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2016 BATIK STORY Date 01 Dec (Thu) - 07 Dec (Wed), 2016 Venue Alam Batik, Indonesia Pasuruan Consultant Do Young KIM Coordinator Euna KIM (Luna) Marina Abdul Ghanie Maslinda Abdul Ghanie Project director Nathalie Boseul SHIN Artist Gihun NOH • Yoonsuk CHOI Movie director Hyoung Ju KIM Journalist Mee Hye LEE Fashion designer So Young MAH Designer Heiin SON • Tae Hoon JANG

Batik Specialist Sri Kholifah(Bu Ifah) Anang Samsul Arifin Fery Sugeng Santoso Kasto Prima Amri Surachmad Widianto Students Ainun Mardiyah • Aris Wahyudi • Ciani Ningsih • Fitriyah Rakhmawati• Handini Fatma Mega • Jossie Aldi Efendi • Koko Prayogi • Lailatul Mukarromah Yasin • Moch Andre Setiawan • Maslikha • Nafisatul Jannah • Roudhotul Alifa • Winda Ariska • Yessica Sabath Indraputri • Yusrotul Amri Indonesia Pasuruan State Office Diano Vela Fery Santoso Esthiana Hendraswati Tri Rahayu Lulis Ratnawati Yudi


Organizer

Introduction :: INDONESIA ¶ Country name conventionallong form: Republic of Indones ia conventional short form: Indonesia ¶ Location Southeastern Asia, archipelago between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean Geographic coordinates : 5 00 S, 120 00 E Map references : Southeast Asia Climate : tropical hot, humid more moderate in highlands Natural resources : petroleum, tin, natural gas, nickel,  timber, bauxite, copper, fertiles oils,  coal, gold, silver

Supervision

Support

¶ Capital name: Jakarta geographic coordinates: 6 10 S, 106 49 E note: Indonesia has three time zones

Manage

ALBATROSS

¶ Population 258,316,051 (July 2016 est.) country comparison to the world : 5 ¶ Nationality noun : Indonesian(s) / adjective : Indonesian Ethnic groups : Javanese 40.1%, Sundanese 15.5%, Malay 3.7%, Batak 3.6%, Madurese 3%, Betawi 2.9%, Minangkabau 2.7%, Buginese 2.7%, Bantenese 2%, Banjarese 1.7%, Balines e 1.7%, Acehnese 1.4%, Dayak 1.4%, Sasak 1.3%, Chinese 1.2%, other 15% (2010 est.) ¶ Languages Bahasa Indonesia (official, modified form of Malay), English, Dutch, local dialects(of which the most widely spoken is Javanese) note: more than 700 languages are used in Indonesia ¶Religions Muslim 87.2%, Christian 7%, Roman Catholic 2.9%, Hindu 1.7%, other 0.9% (includes Buddhist and Confucian), unspecified 0.4% (2010 est.) ¶ Agestructure 0-14 years: 25.42% (male 33,435,020/female 32,224,706) 15-24 years: 17.03% (male 22,397,086/female 21,604,985) 25-54 years: 42.35% (male 55,857,415/female 53,543,682)

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About Batik The unique hand-dyed technique known as Indonesian Batik reflects the lives of Indonesians. Batik, which originated in ‘Ambatik’, means ‘a cloth with little dots’ in Javanese, entered Indonesia in the 7th century and developed into a unique culture. Geometric patterns are related to Indonesian traditions and the local environment in which they live. Symbolic patterns such as the plants that wish for health or the legendary heroes add colorful stories in batik. The process is quite tricky and complex. Putting hot beeswax, such as ink, into ‘canting’, a special tool and people draw lines only in one direction. When the temperature of beeswax is over 70 degrees, it flows too much. If it is lower than that, it hardens and it is not easy to keep the proper temperature. It requires a high concentration of concentration because the concentration of the line needs to be adjusted only by the sense of the hand. Thereafter, the process of applying and drying the color several times over several days is repeated. The area covered with beeswax does not get any color after dyeing.

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The dyeing method is also important. Traditional batik, which takes all the material from the ground and creates it with sunlight and water, does not pollute the environment. Everything that is common in Indonesia, such as mangoes, jackfruits, mahogany bark, field petals, everything that grows under the sun of the equator can be a good vegetable dye. Fixatives are also natural minerals. It takes more time than the use of chemical dyes, but here is the philosophy of the Indonesian people who have lived with nature. The finished batik finally goes through the fog process. It is to spend a full day in the month of various herbs. The type of hub used depends on what material (cloth, leather, wood) is used for batik. Smoked batik does not change shape and color after a long time. All of this work is based on the collaboration of the creators. The Indonesian batik, which has the creativity, partnership and philosophy of Indonesian people, was listed as a UNESCO Cultural Heritage in 2009.

