Page 1

1/6/2012

ONLINE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

SYLLABUS: OTL PD COMMUNITY BUILDING

OTL Professional Development Series | Dr. Torria Bond


Page |1

TABLE OF CONTENTS OTL PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

2

SYLLABI FOR COMMUNITY BUILDING

4


Page |2

Program Purpose The Online Teaching and Learning Workshops equip faculty with general knowledge of effective online teaching and learning, including community building, course structure, teaching techniques, and assessment and evaluation. Student Learning Outcomes Goal 1: Help students develop effective strategies for community building in an online course. Objective 1.1: Students will demonstrate the effective use of Web 2.0 tools to create a sense of presence in an online course. Objective 1.2: Students will create learning activities in their content area that require learners to interact responsively with one another and the course content. Goal 2: Help students apply design theory to course design in their curricular area. Objective 2.1: Students will complete a course design worksheet for a course in their content area. Objective 2.2: Students will construct the developed course in Blackboard 9.1 Goal 3: Assist students to develop and strengthen strategies and practices regarding online teaching techniques. Objective 3.1: Students will be able to facilitate interactions between student/teacher, student/student, and student/course content using use web 2.0 tools and task analysis strategies. Objective 3.2: Students will be able to analyze the use of web tools and issues of copyright to determine appropriate use of materials used for online instruction and archive those materials using Web 2.0 tools. Goal 4: Assist students to develop assessment strategies and tools for evaluation and assessment. Objective 4.1: Students will be able to create a variety of assessments for various purposes within Blackboard integrating web 2.0 tools. Objective 4.2: Students will be able to align assessments to instructional objectives and lesson activities as well as with course and program goals. Goal 5: Help students understand the biblical truths that apply to online teaching and learning. Objective 5.1: Students will identify links between course concepts and a Christian world view.


Page |3


Page |4

California Baptist University, Online & Professional Studies Online Teaching & Learning

Community Building Syllabus OPS MISSION STATEMENT The Division of Online and Professional Studies (OPS) furthers the worldwide mission of California Baptist University through innovative, Christ-centered educational programs designed for non-traditional learners. COURSE DESCRIPTION This seminar will explore effective ways to build community in an online course. The focus will be on creating cognitive presence, social presence and instructor presence with the use of Web 2.0 tools. Students will be expected to create free accounts with multiple resources prior to attendance. ONLINE LEARNING CBU’s Division of Online and Professional Studies (OPS) specializes in “distance education” for working adults and others who need a flexible learning schedule. It offers university courses and degree programs both fully online and in “hybrid” format (partly online and partly on-ground). Each “course week” begins on a Monday and ends on Sunday. Students should log in several times throughout the week to participate in online discussions and other activities. OPS recommends that students complete the various readings and assignments in the order in which they are presented, but the format does allow some flexibility for students to modify their approach or even to work ahead. Active participation in every assignment and every online discussion is expected. Students should be careful of any assignments that have specific “opening” or “closing” times, and they should regularly consult the Course Schedule to ensure that they complete all work in a timely manner. Students access all course materials via the Blackboard 9 site, which includes minimum system requirements and orientation tutorials designed to equip class members for online study.

INSTRUCTOR CONTACT INFORMATION


Page |5 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dr. Torria Bond Tyler Plaza 951-343-3924 tbond@calbaptist.edu By Appointment Only

REQUIRED TEXTS & RESOURCES Ascough, R. (2007). Welcoming design: Hosting a hospitable online course. Teaching Theology and Religion. 10(3) p.131-136 Recommended: Akyol, Z., Garrison, D., and Ozden, M. (2009). Online and blended communities of inquiry: Exploring the developmental and perceptional differences. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning. 10(6) p.65-83 Lehman, R. & Conceicao, S. (2010). Creating a sense of presence in online teaching: How to "be there" for distance learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Palloff, R. & Pratt, K. (2007). Building online learning communities: Effective strategies for the virtual classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass COURSE LEARNING GOALS & OBJECTIVES Course Goals and Objectives Goal 1: Help students develop the effective use of Web 2.0 tools to create a sense of presence in an online course. Objective 1.1: Students will effectively create opportunities for learners to start, create, and validate meaning through reflection and dialogue (cognitive presence). Objective 1.2: Students will effectively create opportunities for learners to express themselves socially and emotionally in a genuine manner (social presence). Objective 1.3: Students will effectively create a facilitator voice that provides constructive critique and formative and summative feedback (instructor presence). Objective 1.4: Students will identify links between the concepts of community building and the Christian world view.

