Corruption and paying bribes is not the answer and you must remember that if you pay a bribe to get out of a traffic fine and avoid demerit points you are as much a criminal as the person you are bribing.

For more information visit: http://nationaltransfers.co.za/ or http://www.aarto.gov.za/ 60

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SOUTH AFRICA

TRANSPORT

Mercedes-Benz Viano and Vito set the benchmark Mercedes-Benz Vans consistently invest in new products and technologies, therefore enhancing its product range. The new generation Viano and Vito have set the benchmark in terms of efficiency, sustainability and comfort. The Viano and Vito model range has been enjoying widespread popularity amongst a number of sectors including the trade and tourism industry and local entrepreneurs. This success is due primarily to their versatility and reliability. A number of model variants in the model range offer BlueEFFICIENCY technology, the utmost in eco-friendly and economical driving. These vehicles are also upgraded in terms of improved payload and their robust nature. Significantly reduced noise levels as well as the new suspension and an upgraded cockpit make handling and controls much simpler whilst also improving the vehicle’s ergonomics. Drive system: extremely economical and clean, BlueEFFICIENCY technology Economic running thanks to low fuel consumption, low emissions thanks to emissions level Euro 5 – the new drive system in the Mercedes-Benz Viano and Vito – demonstrate just what vans fitted with the latest technology are capable of. CO2 emissions and fuel consumption have been reduced by up to 15 percent compared with previous models, achieving record figures. In conjunction with the sophisticated engineering of the current generation of four and six-cylinder Mercedes-Benz engines, this is achieved through BlueEFFICIENCY technology. This encompasses ondemand activation of major assemblies, an ECO start/stop system

and optimised low-resistance tyres. BlueEFFICIENCY technology is available as a standard feature. The new six-speed transmission, standard in combination with all four-cylinder diesel engines, also helps reduce emissions and fuel consumption. Its broad gear ratio spread allows excellent traction at low speeds, while at higher speeds revs and thus fuel consumption are reduced. The engine output of the Vito ranges to suit its spectrum of applications from 100 kW to 165 kW and the Viano from 120 kW to 190 kW. Robust and resilient: payload capacity increased, suspension renewed The character of the Mercedes-Benz Vito as a particularly robust and very functionally designed van is underlined by the new, sturdy bumpers. The Vito’s practicality in rough, everyday situations is further emphasised by a payload that has been increased, in some models quite significantly, and by a completely retuned chassis and suspension system. Both front and rear axles have been revised in every detail and specially tuned to match each specific model. Different suspension configurations are used for the high-payload panel van and the more comfort-oriented crewbus variant. Improved comfort; noise levels considerably reduced Not that comfort is by any means forgotten in the Mercedes-Benz Vito. The interior of the new-generation model offers simpler controls and a new colour concept. The quality feel of the passenger compartment has been improved quite noticeably and, in this context, noise levels could also be considerably reduced. The Vito and Viano range have been thrilling customers for a number of years and these new models, equipped with BlueEFFICIENCY technology, meet the highest standards of efficiency, fuel economy, and environmental friendliness. 3/2012

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AFRICA

Defining

Responsible Tourism Officially, the concept was formalised in 2002 when the Cape Town Declaration on Responsible Tourism in Destinations was signed at a conference under the co-chairmanships of Mike Fabricius (then CEO of Western Cape Tourism) and Harold Goodwin (of the International Centre for Responsible Tourism), writes Martin Hatchuel. According to the document, “Responsible Tourism: • Minimises negative economic, environmental and social impacts; • Generates greater economic benefits for local people and enhances the well-being of host communities, improves working conditions and access to the industry; • Involves local people in decisions that affect their lives and life chances; • Makes positive contributions to the conservation of natural and cultural heritage, to the maintenance of the world’s diversity; • Provides more enjoyable experiences for tourists through more meaningful connections with local people, and a greater understanding of local cultural, social and environmental issues; • Provides access for physically challenged people; and • Is culturally sensitive, engenders respect between tourists and hosts, and builds local pride and confidence.” Which is good - in boardroom-lingo it presses all the right buttons. But what does it really mean? Responsible Tourism involves everyone. It begins with the thinking behind your tourism product, weaves through the way products present their information, continues through the experience you provide (or you as a tourist enjoy), includes the trip back home and ends (or begins again, depending on how you look at it) with the effect it has on visitors and host communities alike. Whether they book through travel agents or not, most travellers today research their trips on line: so, to be practical, that’s where your commitment to responsible tourism needs to begin. Ron Mader (who founded Planeta. com, and who coordinated February’s Responsible Tourism Week) says; “Bottom line for me is that I need to be able to explain responsible tourism to other people. Short answer is 62

