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Tou h ill Pe r f o r mi ng Arts Cen ter | Un ivers ity of Mis s our i–S t. Louis

2012-2013 Season

Alarm Will Sound p. 6

Chick Corea and Béla Fleck p. 12

Big Band Royalty

St. Louis Jazz Orchestra

p. 13

Close-up on Contemporary

Saint Louis Ballet p. 19

Feel the Fusion

New Dance Horizons: A Dance St. Louis Production p. 22

The Bard is Back

The Improvised Shakespeare Company p. 34

Annie

Variety Children’s Theatre

p. 36

CARMINA BURANA: COLLABORATION EXEMPLIFIED p. 26


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Table of Contents BCLASSICAL

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4. Arianna String Quartet 6. Alarm Will Sound 7. eighth blackbird

DJAZZ 8. Sonny Rollins 10. St. Louis Jazz Festival

12. Chick Corea and Béla Fleck 13. St. Louis Jazz Orchestra

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HOLIDAY 14. UMSL’s Jazz for the Holidays 15. Ambassadors of Harmony: Sounds of the Season 16 The Nutcracker

EDANCE 18. 19. 20. 22.

Romeo and Juliet Contemporary Ballet MADCO PNC Arts Alive New Dance Horizons

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Pilobolus Carmina Burana Moulin Rouge Spring to Dance®

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F WORLD MUSIC & DANCE 30. International Performing Arts Series 32. Celtic Festival: Black 47

aCOMEDY

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34. The Improvised Shakespeare Company 35. The Second City 35. The Improv Shop

THEATRE 36. Annie 37. In the Mood

gSPECIAL EVENTS 38. 40. 41. 41.

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Paco Peña Flamenco Dance Company Storytelling Festival Martin Luther King Day Celebration Ambassadors of Harmony: Voices in Harmony

ACADEMIC

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42. Art 43. Music 44. Theatre and Dance 50. Information and Directions 52. Season Calendar

WRITERS & EDITORS: Cary Goldwasser, Carla Gibson, Julia Gleason, Kimberly Klearman, Jackie Kinealy, Emily Horsford DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Marty Baragiola PHOTOGRAPHY: Marty Baragiola (Arianna String Quartet) Marianne Leach (Carmina Burana) Heather Thorne (Carmina Burana) Marty Baragiola (MADCO) John Kane (Pilobolus) Nardella Photography (Moulin Rouge )

THE BLANCHE M. TOUHILL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER IS A NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION.

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FROM THE MANAGING DIRECTOR Welcome to the Touhill’s 10th season! 10 years is a relatively short time, especially compared to the 50th Anniversary the University of Missouri–St. Louis celebrates in 2013. Still, it is a milestone for us; a moment to take stock and look to the future. We take pride in several achievements at this milestone moment, all culminating in the fact the Touhill has become a home for inventive performing arts and arts education in St. Louis. The facility hosts nearly 250 performances a year, representing genres from the entire spectrum of performing arts. These shows, alongside dozens of private and academic events, bring more than 100,000 people to campus on an annual basis with an average of 13,000 new patrons each year. The impact only begins there. With presenting partners – the organizations we regularly work with to bring performances to St. Louis – we offer the next generation of patrons an opportunity to engage with performing arts. Nearly 15,000 elementary students annually experience live performance at the Touhill. Our innovative Explore-Experience-Engage, or , program reaches thousands of adult patrons, providing an opportunity to try something new or learn more about something they love. The Touhill continues to enrich the UMSL campus and community landscapes. As an organization and a venue, the Touhill provides a setting where artists and arts organizations of all levels have access to a high-quality performance environment at a reasonable cost. This kind of support allows smaller companies and academic units to grow, while giving more established arts organizations a comfortable place to call home. Over the course of the last nine years, we have seen the exciting activity that results when professional and academic groups utilize a single facility. We now have a resident string quartet (Arianna String Quartet) and dance company (MADCO), both of which are heavily integrated into the teaching environment, all the while maintaining a clear professional relationship with loyal audiences. Our students get to witness, learn from and participate in this professional reality while still wrapped in the security of a university setting. Partnerships have also led to inventive projects, including the annual Spring to Dance® Festival and an expanded Greater St. Louis Jazz Festival. We are reaching a new high point this season with our production of Carmina Burana. This ambitious event merges resources of Dance St. Louis, Nashville Ballet, MADCO, the St. Louis Bach Society Chorus, St. Louis Children’s Choirs, and UMSL’s orchestra, singers, faculty, dancers and technicians collaborating for an unforgettable opportunity for artists and audience alike. Safe to say an undertaking of this scope may not have happened without the Touhill’s role as an intersection for all of these groups. Ultimately, this production of Carmina Burana will be the culmination of many dreams, a full integration of professional effort and learning on a grand scale in a grand space. Now we look ahead. We continue to develop outstanding plans to grow the facility and the artists that call it home. It all starts with our 10th anniversary season. With so much to offer, I am sure you will find something to enjoy and share with your friends.

- John Cattanach In 2013, the University of Missouri–St. Louis (UMSL) will celebrate 50 years of service to the St. Louis community! To recognize this anniversary, UMSL will host a variety of activities throughout 2013. Performances with this logo are official Jubilee Events. Visit umsl.edu or the UMSL Facebook page this fall for a full list of events.


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Family Four Yulia Sakharova joins St. Louis’ resident world-renowned Arianna String Quartet. We all know the saying, “you can’t choose your family, but you can choose your friends.” Since being a member of a string quartet is likened to being in a family of four, it’s a good thing there’s a selection process. After an exhaustive, year-long international search, the Arianna String Quartet (ASQ) has found its new family member. Acclaimed violinist Yulia Sakharova joins violinist John McGrosso, violist Joanna Mendoza and cellist Kurt Baldwin. Sakharova comes to the ASQ from a distinguished 25-year career as a soloist, chamber musician, recitalist and orchestral performer. Most recently, she held the position of Concertmaster with the Tupelo Symphony Orchestra and Assistant Concertmaster with the Alabama Symphony. “The Arianna String Quartet is one of the top quartets in the country,” said Sakharova, “and I am thrilled to be a member of it. Kurt, John and Joanna are wonderful musicians and people, and I am looking forward very much to many seasons of making music together.”   Part of the audition process included a solo recital and a master class. “The solo recital was phenomenal,” said Mendoza.

“She’s so unbelievably talented. Every piece sounded like the composer and had such personality. We were looking for someone with talent but also with personality.” The final stage of the audition was playing as a quartet. “There was a sense of exhilaration and collective excitement in the room when we started playing with Yulia,” said Baldwin. “The sound was thrilling.” Sakharova was born in Russia, where she made her solo orchestral debut at age eight with the Moldova Philharmonic Orchestra. She moved to the United States and earned degrees from Oberlin and Juilliard. Sakharova has gone on to perform worldwide—from New York’s Carnegie Hall to her native Russia and on to Western and Southern Europe, Japan and Venezuela, where she made her South American solo debut with the Caracas Philharmonic Orchestra. She moved to St. Louis in June to begin rehearsals with the ASQ. Here, she’s found her new family.H


CELEBRATION        

The Arianna String Quartet welcomes violist Elias Goldstein, a rising star among viola players, to the Touhill. Among other accolades, Goldstein won second prize at the prestigious Primrose International Viola Competition in 2011.

PASSPORT: LATIN AMERICA FRIDAY NOVEMBER 2   8PM Inspiration for Passport came from ASQ’s recent trips to Brazil and the quartet’s heightened awareness of great Latin pieces that they feel beg to be heard. Each piece possesses a spiciness of new sounds and rhythms fused with quality of composition.  Flautist Alberto Almarza is more than a special guest musician for this evening, as the ASQ’s friendship with Almarza helped to inspire the evening’s program. LACERDA: String Quartet No. 1 AMAYA: Quintet for Flute and Strings featuring special guest Alberto Almarza, flute FRANK: “Leyendas: An Andean Walkabout”

He has been featured around the world from Russia to Norway to New Mexico and recently made his Russian debut with the Moscow Soloists and the New Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra under Alexander Slatkovsky. As a soloist, he has appeared with the Moscow Soloists under the direction of Yuri Bashmet, New Moscow Philharmonic, New Mexico Chamber Orchestra, the Ukrainian Chamber

RAZUMOVSKY

Orchestra and the DePaul Symphony

FRIDAY MARCH 1 8PM The Arianna will perform a long-awaited, extended evening of music rarely, if ever, performed live on one program. Beethoven’s three Op.59 “Razumovsky Quartets” are known as three of the most monumental and pivotal works under one opus and showcase the master composer at the height of his compositional prowess.

Orchestra, where twice he won the

BEETHOVEN: String Quartet in F Major, Op. 59 No. 1 BEETHOVEN: String Quartet in e minor, Op. 59 No. 2 BEETHOVEN: String Quartet in C Major, Op. 59 No. 3

with the Milwaukee Symphony

annual concerto competition. As an orchestral musician, he has performed as guest concertmaster Orchestra. He was a regular member of the Grant Park Orchestra, and has performed with Bergen Philharmonic in Norway and with members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. He is a

VOICES OF SPRING FRIDAY MAY 3 8PM The evening begins with Mozart’s jubilant String Quartet in G Major,  nicknamed “Spring,” and is followed by Henri Dutilleux’s strikingly stylistic “Ainsi la nuit.”  Robert Schumann’s String Quartet in A Major, Op. 41, No. 3 is the celebratory closer to another memorable season of great chamber music at the Touhill.  MOZART: String Quartet in G Major, K. 387 DUTILLEUX: “Ainsi la nuit” SCHUMANN: String Quartet in A Major, Op. 41 No. 3

founding member and principal violist of the Advent Chamber Orchestra.

ELIAS GOLDSTEIN GUEST VIOLIST

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 6 7:30PM

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HAYDN: String Quartet, Op. 33 No. 2 “The Joke” SHOSTAKOVICH: String Quartet No. 3 in F Major BUNCH: “String Circle” String Quintet featuring special guest Kenji Bunch, composer & violist

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FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 7   8PM Aptly titled, the evening marks Yulia Sakharova’s first concert as the new second violinist of the ASQ, and kicks off the start of the classical music season in St. Louis. Composer and violist Kenji Bunch will join the ASQ on stage to perform his string quintet “String Circle,” a piece he composed for ASQ’s own Joanna Mendoza. She describes “String Circle” as the “sounds of old friends coming together,” integrating jazz, rock and bluegrass in a joyous combination of sounds.

ELIAS GOLDSTEIN

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The New York Times wrote Alarm Will Sound is “… one of the most vital and original ensembles on the American music scene.” This 20-member contemporary classical ensemble has been making waves in the world of modern chamber music since the members began playing together while studying at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y. The members have diverse experience in composition, improvisation, jazz, early music and world music, and are committed to innovative performances and recordings of today’s music. The versatility of Alarm Will Sound allows it to take on music from a wide variety of styles. Its repertoire ranges from European to American works, from the archmodernist to the pop-influenced. It has a reputation for performing demanding music with energetic skill. With such rare musical intelligence and an innate sense of adventure, Alarm Will Sound created 1969, the avant-garde concert the group brings to St. Louis this spring.