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Alam Batik

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Alam Batik is a famous batik production studio in the Pasuruan region, adhering to natural materials and traditional techniques. Students of Bu Ifah, who are lecturer of ‹Batik Story› workshop started Alam Batik and is currently producing batik with local residents. Local awareness of Alam Batik regarding batik is also high. As a batik production studio, Alam Batik is preparing basic tools for batik, and the workshop program of the studio itself is also available, which makes it easy to operate the training program.

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Making Batik in a Small Java Village [See] The Pyeongchang Cultural Olympics “Batik Story” Art Dream Camp Nathalie Boseul Shin Curator, Total Museum of Contemporary Art

The Story Begins The origins of “Batik Story” date back seven years to mymeeting with Marina in Kota Kinabalu on the island of Borneo. The deputy director of the Sabah Animation Creative Content Center(SAC3), she was a friend who wanted to try something new. We quickly joined forces to develop a media art festival. But this was a place that had no infrastructure at all for modern art, let alone media art. The students at SAC3 were struggling financially, drawing on state support for their education, and were obviously not all that interested in exhibitions or modern art. Marina and I first had the idea of developing a human resources pool: I would invite media artists and modern art practitioners to come to Kota Kinabalu from Korea, and SAC3 would hold workshops for the children to teach them methods for planning and managing international events. More ambitiously, we would also organize an international media art festival.

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For five years, we worked hard running a program that was called “Playground in Island.” A number of artists and media lab members took part, including Choi Jeong-hwa, Noh Suntag, Song Ho-jun, the Okin Collective, Seo Hyo-jung, and Bang & Lee. In contrast to the first experience, the students were on a more mature footing when they greeted the guests, and the program proceeded smoothly. In many cases, former student participants went on to become SAC3 staff. But we couldn't organize a media art festival -- or we didn't, at least. After thinking about it, we couldn't find any real justification for holding a media arts festival here. Why, when things were fine the way they were? Whenever I asked myself who we'd be holding the festival for, I was forced to admit -- embarrassing as it was -- that it was for my own personal ambitions. So I told Marina we ought to give up on it. Her response was unflappable. “All right. Let's go ahead and wrap up Playground in Island here. But if it's all right, could I suggest a project?” The project she wanted to do involved batik. A traditional Indonesian art of hand-dyeing, batik has a name that comes from the Java-nese work ambatik, meaning spotted or stained fabric. Students at SAC3's home institution, the Kolej Yayasan Sabah (now the University College Salah Foundation) were taught about batik, but the technique hadn't actually been very helpful for them in their lives, she explained. But Marina wanted to work with Korean artists on exploring the different possibilities for batik as an environmentally friendly, natural approach. Before I could do anything with them, I had to learn about batik. So it was that “Playground in Island: Batik Story” was developed in the winter of 2015 in a small batik factory in Kota Kinabalu. Artists and designers worked together from a wide range of different fields, including photography, fashion design, magazine editing, illustrating, and media art. It was an opportunity to learn about the batik manufacturing process and explore different ways that we might help out. Students at the small factory make batik based on what they had learned from an Indonesian teacher named Bu Ifa. But all they were learning was the skill; they remained unaware of the history of batik, what materials were used and how they were processed -- or, more crucially, why batik was important. Their inability to connect batik with their own lives may have made a certain degree of sense.

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Java: Home of Batik We were in the midst of planning Batik Story in 2017 when we received some good news: the Korea Arts & Culture Education Service was planning an Art Dream Camp program for the Pyeongchang Cultural Olympics that would allow a batik project to be organized in the craft's home country of Indonesia. I thought it might be a good idea to bring Bu Ifa to the Indonesia batik capital of Yogyakarta, but she disagreed. Her students were running the Alam Batik Center in her hometown of Pasuruan, and she thought it would be do the program with them and the underprivileged children in the region. Not only was it my first trip to Indonesia, but I was also learning about batik for the first time, and I decided that if the goal was to help the children with their lives through batik, then it would definitely be a good idea to follow her advice. So it was that we decided to leave for a trip to batik's home island of Java from December 01 to 07, 2016. ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

First, we had to organize a team. To record the local situation, Noh Sun-tag and Roh Ki-hoon signed on as photographers; Kim Hyungjoo, Choi Yoon-suk, and Lee Jung-woo for video; Son Hye-in as a booklet designer; Ma So-young as a fashion designer researching items made with batik fabric; Lee Mi-hye as a magazine designer for promotion; and Jang Tae-hoon as a designer developing the exhibition and pop-up store spaces. Running things smoothly meant choosing the right mix of people who had worked together on batik and other Kota Kinabalu work in the past and people who were joining for the first time. Perhaps the most crucial role was that of mediator for communication with the Kota Kinabalu-based Bu Ifa and the batik experts at the Alam Batik Center. Those jobs were taken on by Marina and her younger sister, an SAC3 administrator named Bibi.