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the Cape Town Declaration - which in one line sums up our shared ambitions and expectations: ‘Responsible tourism is tourism that creates better places for people to live and better places to visit.’ I have found this very easy to explain. I loved the description when I first heard it and I love it now.” In his presentation “We SUCK @ Collaboration,” which he delivered at the Responsible Tourism In Cities Conference at the Tourism Indaba last year, Ron said that for responsible tourism to work, we need to turn on gameification (“the idea of turning an otherwise mundane process into a game, to give people more of an incentive to do it”); and that we then need to do what we love; to honour tradition; to learn from digital natives (that is, locals who’ve entered the on-line world); to preach what we practice; to recognise that small is beautiful but also to think big; to walk where we can (there’s no better way of experiencing a place); to create new events (like the Mossel Bay Toyota Responsible Tourism Week Photo Safari 2012); and to reward early adopters (by supporting them in their projects). And according to Cape Town Tourism and its Responsible Cape Town site, the official line is the one that Ron likes: ‘tourism that creates better places for people to live in, and better places to visit.’ Then, of course, responsible tourism is also about being kind to the natural environment, and incorporates the concepts of sustainable tourism. As the Rainforest Alliance puts it: “We believe that the best way to keep forests standing is by ensuring that it is profitable for businesses and communities to do so. That means helping farmers, forest managers and tourism businesses realise greater economic benefits by ensuring ecosystems within and around their operations are protected, and that their workers are well-trained and enjoy safe conditions, proper sanitation, health care and housing.” The more I examined it, the more confused I became. It even began to sound like bunny-hugging and eco-puffery.


AFRICA

RESPONSIBLE TOURISM

An example of Responsible Tourism in action: The village of Thioffior in the Ndiaffate rural community of the Kaolack region of central Senegal where lodging is in the locals’ houses. The villagers have created their unique haven and welcome visitors to it, as they have seen how the resulting income can help their community. Image: www.thetravelworld.com

Until I received this e-mail from Dave Jack (whose company, BnB Sure, insures a huge number of South Africa’s smaller accommodation providers): “I see from your tweet that you are saying that Responsible Tourism is basically good business sense. Right now in the financial services industry - and that includes us in insurance - we have: • The FAIS Act (the Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act) - a focus on ethics • TCF (Treating Clients Fairly; this article sums it up clearly) - a focus on ethics • King IIIi (The King Report on Corporate Governance) - a focus on ethics Then outside the Insurance world (at this stage); • The CPA (The Consumer Protection Act) - a focus on ethics And now it seems we have; • Responsible Tourism - a focus on ethics. But isn’t that what the CPA, TCF, King III, and all the rest are all about - treating people the way you’d like to be treated?

In other words - ethics. Responsible tourism, said Dave, like so much in our modern world of business, is about acting ethically. But he provided the caveat: “I think it’s all great. Only one small problem - you can’t legislate honesty.” Except that Dave’s response doesn’t appear to address responsible tourism from both the demand and supply sides of the equation - both tourists and tourism practitioners have their part to play here - I think he had it spot on. (Truth is, he told me separately, he’s fully aware of this: “There’s a demand and supply side to everything,” he said.) And so I finally managed to define what responsible tourism means to me: It’s tourism that honours, respects and enhances the areas (small settlements, big cities, natural environments) and people (locals, visitors) that it touches, and tourism that is practiced and enjoyed by the honest. Are you among them? Editor’s note: Readers who want to keep up to date and share in group discussions on this subject can join the Linkedin ‘Responsible Travel and Tourism’ Group at: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Responsible-travel-tourism-3997450

Martin Hatchuel is the author of This Tourism Week - a personal e-letter and informed commentary on issues affecting South Africa’s tourism industry brought to you by http://www.barefootclients.co.za/ Contact: martin@thistourismweek.co.za 3/2012

SATSA / RETOSA Tourism Tattler Trade Journal

63


Issue 3 (May/June) 2012  

The official tourism trade magazine on Africa. Essential reading for anyone involved in the tourism, travel or hospitality trade in or to Af...

Issue 3 (May/June) 2012  

The official tourism trade magazine on Africa. Essential reading for anyone involved in the tourism, travel or hospitality trade in or to Af...

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