ALARM WILL SOUND FRIDAY APRIL 26 8PM

Legend has it that John Lennon of the Beatles and German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen made arrangements to meet in New York in February 1969 to plan a joint concert. The meeting never happened, but the simple idea of these great musicians coming together inspired Alarm Will Sound to create a multimedia musical event. The two-act, two-hour thematic project 1969, features music, images, actors and staging to tell the compelling story of striving for utopia – new music and a new world amidst the turmoil of the late 1960s. Steve Smith of the The New York Times wrote, “As accompaniment and counterpoint, Alarm Will Sound expertly played its ingenious arrangements of Beatles songs and works by Stockhausen and Berio, including snatches of ‘Traces,’ Berio’s little-known, incendiary civilrights opera. Hearing impossible electronic collages like Stockhausen’s ‘Hymnen’ and the Beatles’ ‘Revolution 9’ rendered by live musicians was a consistent wonder.” H


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DEFYINGDESCRIPTION The Chicago-based ensemble eighth blackbird is free-form and almost defies description. The contemporary classical sextet has been called everything from “the ascendant generation of post classical music” to “a new breed of super-musicians.” Mark Swed of the Los Angeles Times, however, attempts description with a multi-genre approach in his review: “They are without stylistic allegiances. Minimalism, Post-Minimalism, experimentalism, New Romanticism, old Expressionism, rock, smooth jazz, not-so-smooth jazz — all come easily and naturally.“ Also coming easily and naturally to this ensemble-in-residence at both University of Chicago and University of Richmond is winning Grammys. At the 2012 Grammy Awards, eighth blackbird won in the category of small ensemble performance for its recording of Steve Mackey’s Lonely Motel: Music from Slide. The group previously won two Grammys for its 2006 recording Strange Imaginary Animals.

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The name also garners some attention. “eighth blackbird” (deliberately spelled in lower case) is from the eighth stanza of Wallace Stevens’ evocative, aphoristic poem “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird” (1917). Composed of players Tim Munro on flute, Michael Maccaferri on clarinet, Yvonne Lam on violin and viola, Nicholas Photino on cello, Matthew Duvall on percussion and Lisa Kaplan on piano, their combined musical aerobatics have the finesse of a string quartet with the energy of a rock band and the audacity of a storefront theater company. H

EIGHTH BLACKBIRD FRIDAY OCTOBER 12 8PM Funded by the James and Vera Olson Fund for the Arts

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ROLLINS PLAYED THE TOUHILL, HE EARNED A STAGGERING SEVEN STANDING OVATIONS DURING A PERFORMANCE THAT STILL HAS PEOPLE TALKING. Born in New York City in 1930, Rollins grew up in Harlem not far from the Savoy Ballroom, the Apollo Theatre and the doorstep of his idol, Coleman Hawkins. He fell in love with the sounds of Louis Armstrong and Fats Waller, and fell under the spell of bebop, which was revolutionizing music at the time. As a child, Rollins picked up the alto saxophone. But by the age of sixteen, he switched to tenor saxophone, trying to emulate Hawkins.

In the early 1950s, he established a reputation – first among musicians, then the public – as the most brash and creative young tenor saxophonist on the scene through his work with Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk and the Modern Jazz Quartet. By the mid 1960s, his live sets became grand, marathon, stream-of-consciousness solos where he would call forth melodies from his encyclopedic knowledge of popular songs, including startling segues and sometimes barely visiting one theme before surging into dazzling variations on the next. “I am convinced that all art has the desire to leave the ordinary,” Rollins said in a recent interview, “and to say it one way, at a spiritual level, a state of the exaltation at existence. All art has this in common.” His career has earned him many honors, accolades and awards, including multiple Grammys and a Kennedy Center Honor. For over half a century, Rollins has played music with majesty. Today, he remains one of the few surviving icons from a golden era of jazz that may never be equaled. H

AN EVENING WITH SONNY ROLLINS PRESENTED BY JAZZ ST. LOUIS

SATURDAY JUNE 22 8PM

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Sponsored by World Wide Technology, Inc.

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“They’re not here now so I feel like I’m sort of representing all of them, all of the guys,” Rollins said in a recent interview. “Remember, I’m one of the last guys left, as I’m constantly being told, so I feel a holy obligation sometimes to evoke these people.”

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SAXOPHONE

A legend himself today, Rollins says he feels a special responsibility to honor those who inspired his musical career.

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Bringing top jazz artists to St. Louis for education, entertainment and appreciation are the highest priorities for the Greater St. Louis Jazz Festival presenting consortium. Led by festival founder and Director Jim Widner, the UMSL Jazz Studies program joins forces with the Touhill and Jazz St. Louis to present the four-day festival. The event kicks off as hundreds of jazz students from middle-school to college converge. They attend clinics, perform on stage and get feedback from some of the most notable adjudicators and clinicians around. The student performances and adjudications are free and open to the public. Thursday night of the festival marks the first headline act (yet to be announced) at Jazz at the Bistro, presented by Jazz St. Louis. Friday night’s headliner, also presented by Jazz St. Louis, is The Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour, featuring vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater, bassist and musical director Christian McBride, trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, saxophonist Chris Potter, pianist Benny Green and drummer Lewis Nash. The 55th Anniversary Tour celebrates Monterey’s legacy and reflects it’s jazz-with-a-purpose

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Saturday night brings the Doc Severinsen Big Band, presented by the Touhill, to the stage. Dressed in his signature flashy style, The Tonight Show bandleader Doc Severinsen is best known as the legendary horn player who welcomed millions of viewers with the familiar theme song for nearly three decades. Beginning as a prodigy at age seven, his musical career spans his lifetime. Today, the 84-year-old continues to play to sold-out audiences and to help the next generation of musicians find their sound. Part of that next generation of musicians includes the UMSL Jazz Ensemble, led by Widner. These jazz students actually perform as the opening act for the headliners during the festival. Decades from now, these students can say they had the chance to open for legends. H

2013 FESTIVAL SCHEDULE AT JAZZ AT THE BISTRO Artist to be Announced PRESENTED BY JAZZ ST. LOUIS THURSDAY APRIL 18 7:30 & 9:30PM Sponsored by World Wide Technology, Inc. AT THE TOUHILL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER MONTEREY JAZZ FESTIVAL with the UMSL Jazz Ensemble, Directed by Jim Widner PRESENTED BY JAZZ ST. LOUIS FRIDAY APRIL 19 7:30PM Sponsored by World Wide Technology, Inc. DOC SEVERINSEN AND HIS BAND with the UMSL Jazz Ensemble, Directed by Jim Widner PRESENTED BY THE TOUHILL SATURDAY APRIL 20 7:30PM For information on student performances and adjudication schedule, please visit www.gsljazzfest.com

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The difference in decades hardly matters. To the music students and concert-going public alike, great jazz only gets better with age. And for both groups, there is much to look forward to with the University of Missouri– St. Louis Greater St. Louis Jazz Festival 2013, presented by UMSL, the Touhill Performing Arts Center and Jazz St. Louis.

exuberance and joyful fun that continues to be the hallmark of the festival to this day.

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There’s a similar age gap with the Monterey Jazz Festival, now touring to celebrate its 55th anniversary. In 1958, the first Monterey Jazz Festival featured artists including Dizzy Gillespie, Louis Armstrong, Sonny Rollins and Billie Holiday.

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Jazz students who will participate in the 2013 Greater St. Louis Jazz Festival were already tucked into bed by the time Doc Severinsen and his band played the notes that ushered The Tonight Show host Johnny Carson onto stage.


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CHICK COREA AND BÉLA FLECK

After that revelation, Fleck closely followed Corea’s career and eventually approached the master pianist to ask for musical suggestions. As Corea got to know Fleck socially, he became intrigued by the music that the banjoist and his seminal bluegrass-meets-bebop band, the Flecktones, were recording. “It’s totally unusual to hear a banjo played that way,” said Corea, an NEA Jazz Master and multiple Grammy Award winner. “Béla was taking the instrument and the tradition of the banjo and bringing it up as a seriously virtuosic instrument.” Fleck invited Corea to record three songs on the Flecktones album Tales From the Acoustic Planet (1994), as well as on the Flecktones inconcert album Live Art (1996). Corea, in turn, enlisted Fleck to perform with him and Bobby McFerrin on his 2001 Rendezvous in New York project recorded live at the Blue Note jazz club in New York. But the pair had never before played in a duet setting until the 2007 album The Enchantment.

When Chick Corea and Béla Fleck take the stage together, musical genres collide and coalesce. The two virtuosos weave together duets on the piano and the banjo to create an unforgettable and unparalleled sound. The novel pairing of Fleck, a Grammy Awardwinning banjo player, with a jazz master like Corea took root after Fleck heard a recording of “Spain” early in his musical career. ”It was one of those defining moments,” said Fleck, “That’s when I realized that the banjo would work in jazz.”

Corea and Fleck converse with the comfort of longtime collaborators, and that ease translates on stage. Unlike many duo projects where each musician takes extended solo excursions, here the pianist and banjoist play as one, joining together on joyrides through the songs. Corea and Fleck’s performance at the Touhill will mark the first time the pair have joined each other on stage in St. Louis.H

CHICK COREA AND BÉLA FLECK PRESENTED BY JAZZ ST. LOUIS

SATURDAY MARCH 23 8PM

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Jazz musicians and concert-goers still revere Duke Ellington and Count Basie. Their influence on big-band swing defined a generation of music and echoes still today, decades after the absolute pinnacle of its popularity. When we speak of jazz visionaries and musical trailblazers, Ellington and Basie are typically mentioned in the same sentence. And while their music falls clearly into the same category, their styles were drastically different. Prolific songwriter Ellington led his namesake orchestra, but it’s his compositions that continue to inspire generations of jazz, theatre, pop and soundtrack composers. He wrote more than 3,000 songs in his lifetime, blending elements of American music, including ragtime, blues and Tin Pan Alley tunes to create his sound. “Duke Ellington,” notes Jim Widner, bassist and director of the St. Louis Jazz Orchestra (STLJO), “is the big-band equivalent of Beethoven and Bach to classical music.” STLJO will pay tribute to Ellington by playing his most memorable tunes, like “Mood Indigo” and “Satin Doll.” Where Ellington was the composer, Basie was the bandleader.

Basie led from his piano – but his true instrument was his band. His sound was about efficiency and economy, encouraging a “less is more” sound from band members. “Mr. Basie’s band, more than any other, was the epitome of swing, of jazz that moved with a built-in flowing intensity,” wrote the New York Times. His arrangements were relaxed, allowing a clean backdrop for generous solo turns from outstanding musicians in the band. When STLJO plays Basie, you’ll hear his best, songs like “April in Paris” and “One O’Clock Jump.” This year at the Touhill, the St. Louis Jazz Orchestra takes a tour through each legend’s legacies. Come to just one concert to enjoy the sound of one of these greats. Come to both because you can’t think of one without the other. Either way, you’ll hear the finest jazz musicians in the St. Louis area do what they do best – pay spectacular live tribute to big-band royalty. H

ST. LOUIS JAZZ ORCHESTRA A NIGHT OF DUKE ELLINGTON TUESDAY OCTOBER 30 7PM

ST. LOUIS JAZZ ORCHESTRA A NIGHT OF COUNT BASIE TUESDAY FEBRUARY 26 7PM

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UMSL’s

Jazz for

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“Personally, this is one of my favorite concerts of the year,” said Widner, director of Jazz Studies at UMSL. Whether a fan of the “Boston Pops,” Henry Mancini or Count Basie, audience members get a “swingin’” start to the holidays. Complete with special guest artists and spectacular stage lighting, this holiday concert is not to be missed.