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Marina and Bibi's help was tremendous. I had been able to speak with students briefly in English in Kota Kinabalu, but the Indonesian children could not speak English, and we didn’t know Indonesian. Marina and Bibi helped prepare everything -- not just communication with local kids, but everything else to do with the workshops, including materials, vehicles, and lodging. Strictly speaking, the Batik Story 2 project in Indonesia was only possible because of Total Museum of Contemporary Art in Korea, SAC3 in Malaysia, and the Alam Batik Center in Indonesia all working together and playing their parts like runners in a three-legged race.

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Alam Batik Center: An Encounter with Batik and Local Children After eating breakfast, I headed along a drizzly country road to Pajaran, the village where the Alam Batik Center is located. It was much smaller and humbler than the pictures I'd seen. Children sat doing batik on a floor that looked like a wooden bench. To help the program run smoothly, the center had apparently recruited participants before our arrival and given them early instruction on basic batik technique. I had only just met the students, and things still seemed a bit stiff between us. I was also flustered about how they seemed to marvel at the “gang” from Korea and how embarrassed their gazes seemed to be. Prior to the program's beginning, the foreigners from Korea were given a brief instruction about batik. Bu Ifa offered a friendly introduction to her students who ran the Alam Batik Center and explained to us about the batik-making process and the traditional approach to batik preservation. After that came the actual work with the children. The plan was to divide them into two groups, one making the batik and the other making a magazine about batik. The batikmaking group first drew images on paper to show the story they wanted to tell about winter and snow; these were then transferred to fabric. This was dipped into a canister of hot wax (called a tjanting), and the image was redrawn along the outline. The image drawn on the fabric absorbed colors from the natural dyes -- a meticulous process that required the assistance of experts. I was curious to see how winter appeared through the eyes of children who lived in a country without snow. While they had never seen or touched snow for themselves, the children there did live in a world of developed media and knew all about snow and winter. They may have wished to touch

midwinter snow for themselves, but their pictures showed something different. One student offered a particularly fascinating and memorable story. “I hate it when it snows,” the child said. “It collects on the matoa trees, and then the matoa fruit dies. Without matoa fruit, we couldn't make batik….” How foolish I had been to somehow simply expect that children in a country without snow would long for snow and winter. The children making the magazine were every bit as enthusiastic as the ones making batik. They created pictures to show the batik-making process, and went around the village in search of batik materials to show and explain. They also interviewed each other and offered brief introductions to themselves. They made the decision to print the magazine on fabric instead of paper. It was the entire batik process all over again: drawing pictures on each page, writing the text, copying it onto fabric, writing over it with the tjanting and dyeing it. The resulting magazine was sewn together stitch by stitch into a bona fide batik journal. It was a bit of a concern that the dyed fabric took so long to dry because of the daily rainy season weather during the short weeklong schedule, but we were able to finish the batik work. On the eve of our departure, a small exhibition for the children's batik and magazine was organized in Pajaran's Skolejo city hall building. An installation framework to hang their work on was made from neighborhood bamboo trees and desks in the office. It was nice to have the exhibition bring a fulfilling finish to the short schedule, but what was truly rewarding was seeing how much the children seemed to enjoy it. After the installation ended, we passed out white T-shirts. Without so much as a “Who'll go first?” they began writing each other's names on the shirts. The result was T-shirts bearing the names of all the participants.