Program Objective(s)

1.1

1.1

1.1

5.1


Page |6 Goal 2: Assist students to create learning activities in their content area that require learners to interact responsively with one another and the course content. Objective 2.1: Students will effectively create opportunities for learner-to-learner interaction in an online environment. Objective 2.2: Students will effectively create opportunities for collaborative learning in an online environment.

1.2 1.2

ACTIVITY OVERVIEW Participants will create a community building plan for a course currently being taught or for a course to be taught in the future. The plan will include an activity description and web 2.0 tool description for social, cognitive, and instructor presence. ASSESSMENT POLICIES Course Evaluation Plan An assessment instrument (checklist, rubric, etc.) will accompany each major graded assignment. See the course website for specific assignment criteria and the accompanying grading instruments.

Workshop Activities

Points Possible 25 25 200

VoiceThread Lecture Response Hosting a Hospital Online Course Reading Quiz Critical Assignment: Community Building Plan Built in VoiceThread Total Points:

250

Final Grades The following scale will be used when calculating final grades: Pass/Fail* A AB+ B *Pass

93%-100% 90%-92% 87%-89% 83%-86% = 100% - 80%

BC+ C C-

80%-82% 77%-79% 73%-76% 70%-72%

D+ D DF

67%-69% 63%-66% 60%-62% <60%


Page |7 SCHEDULE OPS courses begin on a Monday. Accordingly, an OPS course week extends from Monday through Sunday. Unless stated otherwise, graded assignments are due on the last day of the course week (Sunday).

Workshop Activities VoiceThread Lecture Response Hosting a Hospital Online Course Reading Quiz Create and Upload a YouTube Video Create and Upload a Twitter Widget Critical Assignment: Community Building Plan Built in VoiceThread Total Points:

Points Possible 25 25 25 25 150 250

EXPECTATIONS Professionalism All written work must be of professional quality. All written work must be keyed using a computer. Handwritten work will not be accepted. In addition, work that has excessive (more than 2 per page) or distracting grammatical, mechanical, or typographical errors will be graded accordingly. All written assignments should be written using the APA style format. As a professional, you are expected to collaborate with your colleagues during in-class activities or out-of-class group projects, and to respect one another with exemplary listening skills during all interactions, presentations, and class discussions. This also requires supporting your classmates with positive body language and appropriate verbal communication. Late Assignments To encourage progressive and appropriate development of mastery, all work must be completed the date it is due. Late work will not be accepted, unless you are able to document compelling reasons or catastrophic events, and you confer with your professor beforehand. If late work is accepted, only 50% of the points for that particular assignment will be possible. It is your responsibility to initiate communication with the instructor when circumstances may preclude you from completing assignments in the prescribed manner.


Page |8

Netiquette “Netiquette” is network etiquette—that is, the etiquette of cyberspace. And "etiquette" means "the forms required by good breeding or prescribed by authority to be required in social or official life." In other words, netiquette is a set of rules for behaving properly online. Virginia Shea has defined the issues, and discussed them at length, in her book Netiquette. You may view a brief summary of her “Core Rules of Netiquette” at the following website: http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html. They won't answer all netiquette questions, but they will provide some basic principles to use in solving many netiquette dilemmas. Academic Honesty Academic dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism, copying, and other forms) will be reported to the Academic Dean. A first incident of cheating may be handled at the discretion of the instructor in consultation with the Dean. Judicial sanctions may include, but are not limited to, loss of a letter grade or failure in the course in which the offense occurred, suspension, and/or dismissal from the University. A detailed discussion of academic dishonesty appears in the CBU Student Handbook. Students with Disabilities Students who have qualified disabilities and wish to arrange the appropriate accommodations, in addition to the general academic support services coordinated by the Academic Resources Center, must identify themselves to the Director of Disability Services. Disabled students who wish to arrange appropriate accommodations must complete and submit a Request for Accommodations form and provide recent (not older than 3 years) diagnostic test results.

SUGGESTED RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY Bonk, C. & Zhang, K. (2008). Empowering online learning: 100+ activities for reading, reflecting, displaying, & doing. San Francisco, CA: JosseyBass


Page |9 Lehman, R. & Conceicao, S. (2010). Creating a sense of presence in online teaching: How to "be there" for distance learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Palloff, R. & Pratt, K. (2007). Building online learning communities: Effective strategies for the virtual classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Richardson, W. (2010). Blogs, wikis, podcasts, and other powerful web tools for classrooms. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Shank, P (Ed.). (2007). The online learning idea book: 95 proven ways to enhance technology-based and blended learning. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer Solomon, G. & Schrum, L. (2010). Web 2.0 how-to for educators. Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education Websites Pacansky-Brock, M (2011). Building online communities with social media. Retrieved February 2011 at http://sites.google.com/site/buildingonlinecommunity/

Syllabus otl pd community building 3 20 14  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you