This event has become one of the most anticipated concerts of the holiday season. It features the combined sound of UMSL’s Jazz Ensemble, directed by Jim Widner; Vocal Point, conducted by Dr. Jim Henry; and the University Orchestra, conducted by Robert C. Howard.

UMSL’S JAZZ FOR THE HOLIDAYS

The concert features such holiday classics as “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” “The Christmas Song,” “Jingle Bells” and selections from “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” in addition to other holiday favorites.

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“The annual Jazz for the Holidays Concert is a gift from the campus to the community,” said John Cattanach, managing director of the Touhill. “This free concert features upbeat holiday classics with a jazzy flair to be enjoyed by all members of your family. Come celebrate the holiday season with UMSL and enjoy a complementary treat after the show while you get a chance to meet the performers and mingle with your neighbors.”

SUNDAY DECEMBER 2 3PM

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Laughter.

Joy. Musical

Excellence. People don’t just want to hear good music. They can stay home and hear that on their stereos. What people want and need most is to experience music deeply in their souls.

That is the core message of Jim Henry and his chorus, the Ambassadors of Harmony, an awardwinning St. Louis-area men’s ensemble that cares little about winning awards. The chorus has won several contests with its musically masterful performances, including winning the Barbershop Harmony Society’s international competition for the fourth time July 2012. But those are the kinds of “Earthly” achievements that easily fade from memory, said Henry, who heads the choral music department at the University of Missouri–St. Louis. What lasts, he believes, are the artistic performances that connect people and change their lives forever. It’s what the Ambassadors of Harmony strive for in every performance: artistry, vulnerability and love.

Three magical December days at the Touhill Performing Arts Center begin three months earlier in a hot, crowded, rehearsal hall in St. Charles’ Blanchette Park. There at sundown once a week, the sounds of O Holy Night, Jingle Bells, The Christmas Song and other classic holiday favorites mingle with the mating songs of latesummer cicadas. It’s the time of year when the Ambassadors, a brotherhood of music, warmth and friendship, look ahead to sharing the holidays with thousands of fans. The show has been a chorus tradition for more than 25 years. After months of fine-tuning, the Ambassadors of Harmony, along with gold-medalist quartets Crossroads and Vocal Spectrum, channel the spirit of the holidays with their heart-warming concert, Sounds of the Season on the Touhill stage. H

AMBASSADORS OF HARMONY SOUNDS OF THE SEASON FRIDAY DECEMBER 7 8PM SATURDAY DECEMBER 8 2 & 8PM SUNDAY DECEMBER 9 2 & 7PM

a And there is no better way to experience the holidays than with the Ambassadors of Harmony’s Sounds of the Season, a journey of laughter, joy and musical excellence.


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Tradition

The Nutcracker is an annual holiday event in many cities around the United States and the world. Saint Louis Ballet maintains the tradition by producing it continually in St. Louis since Artistic Director Gen Horiuchi arrived in 2001. Horiuchi’s special connection with The Nutcracker began when he performed many principal roles of George Balanchine’s spectacular production during his 13 years with New York City Ballet. He also had a role in the 1993 movie, performing the role of the Chinese lead. “Because of my Broadway experience in The Nutcracker and in spectacle musicals, such as Cats and Song and Dance,” said Horiuchi, “I always incorporate such special effects as smoke, glitter, strobe and pyrotechnics into fulllength ballets. The Nutcracker is no exception.” In The Nutcracker, children are also front and center. “More than 80 professionally trained children are featured in various roles throughout the ballet,” said Horiuchi. Children on and off the stage are drawn to this beloved classic because magical adventure abounds within the story. Young Clara’s mischievous Uncle, Herr Drosselmeyer, concocts a fantasy world for Clara, replete with a growing Christmas tree, a Nutcracker doll that comes to life to battle a

Mouse King, a fantastical sleigh ride through dancing snowflakes and Clara’s visit to the Land of Sweets. It’s a show dear to many hearts and Saint Louis Ballet continues to deliver a fantastic, full-length production that will become a cherished memory for thousands. H

THE NUTCRACKER

PRESENTED BY SAINT LOUIS BALLET

FRIDAY DECEMBER 14 7PM SATURDAY DECEMBER 15 2:30 & 7PM SUNDAY DECEMBER 16 2:30PM WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 19 7PM THURSDAY DECEMBER 20 2:30 & 7PM FRIDAY DECEMBER 21 2:30 & 7PM SATURDAY DECEMBER 22 2:30 & 7PM SUNDAY DECEMBER 23 2:30 & 7PM SUGAR PLUM FAIRY LUNCHEON SATURDAY DECEMBER 15 12:30PM SUNDAY DECEMBER 16 12:30PM Arrive early for this magical luncheon. Meet the Sugar Plum Fairy, her Cavalier and the cast of The Nutcracker. Participants can take pictures with and get autographs from the characters, all in a festive holiday atmosphere. Tickets to the luncheon are sold separately from the performance. H

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E DANCE tou hill .or g Tic ket s: 314 .516.49 49 Many believe the classic story of two young “star-crossed lovers” is the greatest ballet score ever written. The forbidden romance and intense turmoil of Saint Louis Ballet’s Romeo and Juliet returns to the Touhill after receiving standing ovations at its world premiere in June 2011. This production features music by Sergei Prokofiev and choreography by Gen Horiuchi, including sword fighting, court dancing and the iconic balcony pas de deux. The intense drama provides the dancers in Romeo and Juliet unique acting opportunities. Shakespeare’s compelling story and Prokofiev’s passionate music form the quintessential dramatic backdrop for both the dancers and audience to lose themselves in the tale.

ROMEO AND JULIET

PRESENTED BY SAINT LOUIS BALLET

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 8 8PM SATURDAY FEBRUARY 9 2:30 & 8PM SUNDAY FEBRUARY 10 3PM

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“During rehearsals, the dancers playing Romeo and Juliet get so emotional in their acting that the other dancers in the studio end up watching in tears,” said Horiuchi. Horiuchi said one special memory as an audience member provided choreographic inspiration: “I was 16 years old when I first saw Rudolf Nureyev’s production of Romeo and Juliet at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York,” said Horiuchi. “Rudy danced the role of Romeo, Carla Fracci, the principal ballerina of La Scala Ballet, danced Juliet, and the Royal Ballet’s legendary ballerina Margot Fonteyn was Lady Capulet. Not only was I moved by their incredible dancing, I was also impressed with Rudy’s choreography – there was drama, romance and tragedy. He told every detail through such clear story telling technique and his wonderful staging skill.” Saint Louis Ballet’s passionate and dramatic production of Romeo and Juliet returns to the stage just in time for Valentine’s Day. H


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New Works by Renowned Choreographers

With this production, Saint Louis Ballet steps outside the classic ballet format to showcase a powerful troupe performing with exhilarating, contemporary music and innovative choreography. The exciting production will feature a world premiere by Artistic Director Gen Horiuchi that highlights the dancers’ artistry and technique and a comedic duet to Rossini’s William Tell Overture choreographed by Dance St. Louis’ Michael Uthoff. Also showcased is Reflections by The Joffrey Ballet co-founder Gerald Arpino. Arpino’s work has had a major impact on dance in America and is rarely performed by dance companies outside of The Joffrey. Reflections has been described as “a glittering neoclassical jewel” and is Arpino’s nod to the Balanchine style.

The Touhill is partnering with Saint Louis Ballet to bring this impressive collection of work to the stage. “Contemporary ballet can be a challenge to present,” said John Cattanach, managing director of the Touhill. “We see eye-to-eye with Saint Louis Ballet in that a contemporary work is an important part of a major ballet company’s repertoire. We want to make sure that this work is performed.” “It was my first time attending a production by the Saint Louis Ballet. I thought it was phenomenal. The sets, costumes, and, of course, the dancers were superb. As someone who is not originally from St. Louis, I was thoroughly impressed with the quality of the performance.” -Audience Member, 2012

CONTEMPORARY BALLET

PRESENTED BY SAINT LOUIS BALLET

FRIDAY MAY 10 8PM SATURDAY MAY 11 2 & 8PM

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New works highlight Saint Louis Ballet’s Contemporary Ballet concert, returning this spring.

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UP CLOSE & PERSONAL

IF YOU’VE SEEN MADCO PERFORM EVEN ONCE, YOU KNOW THE COMPANY’S DANCERS FOR THEIR ATHLETIC PROWESS, TECHNICAL SKILL AND PHYSICAL TALENTS.

In Outburst, we get into their creative heads. MADCO’s Executive and Artistic Director Stacy West is giving the dancers an uncommon opportunity, one consistent with the company’s goal to present dance with passion, excitement and entertainment value. West is challenging her dancers to stretch into choreography. The entire Outburst program will consist of very personal pieces, created entirely by the company.


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All pieces are not as autobiographical as Flodder’s, rather the themes are reflective of an idea the dancer wants to explore. Like Lindsay Hawkins’ literal interpretation of the word “outburst,” and Claire Hilleren’s exploration of what happens when “people get so stuck inside themselves they don’t notice beauty in the world around them.” All are intensely personal. And, under Stacy West’s artistic direction, these individual pieces come together as an entertaining, synchronous collection. Just like the company itself. MADCO, the Modern American Dance Company, is the professional dance company in residence at the Touhill. H

MADCO: OUTBURST FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 14 8PM SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 15 8PM

MADCO: MOMENTUM FRIDAY MARCH 22 8PM SATURDAY MARCH 23 8PM The company picks up speed in Momentum by performing the work of some of the nation’s hottest choreographers, including Gina Patterson (Austin, Texas), Mikey Thomas (Columbus, Ohio), Janice Garrett (San Francisco) and Joseph Mills (New York). They give audiences a taste of what’s happening in dance across the country.

MADCO: FAMILY MATINEES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 15 2PM SATURDAY MARCH 23 2PM One-hour family performances with interactive discussions throughout with MADCO Artistic Director Stacy West and dancers.

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MADCO dancer Jason Flodder’s piece exemplifies what this opportunity means to a dancer. His choreography takes a journey through his own career, paying special attention to the dichotomy between expressing individuality while being part of an ensemble. He explains that there’s a balance for dancers who routinely must “do what you’re ‘told,’ and at the same time, be yourself.”

Outburst tips the scales toward the “be yourself.”

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After all, what could evoke more passion and excitement for the group of tight-knit dancers in MADCO than creating and performing their own and each other’s creative visions?


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Dance St. Louis opens its 47th season with a pioneering venture—PNC Arts Alive New Dance Horizons—commissioning some of the top choreographers from around the country to collaborate with St. Louis dance companies to create clever and moving world premieres.

FEEL THE FUSION

It’s the ultimate quartet of collaborations! Four renowned choreographers, four local dance companies, four world premieres—all combined into one powerful production.