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Entering Someone Else's Life

Postscript: Mr. Peri the Batik Expert

I had the opportunity to visit the homes of some of the participating children during the workshop. Pajaran, the town where the Alam Batik Center located, was not all that large or prosperous, but the villages where they lived had to be reached along winding country roads. There were no fences separating one house from the next; chickens roamed freely through the neighborhood, goats were enclosed in pens, and seemingly every home had a bird cage on its eaves. Some communities were country villages without any public transportation at all, offering no way out unless someone offered a ride on their motorbike. As soon as we arrived, the villagers raced out to look at us. Once, while I was sitting in the living room talking to the children and their parents, a gentleman who looked like a neighbor offered some mangoes he'd picked from a tree. The villagers also pooled their money to buy us drinks. The “living rooms” were really just a carpet on the ground; there wasn't even proper furniture, let alone TV sets. Even the carpets might have been borrowed from a nearby mosque, Bu Ifa explained. Yet as poor as the people were, they never let it darken their faces. One student said they had quit school, but planned to study batik intently in order to earn money. These were children I never would have met had it not been for the workshop. It afforded me a different kind of experience from any exhibition. But I also had to be constantly vigilant. The week we spent together might be a good experience and memory for us -- but for some, it might be a matter of survival.

Mr. Fery was a student of Bu Ifa's. Four years before, he had come to Pajaran to open the Alam Batik Center with five batik experts and teach the craft to mothers in the nearby village. Every time they received an order, they would distribute material to the village housewives. Most of the stay-at-home mothers in Indonesia work mainly in the home. Part of this may have to do with religion, but another factor is the lack of opportunities for women who grew up in poor homes without a proper education. Mr. Peri offered work to these women, helping them gain at least a little extra income. Not only that, but he also promote the growing of plants to provide the villagers with batik material. One approach was to plant mango trees, allowing villagers to eat or sell the fruit and gather the unused leaves to sell to the Alam Batik Center for materials. This, too, was intended to offer a small supplement to their livelihoods. Most of the materials used by the center come from the village. Mr. Fery said he hoped studying batik would help improve the struggling children's lives. Of course, batik was not simply a means of making money to him. He viewed it, he said, as being like a religious act, something very spiritual. Indeed, whenever he received a batik order, he would dress up nicely and stop meeting with others for a while so that he could focus on the client's wishes or story. Anachronistic as it may seem in an utterly capital-dominated world like today's, I also found myself looking at his mild, happy face and thinking that might just be what that kind of world needs most.

As I mentioned before, entering someone's life is something that requires great care. But meetings are always exciting, especially in the way some of them bring great happiness to both parties. That's how our brief week together went. No rain fell early that morning on the day we left our lodgings. It was sad for us to go home, but we were able to do it with a smile knowing the ten children we had met in Pajaran would soon be coming to Korea in February. I can't help wondering how the sunny, nose-nipping winter will feel to them.

©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Until We Meet Again

Related Materials Booklet from the ‘Playground in Island: Batik Story’ Workshop https://issuu.com/totalmuseum/docs/batiker2015 Video of ‘Playground in Island 2015: Batik Story’ https://vimeo.com/153465196

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The Pyeonchang Cultural Olympics Art Dream Camp is a culture and art education program aimed at encouraging interest in the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics among children and teenagers in Southern Hemisphere countries where winters are not cold. Starting in Vietnam on Saturday, November 5, 2016, Korean artists visited countries without winter sports to offer art education to local children, teenagers, and residents. Professional artists in various areas visited the four countries of Vietnam, Colombia, Malawi, and Indonesia offering programs in puppeteering, modern dance, music, visual arts, and crafts. Local participants are also being invited to Pyeongchang in February 2017 for an arts education project that will assemble the results of teaching in the four countries into one work back in Korea.


Indonesia does not have the word winter. There is the word ‘Musim Dingin’. It is a combined word of ‘Musim’ which means ‘cold weather’ or cold hearted and ‘Dinging’ which means weather. However it is as unrealistic as Santa Claus in this hot country where the average temperature is over 27 degrees all year round. Winter is a fantasy world for children in Pasuruan, East Java, where they always be in the summer. The children, sitting on the umbrella of the Alam Batik Center where the hot-spots are wetting the yard every day, batik the imaginary winter on a pure white cloth. The sacred Bromo volcano, where the god of fire lives, has snowflakes. And the small, green village sleeps quietly in the snow, pouring like stars. The works that children completed and dyed for themselves and were exhibited on the last day of ‘Art Dream Camp’, Sukorejo Town Office. The villagers gathered in a rustic exhibition space made of bamboo as a main material, which can be seen everywhere in Sukorejo. It was a warm winter.

Nafisatul Jannah

Lailatul Mukarromah Yasin

Ciani Ningsih

Ainun Mardiyah

Koko Prayogi

Yusrotul Amri

Fitriyah Rakhmawati

Maslikha

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Yusrotul Amri Sadan Timur Kalirejo Village Pasuruan 3 July 1996 Female High School Graduates Batik maker To be successful person Fried Rice

Yusrotul Amri

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Ciani Ningsih

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Ciani Ningsih Pajaran Ds.Gunting Village Pasuruan, 21 December 1996 Female – To help people in need To be successful person Chicken Noodle


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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Koko Prayogi Gendol pakukerto sukorejo Pasuruan 3 June 1999 Male Student Businessman To understand more on batik Indonesia Salad (Pecel)

Koko Prayogi

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Lailatul Mukarromah Yasin

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Lailatul Mukarromah Yasin Sadan Timur Kalirejo Village Pasuruan, December 2001 Female High School Graduates Businessman To be famous batik maker Soto (Noodle soup)


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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD HOBBY

Nafisatul Jannah Sadan Timur Kalirejo Village Pasuruan 11 December 2000 Female To Introduce batik to people in my village To sustain in batik making Bakso (Noodle soup) Swimming

Nafisatul Jannah

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Fitriyah Rakhmawati

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Fitriyah Rakhmawati Gunting Ds.Genitri Village Pasuruan, 23 December 2002 Female Student Teacher Being helpful and continue making batik Bakso (Noodle soup)


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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD HOBBY

Maslikha Kerajan Kenduruan Village Pasuruan, 19 March 1995 Female Freelancer To be famous batik maker To be a better person Bakso (Noodle soup) Photography

Maslikha

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Ainun Mardiyah

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD HOBBY

Ainun Mardiyah Sadan Timur Kalirejo Village Pasuruan, 13 June 2000 Female To know more about batik To make my parents happy Fried Rice Reading


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‹Cerita Batik: Batik Story› is a batik guide book made by batik technique. It was produced 100% handcrafted based on the contents of the research conducted during the workshop by participants of the Art Dream Camp in Indonesia. Although this book has the premise that it is a ‘introduction for people who are new to batik’, public relations is a secondary function. The first reader of this book is the seven students who participated in the production. Those who have started to study batik now understand the whole process of batik through the active learning process of the coverage type and experience the batik technique. Students also collect the plants that are the source of batik, and expresses them in batik. It is the most realistic way to promote batik in a small rural town, where it is hard to find a print shop far from computer. The production process for 4 nights and 5 days is as follows.

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Day 4 - Dyeing Repeat Repeat the process of dyeing and drying each page in the dye of the desired color.

Day 1 – Collecting Information Through interviews, they understand each other. And they collect information about batik by going around the Alarm Batik Center and all over town.

Day 5 - Sewing Binding The slope of the fabric is stitched and inverted, and each page is connected by yarn. ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Day 2 - Editorial Meeting It is divided into four teams, each of which summarizes the batik, explains the material and the process, and how to introduce the participants.

Day 3 _ Text and Painting The texts and drawings on paper are transferred to a prepared white fabric and then the contents are engraved with batik technique using canting and waxing tools.

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“Memperkenalkan Tentang Kita (Introducing us)!” The students who visited the Alam Batik Center to learn Indonesian traditional cultural heritage are young batik evangelists who have gone through a series of screenings. ‘Art Dream Camp’ recruited volunteers in the late teens and early twenties who reside near the village of Sukorejo in Pasuruan province, and 21 students who passed the preliminary interview eventually joined the camp. Interest in batik is very special, but most students are still in the beginner's class. Students were given the mandatory tool of batik, Cantng, and the ‘Bixa Orellana’ seedlings, also called ‘lipstick trees’ as one of the dyeing materials. Students who have their own tools and raw materials learn the whole process of batik over several weeks at the Alarm Batik Center. Students and participants from Art Dream Camp from Korea were divided into two teams for four nights and five days, respectively, to complete a book about batik and a batik work with winter story they imagined. This introductory article is based on the interviews of the participating students themselves.

My name is Aris. I wanted to learn Indonesian tradition, so I came to the Alarm Batik center. This is like my playground. My house is right opposite the Alarm Batik center, and the second of the three children. I was born and grew up in this village. Bob Marley's face on one side of my room was drawn by my friends with me. My hobby is football. And it's a coffee lover. It was two years ago that I became interested in batik in earnest. Sometimes I come to the Alarm Batik center and naturally come into contact with batik. I do not know what batik charm is yet. Maybe it's something I should know until I die? My dream is to introduce our traditional arts all over the world.

I am Andre who is interested in fashion. Why did you dye your hair yellow? This is Lionel Messi's hairstyle in 2016. haha. I am probably the oldest one among the Indonesian participants. I am twenty-five years old. I was curious about batik when I was working at the T-shirt shop. Would not it be possible to create a different design if I use a batik on a T-shirt? Batik has a philosophy of Indonesian people. The process of making batik is quite complicated and takes a long time. For that reason, I have the desire to try more.