PNC ARTS ALIVE NEW DANCE HORIZONS A DANCE ST. LOUIS PRODUCTION

FRIDAY OCTOBER 5 8PM SATURDAY OCTOBER 6 2 & 8PM

Saint Louis Ballet, aTrek Dance Collective, MADCO and Common Thread Contemporary Dance Company team up with the ironic post-modernist Pam Tanowitz, the witty and subversive choreographer Victoria Marks, thought-provoking ballet artist Gina Patterson and the musical and expressive Jessica Lang. After the world premiere at the Touhill, the production will tour five venues in Missouri and Illinois. “New Dance Horizons will kick off the season with a huge creative bang,” said Michael Uthoff, artistic and executive director of Dance St. Louis. “It’s the first time Dance St. Louis has commissioned such a production, and with the level and variety of talent involved this is going to engage dance enthusiasts while setting a great precedent for Dance St. Louis’ outstanding 2012-2013 season.” PNC Arts Alive New Dance Horizons is a bold new step for Dance St. Louis that brings a concentrated hit of brand-new dance to the region like never before. The production also serves as a part of the city’s annual festival, American Arts Experience–St. Louis, which celebrates all mediums of American arts in the St. Louis region. This event is being underwritten in part by a grant from PNC Arts Alive. Supporting sponsors include NOVUS International, Inc., Jerome Robbins Foundation, Regional Arts Commission and Whitaker Foundation. Additional support provided by Drs. Dan and Susan Luedke and National Endowment for the Arts. Tour sponsor is Ameren. H Ameren is Dance St. Louis’ 2012-2013 season presenting sponsor. Dance St. Louis is supported by the Arts and Education Council, Missouri Arts Council, Regional Arts Commission, Mid-America Arts Alliance, and National Endowment for the Arts. Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark and The Cheshire Saint Louis are the official hotels.  


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The company started thinking outside the box before the phrase was invented, and it keeps warping that box into shapes never before imagined. Since its founding in 1971, Pilobolus has evolved from an avant-garde dance troupe into a full-fledged entertainment company involved in the creation and distribution of dance, live performances, film, music videos and more. The powerhouse of choreographers and dancer-athletes has performed for 120 million domestic viewers, for more than 4 million people in 64 countries, and has appeared on more than 100 TV shows and 200 broadcasts. From appearances on The Oprah Winfrey Show, Late Night with Conan O’Brien and 16 NFL games to the attention-grabbing performance on the 79th Annual Academy Awards and a feature on CBS’ 60 Minutes, there’s no denying Pilobolus is considered the “it” dance company by mass media, critics and audiences alike. As the New York Sun states, “Pilobolus is a law unto itself… a singular theatrical universe.”

A Pilobolus show is always an adventure, because no two works look, sound or feel alike. They’re acrobats, clowns, magicians and poets – and when they fly, slither and twist together, they’ll take you on the wildest of wonder-filled rides. The Washington Post describes it best, “Pilobolus embodies a large part of what the best in contemporary dance is all about: discovery. Making something new with the same standard body parts the rest of us have.” The 2012 season marks Pilobolus’ 41st year. While it has become a stable and influential force in the world of dance, Pilobolus remains as protean as ever, looking forward to the next 40 years. H  Ameren is Dance St. Louis’ 2012-2013 season presenting sponsor. Dance St. Louis is supported by the Arts and Education Council, Missouri Arts Council, Regional Arts Commission, Mid-America Arts Alliance, and National Endowment for the Arts. Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark and The Cheshire Saint Louis are the official hotels. 

PILOBOLUS

PRESENTED BY DANCE ST. LOUIS

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 9 8PM SATURDAY NOVEMBER 10 2 & 8PM

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The closest thing contemporary dance has to a household name is Pilobolus.

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THE EVOLUTION OF THE NATION’S PREMIERE DANCE COMPANY

Pilobolus returns to the Touhill on November 9-10 to showcase its inventive and dynamic repertoire. “For a company with a reputation as one of the finest and most innovative dance companies in the world, there’s no denying this will be one of the hottest shows of the season,” said Michael Uthoff, artistic and executive director of Dance St. Louis.

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CARMINA BURANA

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“Carmina Burana is an enormous production that takes years of planning, but the end result is more than worth it,” said Michael Uthoff, artistic and executive director of Dance St. Louis. The opening performance is Bach Cantata No. 10, performed by UMSL’s University Orchestra and University Singers and Bach Society of Saint Louis with choreography by Dance St. Louis’ very own Michael Uthoff and performed by St. Louis-based dance company MADCO. “O Fortuna,” the dazzling first sound of Carmina Burana, is likely the most familiar portion of the production. The dramatic and thunderous piece is often heard in action scenes from movie trailers, feature films and video games because of its strong percussive elements, ancient lyrics and ominous tone. The iconic instrumentation of Carmina Burana was written by German composer Carl Orff in 1937 to accompany Latin poetry written in the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries by German monks in the foothills of the Bavarian Alps. The poems challenged conventional values and religious leadership of the time, examined the cycle of life, and questioned the source of life’s pains.

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Co-presented with the University of Missouri-St. Louis University Orchestra & Singers plus Bach Society of Saint Louis and St. Louis Children’s Choirs

WITH OPENING ACT: MADCO WITH UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA & SINGERS

NASHVILLE BALLET: CARMINA BURANA

PRESENTED BY DANCE ST. LOUIS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI–ST. LOUIS

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 21 8PM FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22 8PM SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23 8PM SUNDAY FEBRUARY 24 2PM Ameren is Dance St. Louis’ 2012-2013 season presenting sponsor. Dance St. Louis is supported by the Arts and Education Council, Missouri Arts Council, Regional Arts Commission, Mid-America Arts Alliance, and National Endowment for the Arts. Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark and The Cheshire Saint Louis are the official hotels.  

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A dream come true for classical music and dance lovers, the live performance will feature 120 singers, 60 musicians and 40 dancers on stage at the same time.

Nashville Ballet, the largest professional ballet company in Tennessee, premiered Carmina Burana in 2009. Critics and audiences considered it an instant success. Critic Pamela Gaye noted in her review for Ballet co.uk, “Choreographically, Carmina Burana challenges dancers... because of the call to intensify the dance and render it equal in power to the music. Few choreographers have been able to achieve this momentum, and it is at this task that Vasterling excelled.” H

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The breathtaking production of Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana, considered one of the most popular pieces of music ever written, brings together Nashville Ballet, UMSL’s University Orchestra and University Singers, Bach Society of Saint Louis and St. Louis Children’s Choirs into a firework of live music and riveting dance.

The poems were recorded on parchment made from animal skin that could be written on, erased and reused. The parchment material inspired portions of the choreography, created by Nashville Ballet’s artistic director Paul Vasterling, and the production’s costumes, designed by former Nashville Ballet company member Eric Harris.

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Every so often, performers from across the spectrum of artistic media have the opportunity to collaborate on a masterpiece production. The Dance St. Louis 2012-2013 season offers that kind of production in Carmina Burana.


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The captivating love story comes alive through ballet. Fin de siècle Paris throbbed with love, ambition and desire. And the Moulin Rouge cabaret theater boasted extravagance, exuberance and intrigue, becoming the inspiration for books, paintings, films, musicals – and now ballet. CANADA’S ROYAL WINNIPEG BALLET: MOULIN ROUGE®-THE BALLET PRESENTED BY DANCE ST. LOUIS

FRIDAY JANUARY 25 8PM SATURDAY JANUARY 26 2 & 8PM

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Atlanta InTown called it “a triumph… stunningly beautiful… it’s moments like this that make ballet fans out of people who think they don’t like ballet.” Moulin Rouge® – The Ballet has been seen by nearly 60,000 people across North America and has been said to leave audiences dancing and singing as they exit the theater. This passionate story springs to life with beautiful choreography performed by Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet.

In the spirit of the Moulin Rouge of Paris, Moulin Rouge® is a registered trademark of Moulin Rouge S.A.

Since its 2008 debut, the festival has exploded into one of the hottest dance festivals in the country and a major Memorial Day weekend attraction in St. Louis. Now in its sixth year, the festival offers patrons every style of dance from classical ballet, tap and jazz to modern and cutting-edge contemporary dance from professional companies across the country (and around the world). The festival has also become the platform for many companies to perform world premieres. Each evening kicks off at 5:30 p.m. with interactive performances by local performing arts groups in the Terrace Lobby. At 6 p.m., four companies perform in the Lee Theater, followed by a series of performances by six companies in the AnheuserBusch Performance Hall at 7:30 p.m. With 10 professional dance companies performing distinct works each night, there’s nothing quite like the Emerson SPRING TO DANCE® FESTIVAL. It’s world-class fun for a bargain price. In fact, the affordability of the tickets is one of the festival’s hallmarks. As one attendee summed it up: “Excellent chance to view a wide variety of dance companies in a classy format at a cheap price.” Emerson is the festival title sponsor. The master classes presenting sponsor is Fox Performing Arts Charitable Foundation. Additional support provided by Caleb C. and Julia W. Dula Educational and Charitable Foundation.

6TH ANNUAL EMERSON SPRING TO DANCE® FESTIVAL PRESENTED BY DANCE ST. LOUIS AND THE TOUHILL

MAY 23-25 Ameren is Dance St. Louis’ 2012-2013 season presenting sponsor. Dance St. Louis is supported by the Arts and Education Council, Missouri Arts Council, Regional Arts Commission, Mid-America Arts Alliance, and National Endowment for the Arts. Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark and The Cheshire Saint Louis are the official hotels.  

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5:30PM Festive Fun in the Lobby 6:00PM Lee Theater Performance 7:30PM Anheuser-Busch Performance

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Based on an original new story and set to classical music by composers, including Debussy, Offenbach, Strauss and Ravel, Moulin Rouge® – The Ballet features high-kicking choreography, vibrant costumes and a beautiful set designed to resemble Parisian street scenes, stone staircases and towers under the shadow of the famous Moulin windmill.

Thirty professional dance companies over three nights with a different program each night – it’s the formula for the annual Emerson SPRING TO DANCE® FESTIVAL that has proved incredibly successful for Dance St. Louis and the Touhill.

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Created in 2009 by Jorden Morris, choreographer and former principal dancer of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Moulin Rouge® – The Ballet introduces the audience to Matthew, a struggling artist, and Nathalie, a can-can dancer, who tempt fate as they seek love at the infamous cabaret during turn of the century Paris, where pomp runs hand in hand with poverty and freedom breeds reckless passion.

“Lots of events compete for the Memorial Day weekend crowd, but few can boast the moves of the Spring to Dance Festival held at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center.” (St. Louis PostDispatch, 2012)

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A favorite on the movie screen and stage is transformed into a stunning ballet performed by Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet, the oldest continuously-running ballet company in North America.


PRESENTED BY THE CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

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POLLY FERMAN

In the past century, the tango has evolved from its roots in the dance houses of Buenos Aires to a standard part of the repertoire for many classical musicians. The tango’s mischievous sound and sensual dance became popular among the Argentinean underclass and since has become synonymous with elegance and romance. Today, Uruguayan-born pianist Polly Ferman performs Latin American music on the most prestigious stages in the world, including New York’s Carnegie Hall, Tokyo’s Suntory and Takemitsu Halls and the Buenos Aires Teatro Colon. An essential part of the genre, Ferman’s numerous recordings constitute one of the world’s most extensive collections of Latin American repertoire, including habaneras, milongas and tangos.

POLLY FERMAN: TANGO PIANIST SATURDAY OCTOBER 6 8PM

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The Emmy-nominated comedian was raised in a Greek home but grew up in an American society. As Basile explains, that’s the perfect set-up for conflict – and comedy. And yes, he goes by the single name, Basile. He tells stories of his childhood as a Greek-American like being forced to attend Greek school, the way Greeks have “reinvented” the English language and his Yiayia, a grandmother he describes as “a cross between Buddy Hackett and the Incredible Hulk.” Basile is perhaps best known from his criticallyacclaimed comedy series Growing Up Greek in America. With more than 100 television appearances, including HBO, Showtime, Comedy Central and NBC’s The Tonight Show with Jay Leno to his credit, Basile is also known for his voice work as Universal Studio’s Bullwinkle J. Moose, and he does several other voices for the Satellite Comedy Network and Cartoon Network.