Hello. I am a 19-year-old Yessica who enjoys painting, hiking and traveling. I ride a scooter every day for 10 minutes to the Alarm Batik center. After learning about batik in class at school, I wanted to know more and found this place. I was wondering how the batik that I've always seen in everyday life is made. In Indonesia you can see people wearing batik clothes or scarves everywhere. My dream is a designer. I want to draw a motif from batik and make my own design. I want more people to know that Batik is a unique culture in Indonesia.

I'm eighteen years old. My name is Mega. Alifa is a cousin who lives in next door. My days are very busy. After school, I have to clean and wash your clothes. Then I walked 4km to the Alarm Batik center here. It is common here to help with housework, so I don't have any complaint. I want to be a teacher. I will learn batik and teach my students. Building knowledge is important in education, business, and in any field. I wish I could create my own batik patterns as well as traditional patterns. There are more stories in batik than I can see.

Call me as Alifa who wants to develop Indonesian batik. Before I know batik, it was my dream to do business related to my favorite food, such as ice cream. It's different now. I knew it was really important to keep our traditions for the next generation. Of course, I cannot do it for everyone from the beginning. I will start with the village community where I live. Then I think it will be naturally transmitted to other local people. Batik is also a great help to local economic development. As time goes by, One family, the whole country can grow further.

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My name is Winda. It lives in a village 2km away from the alarm batik center. I do not have anybody around me doing batik, but my village manager introduced me to this workshop program and I applied for it. All participants in this program meet here for the first time. Speaking of me, I have a boyfriend and I love swimming. But I do not know how to swim.haha. The goal in this workshop is to learn batik hard and publicize it to many people. If someone is not interested in batik, I want to explain it well so that she or he become love batik. I simply try to understand batik more deeply than technology.

I'm Aldi. I am 17 years old and I have been involved in the Art Dream Camp since I wanted to learn more about the batik and develop the area where I live. It's still very difficult. Among them, drawing flowers is the most difficult to me. Flower is one of common patterns. But it's not as easy as completing a sophisticated pattern like the teachers at the Alarm Batik Center. My goal is to be good at batik once. Personally I like contemporary style more than traditional batik pattern, because I can wear it. It should be considered the tastes of my younger friends as well as older adults like my dad. If I have the opportunity to travel to one country all over the world, I want to go to Korea. Heartily!


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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD HOBBY

Moch Andre Setiawan Krajan Ds.Sukorjo Village Pasuruan, 15 April 1991 Male Freelancer Painter To be successful painter Bakso (Noodle soup) Music

Moch Andre Setiawan

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Aris Wahyudi

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Aris Wahyudi Pajaran gunting sukorejo Pasuruan, 8 December 1999 Male Student To make my parents happy To introduce batik to the whole world Chicken Mee


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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Roudhotul Alifa Sumber Gareng Sukorjo Village Pasuruan 17 April 1998 Female Freelancer Businesswoman Improve Indonesia batik Shrimp

Roudhotul Alifa

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Yessica Sabath Indraputri

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Yessica Sabath Indraputri Genengan Ds.Glagasari Village Pasuruan 15 February 1997 Female Freelancer Businesswoman To learn more on batik Indonesia Salad (tempe)


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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Winda Ariska Glatik Ds.Glagasari Village Pasuruan 10 May 1998 Female Freelancer Teacher To be successful person and introduce batik to community Noodles

Winda Ariska

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Handini Fatma Mega

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NAME ADDRESS PLACE & DATE OF BIRTH GENDER EDUCATION/WORK AMBITION DREAM FAVORITE FOOD

Handini Fatma Mega Sumber Gareng Sukorjo Village Pasuruan 20 May 1998 Female Freelancer Businesswoman To understand more on batik Tempe (local indonesian food from soy)


©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Canting & Brush Canting is the drawing tool in batik. Brush is made of palm leaves to clean injection hole.

Canting & Scale

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©노기훈 Noh Gihun ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Calcium Lime

Beeswax pot and brazier It is used to melt beeswax.

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©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Rambutan Leaves Leaves from Rambutan, tropical fruit.

Matoa Leaves Matoa tree is one of popular trees in Indoensia. Leave from Matoa used as a dye in Batik.

Juwet Fruit Leave Juwet Fruit is a kind of Java plum, which is a common name for the edible fruits of several tropical tree species.