BASILE: GREEK COMEDY FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22 8PM

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Sponsored by International Studies and Programs, Department of Music, and Women in the Arts, University of Missouri–St. Louis

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GROWING UP GREEK IN AMERICA

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Sponsored by The Hellenic Government-Karakas Family Foundation Professorship in Greek Studies, International Studies and Programs, University of Missouri-St. Louis

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FEATURING THE ARIANNA STRING QUARTET Shakuhachi, koto and shamisen may not be the first that come to mind when you think of instruments performing alongside a violin, viola and cello. But Kyo-Shin-An Arts (KSA) is dedicated to integrating these Japanese classical instruments into the sounds of Western classical music. Despite obvious differences in form and sonority, the two traditions can be remarkably compatible: Japanese and Western classical music share adherence to structure, long histories of musical evolution and a significant range of distinct periods and styles. With interest growing in bringing the two cultural traditions together, KSA works with composers, virtuosos from the Japanese tradition and Western ensembles to create and perform the new repertoire. A significant number of contemporary composers – both Japanese and Western – have already ventured in this direction. The Kyo-Shin-An Arts project however, is the first formal, high-profile program in this arena. KSA’s Kammerraku® is a collection of commissioned works for string quartet. As the program travels, KSA performs a concert featuring two or more works from the Kammerraku® repertoire in combination with Western repertoire of their choice. Their St. Louis concert features the Touhill’s string quartet in residence, the Arianna String Quartet. The program features compositions by Daron Hagen, Pulitzer Prize winner Paul Moravec, James Nyoraku Schleger and Somei Satoh.

KYO-SHIN-AN ARTS "KAMMERRAKU®"

FEATURING THE ARIANNA STRING QUARTET

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 30 8PM

b Sponsored by The Ei’ichi Shibusawa-Seigo Arai Professorship in Japanese Studies, International Studies and Programs, University of Missouri-St. Louis, and the Arianna String Quartet

THE ORCHID TRIO

The Orchid Ensemble is a trio of musicians from diverse ethnic backgrounds—from China to Taiwan to Canada—who use ancient Chinese instruments to blend traditional and contemporary Chinese music, improvisational jazz and world music into a new sound. Devoted to fostering cultural exchange between Western and Asian musicians, the Orchid Ensemble regularly collaborates with artists from a wide range of musical and ethnic backgrounds, commissions new works from American and Canadian composers, and tours across North America with stops at world, jazz and folk music festivals. The ensemble’s 2005 release, Road to Kashgar, earned a nomination from Canada’s Music Awards in 2005, and is regularly featured on Canadian television and radio.

ORCHID TRIO

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 22 8PM

bD Sponsored by Dr. Y. S. Tsiang Professorship in Chinese Studies, International Studies and Programs, University of Missouri-St. Louis

LE CHANT SUR LA LOWE When it comes to world music, the traditional chants of the Forest Peoples of Gabon may not be the most recognizable. But more people are sure to become enchanted with the uplifting harmonies and infectious rhythms of Pygmy music after they hear Le Chant Sur La Lowe perform.

The African vocal group is comprised of singers, dancers and musicians who perform the traditional music of the tribes of Gabon and a variety of African music. And they perform it worldwide—from its birthplace in Gabon, to Barcelona, to Atlanta to the Touhill in St. Louis.

LE CHANT SUR LA LOWE SATURDAY MARCH 2 8PM Sponsored by E. Desmond Lee Endowed Professor of African/ African-American Studies, International Studies and Programs, University of Missouri-St. Louis

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KYO-SHIN-AN ARTS “KAMMERRAKU®”


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OPENING ACT BY ST. LOUIS IRISH ARTS

PRESENTED BY THE CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 3 8PM Sponsored by The Smurfit-Stone Corporation Endowed Professorship in Irish Studies, International Studies and Programs, University of Missouri-St. Louis, and Llywelyn’s Pubs


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The group’s sound is a mix of these modern musical genres, but its unapologetically political and social messages are rooted firmly in Irish history. Black 47 front man Larry Kirwan explained to Irish America Magazine that the band’s name is more than a nod to the worst year of the Irish Potato Famine; there’s a very personal connection. “I was raised by a very old grandfather who was the youngest son of a man who had escaped the famine,” he said, “So he had actually seen the famine and passed on the stories to my grandfather who passed them on to me. He made me promise that these people would not be forgotten. ”Kirwan is doing his part as a songwriter to fulfill that promise. Black 47’s songs have been featured in political science and history courses in hundreds of high schools and colleges throughout the United States. Time Magazine noted that Kirwan writes all the group’s songs, “mixing in events from his life, including… early rejections from New York clubs.” The long-ago search for an audience served to strengthen the group’s sound as much as it did Kirwan’s storytelling. He told Time that “by playing in those Irish places where we had to play for people who

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Get bigger they did. Two decades after its first album release, Black 47 continues to be a huge draw at the blue-collar New York bar Paddy Reilly’s, where it originally gained popularity. “We were getting offers to play the major venues around New York City,” Kirwan said, “but we wouldn’t budge. We felt the world should come to us and it did.” Staying entrenched in the pub scene keeps the group firmly planted where it thrives – being known “for its partying as much as its politics.” “One of rock’s most passionate bands, Black 47 plays Kirwan’s fiery agitpop howlers with the fury of the early Pogues. This Irish tinted rock (with shadings of ska and reggae) is incendiary.” — Chicago Sun Times “A melting pot of styles, blending traditional Irish instruments and melodies with reggae rhythms and hip-hop and funk beats. They’ve become the voice of Irish-Americans.” — Washington Post

Arrive early for the Celtic Festival Atmosphere! Llywelyn’s Pub brings its finest to the Touhill Lobby. Start the evening with Irish food tasting and beer sampling THEN STAY AFTER for the Llywelyn’s Pub VIP Experience. Upgrade your ticket and join us for an intimate post-performance gathering featuring open bar and buffet.

Call or visit the Ticket Office to purchase the Llywellyn’s Pub VIP Package.

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Since 1989, Black 47 has taken its Celtic-rock roots and blended the sound with distinctive musical styles of its native New York – a little reggae, hip-hop, folk, Irish traditional, jazz and blues.

didn’t care about us one way or another, or hated us, we couldn’t help but get better.” Kirwan characterizes these shows as “wild, wild nights (as the) crowds were getting bigger.”

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“...An unashamedly topical wallop of the early-Seventies Jersey-bar E Street Band and the Combat Rock-era Clash, laced with the mourning siren of uilleann pipes.” - Rolling Stone

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a COMEDY tou hill .or g Tic ket s: 314 .516.49 49 Shakespearian actors usually memorize their lines, but the Improvised Shakespeare Company players make it up as they go along. The comedy-meetsthe-classics show returns to the Touhill this season after a successful run last spring as part of the Chicago-based troupe’s nationwide tour. Each performance, the Company members craft a two-act comedic play based on a title suggested by the audience and using Shakespearian-style language, characters and themes. “Some of my favorites are ‘The Rocky Hamlet Picture Show’ and ‘A Mid-Summer’s Night Menopause,’” said Blaine Swen, the creator and director of the Improvised Shakespeare Company. “We also get titles that have nothing to do with Shakespeare—once our title was just ‘Justin Bieber.’” Swen says an especially bizarre title occasionally stumps him, but at least one actor always has an instinct of where to start. Audience members frequently ask if the troupe brainstorms for the second act during intermission, but they have a strict policy of not talking about

THE IMPROVISED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 28 8PM SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29 5 & 9PM

future acts during the break. Improv works best when it’s spontaneous, Swen explains. The Improvised Shakespeare Company is 18 members strong, and five perform during each show. The actors have different degrees of experience with Shakespeare—from years on stage to a semester in high school —but everybody in the group made the pilgrimage to Chicago, the world’s improv capitol, to study sketch comedy, Swen says. To create authentic Shakespearian themes and archetypes within an improv format, the group studies his plays and meets with a Loyola University professor who specializes in Shakespeare. “Some people come to see us perform because they love improv, and some because they love Shakespeare,” Swen said. “There’s really something for everyone.” H


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Every time The Second City touring company returns to the Touhill’s Lee Theater for its popular annual show, a future legend could be onstage.

Named the country’s “Comedy Empire” by the New York Times, the Chicago-based improv group has a reputation for cultivating the next generation of comedic royalty with alumni including Tina Fey, Bill Murray and Steven Colbert. Today, The Second City is famous for influencing the nation’s sense of humor through the popular movies and television that its graduates have created, such as The Colbert Report and 30 Rock. But in 1959 when the small cabaret theater first opened its doors in Old Town Chicago, comedic improvisation was unconventional compared to scripted stand-up and sketches.

In the following years, its unique style attracted performers and patrons, and The Second City evolved into a cultural landmark. In more than half a century since The Second City opened, the jokes have changed, but the experience remains the same. When the comedy troupe returns to the Lee Theater this spring, audience members will be treated to a cabaret-style performance seated at tables close to the stage with beverage service available. With a celebrated tradition of launching the careers of the biggest names in comedy, a Second City performance is a don’t-miss event for those who want to say, “I saw her when…”

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LOCAL LAUGHS The Touhill and St. Louis’ own Improv Shop are teaming up to present five evenings of comedy this season. For the latest information, sign up to be an e-lister and like us on Facebook. We’ll let you know when it’s your turn to be spontaneous.

WANT TO LEARN IMPROV FROM THE PROS? Whether a seasoned performer or someone who's never been onstage, here’s a chance to learn improv from the pros. These touring companies will share the traditions developed by the innovative men and women who perform with these groundbreaking troupes. These master classes are held on the Lee Theater stage. THE IMPROVISED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY: MASTER CLASS FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 28 4PM THE SECOND CITY: MASTER CLASS FRIDAY APRIL 5 2PM

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A diverse 80-member cast, a professional orchestra and the Tony-nominated director Lara Teeter are joining together to produce the Broadway classic Annie. But fans do not have to fly to New York City and fight the clogged Manhattan streets to see the beloved musical. The Variety Children’s Theatre is bringing the full production to the Touhill in St. Louis. For the fourth consecutive year, the St. Louis charity and its Children’s Theatre program —a therapeutic and recreational program for children with physical and mental disabilities— will stage the Broadway show at the Touhill. Alongside the most talented child and adult actors in St. Louis, the Variety kids have earned critical acclaim for each of their past performances. Before last year’s production of The Wizard of Oz, KDHX Radio theatre reviewer Gerry Kowalski raved, “I think we have to regard it as one of the major local producers of professional musicals.”             