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©노기훈 Noh Gihun ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Pandan Leaves Pandan is a tree of palm family. Leaves from Pandan are used for spice. It is used to make yellowish green.

Nangka Leaves Nangka tree is known as Jackfruit tree. Leaves and root from Nangka are used for making yellow.

Chili Leaves It is used to make green.

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©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Mango Leaves Mango tree is sweet tropical fruit tree. Both fruits and leaves are raw materials for natural dyeing.

Rambutan Leaves Leaves from Rambutan, tropical fruit. Leaves are used to make yellowish green.

Indigo Paste A fermented dough from indigo. It is used for various navy colors.

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©노기훈 Noh Gihun ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Bark of Bixa Bark of Bixa tree is used to make red color.

Garden Balsam Balsam petals and leaves are used to make scarlet color.

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Coconut Sugar Mineral-rich coconut sugar mixed with water is used for indigo color.


©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Beeswas Drwaing material. After dyeing, white line remains in waxing parts.

Aluminum sulfate A fixative from processing of alunite. It helps the development of bright colors such as pink and yellow.

Bixa Seeds Seeds of the red berries of Bixa wood which are also the raw material of lipstick. It is a red dye.

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©노기훈 Noh Gihun ©노기훈 Noh Gihun

©노기훈 Noh Gihun

Secang Tree A kind of thorn tree with yellow flowers. A bark of Secan tree is mainly used for batik dyeing.

Lime Lime is a calcium-containing inorganic material in which carbonates, oxides, and hydroxides predominate. Lime powder is used as a fixative for color development of medium saturation.

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Ferrous sulfate A fixative of turquoise crystals collected from stones. It helps to develop dark colors such as ocher or black.


Do Young KIM He had established and managed ‘art center nabi’ which is the first media art center in Korea as a managing director.(2000~2004) And he has been working for SK as an team leader of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) team since 2004. He has developed and supported art education program, art therapy program, performance. His interest is to support unprivileged youths who have artistic talentthrough art education program such as Happy music school, Happy musical school etc. And recently he designs and runs project to support unprivileged youths who have artistic talent to start a 'Social Enterprise' using their talent.

Euna KIM KIM Euna majored ceramic art in University and studied museum management in graduate school. She was participated in Korea International Cooperation Agency(KOICA) as a global volunteer which taught the pottery craft to the residents in the Dominican Republic from 2012 to 2013. She worked in the National Museum of Korea in 2014, and now she is an educator of TOTAL Museum.

Hyoung Ju KIM A director, producer and cinematographer of the documentary film «The Basement Satellite» released in February 2015. Worked as a cinematographer in many commercial films such as «A perfect way to steal a dog», «Talking Architect». Asking questions about the meaning of recording and shooting, performed collaborative video works with various genres.

Gihun NOH Gihun Noh is interested in the geographical environment resulted from the past, and takes a picture of its present appearance. From the premise that ‘The current situation stems from the past’, He takes a picture of the shadows of the past surrounding the present. For example, the first generation industrial complex builded by the government's urban planning(Gumi City), the validity of the Seoul-Incheon Railroad Line, the first railroad which was built during the Japanese colonial rule (Line No.1), the specific place in Seoul where the people who are belonging to the social position of the homeless caused by the economic incompetence (Black Night), and Invariability of the historical placesquare where will exist forever as a space even if times had changed(Mise-en-Scène).

So Young MAH ‘mah soyoung’ Fashion & Textile Design Studio, Seoul, Korea Studio Representive/Creative Director/Production Manager Good for Fashion & Textile Design, Installation Design and Production Management. Skilled in drawing ability in both rough and detailed, design sampling to carry out design outcomes. Confidence and easy-going personality. Keeping good relationship with colleagues and co-partners.

Heiin SON Born in Seoul in 1983, Hyein Son lives in Gyeonggi Province. She majored in communication design in Konkuk University. Building a career with Design lab Buret in 2009 and AGI Society in 2013, she currently works as a freelancer. She has been working on exhibition, publication and graphic design and plans to further build academic and work experience in these arenas. She also contributed to exhibitions held at Seoul Museum of History, Horim Museum and Gwacheon National Science Museum and is interested in how graphic design can shape the space.

Nathalie Boseul SHIN I was born in 1972, Inchoen. I studied philosophy at Ewha Womans University, Aesthetics at Hongik Graduate School. My MA thesis subject is art and technology, especially interactivity. I worked at art center nabi which is specialized in media art (curator, 2000-02), Seoul International Media Art Biennale (exhibition team manager, 2003-5), alternative space Loop (chief curator, 2006). Since 2007, I have worked at Total Museum of Contemporary Art. Selected Exhibitions: «Acts of Voicing»(Stuttgart 2012/Seoul 2013), «Playground in Island»(Malaysia 2010-present), «What if in Venice: corea campanella›(Venice, 2013), «Show must go on»(London2012), «Postcapital Archive: 1989-2001»(Seoul, 2012), Dan Perjovschi solo show «News after the news»(2012) et.al.

Mee Hye LEE Meehye Lee used to be a feature director at «Vogue Korea». She has interviewed a wide range of individuals from K-Pop stars to underground musicians, and written columns for culture and the arts. She was in charge of the exhibition ‘FASHION INTO ART’ at the Plateau Samsung Museum of Art, which was a special celebration for the 15th anniversary of Vogue Korea. She has also participated in various exhibitions and lectures about fashion and art. At the end of 2015, she chose to leave «Vogue Korea» and is planning for a variety of new cultural projects with her 12 years of work experience. Now she is working for various media outlets including «Vogue Korea» as a content creator and columnist.

Zerolab Graphic product design studio by Jang Taehoon, Kim donghoon, Kim Dohyeon. We aim at total directional cultural activities and blur the distinction between experimental designs and commercial designs through various creative activities. Besides product space and visual design, we have also been seeking for a new possibility by holding workshops, publishing in book form and working on public improvement projects. Recently we are working on workshops on stools and printing through exhibitions and making chances to experience the work process of designers and production methods for visitors.

Yoonsuk CHOI Yoonsuk Choi (Born in Seoul, 1981) is a Seoul based artist. His practice is mainly dealing with his immediate surroundings; habitual gestures and the notion of universal Cartesian time and also he is interested in the tension between the personal life of an artist and artist's works. He is currently developing his art practice via approaching to various mediums such as performance, video and sound etc. He has recently held solo exhibition at Space O'NewWall in Seoul, Korea and also participated in various group exhibitions and performance projects.

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Marina Abd Ghanie Marina Abd Ghanie (born in Sandakan, 1981) is currently working as the Deputy Director of Sabah Animation & Creative Content Centre (SAC3). Her recent research interest includes Storytelling by the Elders of North Borneo, Transmedia Storytelling, Animation for preschoolers and Narrative aesthetics in media production or edutainment for children. Future project will focus on arts and media education for local community which can help to preserve or conserve the culture and natural heritage of Sabah. She's actively involved in collaborative project such as Playground in Island ‹2010-current›, Roadshow 2016 KK-Sandakan and SAC3 Korea Artist / Curator Residency Programme.

Anang Samsul Arifin

Diano Vela Fery Santoso

Widianto

Esthiana Hendraswati Tri Rahayu

Kasto

Lulis Ratnawati Yudi

Maslinda Abd Ghanie(BB) Fondly known as BB rather than Maslinda Abd Ghanie, this young lady was born in 1987 in Sandakan. Her current job as the Centre Manager for Sabah Animation & Creative Content Centre (SAC3) made her more inclined towards Community-based Education, Management, and also Event & Project Coordinating as her current interest. Her past job as the Lead Coordinator for 1Azam Community Education Project also contributed a lot to her career development. BB is actively involved in collaborative project such as ‹Playground in Island› (2010-current) and ‹Roadshow 2016: KK-Sandakan› (2016).

Sri Kholifah Sri Kholifah (Born in Malang, Indonesia,1962) or more amicably known as Iifah is a Batik Specialist who gained local and international recognition through her passion in helping people escape poverty life in Pasuruan region of Indonesia. Her motto in life is to help create space and possibilities for people who have deep interest in creating batik but do not have the mean s or resources. Thus, with this aim, she provides training in producing Natural Dye Batik which is an alternative to chemical dyes that can be harmful to the environment-a matter often associated with Batik making while finding ways to maximize used products as raw materials. Currently, she continues her dedication through her work as Batik Master Trainer in UCSF (University College Sabah Foundation); advocating budding artists in creating their Borneo Botanic Batik while actively researching and studying local natural resources to find the best way of fabricating highly pigmented organic colour for Batik.

Fery Sugeng Santoso

Prima Amri Surachmad

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42 ©노기훈 Noh Gihun


43 ©노기훈 Noh Gihun


Profile for Total Museum of Contemporary Art

[2016] BatikStory 2 (en)  

Total Museum BatikStory 2016_B(en)

[2016] BatikStory 2 (en)  

Total Museum BatikStory 2016_B(en)