ANNIE

PRESENTED BY VARIETY CHILDREN’S THEATRE

FRIDAY OCTOBER 26 7:30PM SATURDAY OCTOBER 27 1:30 & 7PM SUNDAY OCTOBER 28 1:30PM

The Variety Children’s Theatre delivers Broadway-quality shows while giving children of all abilities a chance to enjoy the limelight onstage, and to experience theatre production behind the curtain. “We hope all of St. Louis will want to see this classic tale of Little Orphan Annie performed right here in our own backyard,” says Jan Albus, Variety CEO and Variety Children’s Theatre executive producer. “No need to travel to New York City to see this musical come to life in a big – and professional – way!” The Variety Children’s Theatre is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Regional Arts Council. H


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Overcoming the hardships of financial disaster and war, the greatest generation revived the American dream and built a bright future for their children and grandchildren. Today, the big-band music that inspired them to dance and swoon takes audience members on a sentimental trip to the era that shaped 20th-century America. Consistently a sell-out show, the musical revue In the Mood returns to the Touhill for a night of authentic big-band music, singing and dancing. The performers dress in the style of the day, contributing to the genuine 1940s feel. Music made popular by Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller and The Dorsey

Brothers fills the theater with the sound that soothed a nation at war. With In the Mood, local fans of big-band music have the chance to see a globally acclaimed musical performance. When the ensemble performed at the National Archives in Washington D.C. for the 50th anniversary of World War II, crowds lined up hours before show time for tickets, prompting two extra performances to meet demand. Popular overseas as well, In the Mood sold out shows in Australia and New Zealand during its 17th season last year. Now, the Touhill favorite is returning to St. Louis for two shows during its 18th season. Seniors who used to swing dance with their sweeties to big-band music, along with younger fans, are sure to enjoy this unforgettable night of nostalgia. H

IN THE MOOD SATURDAY OCTOBER 13 3 & 7:30PM

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In the 1940s, America’s greatest generation sacrificed at home and abroad to win victory in World War II while the nation recovered from the threadbare years of the Great Depression. All the while, the nation’s soundtrack was an upbeat, hopeful mix of swing tempos and romantic ballads that promised better days ahead.

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G SPECIAL EVENTS tou hill .or g Tic ket s: 314 .516.49 49

Paco Peña is recognized as one of the world’s foremost traditional Flamenco guitar players – if not simply one of the world’s foremost guitarists. In 1995, the New York Times declared, “Mr. Peña is a virtuoso, capable of dazzling an audience beyond the frets of mortal man. He combines rapid-fire flourishes with a colorist’s sense of shading; this listener cannot recall hearing any guitarist with a more assured mastery of his instrument.” Yet while on stage with the Paco Peña Dance Company, Peña puts the art of Flamenco in the forefront rather than his own talent. In Flamenco Vivo, Peña brings together the most authentic artists in the genre, an ensemble comprised of three dancers, a singer, a percussionist and three guitarists, including Peña. The Paco Peña Dance Company will perform in St. Louis for the first time since 2003 as part of The St. Louis Classical Guitar Society’s 50th anniversary celebration. The Spanish-born guitar player is so dedicated to the authenticity of the art form that, according to William Ash, president of the Classical Guitar Society, the performance “is about the art form, not about Peña.” Ash continues to explain that Peña “personally chooses the finest practitioners from Spain to accompany him on tour. His talent is on central display, but it is his taste in performers and artistic control of the choreography that has earned him worldwide critical praise.” Peña purposefully fades into the ensemble during a performance, but his role as the prominent force behind the vision for the company is palpable. “I’ve always aimed to

give audiences flamenco that has passion and art. Above all, it must have truth. When I formed the company in 1970 there were other flamenco companies touring the world, but at that time they seemed more concerned with spectacle than with the art form I knew and loved. I decided to gather together a few other performers and present the art as I saw it and felt it. It was time to return to the roots of flamenco.” He did just that, drawing enthusiastic fans of authentic flamenco from his native Spain and around the world. His work earns raves from, among many others, dance critic for the New York Times Alastair Macaulay who noted, “the arc of a suddenly raised arm, the insistence with which a singer alternates between two notes, the proud stretch of shoulders above a pulledup waistline, a rapid series of strong guitar chords, the drumming of heels into the floor: for those of us who are susceptible, these ingredients can come together in the most profoundly satisfying way. The ovations from the throng at (the performance venue) Town Hall indicated that many felt likewise.” Flamenco vivo, indeed. This is the Paco Peña Flamenco Company’s forth St. Louis appearance since 1989, three under the auspices of the St. Louis Classical Guitar Society. The performance is co-sponsored by the Whitaker Foundation, and presented under a Special Projects grant from the Regional Arts Commission. H


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PACO PEÑA FLAMENCO DANCE CO. PRESENTED BY ST. LOUIS GUITAR SOCIETY

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 28 7:30PM

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GIVING VOICE TO HUMAN EXPERIENCE The St. Louis Storytelling Festival is a four-day spring extravaganza at more than 20 area locations. The grand finale takes place at the Touhill. The 2013 festival features the best national as well as regional storytellers. All are unique in their telling styles, content and storytelling personalities. Now in its 34th year, more than 700,000 people have experienced this festival that has achieved national and international acclaim.


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MLK DAY CELEBRATION MONDAY JANUARY 21 10AM

Along with public programming, the festival is inclusive of special audiences unable to attend events and activities. These audiences include community members, both young and old, confined to hospitals, juvenile detention centers and senior residential centers. Great storytelling is a gift. It allows families and communities to share life experiences, preserve cultural and historical heritages and to pass on their rich history to future generations. Year after year, audiences are inspired by the telling of tales and sharing in the performances. Join the 2013 St. Louis Storytelling Festival as we connect the community through stories. H

Consult the website for complete program information and locations www.stlstorytellingfestival.org

ST. LOUIS STORYTELLING FESTIVAL SATURDAY MAY 4 7:30 PM

AMBASSADORS OF HARMONY Your favorite a capella chorus is as entertaining as ever as it puts its signature sound on songs you love! The Ambassadors of Harmony, an awardwinning St. Louis-area men’s ensemble is 160 voices strong. Known for powerful and musically masterful performances, the Ambassadors of Harmony’s annual June concert boasts all the showmanship and talent you adore each December. AMBASSADORS OF HARMONY: VOICES OF HARMONY SATURDAY JUNE 15 2 & 8PM

SPECI A L EVENTS

The festival encompasses activities for all ages, with special events featuring family storytelling, tales for adults including ghost stories, a youth storytelling concert, storytelling workshops, programs for the deaf and an evening of spiritual and faith-based storytelling.

Join the University of Missouri–St. Louis and the St. Louis community for a spectacular celebration of Dr. King’s legacy. This will be the first in a series of events celebrating the University’s 50th anniversary. Dr. Julianne Malveaux, a provocative economist, author and commentator will be the guest speaker. A special media presentation will capture the event’s theme, “50 Years of Fulfilling the Dream.” Musical guests will include the talented Dickson String Quartet, the Trinity Mt. Carmel Church Mass Choir and other artists. A program for children ages 5 to 11, hosted by the University’s College of Education, will run concurrently in the lobby. Celebrate 50 Years of Fulfilling the Dream with us. H

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The St. Louis Storytelling Festival is an example of how a public university provides an important cultural service to the community and involves a wide array of community organizations and individuals. It has inspired other organizations such as the University of Manitoba to host the Winnipeg International Storytelling Festival.

MLK DAY CELEBRATION

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More than 80 events and 60 storytellers converge on various historic sites, including the Gateway Arch, University of Missouri– St. Louis, Missouri Historical Society, Missouri Botanical Garden and multiple library branches. The grand finale takes place at the Touhill Performing Arts Center and offers performances by all featured storytellers.


D ACADEMIC tou hill .or g Tic ket s: 314 .516.49 49

Art , Anyone? You know the Touhill as a cultural destination, hosting performing arts across genres. The visual arts also abound in and around the Touhill.

GALLERY 210

Located next to the Touhill, Gallery 210 has become a leader in presenting contemporary art in St. Louis.

FEBRUARY 7 – APRIL 13 ORNAMENTAL IRON: New work from contemporary blacksmith John Medweduff. Experiences and memories of landscapes and rivers from his youth in Tennessee and adult life in the Midwest influence the shape and form of Medweduff’s work.

APRIL 11 – MAY 4 PARENTAL ADVISORY Annual BFA student exhibition.

AUGUST 23 – SEPTEMBER 29 EXPOSURE 15: HEATHER CORLEY, GINA ALVAREZ AND DEBORAH DOUGLAS. Exposure 15 is the latest in a series of group exhibitions featuring artists who live and work in the St. Louis metropolitan area. The artists work addresses the women’s roles in idealization of romance and domestic life. SEPTEMBER 6 – OCTOBER 13 UMSL FINE ART FACULTY JUBILEE EXHIBITION Biannual exhibition of new work by the UMSL fine art faculty.

APRIL 26 – MAY 26 COLLABORATIVE III: The second installment of cooperative exhibition featuring the work of selected students from area high schools.

GALLERY FAB

Gallery FAB located in the UMSL Fine Arts Building is where UMSL art students and faculty showcase their work.

SEPTEMBER 6 – OCTOBER 13 MICHAEL GITLIN: DUST STUDIES Gitlin’s Dust Studies is composed of digital close-ups of what gathers in the corners of our homes and our lives. OCTOBER 11 – DECEMBER 1 ASMA KAZMI: PLAYING GENDER Kazmi’s most recent performance work focuses on men on the fringes of modern Indian society – cross dressers, eunuchs and hermaphrodites, who are traditionally known as hijras. Kazmi spent the summer of 2009 working with three hijras in New Delhi and exploring the idea of gender-identity creation. She says her identity as a heterosexual female is “awkwardly visible throughout the work.” OCTOBER 18 – DECEMBER 1 SEMICONDUCTOR: BRILLIANT NOISE. Semiconductor, the artistic duo of Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt, presents a short film that layers satellite images of the sun and its solar winds over a soundtrack of radio frequencies. The filmmakers put the satellite images into time-lapse sequences and manipulate audio to accentuate the sun’s wildly varying intensity and brightness.  JANUARY 24 – MARCH 23 PEREGRINE HONIG: NEW WORK Honig’s work is concerned with the relationship between pop culture as it relates to women’s sexual vulnerability, the ethics of luxury, and the role of fashion and consumerism in an atmosphere of social anxiety. Her stylized and extreme images of women and young girls address themes of sexual vulnerability, trends in disease and contemporary social hierarchies. JANUARY 24 – MARCH 23 REBECCA BARON AND DOUGLAS GOODWIN: LOSSLESS # 5 “Lossless” data compression is a digital process that reduces computer files size without a loss in quality. Lossless Nos. 1-5 is a project that explores the possibilities of the transformation and distortion of images within the digital realm.

AUGUST 16 – SEPTEMBER 15 SIGNIFICANT OTHERS SEPTEMBER 27 – OCTOBER 27 MIXED MEDIA BY ASHLEY KOPP WENZEL JANUARY 24 – FEBRUARY 23 JUBILEE presented by Department of Art and Art History MARCH 4 – 23 GRAPHIC DESIGN FACULTY APRIL 1 – 13 PHOTOGRAPHY FACULTY APRIL 22 – MAY 11 STUDIO FACULTY

TOUHILL GALLERY

The art department exhibits works in the Promenade Lobby of the Touhill. The exhibits change every few months. Dan Younger will kick off the Touhill Gallery 12-13 exhibits late August – November with large format, vividly colored photographs. Luci McMichael’s art will be exhibited December through February; she works in a variety of art forms, including fibers, wood, ceramics, metals and mixed media.

Exhibits and dates subject to change.


DON’T MISS THESE MUSIC PERFORMANCES

UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE WITH GUEST ARTIST DENISE THIMES

UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10 7:30PM UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA CONCERT THURSDAY NOVEMBER 1 7:30PM STELLA MARKOU FACULTY RECITAL MONDAY NOVEMBER 5 7:30PM UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 7 7:30PM UNIVERSITY SINGERS & VOCAL POINT MONDAY NOVEMBER 12 7:30PM UNIVERSITY PERCUSSION & AFRO-CUBAN ENSEMBLE WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 14 7:30PM UMSL JAZZ COMBOS THURSDAY NOVEMBER 15 7:30PM CONCERTO COMPETITION FINAL ROUND FRIDAY NOVEMBER 16 2:00PM STUDENT CHAMBER MUSIC TUESDAY NOVEMBER 27 7:30PM PIANO STUDIO CONCERT WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28 7:30PM UMSL’S JAZZ FOR THE HOLIDAYS SUNDAY DECEMBER 2 3:00PM ALLA VOSKOBOYNIKOVA FACULTY RECITAL TUESDAY DECEMBER 4 7:30PM

UNIVERSITY PERCUSSION, AFROCUBAN ENSEMBLE & VOCAL POINT MONDAY APRIL 8 7:30PM This is a distinctive fusion of percussive sounds and joyous vocal music. “This collaboration brings together divergent groups on the same program,” says Music Department Chair Bob Nordman, who also notes that it is “such a different combination that they often have to work to seek out literature they can use together.”

UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 5 7:30PM CLASSIC HOLIDAY CONCERT MONDAY DECEMBER 10 7:30PM BARBARA HARBACH COLLABORATIVE COMPOSITION CONCERT FRIDAY JANUARY 11 7:30PM DES LEE HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC CONCERT TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12 6:30PM DES LEE MIDDLE SCHOOL MUSIC CONCERT THURSDAY FEBRUARY 14 6:30PM UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE TUESDAY MARCH 12 7:30PM UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE WEDNESDAY MARCH 13 7:30PM UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA CONCERTO CONCERT MONDAY MARCH 18 7:30PM OPERA THEATRE WORKSHOP SCENES APRIL 2 & 3 7:30PM

UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE

FEATURING A SUITE COMPOSED BY BARBARA HARBACH WEDNESDAY APRIL 24 7:30PM Conducted by Gary Brandes, the UMSL Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band will premiere a three movement suite written by composer Barbara Harbach.

UMSL JAZZ COMBOS THURSDAY APRIL 04 7:30PM UNIVERSITY PERCUSSION, AFRO-CUBAN ENSEMBLE, & VOCAL POINT MONDAY APRIL 8 7:30PM GREATER ST. LOUIS JAZZ FESTIVAL Daytime Ensemble Concerts APRIL 17-20 UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA & UNIVERSITY SINGERS Combined Works Concert MONDAY APRIL 22 7:30PM UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE WEDNESDAY APRIL 24 7:30PM PIANO STUDIO SPRING CONCERT WEDNESDAY MAY 1 7:30PM UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY CHORUS TUESDAY MAY 7 7:30PM

All performances are free unless otherwise noted.

STUDENT CHAMBER MUSIC WEDNESDAY MAY 8 7:30PM

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WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 7 7:30PM The acclaimed UMSL Jazz Ensemble turns up the volume with a very special guest artist, St. Louis-based vocalist Denise Thimes. This is the ensemble’s last concert before its performance at the prestigious Midwest International Band & Orchestra Clinic. The UMSL Jazz Ensemble was selected by audition to perform at the conference, known as the “most important annual gatherings of the music education field.” Clinic president Ray E. Cramer notes that “directors at every level, throughout the world, aspire to have a group perform at the Midwest Clinic because it is held in such high esteem in the professional world around the globe.” Cheer them on before they head to Chicago to represent UMSL and St. Louis.

JAZZ ST. LOUIS YOUTH CONCERTS SUNDAY OCTOBER 7 2:00PM

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D ACADEMIC tou hill .or g Tic ket s: 314 .516.49 49

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, DANCE AND MEDIA STUDIES IN THE BLOOD

by Suzan-Lori Parks

PRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, DANCE & MEDIA STUDIES

OCTOBER 25-28 “An extraordinary new play” – New York Times The play In the Blood, a 2000 Pulitzer Prize finalist (an award the playwright won in 2002 for her Topdog/Underdog), is a contemporary, urban take on The Scarlet Letter. A topical and edgy exploration of sin and redemption. Niyi Coker, E. Desmond Lee Professor, says this choice is based on the desire to showcase female writers. “Hers is a very powerful voice,” he said, “and it is fascinating to see how she can get in the heads of men for 90 minutes of a play.” $10 general public / $5 student with UMSL ID

FESTIVAL OF DANCE

PRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, DANCE & MEDIA STUDIES

NOVEMBER 8-10 The Department of Theatre, Dance, & Media Studies presents the Fall Dance Concert. The Festival of Dance featuring choreography from UMSL Faculty and students and guest Modern American Dance Company. The Concert includes a variety of dances from Ballet to Modern. Come join the University of Missouri– St. Louis Department of Theatre and Dance for three evenings of dance and music. $5 general public

FOUR BY TENN

PRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, DANCE & MEDIA STUDIES

MARCH 14-17

In celebration of Missouri’s own Tennessee Williams, the Theatre Department will select and showcase scenes from the playwright’s most compelling work. $10 general public, $5 students UMSL ID

THE KINETIC CHAMBER PROJECT

PRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, DANCE & MEDIA STUDIES

APRIL 11 -13 Join the Department of Theatre, Dance and Media Studies for an evening of dance. Students will perform dance pieces choreographed by faculty, guest artist and aspiring student choreographers. All will enjoy this eclectic dance concert set in the intimate Lee Theatre. $5 general public


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A GREAT PERFORMANCE BEGINS LONG BEFORE IT TAKES THE STAGE. Great art begins with creative people nurturing a dynamic idea. Dancers envision vibrant choreography, musicians build poignant melodies and directors interpret scripts to create relevant moments. A performance can take years to actually materialize before an audience. From this point on, a dynamic idea needs a certain amount of financial commitment to get off the drawing board and onto the stage. Grants, sponsorships, as well as support from foundations, corporations and individuals like you fill this need.

THE TOUHILL WORKS HARD TO KEEP COSTS LOW, BUT THE TRUTH IS – WHAT YOU SEE ON STAGE IS EXPENSIVE TO PRODUCE. We really don’t want you to think about these things; we would rather you experience only the magic of live performing arts. Still, we want to pull back the curtain for just a second so you know the importance of contributions from people like you. Ticket revenue is important, but often 50 percent or more of funding is secure even before tickets are considered. It is this financial base that allows a program to move from an idea to the stage and a necessary part of keeping ticket prices low and accessible.

THE FRIENDS OF THE TOUHILL PROVIDE A POOL OF FUNDING TO GET GREAT IDEAS INTO DEVELOPMENT AND ONTO THE STAGE. As a not-for-profit organization, we are here to provide great art to the St. Louis region and make it accessible for people to attend. By pairing our resources with the best ideas, new art can be composed, choreographed, designed, built, rehearsed, marketed and experienced.

WHEN YOU JOIN THE FRIENDS OF THE TOUHILL, YOU PROVIDE THE FUNDING TO GET GREAT IDEAS ON THE PATH TO BECOMING GREAT ART.

HOW TO BECOME A FRIEND GO TO TOUHILL.ORG CALL THE TOUHILL ENGAGEMENT OFFICE AT 314-516-4958 IN PERSON AT THE TOUHILL TICKET OFFICE SIGN UP AT PERFORMANCES


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Cynthia J. Bambini Heather Backes Janet Conners Judie A. Courtney

Dr. Malaika Horne Laura Lock John Shaw Lisa Youngblood

SOLOIST LEVEL Dixie and Suzanne Kohn Kenneth and Nancy Kranzberg Robert Bousman and Ernest Rohay

ENSEMBLE LEVEL Barbara A. Horn, M.D. & Peter D. Weiss, M.D. Richard Kluesner Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Siler Lora Simpson

PATRON LEVEL Dr. Mark and Carol Burkholder Dr. William Carver David Ganz Tracy A. Gilroy Dr. John B. and Doris Hylton Jean Prokop Dennis E. Rose

Michael A. Roth Mary Ellen Schukai James and Catherine Sieveking Michael J. Sieveking Marie Steinbach Dr. James E. Westbury Jim and Lana Widner

FRIEND LEVEL Edward O. Bull Maurice and Marybeth Champion-Garthe Roy Cobb Dr. Sven G. Eliasson Dr. Sallyanne H. Fitzgerald Jim and Julia Gleason Donn and Royal Gunter

Franklin and Rachel Haspiel Dr. Jacqueline Kelly Katherine Madson Charlotte Martin Don W. Paulsen Dr. Julia Muller and Mr. Earl Schreckengast

SPONSORS Emerson and Emerson Charitable Trust Regional Arts Commission Thomas Coffee McAthur’s Bakery

Donor list as of July 1, 2012

F RI EN D S O F T H E T O U H I L L

Dana Sandweiss - President Kathleen Matheny - Vice President

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FRIENDS BOARD

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Thank You


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TOUHILL VOLUNTEERS Thank you for generously giving your time! We couldn't do what we do without you!

Carole Allen David Amdur Rita Anokhin Ellen Kaye Augustine Richard Augustine Tim Barnes Rebecca Barnes Christine Bates Dottie Bates Janet Beasley Della Bibko Duane Bibko Jacquelin Bishop Dick Blatz Margaret Blatz Joan Bohrer Genetra Bowser Carla Bright Vicki Budd-Darby Scott Carter Willyetta Carter Linda Casey Terri Christian Donald Cole Doris Coleman Ania Colvin Teresa Connelly Lisa Cripe Cathy Cunningham Catherine Daniels Donna Dannenmaier Galina Dega Jacqueline Dehmer William Dehmer Joe DeLuca Bill Dick Dottie Dick Beverly Dixon Loyd Duering Georgia Durfee Gerry Durfee Chuck Ehlert Felicia Ezell Linda Fiehler Phyllis Floyd Joan Fromme Barbara Fuhrmann Paul Fuhrmann Mary Fulmer Angela Gielow

Don Greer Pat Greer Craig Groh Margo Harris Tom Healy Betty Heath Becky Henderson Diane Henderson Bob Herr Gloria Herr Garry Hitt Florence Hodge Faye Holdenried Yvonne Holmes Richard Hu Carol Hutchinson Donald Jeffries Gene Jewell Hilda Jones Dorothy Kaiser Kathy Keane Angel Keys Libbie Krumme Roger Krumme Jennifer Krupp Robert Larson Mary Leuchtmann Audrey Levit Steve Levit Mary Lutz Whitt Lynn Olivia Martin Roz Marx Roslyn McSpadden Madreen Meyer Norman Meyer Paul Meyer Yul Miller Jim Mitchell Larry Mitchell Linda Mitchell Ginni Mittler Don Muckerman Joseph Mudrovic Janice Mueller Mary Mueller Kendra Neely-mMartin Sheila O Conner Larry Olson Jacque Perez

Active Volunteer list as of July 1, 2012

Pat Poindexter Kathy Pratte Tracy Ramsey Don Rataj Diane Rataj Cheryl Rhodes Kathleen Riethmann Tom Riethmann Sheryl Rogers Mieke Rossi Janie Saxe Brenda Schmelzel Betty Schmelzer Charles Schmidt Alvin Schumacher Patricia Scotft Carol Simon William Simon Leslie Smith Pamela Smith Brad Snead Jo Snead Peggy Stephens Jane Sulze Joe Sulze Tammy Tate John Terry Sheri Terry Murlene Thayer Barbara Thomas Valda Teutken Monica Tyler Michael Ursch Kathleen Vallet Frank Vullo Jean Vullo Margaret Wald Rushelia Walker Harold Walters Judith Walters Sandra Walton Matt Waterman Brenda Weaver April Webb Steve Webb Martin Wilder Rita Wilhelm Randy Wilson Karen Wood Jeanne Yegge


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VOLUNTEER Volunteers and Touhill staff are partners, each with an equal and complementary role in realizing the Touhill experience for our patrons. All performances are supported by nearly 120 active community volunteers who serve as ticket takers, greeters, guest service representatives and ushers.

How it works

Volunteers choose the performance opportunities they want to assist – based on their interests and availability. The coordinator assigns them to selected events and returns their schedule confirmation. On the day of the event, the volunteer will be assigned a task position based on the needs of the performance. Most of the volunteers get to see or experience a majority of the show itself! We ask that volunteers commit to at least 12 events a year to remain in active status as a member of the Guild. For volunteers, events last just around five hours from call time to dismissal.

Major perks!

Touhill volunteers are afforded special benefits associated with giving time to an UMSL organization: Experience a Touhill performances on us, with two complimentary tickets per active volunteer. Access to The Mark Twain Building, host to a wide-range of recreational activities and programs including a running track, work-out facilities and a swimming pool. Free admission to Triton home games. 10% discount on purchases at the Campus Bookstore. A vision care discount with 25% off comprehensive care examinations and eyeglasses.

For more information:

visit touhill.org or call 314-516-4939.

H BECO ME A VO L U N T EER

Join the award-winning Touhill Volunteer Guild! You can experience the arts from a whole new perspective as a volunteer. Our volunteers are appreciated and recognized for their service and commitment to strengthening the artistic community.

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Information and Directions TOUHILL TICKET OFFICE All ticketing services are now consolidated at the main entrance to the Touhill. Ticket Office hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-4 p.m., with extended hours on Monday and Thursday until 7 p.m., and at least two hours prior to ticketed performances on Saturday and Sunday. The Touhill Ticket Office remains open through intermission. Phone: 314.516.4949 Toll-free: 866.516.4949 Online: www.touhill.org All tickets purchased by phone and online must be charged to MasterCard, Visa or Discover; individual tickets will not be held without payment. Checks may be made payable to the University of Missouri–St. Louis or UMSL. Tickets purchased via mail, phone or online will be mailed. Please allow 7-10 business days for delivery. All tickets purchased less than seven days prior to the performance will be held at Will Call. Patrons must present an I.D. when picking up tickets. Tickets will only be released to ticket purchaser with I.D. Call with name changes.

SER V IC E FE E S A service fee is added to the price of each ticket for all phone, mail, fax and online purchases. There are no additional fees charged at the window. Fees are not printed on the ticket. DI S C OUN T S Local students, seniors and UMSL employees benefit from discounted ticket prices to many performances at the Touhill. Please ask at the time of purchase if the show you choose to attend is eligible. Students and UMSL employees must present current I.D. when requesting discounts. Discounts may not be combined.

L AT E S E AT I N G P O L I C Y Please arrive at the Touhill with enough time to find your seat before the performance begins. Late arrivals will be seated at the discretion of the House Manager, who will determine an appropriate time so as not to interrupt the artists or other audience members. Video monitors are available at each door to ensure that you can partake of the program while waiting to enter the Hall. Late seating points may be significantly into the program.

T I CKE T RE SE L L E RS Be advised that only tickets printed on Touhill imprinted ticket stock will be honored for admittance to events held at the Touhill. Touhill tickets may be offered through other resellers, however we recommend checking directly with the Touhill Ticket Office for availability and pricing prior to purchasing from these resellers. The Touhill will not be responsible for any transactions between a reseller and patron.

DI SRUP T I VE BE HAVI OR P OL I CY In order to preserve the enjoyment and safety of all patrons and performers, the Touhill does not permit disruptive behavior that REFR E S HM E N T S FA MI LY causes undue attention to any There is a bar/concession area Indicates performances audience members. If a patron located in the Terrace Lobby and likely to be enjoyed by patrons displays behavior deemed outside the Lee Theater for most of all ages. disruptive by the House performances. Concessions are Manager, he or she may be open one hour before curtain MAT U R E A U D I E N C ES asked to leave the facility and and during intermission, Indicates performances will not be allowed a refund. featuring drinks, snacks and are suitable for mature audiences T OBACCO-F RE E light dinner fare. Catering is due to adult content. Please note that the UMSL available for private parties. campus is tobacco-free. Please contact an event manager G R O U P D I S C O U N T S at 314.516.4100 for information. Group discounts may be available for groups of 15 or more. Call 314.516.4940 for information. E3! Look for to indicate which performances are part of the Explore - Experience - Engage program.


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KEY B LANCHE M. TOUHILL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PARKING HANDICAPPED PARKING

FROM I-70 TO THE MAIN ENTRANCE AND TICKET OFFICE: Take the Florissant Road exit (exit 240) and travel south one-half mile to Arnold B. Grobman Dr. Turn right, continue up the hill and park in the garages to your left or in Parking Lot E to your right. Follow signs for handicapped parking. FROM 170 TO THE MAIN ENTRANCE AND TICKET OFFICE: Travel East on Natural Bridge Road. Turn left onto University Dr. and follow it around to the right as it turns into Arnold B. Grobman Drive. Parking is available in the garages on the right and in Parking Lot E on the left. METROLINK Go METRO! The UMSL North Campus MetroLink Station is just steps from the Touhill’s Main Entrance! PARKING Touhill patrons enjoy plenty of FREE parking, found in Parking Garages and Lot E at the Touhill’s Main Entrance, and Lot K at the Touhill’s Lee Entrance. Handicap accessible parking is also available.

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2012-13 Touhill Season Calendar AUGUST AUGUST

DECEMBER DECEMBER

APRIL APRIL

THE IMPROV SHOP Wednesday 29, 7:30 p.m.

UMSL’S JAZZ FOR THE HOLIDAYS Sunday 2, 3 p.m.

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER

AMBASSADORS OF HARMONY: SOUNDS OF THE SEASON Friday 7, 8 p.m. Saturday 8, 2 & 8 p.m. Sunday 9, 2 & 7 p.m.

THE SECOND CITY Friday 5, 2 p.m.- Master Class Friday 5, 7 & 10 p.m. Saturday 6, 5 & 9 p.m.

ASQ: CELEBRATION Friday 7, 8 p.m. MADCO: OUTBURST Friday 14, 8 p.m. Saturday 15, 2 p.m. Saturday 15, 8 p.m.

THE IMPROV SHOP Wednesday 12, 7:30 p.m.

UMSL DANCE: THE KINETIC CHAMBER PROJECT April 11-12, 8 p.m.

THE NUTCRACKER December 14-23

ORCHID TRIO Saturday 22, 8 p.m.

GREATER ST. LOUIS JAZZ FESTIVAL April 17 - 20 -All Day

JANUARY JANUARY

THE IMPROVISED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY Friday 28, 4 p.m.- Master Class Friday 28, 8 p.m. Saturday 29, 5 & 9 p.m.

MONTEREY JAZZ FESTIVAL Friday 19, 7:30 p.m.

MLK DAY CELEBRATION Monday 21, 10 a.m.

DOC SEVERINSEN and his Big Band Saturday 20, 7:30 p.m.

MOULIN ROUGE Friday 25, 8 p.m. Saturday 26, 2 & 8 p.m.

OCTOBER OCTOBER NEW DANCE HORIZONS Friday 5, 8 p.m. Saturday 6, 2 & 8 p.m.

UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE Wednesday 24, 7:30 p.m.

FEBRUARY FEBRUARY

ALARM WILL SOUND: 1969 Friday 26, 8 p.m.

ELIAS GOLDSTEIN Wednesday 6, 7:30 p.m.

POLLY FERMAN Saturday 6, 8 p.m. JAZZ REACH FAMILY CONCERT Sunday 7, 2 p.m.

ROMEO AND JULIET Friday 8, 8 p.m. Saturday 9, 2:30 & 8 p.m. Sunday 10, 3 p.m.

THE IMPROV SHOP Wednesday 10, 7:30 p.m.

THE IMPROV SHOP Wednesday 13, 7:30 p.m.

EIGHTH BLACKBIRD Friday 12, 8 p.m.

CARMINA BURANA Thursday 21, 8 p.m. Friday 22, 8 p.m. Saturday 23, 8 p.m. Sunday 24, 2 p.m.

IN THE MOOD Saturday 13, 3 & 7:30 p.m. UMSL THEATRE: IN THE BLOOD Thursday 25, 7:30 p.m. Friday 26, 7:30 p.m. Saturday 27, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sunday 28, 2 p.m. ANNIE Friday 26, 7:30 p.m. Saturday 27, 1:30 & 7 p.m. Sunday 28, 1:30 p.m.

MAY MAY ASQ: VOICES OF SPRING Friday 3, 8 p.m. STORYTELLING FESTIVAL Saturday 4, 7:30 p.m. CONTEMPORARY BALLET Friday 10, 8 p.m. Saturday 11, 2 & 8 p.m. THE IMPROV SHOP Wednesday 15, 7:30 p.m.

BASILE Friday 22, 8 p.m.

SPRING TO DANCE® 2013 May 23-25, 5 p.m.

ST. LOUIS JAZZ ORCHESTRA Tuesday 26, 7 p.m.

JUNE JUNE

PACO PEÑA Thursday 28, 7:30 p.m.

AMBASSADORS OF HARMONY: VOICES IN HARMONY Saturday 15, 2 & 8 p.m.

MARCH MARCH

SONNY ROLLINS Saturday 22, 8 p.m.

ASQ: RAZUMOVSKY Friday 1, 8 p.m.

ST. LOUIS JAZZ ORCHESTRA Tuesday 30, 7 p.m.

LE CHANT SUR LA LOWE Saturday 2, 8 p.m.

NOVEMBER N OVEMBER ASQ: PASSPORT: LATIN AMERICA Friday 2, 8 p.m. CELTIC FESTIVAL featuring Black 47 Saturday 3, 8 p.m. UMSL JAZZ ENSEMBLE Wednesday 7, 7:30 p.m. UMSL DANCE: FESTIVAL OF DANCE Thursday 8, 8 p.m. Friday 9, 8 p.m. Saturday 10, 8 p.m.

UMSL THEATRE: FOUR BY TENN Thursday 4, 7:30 p.m. Friday 15, 7:30 p.m. Saturday 16, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sunday 17, 2 p.m. MADCO: MOMENTUM Friday 22, 8 p.m. Saturday 23, 2 p.m. Saturday 23, 8 p.m. CHICK COREA & BÉLA FLECK Saturday 23, 8 p.m.

PILOBOLUS Friday 9, 8 p.m. Saturday 10, 2 & 8 p.m.

For more information visit

touhill.org

KYO-SHIN-AN ARTS “Kammerraku®” featuring ASQ Friday 30, 8 p.m.

B CLASSICAL

UNIVERSITY PERCUSSION, AFRO-CUBAN ENSEMBLE & VOCAL POINT Monday 8, 7:30 p.m.

D JAZZ

E DANCE

F WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

A CONCERTS & COMEDY

THEATRE

G SPECIAL EVENTS


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1 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 63121-4400

Ex p e ri e n c e T he To u hill!

2012-2013 Touhill Experience Magazine  
2012-2013 Touhill Experience Magazine  

The Touhill offers quality arts and entertainment from across the spectrum of the performing arts genres. The facility serves as an academi...

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